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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  May 28, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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hello. i'm geeta guru-murthy with bbc world news. our top stories. french riot police evict hundreds of people from a makeshift camp near calais. thailand's military leaders have released 120 critics. but the political crisis continues. an influential faction has splint from the taliban. and a stop and go button for a car with no steering wheel or pedals. it's a driverless car from google.
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hello. hundreds of people from around the world are being evicted by riot police from illegal camps outside the french port of calais. many have been kept there for months. some have been trying to smuggle themselves into britain on trucks. well, they say they have nowhere else to go. the french authorities say an outbreak of scabies and a lack of running water pose a health risk. our correspondent is at the site and has been following the operation since earlier today. >> reporter: so the police have been here about an hour now. they're just starting to make their second sweep through the camp. this is the syrian camp right next to the port. and the police are working their way through tent by tent. they're looking inside, seeing
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who's in there. there's been announcements on a loud speaker telling people that they need to move on. no one, frankly, knows where they're supposed to go. there's some buses parked just on the road behind the camp. no one seems to know where those buses are going to take them. but in the meantime, the police, quite quietly, it has to be said, are just working through, you can see here, looking in the tents, checking to see if anyone's still in there. then at some point we expect this whole camp to be bulldozed. that could happen later today. here again -- [ speaking in foreign language ] >> reporter: so basically she's saying that they have to do this, have to go immediately. but, again, there's this terrific uncertainty about where people are supposed to go.
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some of the migrants are huddled by a feeding station just the other side of the road. they think maybe they can stay there safely. again, those buses are simply waiting there. but in the meantime, this slow, steady process of clearing out the camp, which has been expected for the last couple of days, continues. this isn't the first time this has happened. we've had the clearing of the camp back in 2002. other camps, makeshift camps around calais have been erected and then demolished over the years. this is the latest in a whole series of repeating episodes. this camp has expanded dramatically in the last few months to the point where the authorities clearly believe that it poses a danger to public health. there's this talk about an outbreak of scabies. we've seen people being treated for that. but the authorities feel that the time has come for this large camp to be removed and any of those health agents to be
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removed with it. with that operation comes this terrific level of uncertainty. >> paul adams there at calais. the daily movement of people searching simply for a better life continues also in north africa. around 1,000 migrants have tried to storm the border between morocco and spain's enclave of malia. spanish authorities say 400 people managed to climb a fence into the spanish territory. they will stay at an immigration center there. some might be transferred to the spanish mainland. authorities say most people will eventually be sent back to their countries of origin. that is mostly in sub saharan africa. the bbc's correspondent tom burr ij told me more. >> we were in malia for the last few week. we went up into the hills to these makeshift camps where tens of thousands of migrants are living in pretty basic conditions. the important thing to note is they're determined, incredibly determined to cross into malia,
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europe, spain. they have to scale the border fence around about six meters, the largest part of it is six meters high with barbed wire. what we've seen in recent weeks, there's been more pressure on that border. what we saw this morning is that groups, large groups of the migrants, in the hundreds, go down to the border fence and essentially storm it. they have to scale this large border fence. and this morning we believe the latest report is actually estimating that around about 2,000 migrants attempted the crossing. the police in that part of spain say 400 were successful. >> those pictures speak volumes, don't they. the images that we're just looking at, tom, of the people climbing the fences. many, many people who have crossed from all over the world to try and get into europe, they leave behind family, home. because they are desperate to do any kind of work possible to get money. that huge flow cannot be stopped by fences and gates at the end of the day, can it?
