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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 25, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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one—quarter of india's rural population lives below the official poverty line — that's 216 million people whose livelihoods could be improved by the addition of basic facilities like electricity. and of course, one key way of helping people out of poverty is... ..education. it's always such a privilege to come to a place like this and see how the simplest technology can make a world of difference. that's it from india for the moment. you can see plenty of photos and more backstage gossip on twitter. we live at: thanks for watching. see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and rachel
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burden. a blow for president trump as he admits defeat on one of his main campaign promises. he's forced to abandon a vote on healthcare reform because he couldn't get enough support from his own party. good morning, it's saturday 25th march. also ahead — did he act alone? police try to piece together the final movements of the westminster attacker khalid masood. a whatsapp message sent minutes before his killing spree is being looked at. police have now released all but two of the 11 people arrested since the attack on wednesday. almost two million people in the uk don't have a bank account. a house of lords report says it's a scandal. a new push to get more mothers to
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breastfeed beyond six weeks. and in sport, the republic of ireland captain suffers a broken leg. he was injured in the second half of the goalless draw with wales and will have surgery later today. chris has the weather for us. have surgery later today. chris has the weatherfor us. well, we hope he has the weather, he had his back to it. it is lovely out there this morning. here's repairing the weather. first, our main story. donald trump has tried to shrug off the biggest setback so far in his presidency, a failure to overhaul barack obama's health reforms. he's been forced to scrap a vote on his plans at the last minute because he didn't have enough backing from his own party. greg dawson reports. it was a promise that became one of the pillars of his campaign. and one he repeated at every rally. obamacare must be replaced.
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we will get rid of obamacare which is a disaster. repealing and replacing the disaster known as obamacare. his pitch to voters — trust me, i am a dealmaker. if you can't make a good deal with a politician than there is something wrong with you. you're certainly not very good. throughout friday, the trump administration, led by the vice president was trying to persuade fellow republicans to back them. it was not working. some would not accept proposed cuts. others said they did not go far enough. facing defeat, paul ryan consulted with the president and pulled the plug on the bill. yeah, we will live with obamacare for the foreseeable future. my worry is that obamacare will be getting even worse. he still predicts that obamacare will end in failure.
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but he conceded that until democrats agree he can not change it. it is imploding and soon will explode. it will not be pretty. the democrats do not want to see that. they will reach out, when they are ready. pushing through healthca re change in america is one of president obama's defining achievement in the white house. it provided over 20 million people with health—insurance. 0pponents say it is too expensive and involves too much government interference in people's lives. but criticising obamacare has proved much easier than replacing it for donald trump. after his controversial travel ban was blocked, this is another blow to his authority less than a month months after he took power counter—terrorism police have released all but two of the ii people arrested since the attack in westminster on wednesday. they are appealing for information as they try to establish whether khalid masood acted alone or had help, as alexandra mackenzie reports.
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khalid masood, the former teacher and father who became a terrorist. did he act alone? as police begin to build a picture of the killer it emerged that minutes before he launched his attack he used a messaging service, whatsapp, to send a message from his phone. born adrian elms in kent, by the time he was at school in tunbridge wells he was known by another name. but what triggered such a brutal attack from a sporty schoolboy who liked to party? he was likejekyll and hyde. but, you know, i loved him. ijust wanted to give him a lift, sort of balance him up a bit. he developed a reputation for violence.
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he spent time in three prisons. last night, the saudi arabian embassy in london confirmed he had worked there as a teacher around ten years ago. by then, he had converted to islam. the police investigation into the attack on wednesday has been swift. it brought them to this hotel in brighton. khalid masood stayed here the night before he carried out his deadly attack which took the lives of four people. described as a nice guest, he said he was visiting friends. in manchester, a car was taken away by police. there were further raids and two people, both from birmingham, remain in custody. the police investigation will now focus on finding out if anyone helped khalid masood to carry out his attack and at what inspired him to commit mass murder. 0ur reporter alexandra mckenzie is outside new scotland yard for us this morning. can you bring us date with the investigation? this is going into
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the third full day of the investigation, a massive investigation, a massive investigation involving hundreds of officers. so far it is about gathering information. 11 people have been arrested and all but two have been arrested and all but two have now been released. two of those have now been released. two of those have been released on bail. police have been released on bail. police have also been gathering evidence, they have taken commuters and a phenomenal amount of data to look through. —— take on computers. they also have items seized at properties and the hotel he stayed at brighton. very much about gathering evidence and now they have to begin the massive task of sifting through the evidence. the big question— did he act alone or did somebody else know that this attack was going to happen here at westminster. we heard about the message is sent via whatsapp,
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then just minutes before the attack began. the police will want to know about that and there was the recipient is was aware that the attack was about to happen. this weekend marks 60 years since the treaty of rome was signed, creating the european economic community which we now know as the european union. more than 20 eu heads of state and government are gathering this weekend in the italian capital to mark the historic event. prime minister theresa may will not be attending. more needs to be done to help tackle the vicious cycle of debt and overcharging — according to a house of lords committee. it says banks are failing customers who need them most — leaving the poorest to reply on expensive products. here's our business correspondent, jonty bloom. banks and building societies are not just for the rich but are difficult for the poor access. 1.7 million people in this country