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>> reporter: it can't. the spanish authorities have invested more money on that border fence to try and prevent, deter some of the migrants trying to scale it. but it hasn't worked because we've seen these pictures on numerous occasions over the last few weeks and months. spain says it needs more help from the european union to bolster up that border. they also say that actually more work needs to be done to tackle the masses that they say traffic the migrants from their countries of origin in sub saharan africa. >> tom burridge. moving to thailand, the thai army says it's released 124 people who were taken into custody after last week's coup. one of the conditions for their release is that they must avoid any political activity and tell the military of any travel plans. well, the army summoned around 253 people over the last week. you can just see this convoy
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here bringing prominent political figures, academics. thailand's former prime minister, yingluck shinawatra, has been released. she's still under some restrictions. red shirt leaders who support her are still being held. the military has broadcast these pictures today to show them still, that they are being treated well even though they're in detention. there is skepticism, however, about the total number of people who are in custody at the moment. reports of more swid sprewidesp detentions. leaders of the two main anti-government movements, the buddhist monk seen here who's the leader of a movement, plus the leader of the people's democratic reform committee, the largest protest group, have also now been released. more on all that. our correspondent jonah fisher is on the line now from bangkok. jonah, just bring us up to date. there's been quite a few changes. we heard about facebook being
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blocked. now back on again. what's the latest right now? >> reporter: okay. let me just talk you through some of today's developments. as to how many people they've had in detention and how many of those have been released, they said they summoned about 250. 200 of those people have chosen to come. and of those, 124 had been detained for a period of time and then released. now, separate to that, we have the news in the last couple of hours that red shirt leaders, that's the group that, broadly speaking, supports the government that's just been ousted here, that they have now been released from military detention. you remember when the coup unfolded last thursday. the people who were involved in those discussions were taken into military detention. so the people who've been released as part of that group have been released today. we've just spoken to one of them on the phone. he didn't want to be named. but he made it clear that they've been treated well in military custody for these six
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days and that in order to be released, they had to sign a document which promised that they would not take part in political activity and that they would notify the military if they had any plans to travel abroad. so people have been being released today. and we've had a little bit more clarity as to what's been happening over the last few days according to the army. it should be stressed, we can't verify any of the numbers that they give us. >> what about the social media reports of people being called in by the government and clampdown on facebook? >> reporter: yeah, well, the internet here in thailand went into a bit of panic, the social media part of it, at least, in the last hour or so when it seemed like facebook had been blocked by the military authorities. there's been considerable speculation that they might do so. in fact, it appears that perhaps something else was wrong with it. after about 20 minutes or so, facebook started working again. there have been other sites which have been targeted by the
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military authorities here. particularly those associated with the red shirt movement. but for now, facebook is working. twitter is working. and there is sporadic censorship, often rather erratically enforced across other websites here. >> jonah fisher in bangkok, thank you. to pakistan next. why the taliban says it may be splitting. the commander of one of the main fighting units says his group has now left the organization because of differences over negotiations with pakistan's government. the group known as the ttp says it's in favor of peace talks. our correspondent is in karachi. just explain what's happened and what does it mean. >> reporter:. >> can you hear us? can you hear me now? no.
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i'm so sorry. think we'll go back to him just as soon as we can. we'll just make sure that we can get that line up before we go back to him in karachi. a fire at a hospital in south korea has killed at least 21 people and injured many others with some being in critical condition. the fire was in the southwestern county of janseong around 300 kilometers south of the capital seoul. most of the patients at the hospital for elderly. one patient is being questioned on suspicion of arson. reporting now from seoul. >> reporter: this was meant to be a place of safety to south koreans. but the elderly residents of this hospital, the sick, the senile, straight victims, were woken by fire wednesday morning. those on the upper floors bore the brunt of the smoke. one of the nurses there to help them also found dead. >> translator: the total number of dead is 21. there are six who were heavily injured and one with a minor