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have no bank account. many can only borrow at a high interest rate, at even if they are not forced to use payday lenders. the closure of thousands of high—street banks also hit the poorest and the elderly as they have less access to online services. working age population have less than £100 in saving and if they use prepaid meters, they pay more for basic services like gas and electricity. to end such financial exclusion, the lords committee is calling for better financial education in schools and a dedicated government minister to tackle the problem and for the banks to have a duty of care to their customers. too many people still do not have a bank account or access to basic and fairly priced financial services. most of us take it for granted. that means the poverty premium, where the poor pay more for a range of things is leading them into a vicious circle of further debt and financial distress. the government says that 4 million people are benefiting from basic bank accounts which charge no fees and that tough new rules mean that the number of payday loans has halved since 2014. borisjohnson‘s banned all—male
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entourages from his trips abroad. it's after he turned up to a women's empowerment event in new york with a group of men. the foreign secretary says he'll also ban so—called "manels" — which are panels made up of men — to increase diversity. a recording has been released of the hollywood actor harrison ford calling himself a "schmuck" after accidentally landing his plane in the wrong part of an airport in california. the star wars actor, who has a pilot's licence, was talking to air traffic controllers atjohn wayne airport in orange county immediately after the incident last month. nobody was injured. that was the voice of harrison ford. a ban on taking laptops and tablets on board flights to the uk from six countries comes into force today. passengers travelling from turkey, egypt, lebanon, jordan, tunisia and saudi arabia must put any electronic device larger than a standard smart phone into the hold.
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the ban was imposed following a similar measure in the united states. this year's red nose day has so far raised more than 71 million. among the highlights of the seven—hour comic relief telethon was a sequel to the film, love actually. the comedian, sir lenny henry, opened the show with a tribute to those affected by the westminster attack, as our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. the total... a huge total. £71 million! the evening began with comic relief co—founder, sir lenny henry. the comedian and actor also referred briefly to the tragic events this week. we would like to send our thoughts and love to all those affected by the events in
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westminster. tonight is a chance to save lives, to reach out in the spirit of compassion. the money you give tonight will make things better for people with difficult lives at home and abroad. the most anticipated moment of the night was the love actually sequel featuring many of the original cast and a couple of other familiar faces. that's great! that is a great! can we have rice with it this time? i am getting tired of stirfry. other comedy highlights included a james corden, take that carpel karaoke. and a special appearance from mrs brown. there were musical
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performances from the likes of ed sheerin. as well as a peal films with celebrities visiting some of the places where the money raised can make a huge difference. and now look at him stop he is almost unrecognisable. that is down to you. the money that you raised. please, give generously tonight. just to confirm, at this stage, £71 million raised on the night. that number often rises in the following days. well done to everybody who took part yesterday. it is saturday morning and you are watching brea kfast. morning and you are watching breakfast. the man behind the westminster attacks, khalid masood, 01’ was westminster attacks, khalid masood, or was born in kent and named adrian elms. police are now trying to find out what or who turned him into a killer. 0ne out what or who turned him into a killer. one thing we do know is that
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he was a convert to islam in their life. police say that they're working assumption is that he was inspired by international terrorism. it is not the first time a convert has been linked to a major terror attack. 0ne has been linked to a major terror attack. one report suggested 16% of people convicted of terror offences in the uk were converts. they include: richard reid, the shoe bomber who tried to blow up a us passenger plane in 2001. he is now serving a life sentence in the states. michael adebolajo, one of the men who killed fusilier lee rigby in woolwich also converted to islam. as did richard dart, the son of teachers from dorset, who was jailed for preparing acts of terrorism in 2013. so are converts to islam particularly vulnerable to becoming extremists? zahed amanullah from the institute for strategic dialogue joins us now. thank you very much. why did you think, in fact, thank you very much. why did you think, infact, did thank you very much. why did you think, in fact, did you think there isa
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think, in fact, did you think there is a particular issue with condos? —— converts. is a particular issue with condos? -- converts. by and large, converts are by and large not involved in any activity like this. that goes without saying. but people that do convert to a religion, at what it is, amd needs of looking for an identity other than they have. so thatis identity other than they have. so that is a very vulnerable time for people. in my personal experience, from people i know who are converted, a lot of time they have converted, a lot of time they have converted by marrying into a muslim family. we do not see people in those positions going on to commit these kinds of crimes. it is the people who are converting on our own, and it depends who is doing the converting, who is guiding them. and thatis converting, who is guiding them. and that is where we have to look at extremist recruitment. and you are quite right to point out that many converts to many religions quite often a re converts to many religions quite often are more orthodox, more fundamentally nepalese. often are more orthodox, more fundamentally nepalesem often are more orthodox, more fundamentally nepalese. it is true. a lot of times, people looking for that just 68. they a lot of times, people looking for thatjust 68. they can be a little bit more orthodox or conservative, for example, but that alone, of
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course, is not the only driving factor. it is how it fits into a pattern of grievances, we have seen the pattern of mental health backgrounds and criminal backgrounds, and is a risk factors. it is the type of conversion that makes a difference. talk to us from what we know so far, and indeed a lot in the papers today are trying to piece together khalid masood, and the various parts of his life. on the various parts of his life. on the face of it, it is quite confusing. we see these pictures people are talking about of him as a child, and then later in life, he got in trouble with the law. was of the picture is emerging to you? cheering we do want to regulate too much. —— what is the picture that is. was he acting alone is the real question. that remains to be seen. but in terms of the pattern of behaviour we have seen in his life, we have seen the troubled background, for example, and the present time that he served. all of these things show there was a search for stability in his life, in his