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injury. there were 34 people in total on that floor. >> reporter: this is the second time this week that koreans have watched a fire take the lives of their countrymen. a blaze at a bus terminal north of seoul on monday left seven people dead. and divers are still searching for the last remaining bodies of those killed in the sewol ferry disaster last month which claimed more than 300 lives. president park geun-hye has blamed that disaster on a lack of checks and safety procedures and vowed to make south korea a safer place for people to live. images like this adding to the pressure to prove she can. lucy williamson, bbc news, seoul. >> we're going to try and go back to pakistan now and our correspondent in karachi. news of a potential splint in the pakistani taliban. just explain a little bit more for us. >> reporter: that's right. this is a powerful group within
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the pakistani taliban. they have the support of tribesman. when pakistani taliban umbrella group was formed in 2007, most of the foot soldiers were from mesuhd tribe. there was a struggle for the top slot. there was a new chief. since then we've been hearing reports of infighting within the pakistani taliban. today they've come out openly. this group has a lot of supporters. this is being seen as a major blow to the strength of pakistani taliban. >> what is it actually going to mean, though, for those trying to negotiate some sort of peace and for those trying to fight
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the militants? >> reporter: it's all a bit murky. but there is a view out there that this could help the pakistani government, which has been struggling to engage the pakistani taliban in some kind of peace talks. the group which has separated itself from taliban is in favor of talks. is in favor of stopping attacks while these so-called talks are happening. the main ttp, the main taliban, pakistani taliban leadership, says that they will carry on with their attacks because they don't have too much faith in the talks process. at the end of the day, this weakens the taliban. the last few months we've seen the number of attacks in pakistan go down. so many people are seeing it as a positive development. >> okay, thanks for bearing with us there in karachi. many thanks. aaron is right here. maybe you can hear him coming into the studio. >> i'm as quiet as a mouse. >> he makes an entrance. regardless of what else is going
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on. >> go about business, geeta. it's all about the business. hello, there. drugs giant glaxosmithkline known as gsk is under investigation by a britain fraud office known as sffo all over gsk's commercial practices. the british based pharmaceutical giant says it will fully cooperate with the sffo but refused to say whether the criminal investigation is connected to a specific incident. the firm is willing bb investigated in connection with allegations that representatives in china and poland bribed doctors and hospital officials to prescribe gsk products. we're going to keep across that story. as well as this one right here. general electric's offer for the french train and turbines maker, it's a giant of a company, have been approved. officials in the office of the french president francois hollande have said the factories will be opened. there is a bit of a toss up for
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this one. a german firm is also interested in the power turbines business and said yesterday on tuesday they hope to make a formal offer by june 16th. again, something else we're keeping across on bbc business. what about this one? take a look at it. there you go. would you be seen dead in that? a stop and go -- i shouldn't say that, should i? a stop and go button for a car with no controls, no steering wheel. not even any pedals. something science fiction movies are made of. but something i have to tell you that google wants to turn into reality. the search engine plans to start building its own self-driving cars instead of -- look at him. going like the wind. it only goes about 40 kilometers. google wants to build their own instead of modifying other vehicles because they believe it will be a lot safer. there you go. it's even got cup holders. lots going on on twitter. get me @bbcaaron. how many cup holders in your car.
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>> three. >> how many kids? >> two. >> extra one. >> exactly. for me. stay with us. much more to come. migrants storming the fence in the spanish territory of malia. one of the many crises taking place in europe today. our bbc europe editor will help us understand. woo-hoo, bomb that cherry lip through the doggy door or
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from samsung. this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy with the top stories. hundreds of migrants are being evicted from their camp in the french port of calais. many are treated for scabies. authorities say that's why the camp has been closed. around 1,000 migrants tried to storm the border between morocco and spanish territory of melilla. spanish authorities say around 400 people managed to climb a fence. a bit more on those issues facing europe now. with the immigrant camp in the
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french port of calais being cleared by migrant police and migrants storming that border in melilla. also european voters making it clear to the eu they're unhappy with how the issue of immigration is being tackled. with me is patrick jackson. patrick, when we see those pictures, it's pretty unflattering. the problem throughout europe seems to be those in low paid jobs, indigenous populations, seem threatened by others from other parts of the world who are going to do the same job for much less money. can europe actually shut its doors? does it have the policy wherewithal to do that if it wants to make a massive change? >> it would be a huge challenge for europe to shut its doors. the illegal immigration to europe rose by 50% last year alone. it's a continuing problem. and the solution offered by european leaders a t the moment is to reconfigure the policy on
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asylum. basically, to share the burden of asylum seekers. >> the problem at the moment is that when people come into a country, which obviously the border countries like spain or to greece, as opposed to apply for asylum in those countries they travel to countries like britain or france and apply for asylum there. that has been going on now for over a decade. we heard from a european commissioner earlier today saying free movement of people is a corner stone of what europe is about. it's about wealth creation as well, isn't it? >> it is a cornerstone of what europe is about. but president francois hollande of france last night, he himself said europe needs a more coherent policy on asylum. so he's recognizing the problem of, say, his socialist party took a severe defeat at the european elections against the anti-immigration national front. he's keenly aware of people's concerns about immigration. the policies he's advocating has
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been for a long time. it's basically burden sharing. it's relieving these pressure points which are typically italy, spain, north african colonies. like obviously in the news today we have 400 migrants breaking through a fence in melilla, in the spanish territory of ma l melilla, north africa. these are the points where these european -- have to deal with asylum themselves. what they're saying, italians particularly, is that the northern countries of the eu should take a more immediate role -- >> the italians have been saying that for many years. but it all costs money. and ultimately we've seen in europe -- in england, in britain, we've seen an anti-migration party doing extremely well in the last few days. there's no appetite from northern european countries to encourage this. yet you cannot imagine what
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policies actually, you know, will have apart from a little financial assistance from the european states to stop what is a global trend at the end of the day. isn't it a fact that people just get used to it and accept it? >> well -- >> and the government will have to go out and make a positive case. governments are now torn between making a very positive case for migration or reacting to these often fascist parties. >> after the terrible tragedy we had with the death of nearly 400 migrants off italy in october, european leaders agreed to supply some extra funds to help asylum seekers. some 30 million euros at the time. they also agreed they would beef up the european union's agency for dealing with the borders. this agency has been underfunded for years. its funding has dropped. so one solution would be to supply more money to look after the borders. but as you say, this is a big
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problem. it's not going to go away. the year of the biggest illegal immigration to europe in recent years was 2011. and it was -- it hinged on the wave of migration from libya during the crisis there. so this goes to foreign policy. to europe's involvement -- >> it goes to syria, et cetera. we'll have to leave it there for now. patrick, thanks for much, indeed. >> you're welcome, geeta. a day of mourning and reflection. university of california santa barbara yesterday for the six victims killed in a violent rampage friday night. police say student elliot rodger who suffered from mental illness stabbed three people. let's get more on that. six victims, in fact, were killed. >> reporter: flowers are still being laid in memory of those who died. people here are still in shock. isla vista is a small, very studenty beach side town. it was along this road that elliot rodger opened fire out of his car window. he stopped here and shot into
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the deli where he killed christopher michael martinez. it's now the site of one of the many little memorials that have been left around the town. flowers fill the bullet holes in the window. one of those who survived the attack described that moment captured on in-store video. >> pow, pow, pow, pow, pow, pow. stop for two, three seconds. it picked up again. it went for maybe 15, 20 seconds. he was almost smiling like he was happy about what was going on. it was very chilling. i'll remember that day for a long time. if you look at the video, the bullets actually coming over my head breaking the glass of coolers as i'm sliding under it. all that glass actually broke and landed on my back and head. first two bullets that came through hit christopher martinez in the chest. i took my shirt off. we applied the pressure to his wounds to stop the bleeding while his friends were actually giving him cpr. >> reporter: this is a video of chris michael martinez that his father richard took and has on his phone. the 20-year-old was a keen
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sportsman. >> he was hard working. competitive. and he was just so much fun. i mean, he was just a delight to be around. i took him to paris when he was 12. and it was the most fun i ever had. >> the father of one of the victims. sorry. we'll leave it there. we'll see you soon. [ salesman ] congrats on the new car. [ woman ] thanks. the dealership reviews on cars.com made it easy, but... [ man ] we thought it might be a little more tense. you miss the drama? yeah. [ technician ] ask him whatever you want. okay. ♪ do you think my sister's prettier than me? ♪ [ laughs ] [ male announcer ] research, price, find. only cars.com helps you get the right car without all the drama.