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very life, and so forth. these things to play a part. we know that the risk factors can include psychological problems, as well. so there is evidence, here, as there is in many other logan act cases. your in situ has indicated signs of early warning signs. what would investigate is currently be looking at in terms of what size they may have been in the buildup? as mentioned before, the risk factors themselves are not alone, they are not the only things to look at. what we need to look at is what ideology was introduced to this person that caused them to turn those risk factors into an actual threat of violence and terrorism. and often thatis violence and terrorism. and often that is extra is recruitment that can happen online or off—line. there is indications, for example, that he might have met with other people before the incident. we will need to find out if those people were influencing him to commit this act. but it is that extremist ideology
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that plays into the vulnerability of the individual that leighton leaves them to commit a terrorist act. —— that then leave, it leaves them. we are working with organisations to try to intercept that recruitment of vulnerable people. it is early days, but we have done studies to show that that can work. but it is to be done on a mass scale. typically, then this kind of radicalisation happen quickly? it can. it depends on the individual. —— can this kind. what are the grievances driving and? but it is that recruitment that often but it is that recruitment that ofte n ma kes but it is that recruitment that often makes the difference. and that is why it is important for intelligence services to find out if there was anyone who has influenced him in the last few days. and indeed he has a current network of people. absolutely. that is critical. if you identify that, we can identify the kind of messaging. visible, from a logistically to do. second of all,
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why he felt this was an act he needed to take. thank you for joining us this morning, zahed amanullah. it's 7:20 and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: president trump's suffered a setback on one of his main campaign pledges. he's been forced to abandon a vote on health care reform because of a lack of support from his own party. police investigating the terror attack on westminster are continuing to question two people. nine others who had been arrested have been released as officers try to establish whether the killer khalid masood was working alone. also coming up in the programme, well, we've all sat in classrooms listening to history teachers. now we'll take a look at the technology that's allowing pupils to travel hundreds of miles from their desks, and in to a virtual battlefield. that would liven up a history lesson! here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. the weekend is looking fine,
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weatherwise, because we have an air of high pressure with us both today and tomorrow. that is good to bring and tomorrow. that is good to bring a lot of dry weather with sunshine. but it is quite chilly this morning. if you have 0rigi been out this morning, there are a number of places that have had a frost overnight. these are the overnight lows. miners fighting kate ridge and topcliffe. a number of spots or —3 and “i! topcliffe. a number of spots or —3 and “11 indian northern part of the uk. a cool site of the day. that frost moving away and we will see things warm up quite nicely through the afternoon. hives will hit 19 degrees or so. the warmest spot is probably around parts of south—west england, wales, north—west england, too. to start the day. we have mist in fog stretching across the midlands, lincolnshire, and yorkshire. should not soon. it will stay quite cloudy today in shetland. an odd spot of morning rain and then dry bright. sunshine in the mainland scotland. sunny in northern too. in
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both, at temperatures should get to 70 degrees in the warm spots. but possibly 1819 degrees in parts of western wales, where there are some hotspots. cooler on the east coast due to onshore winds. gusty winds, too, and overnight cloud with those clear skies in place, whether winds are light, it will be cold, down two —4 are light, it will be cold, down two “11 minus five degrees. —— where the winds. a similar one to the wungong pass. the cloud should burn off early. plenty of sunshine again, but the taps temperatures will be an odd degree lower across england and wales, competitive age. —— to the onejust wales, competitive age. —— to the one just past. winds are blowing across the south coast of england. that is alinta look out for. plenty of sunshine through the course of the day. senator looking fine dry, but the clocks go forward by an hour tonight, and that means if you are
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working, like me, tomorrow, that is 110w working, like me, tomorrow, that is now less than that. back thank you very much. do not forget. it is 7:22. more than half of mothers who breastfeed stop after six to eight weeks, according to a survey by public health england. their research found although three quarters of new mums chose to breastfeed from birth, this figure dropped significantly within two months, as frankie mccamley reports. like many new mums, laura started breast—feeding as soon as autumn was born, but after around six weeks, they both fell ill, so she had to stop. when i decided to give up breast—feeding, i kind of did not really wa nt breast—feeding, i kind of did not really want to. it was something i thought about a lot. i did a lot of research about how to rain get my supply back up with power pumping and things like eating oats. ——
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trying. so i tried a lot of those things, but unfortunately, it did not really work at all. the whole experience left her feeling extremely anxious of breast—feeding. additionally fellow people would be judging me when they saw me feeding her with a bottle. to some extent, i still do. ifind that her with a bottle. to some extent, i still do. i find that very kind of difficult when i feed her in public, i think maybe people are wondering why i am not breast—feeding her and kind of thinking that im not a good mum, or maybe i don't love her as much as other people love their babies, because i am not doing what is considered best. -- i'm not. according to public of england, little autumn is not alone. a survey found that while almost three quarters of women starting breast—feeding when their child was born, less than half of them were still doing that six to eight weeks