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hello. hundreds of migrants from around the world are being evicted by riot police from illegal camps outside the french port of calais. many have been camped there for months and some have tried to smuggle themselves into britain in trucks. they say they've got nowhere else to go. but the french authorities say an outbreak of scabies and a lack of running water pose a health risk and the site needs to be bulldozed. correspondent paul adams is there. he's been following the operation. >> reporter: so the police have been here about an hour now. they're just starting to make their second sweep through the camp. this is the syrian camp right next to the port. and the police are working their way through tent by tent. they're looking inside, seeing who's in there. there's been announcements on a loud speaker telling people that they need to move on. no one, frankly, knows where they're supposed to go. there's some buses parked just
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on the road behind the camp. no one seems to know where those buses are going to take them. but in the meantime, the police, quite quietly, it has to be said, are just working through, you can see here, looking in the tents, checking to see if anyone's still in there. then at some point we expect this whole camp to be bulldozed. that could happen later today. here again. [ speaking in foreign language ] >> reporter: so basically she's saying that they have to do this immediately. have to go immediately. but, again, there's this terrific uncertainty about where people are supposed to go. some of the migrants are huddled by a feeding station just the other side of the road. they think maybe they can stay there safely. again, those buses are simply waiting there.
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but in the meantime, this slow, steady process of clearing out the camp, which has been expected for the last couple of days, continues. this isn't the first time this has happened. we've had the clearing of the camp back in 2002. other camps, makeshift camps around calais have been erected and then demolished over the years. this is the latest in a whole series of repeating episodes. this camp has expanded dramatically in the last few months to the point where the authorities clearly believe that it poses a danger to public health. there's this talk about an outbreak of scabies. we've seen people being treated for that. but the authorities feel that the time has come for this large camp to be removed and any of those health agents to be removed with it. with that operation comes this terrific level of uncertainty. >> paul adams there at calais. the daily movement of people searching simply for a better
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life continues in north africa. around 1,000 people have tried to storm the border between morocco and spain's enclave of melilla. the spanish authorities -- sorry. droppedmy pen. the spanish authorities say 400 people managed to climb a fence and enter the spanish territory. they will now stay at the immigration center there. some might be transferred to the spanish mainland. authorities say most of them will eventually be returned to countries of origin in sub saharan africa. bbc's correspondent tom burridge has more. >> reporter: we were in melilla in the last few weeks. we crossed into morocco, up into the hills to these makeshift camps where tens of thois of migrants, originally from sub saharan african countries are living in pretty basic conditions. the important thing to note is they're determined, incredibly determined, to cross into melilla, into europe, into spain. they have to scale a border fence of around about six meters.
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the largest part of it is six meters high with barbed wire. what we've seen in recent weeks, there's been more pressure on that border. what we saw this morning is that groups, large groups of the migrants, in the hundreds, go down to the border fence and essentially storm it. they have to scale this large border fence. and this morning we believe the latest report is actually estimating that around about 2,000 migrants attempted the crossing. the police in that part of spain say 400 were successful. >> those pictures speak volumes, don't they? the images that we're just looking at, tom, of the people climbing the fences. many, many people who have crossed from all over the world to try and get into europe, they leave behind family, home. because they are desperate to do any kind of work possible to get money. that huge flow cannot be stopped by fences and gates at the end of the day, can it? >> reporter: it can't. the spanish authorities have invested more money on that border fence to try and prevent,
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deter some of the migrants trying to scale it. but it hasn't worked because we've seen these pictures on numerous occasions over the last few weeks and months. spain says it needs more help from the european union to bolster up that border. they also say that actually more work needs to be done to tackle the masses that they say traffic the migrants from their countries of origin in sub saharan africa. up to morocco from where they then try and make the final crossing into europe. they also say that actually more work needs to be done in those countries of origin to educate the migrants about the realities of life when you get into melilla. because what we saw is that the migrants there, although they do live in this temporary immigration center at the expense of the spanish taxpayer, i think it's important to point out, most of them, all of them can't work legally. and most of them don't work. some end up washing cars on the streets in melilla. essentially they're in limbo. they stay there. there are long, lengthy bureaucratic processes to try and process their claim.
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yet some might make it to the spanish mainland. the spanish authorities say essentially most will be returned to their country of origin. >> tom burridge in madrid on the european migration story that continues. moving to thailand, the thai army says it's released 124 people who were taken into custody after last week's coup. one of the conditions for their release is that they must avoid any political activity and tell the military of any travel plans. well, the army summoned around 250 people over the last week. you can just see this convoy here bringing prominent political figures, academics. the army says 76 people are still in custody. thailand's former prime minister, yingluck shinawatra, has been released. but she's still under some restrictions. in the past couple of hours, red shirt leaders who support yingluck have also been released. the military has broadcast these pictures earlier to show they were being treated well in custody. leaders of the two main
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anti-government movements, buddhist monk seen here and -- he's the leader of a movement. plus the leader of the people's democratic reform committee ch( is the largest protest group, have also now been released. jonah fisher has more on these latest developments from bangkok. >> reporter: the army gave a press conference this morning on which they announced of the 250 people they summoned over the last week, 124 of them have come in, been detained for a period of time and have then been released. a group that's chosen not to report about 50 of them, there was 76 people still in custody with the military. in the last few minutes, we've learned, perhaps more significantly, that the leadership group of one of the protest movements here called the united front for democracy against dictatorship, broadly known as the red shirt movement, their leadership group who were taken as the coup unfolded last
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thursday have now been released as well. that's what they're saying. it's not clear what exactly will happen to them. yesterday when the pdrc, the rival protest group, the anti-government group, when they were released they were taken straight to a court and charged with insurrection. we'll have to wait and see what happens with these leaders from the red shirt movement. we've tried to speak to some of them in the last few minutes. they don't want to talk. we know there are restrictions associated with being released. we'll have to see whether they are genuinely free or whether, indeed, they are also taken to a court. >> i mean, the restrictions sound pretty severe. the government is obviously still very fearful. >> reporter: yeah. that's right. they don't want an organized opposition to this military takeover gathering strength. so we don't know for certain what conditions these people have agreed to on their release. we've been told certainly in the case of yingluck shinawatra, the former prime minister, that she has to agree to take a step back from politics and to inform the
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military on all her movements. we understand that similar conditions are being applied to others when they are being released. certainly of those people who've been into detention over the last week or so, none of them really have wanted to talk about their experience or comment on what's happening here politically. one would imagine they've been given a pretty stern warning in military detention not to come out and -- and be active politically. not to criticize what's been happening here. >> jonah fisher there in bangkok. with me is bbc world service asia-pacific editor. what does this all mean? we've had lots of details there. what are we facing now with all these people being released? >> well, the army, to my mind, appears to be giving the impression that it's releasing these people, likely getting back to some kind of normality. that their rule will not be too draconian. of course, as we heard from jonah fisher, people who have been released have been very, very quiet. suggesting they're being put under some kind of restrictions
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or pressure. so even though they're out of military control, they're not free to do what they want to do. to organize protests. to speak out against the military coup. and that kind of thing. so whilst the army might be giving the impression at least people are free, they're not really free. the army is still very much in control. >> have you spoken to -- have you been able to sample ordinary public opinion? what are people feeling about the fact that there is this very strong military rule now? >> well, people are quite divided. and divided along the lines that they were divided before the military coup. those who wanted an end to the government of yingluck shinawatra are quite happy. they see the army as somewhat of a savior. that they've come to sort out thailand's political problems, bring stability where there was no stability before. of course, there are many people, some of them staged small protests, who really say this is the end of democracy. they want elections to come back as soon as possible. they think the military taking over is a step backwards. and a return to dictatorship.
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>> and is there any prospect of that? >> well, so far the general who's taken over control of the country has given sort of vague assurances that reforms will come in. that there'll be elections down the line. but he's given no real firm undertaking about when that might happen. in fact, two journalists who questioned him at a press conference quite vigorously about timetables and who's in control of the country and how the army was controlling the country, he told them to stop asking him questions. the army is very much in control. we're not quite sure what they're going to do with the power they've got. >> michael bristow, thanks a lot. other news today, according to new research, nearly a third of people in britain admit to being racially prejudice. the information from the british social attitudes survey shows 30% of those questioned describe themselves as either very or a little prejudice against people of other races. it shows wide variations.
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the u.s. state department has warned american citizens in libya to leave the country immediately saying that the situation there is unpredictable and unstable. the u.s. has already announced it's deploying an amphibious assault ship for evacuation of american embassy personnel. four police officers are killed in tunisia. no group has claimed responsibility. stay with us here on bbc world news. much more to come. ♪ yes. it's pharrell williams, producer to the stars, talking to us about being a global sensation. new car!
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this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy.