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later. it is now launching chatbot, to help mothers with concerns they might have. according to public health england, breast—feeding can boost their babies ability to fight illness and infectious. and for mothers, it can reduce the risk of ovarian and breast cancer. it also burns about 500 calories a day. as for laura and herfamily, though, they said that the service would not have changed their minds to stop breast—feeding, but a support like it would have been a great help at the time. frankie mccamley, bbc news. joining us now is jackie hall, a breastfeeding consultant for the nhs, and emma blinkhorn, who's been breastfeeding her daughter since she was born five months ago. lily—may. isn't she gorgeous? how is it going? how are you? brilliant. thank you. five months now. it was tricky at
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the start, but we have overcome obstacles the start, but we have overcome o bsta cles to the start, but we have overcome obstacles to get where we are today. did you always think you would breast feed? i have. i always wanted to give it a go. at the start, i was not sure what it would entail or how difficult it would be. i thought it would just come naturally. difficult it would be. i thought it wouldjust come naturally. because nobody else in your family had breast—fed? nobody else in your family had breast-fed? no. i had not been around anyone had breast—fed before. so it was a new experience. i disorder would come naturally. and i did not know that there would be so many issues to overcome at the start. it can be tough. tell us about some of the challenges that you face. just some of the cluster feeding at the start, babies will eat a lot of the beginning. naively, i thought that they would have three set meals a day, maybe. something tells me lily—may has something on her mind right now... tell us,
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jackie, from the statistics, emma is coming up to precisely the time when a lot of mothers stop to breastfeed. there seems to be any number of reasons around. what you think the main reason is? certainly, ithink reasons around. what you think the main reason is? certainly, i think a lot of people hear the term six months and tend to think that is what the department of health recommends. six months exclusive breast—feeding. but we know the world health organization encourages breast—feeding beyond six months alongside soz and —— solids, as well. and up to two years and beyond. 0ur department of health tent is a one year and beyond, with no cut—off point. so there is sometimesjust a lot no cut—off point. so there is sometimes just a lot of ladies that think that six months as the cover point. lily-may is clearly a little... tell us what is going on! is it because she... yes... 0ur
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timing... 0urtiming is is it because she... yes... 0ur timing... 0ur timing is all wrong. now, our direct it will tell us and we can still here. can we? that is good. no, that is fine. so, what about the embarrassment factor and that sort of thing? is that have a pa rt that sort of thing? is that have a part to play, so you? other people are. at the start, yes. comments at the start. there has been some negativity. but then there is a lot more positivity out there than there is negativity. and it is hard to get over it. it is hard to be out there publicly feeding your child when you are not sure how people will take it. but it is something that i have overcome, and it is completely natural thing. it is completely normal. and it is a shame, because of there were more people doing it, i think would be more normal, as well, for people to see people breast—feeding. well, for people to see people breast-feeding. and from a health benefits point of view, just take us through the principles. we know that breastmilk is a normal, normalfluid
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that babies need, and also for nutrition. it is packed full of antibodies, which protect against chest infections, protects against diarrhoea and other gastric infections, like that. and there is just a whole range of wonderful things that happen because of the breastmilk. so we know a lot more 110w breastmilk. so we know a lot more now than we used to. the reason why we do promote it. that's not be accused of everyday sexism. come on... it is that it said that a lot of women try to breast feed via difficult. and women will always tell us that in these situations, as well, that they feel an enormous amount of pressure and that there is pressure from health visitors, midwives, and so on. and that almost puts them. and i can fully understand that. even from my own
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experience. these early weeks are so intensive. —— puts them off. people think that they are going to be easy. but we know that it takes a good for to six weeks to get your milk supply established. and that requires a rather frequent feeding, getting used to feeding and different positions. it can be discomfort, as well, at the beginning. but it is not meant to be painful. so, you know, we always encourage people to seek out 1—to—1 support. go along to drop ins. we certainly worked to produce these... it really helps to have support around. i promise we are living bell listening. but lily—may is fast taking myjob, listening. but lily—may is fast taking my job, as listening. but lily—may is fast taking myjob, as long as my script. —— i promise we are listening. thank you so much for bringing her in. she has been brilliant. well done. she has been brilliant. well done. she has been brilliant. well done. she has been lovely. we will leave you
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for a moment, and handover. has been lovely. we will leave you fora moment, and handover. so has been lovely. we will leave you for a moment, and handover. so thank you very much, and we have the headlines coming up injust a moment. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and rachel burden. coming up before eight, chris will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. president trump says he's surprised and disappointed after failing to secure support from his own party for plans to replace 0bamacare. he had to withdraw his healthcare bill after it failed to get enough support ahead of a vote. president trump has said there were parts of it he didn't like anyway, and it'll mean a better bill at some point in the future. speaking earlier on breakfast, former advisor to george w bush, anneke green, told us president bush still has support in his party. it is coming across in the press as
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a blow but he will give it portray this as a smart move and something he is doing for the american people andi he is doing for the american people and i do not think it will affect his core support. we see that even in the praise coming from the groups in the praise coming from the groups in the house who refused to vote for the bill. counter—terrorism police have released all but two of the 11 people arrested since the attack in westminster on wednesday. the attacker, khalid masood, killed three people when he drove into pedestrians on westminster bridge before stabbing a police officer to death outside parliament. police are still trying to establish whether he acted alone. this weekend marks 60 years since the treaty of rome was signed, creating the european economic community which we now know as the european union. more than 20 eu heads of state and government are gathering this weekend in the italian capital to mark the historic event. prime minister theresa may will not be attending. more needs to be done to help tackle the vicious cycle of debt and overcharging — according to a house of lords committee.