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our top stories. migrants are being evicted from their camp in the french port of calais. many treated for scabies. authorities say that's why the camp needs to be closed. around 1,000 people have tried to storm the border between morocco and the spanish enclave of melilla. spanish authorities say around 400 migrants managed to climb a fence there. now, a fire at a hospital in south korea has killed at least 21 people and injured many others. with some such being in critical condition. the fire was in the southwestern county of janseong around 300 kilometers south of the capital seoul. most of the pashltients a t the hospital were eld ler pip one patient is being questioned on suspicion of arson. lucy williamson reports from seoul. >> reporter: this was meant to be a place of safety for south kor korea's aged. but the elderly residents of this hospital, the sick, the senile, straight victims, were woken by fire on wednesday
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morning. those on the upper floors bore the brunt of the smoke. one of the nurses there to help them also found dead. >> translator: the total number of dead is 21. there are six who were heavily injured and one with a minor injury. there were 34 people in total on that floor. >> reporter: this is the second time this week that koreans have watched a fire take the lives of their countrymen. a blaze at a bus terminal north of seoul on monday left seven people dead. and divers are still searching for the last remaining bodies of those killed in the sewol ferry disaster last month which claimed more than 300 lives. president park geun-hye has blamed that disaster on a lack of checks and safety procedures and vowed to make south korea a safer place for people to live. images like this adding to the pressure to prove she can. lucy williamson, bbc news, seoul. polling has begun for a third day in egypt where voters
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are choosing their president. the election originally scheduled over two days has been extended to try to boost turnout, which has been poor despite the declaration of a national holiday and free public transport. our correspondent in alexandria h says the response from the voters not very encouraging. >> reporter: more than three hours ago the polling stations have opened the doors. yes, the number of voters who showed up so far are very, very few. despite that fact that the election commission has decided to extend the voting for one extra day. so far from what we have seen, that this decision has not managed yet to encourage voters to come here, show up, cast their vote and choose the next president. in fact, the turnout has been going down gradually. on the first day, it was 20,000. we had long queues outside the polling stations. especially in the first two or three hours of the vote. then it went down on the second day. and today the scene is very,
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very quiet. we have spoken to the election commission representative here in alexandria. he said that the turnout overall during the past two days in this city is around 40%. here we have 3 million eligible voters. it is the second largest city in egypt. but still we are getting mixed reaction from turning this decision of extending the voting. some say this is a political manipulation. they're afraid of any potential vote rigging. on the other hand, we have the field marshal saying this decision gives them impression that the turnout is low. they believe this is not true. a murder mystery is gripping japan. police have been searching the apartment of a japanese-brazilian woman in tokyo after the body of a 29-year-old nurse was found in a storage locker nearby.
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the body of rika akata had been sent to an address in tokyo in a parcel from osaka. >> reporter: this is one of the last pictures of 29-year-old rika okata before she disappeared in late march. on her facebook page, she said she was going to see an old friend she hadn't seen for at least a decade. over a month later, her body was found stuffed into this storage locker on the outskirts of tokyo. more than 400 kilometers away from her home in osaka. even more bizarre, her body had apparently been posted here from osaka in a two-meter-long parcel labeled as containing a doll. the postage had been paid with ms. okata's own credit card. but the story gets even stranger. this apartment being searched in tokyo was home to a japanese-brazilian woman. an old schoolmate of ms. okata.