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it says banks are failing customers who need them most — leaving the poorest to rely on expensive products. it adds controls on "rent to own" products must be introduced urgently. too many people still do not have a bank account or access to basic and fairly priced financial services of the sort that most of us take for granted. that means that poverty premium, where the poor pay more for a range of things from a leading man hours to getting a loan is leading them into a vicious circle of further debt and financial distress. this year's comic relief has raised more than £71 million. the fundraiser included james corden's carpool karaoke with take that and a special love actually sequel. comic relief has raised more than one billion pounds since it launched in 1985. that total, £71 million as it stands
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right now. it is incredible. we are thinking today about poor old seamus coleman and his horrible injury. 28 years old with a great season so far, although that is over now. republic of ireland in wales, the game was goalless and not that memorable but will now be remembered for the wrong reasons, a horrific tackle. just reading a form of river re— saying that the challenge was reckless and out of control and that neil taylor was distraught afterwards. he is in hospital. he will have surgery today and then we will have surgery today and then we will have surgery today and then we will have more of an idea. but the manager says it is a bad break. i don't know what that means but it sounds like it will be a long recovery. the match ended goalless. gareth bale had the only real chances for either side — but he'll miss the next game against serbia, after
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receiving a yellow card. of course the main talking point though is that horrific injury to seamus coleman. manager martin 0'neill, said it was a bad break — it wasn't a malicious tackle, but it was mistimed and a very poor challenge. and neil taylor was sent off for it, as coleman was carried off on a stretcher, needing oxygen, to help him cope . a load to him, he was having the season of a lifetime at club level. he isa season of a lifetime at club level. he is a big playerfor us and a great captain. a great character. so it isa great captain. a great character. so it is a big loss. a big loss to everton come to us but he will fight back, i hope. it puts things in perspective, i suppose. he is not that type of player. taylor. he is a
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great boy. i have not seen the challenge but i have seen the outcome, if you like. so... it is terrible for seamus and it is a shame because he is someone i respect, one of the best fullbacks in premier league. there was quite a reaction on social media to seamus coleman's injury former evertonian wayne rooney led by the way by tweeting"hope seamus coleman gets better soon. horrible tackle." among the celebrities to express their support, was 0ne direction star niall horan, who wrote: "horrific what happened to seamus coleman tonight. hope he recovers well". and james corden said: "stay strong, seamus coleman. every true football fan wishes you a strong recovery " formula 1 is back, and so is lewis hamilton. he missed out on the world title last season, but has dominated qualifying down under in australia. hamilton claimed a record equalling sixth pole position
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at the australian grand prix. the briton was more than a quarter of a second quicker than ferrari's sebastian vettel. his new mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas was third. it was a busy night in rugby league's super league, and we have new leaders in hull fc, thanks to their win at wigan. but at the other end of the table, things have gone from bad to worse for warrington, who've lost every game this season — just six months after they were in the grand final, they were beaten 31—6 by st helens — adam swift with the pick of their five tries. in rugby union's premiership, gloucester comfortably, saw off local rivals bristol 32—14. england wing jonny may, sealed the bonus point win for gloucester — and bristol's hopes of avoiding relegation straight back to the championship look slim — they're seven points adrift at the bottom of the table, with four games to play. in the pro12, john andrew's late try, secured a crucial win for ulster against newport gwent dragons. the 27—17 victory, means ulster stay in the fourth
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and final play—off spot. but scarlets, are also chasing that play—off place — and they're just three points behind ulster now, after getting a bonus point in their 26—10 win over edinburgh. britain's johanna konta is through to the third round of the miami 0pen tennis, after beating sasnovich. we're going to return to football now, and a very special little boy who will be at wembley tomorrow, for england's game against lithuania. you may have seen him before — five—year—old sunderland fan bradley lowery, is suffering from a rare type of cancer. this is how his mum gemma, told him he was to be a mascot, alongside his hero and "best mate" jermain defoe. guess who is going to the england match next week? jermain defoe. hooray! are you buzzing? at the very
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beginning it wasjust hooray! are you buzzing? at the very beginning it was just amazing. it was his dream come true. now hejust callsjermain was his dream come true. now hejust calls jermain defoe was his dream come true. now hejust callsjermain defoe his best friend. it is normalfor him now callsjermain defoe his best friend. it is normal for him now but at the beginning it was fantastic and to have that experience and all the experiences he has at the moment is quite surreal. and not only for him. it gives us memories that we can carry with us for the rest of our lives. a proud moment. and i love the way that all of the players they we re the way that all of the players they were giving him fist pumps. i am sure they will do that tomorrow. she is common. we also wish him all the best. i won't show you the picture but it is horrific. the immediate aftermath of that tackle. it was com pletely aftermath of that tackle. it was completely upended, completely horrible. to be fair, neiltaylor
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realised it was broken straightaway and was quite distraught afterwards. how awful. imagine the pain he must have been in. hopefully the operation goes well. thank you very much. history helps us to paint a picture of the past but the future we will come back to that. it is about how technology can understand that what happens to people in the past. we will talk about virtual reality headset because they are being introduced into history lessons to make them or interesting. a development team are inventing a new way to use a virtual reality headset to take students to the battlefields of the first world war. thousands of children have followed the centenary trail across the channel to visit the first world war battlefields. thousands more will
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not have that chance. now, the merseyside development team think they have a solution. keep it in the background. maybe start there, walk there. if you move around to the farmhouse... get to one o'clock. the historian peter barton facing a battery of small cameras is here to bring history alive by inviting stu d e nts bring history alive by inviting students into the trenches. trench wa rfa re students into the trenches. trench warfare was more about maintenance rather than anything else. he is a solitary figure. his department crew is hidden from sight as cameras record his view of the landslide. is hidden from sight as cameras record his view of the landslidelj speak record his view of the landslide.” speak to that block of cameras as if it is to a group. the idea is to make it as informal as possible. normally on television you get a very small timescale. here i can talk for as long as i like so i can talk for as long as i like so i can talk for as long as i like so i can talk for five talk for as long as i like so i can talk forfive or six talk for as long as i like so i can talk for five or six or seven minutes. back in liverpool, the
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individual images stitched together to make a 360 degrees virtual reality. i think history as a subject can be quite dull if taught ina subject can be quite dull if taught in a particular way and it enables children from all walks of life to ta ke children from all walks of life to take part and experience the first world war battlefields. we can sit in classrooms like that and listen to teachers at the front talk about important events in history. this technology will enable students to travel miles from their desk and onto the actual battlefield. and what they are doing over there is defending themselves, their regiment... what i will do is take you straight into where they sold to spend his life, in the front—line trench. at this collagen crossbreed, the acid tressed test. remember, you can adjust focus, the volume, the system will enable a class of
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stu d e nts to system will enable a class of students to share the experience, but to react as individuals. what did they make of it? everyone loves the technology of it and is far more massive when you can see what you can do with it. it is not difficult to listen to, it is there was no distractions. the man who oversees government funded visits during the centenary, believes the virtual reality is that the start of its journey. here is an opportunity to ta ke journey. here is an opportunity to take young people all over the world to show them the sides where things have happened in the past and to give them a genuine immersive experience which they could not otherwise get. without being there themselves. these are early days of themselves. these are early days of the virtual world is without limit, enabling more and more of us to step backin enabling more and more of us to step back in history. amazing images. parts of the country are looking sunny this morning. chris, what do you have? decent
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sunshine today, charlie, in a nutshell. this is the early—morning weather watcher picture, then to us from wales showing clear skies and cloud in the sky. this is the scene in north—west wales. beautiful sunshine around, really, but as cold start to the day. to tell us might drop to —5 in the coldest parts of north yorkshire in northern ireland as well. it is chilly first thing this morning. with the sun already up, any early—morning fist and book burning away we will see where temperatures rise by nicely and in the afternoon we should see warm spots getting up to 1890 degrees. it will be there or thereabouts for being warmest day of the year so far. this weather for the weekend. a few fog patches this morning from east wales through the midlands to lincolnshire. not massively expensive so they should move away quickly this morning. northern scotland, it seemed cloudy and shetland with a few spots of morning rain botrytis afternoon where is the rest of the mainland should state drives sunshine. sunshine is what the northern ireland and that is
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early—morning mist and fog burning away quickly this morning. looking at those sunny skies. warmest weather is towards the western side of england and wales with temperatures at 18 or 19 degrees. the grief with the wind coming in at will keep things a bit chilly around the south coast towards the coast of kent and parts of east anglia. 0vernight, another cold one coming up. in the countryside again will see temperatures falling away to give pockets of rust. i don't see why we should not get temperatures down as low as “11, minus five degrees. remember sunday, if anything there is a sunshine again, still with chilly wind in the south but the temperature is probably a degree down across much of england and wales compared with today. still and wales compared with today. still a decent kind of day. but average in the warmest spot is again climbing into the mid to upper teens. pleasa nt into the mid to upper teens. pleasant sunshine to come as we go through the course of both this afternoon and sunday afternoon as well. that is how the weather looks. a quick reminder that as you go to
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bed tonight, the clock will move forward and now. that for though of us forward and now. that for though of us working tomorrow, and our lesson there, iam us working tomorrow, and our lesson there, i am afraid. i'm already not looking forward to that. the clocks will change later tonight. thank you. that was a welcome reminder. we'll be back with the headlines at 8am. now it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. two big issues on this week's programme: bbc news programmes decant to westminster, near the site of wednesday's attack. was the exceptional scale and nature of these outside broadcasts exactly the response the attacker might have hoped for? and did coverage of martin mcguinness' death focus too much on his role as a peacemaker and statesman, and not enough on his ira past? from early wednesday afternoon onwards, millions of us have watched what unfolded in westminster, with a sense of shock and revulsion.