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and now the chief suspect. after ms. okata disappeared, a woman fitting the suspect's description went to this osaka passport office and applied for a new passport in ms. okata's name. earlier this month that woman used the passport to leave japan and to fly to shanghai. once there, she continued to use ms. okata's credit card. reportedly racking up bills of at least 10,000 u.s. dollars. in shanghai, the woman has now apparently turned herself in to police. bbc news in tokyo. to pakistan next where the taliban says it may be splitting. the commander of one of the main fighting units says his group has now left the organization because of differences over negotiations with pakistan's government. the group known as the ttp says it's in favor of peace talks. our pakistan correspondent has
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been telling me more. >> reporter: this is a powerful group who within the pakistani taliban is headed by -- he has the support of mehsud tribesman. when pakistani taliban umbrella group was formed in 2007, most of the foot soldiers were from mehsud tribe. two of the main leaders came from the same tribe as well. in november when the leader was killed in a u.s. drone strike, after that there was a struggle for the top slot. he became the new chief. since then we've been hearing reports of infighting within the pakistani taliban. today they've come out openly. this group has a lot of supporters in south waziristan. this is being seen as a major blow to the strength of pakistani taliban. a little bit of light relief. pharrell williams has been producing songs for many stars,
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including britney spears and kanye west. but recently has become a global sensation himself. he's a man behind some of the catchiest tunes over the last year, if you like that kind of thing, with hits like "happy" and "blurred lines." it's not just about the music. the bbc discovered. ♪ >> reporter: to listen to your album. there's a lot of it that reminds me of things, this huge sweeping or kes tral moments in it that are really kind of wildly romantic. >> well, the strings that you're referring to are all done by and arranged ed hans zimmer. we wanted music that offered people escapism, should they want it. but, you know, the music was just written to lift ♪ come along if you feel like a room without a roof ♪ >> reporter: you say the music is written to lift. if there is anything that can
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lift anybody, it's "happy." >> "happy" is a song that was written for a pivotal moment in the movie for "despicable me 2." and i ended up writing, like, nine different attempts. nine different songs to try and fit that scene. nothing worked. animation helps. illumination. 48% of the success is to those guys for pushing me to say, nope. song number two, cool. but no. number five, you know what? close, but no cigar. nine, eh, not so much. when i finally got to ten and they liked it, i attribute it to them pushing me. >> reporter: the thing that i noticed from your latest songs is you really love women. >> who -- yeah. who doesn't? well, they've been good to me. they've been so good to me over the past 20 years. there's a lot that women go through that us as men, that we just will never be able to understand. we can read about it. we can study it as much as we want. but until we walk in your shoes,
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we don't know what it's like. so for me, i intended to -- to talk about that a little bit and spread some of that message in my album. and just try and push -- push your fight. >> reporter: there's one woman we haven't spoken about. that woman is hillary clinton. would you like to see a woman president? >> i would love to. >> reporter: will you support her? >> of course. >> reporter: why would you feel strongly about that? >> there have got to be a lot of people that say, you know, politics should not be gender specific. but women are not treated equally in politics, "a." "b," women are definitely not treated equally in society. "c," what would a world be like if we had, like, 75% of our world leaders, our prime ministers and our presidents to be female? that would be a very different world. but i don't think that it's -- i think it's a change that's going to come.
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and i think hillary would be perfect. ♪ >> reporter: you kind of look back over the last couple of years now and think, did that all really happen? >> i'm just as shocked to -- right now to do this interview with you. because i know how much of a big deal this is, you know, what this means in this country. so i'm ever so grateful. because i never expected any of this. the only thing i expected to do was continue to be the guy standing next to the guy. i was a producer. you know? but for whatever reason, you guys have offered me the opportunity to express myself as an artist. you know, the people were very patient with me. and i just intend on being loyal to the groove and things that feel good. >> reporter: can i say thank you from all of us? >> yes. >> reporter: brilliant. >> thank you. >> pharrell williams, all his
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fans. tweet us if you want to. let me know what you think about all that. a reminder of our top story. the french authorities say they've cleared hundreds of people from illegal migration camps outside calais because of poor sanitation and no running water. the people there say they have nowhere else to go. this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy. thanks for watching. , "wow, how is there no way to tell the good from the bad?" so we gave people the power of the review. and now angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. you can easily buy and schedule services from top-rated providers. conveniently stay up to date on progress. and effortlessly turn your photos into finished projects with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪ the ones that keep people out. like this one. and the ones that keep people in. like your living room. go and smell the roses.
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american express can help protect you. with intelligent security that learns your spending patterns, and can alert you instantly to an unusual charge. so you can be a member of a more secure world. this is what membership is. this is what membership does. hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm tim willcox. europe's continuing illegal immigration crisis. hundreds of migrants forcing their way through razor wire barriers into spain's enclave of melilla. nearly 1,000 migrants have cleared from a camp in the french town of calais. they say they don't know where to go. just hours before a major foreign policy speech, president obama announces nearly 10,000 u.s. troops will stay in afghanistan. but only for one more year. also on the program, aaron

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