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for some, though, there was also concern about whether the huge media attention played into the hands of those who would support this outrage. you are watching bbc news. updating you on an ongoing incident outside the palace of westminster... we were treated to nothing more than oft repeated sequences of something like three or four events that have happened, interspersed with speculation, then the events repeated, then more speculation. bbc, you can do better than this. repeating things over and over again, highlighting the terrorism, isn't that exactly what the terrorists want? i rather suspect it is. tim crompton with his views, there, which were echoed by many other viewers. of course, a degree of repetition and speculation is inevitable in the initial reporting of an event of this kind. but other viewers objected
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to the choice made bbc news to broadcast extensively, since the attack, not from its usual studios, but from the streets of westminster, near the scene of the crime. wednesday's news at ten, thursday's breakfast programme, victoria derbyshire that day, and much of the news channel's output all mounted outside broadcasts, which, felt some, could have disrupted police work, and was the very opposite of the "carry on as normal" approach which the prime minister herself had described as the right response to terrorism. here's mike windell. why on earth do the anchors have to run the programme from an empty street, reading from a makeshift prompt? what is the latest from there, helena? well, ben, this is one of five hospitals... why were there repeated visits to reporters outside hospitals who had nothing to report? all of this served to own unduly dramatise ties the situation, adding nothing to the quality of the coverage, but giving
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maximum exposure for the terrorist? apart from reporting facts and showing respect for victims, the day after an attack like this should be handled like any other day. if the programme had been run from the studio, with some time allocated to other news, the bbc would have shown that normality had not been disrupted by the incident. instead, you choose — chose to show the terrorists what a big impact they can have. well, to discuss how bbc news covered the attacks and the aftermath, that, i am joined by gavin allen, the bbc‘s controller of daily news programmes. several different points there. let's take them one at a time. it was obviously a terrible attack. viewers have been saying, what was to be gained by all these outside broadcasts, the day after, given there were no further developments at the scene? well, there were further developments, in fact. 0n the morning after, for instance, itremained an unfolding situation. there was a minute's silence about to happen.
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mps were coming back from the special statement by the prime minister. but is also partly about the nature of the news. i think to be at a location where a news event has happened, you simply do get, as a journalist, a better understanding, than sat in front of your desk or in a studio. it also, i think, conveys to the audience, importantly, this is a major event, and if you like it or not, it is could have a huge impact on the uk. there is a real concern about copycats, fuelled by... i don't think — i don't think responsibly reporting what has happened is encouraging people to repeat it. i mean, we are very aware of the responsibilities we have, but we are also aware that there are millions of people out there, the audiences of different programmes, who really want to know what actually happened, not what is being speculated, or not what they think has happened or what the rumour says. they come to the bbc to really understand what has actually occurred, and i think it is ourjob to tell them. at the end of the day, whether we like it or not, let's be realistic, this was a huge event and there is going to be publicity, as you put it,
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for the terrorists, in this case. because everywhere, social media, every media organisation is going to cover it. i think responsibility for us, the bbc, is to make sure that the way we cover it and the procedures with which we cover it, is absolutely accurate. so you get the information you need, without overly sensationalising it. there were lots of images of the dead or dying and severely injured, which the bbc broadcast. many believe this was intrusive. why did you run them? i quibble with that, actually, because i think there were an awful lot of images, i have seen across this week, both in the newsroom and in newspapers, and of course, on—air. but we take really great care to really think about what we are conveying with the images. and there are a lot of images that we did not show. and would not broadcast. and i think in terms of conveying and trying to understand for the audience's sake, what has happened, and the severity — the horror of what has happened, but not to overflow into insensitivity and in thinking on the sort of dignity of the injured or the dying, or, sadly, in the case of the dead, theirfamilies. and i think that is important, too.
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yes, pc keith palmer, who died, people would take that as an example. the images we showed — we were very careful not to show a lot of these images. what we try to show is the scene, a more general, had generic sequence of people gathered around him, trying to save him. but we were very careful about what we... but again, it is about that balance about... this is an event which actually happened. people thought they saw the bodies of the severely injured. 0r possibly dead or dying. and that — the fact that they did not necessarily see their faces did not necessarily make it acceptable. it makes quite a big difference, actually. i think if you see a crowd of people around someone who is injured, that is very different from some of the images as seen elsewhere of the person themselves injured, and the blood. that is actually quite a big difference, and it still conveys an understanding. it is where you draw the line. but in fairness, it is not a precise line. you need to make a judgement, which is why different broadcasters, and different media organisations have come to different judgements. in the early hours, as one of the viewers was saying, there, you've got
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a lot of repetition in the aftermath of the attack. with not very much in the way of facts. so some viewers feel that this kind of coverage is, in a sense, adding to a sense of panic, unnecessarily. i don't think it does. i think people come to a particular news channel, to find out what is the latest news. now, how long they stay for is up to them, but it varies, person—to—person. but if you come in, you want the news instantly. so inevitably, there will be repetition. but any minute, there could be an update with new news and fresh information. what we try to do is ensure that every bit of that information was conveyed clearly, and accurately, and not to speculate. and i think we achieved that, fairly well. thank you, gavin. stay with us. we will talk about our nets issue now, because that was not the only big controversy about bbc news coverage this week. martin mcguinness, who died on tuesday, was a former ira leader, who played a significant role in the northern ireland peace process, subsequently becoming deputy first minister. but for hundreds of viewers, the bbc focused too much on the latter part of his life, and not enough on the former. one of them, called tim,
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from northern ireland, left us this telephone message. i think it's unbelievable that bbc has lined up people with prayers, prayers, prayers, for a butcher. an absolute butcher. of a person. 0ther viewers also objected to the scale and tone of the coverage, including des murphy, who sent us this e—mail... and gavin allen is still with me in the studio. let's talk about this. the main charge is that the bbc glossed over his very serious past as a senior ira commander, and that was unacceptable, if you were trying to be balanced. it would absolutely have been unacceptable if we would have
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glossed over that core part of martin mcguinness' life. but we really didn't. it was really clear in the interviews we did, in the packages we ran, and the bulletins, that we were conveying somebody who, yes, in the second half of their life, was a senior politician, and a negotiator for peace and the peace process, but in the early half, was absolutely clearly involved with the ira and was responsible, either directly or indirectly, for a number of deaths. and we — we wouldn't and couldn't have glossed over that. we had hundreds of complaints saying they felt it was not given enough attention, that the terrorist past. and most of those interviewed, such as tony blair and bill clinton, were paying tribute about the peace process. critical voices seemed a lot further down the running order. i — i'm not sure which bulletin you are referring to. butl... in terms of prominence overall, in terms of who was being interviewed, and what they had to say. but i can think of many examples and certainly on every programme, that we ran, we will have had the voices of relatives of victims,
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people such as norman tebbit, who were absolutely clear in their utter condemnation and loathing of someone they described as a coward, and the world is a sweeter place without them. we were very clear there was some hatred of martin mcguinness, but there was also a reference for him by others, and what we had to do is try and make sure that this was a very complex person, for a number of people, hated on one side, loved on another. —— reverence. we had to convey that was who he was. reverence is a really interesting issue here, isn't it? because when it comes to an obituary, the bbc can be accused of having a tendency to be too reverential for fear of causing offence, because that person has just died. yes, i don't think it is fear of causing offence. it's all obituaries, notjust the bbc. by its very nature, and somebody has just died, you tend to accentuate the positive, and i don't think we were in this case. we try to be as balance as we can be, and as impartial as we can be. but in obituaries, i think it is incredibly important new convey a person's
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life, notjust a sort of sensitivity towards relatives and the moment that he's died. well, as i said, we've had hundreds of complaints from people who are really very angry. they say the bbc didn't give enough attention to martin mcguinness' terrorist past. what do you say to them? i suppose what i might say is that one of the images of this week, that stays with me, about martin mcguinness, will be the first minister, or former first minister, arlene foster, going to that funeral yesterday as a member of the democratic unionist party, at the funeral of a former ira commander. that is a pretty extraordinary juxtaposition of someone who should be a sworn enemy, but recognises this is actually quite complex. i don't underplay at all, in any way, the fact that, as i say, people hated this man, but i think it is the job of the bbc to try and represent the totality of somebody, across the board, of that person. gavin allen, thank you for coming on newswatch. thank you for all of your comments this week. please share your opinion on bbc news by calling us on 0370 010 6676. 0r e—mailing newswatch@bbc. co. uk. and do have a look at our website for previous discussions.
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that's all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and rachel burden. a blow for president trump as he admits defeat on one of his main campaign promises. he's forced to abandon a vote on healthcare reform because he couldn't get enough support from his own party. good morning. it's saturday, 25th march. also ahead: did he act alone? police try to piece together the final movements of the westminster attacker khalid masood. a whatsapp message sent minutes before his killing spree is being looked at and two people remain in
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custody. the rest have been released. almost two million people in the uk don't have a bank account. a house of lords report says it's a scandal. in sport, the republic of ireland captain, seamus coleman, suffers a broken.
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