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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 26, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. labour promises higher pay rises for nhs staff in england. they'd abolish the pay cap and bring back bursaries for student nurses. but the conservatives say labour's sums don't add up and would put the health service at risk. good morning, it's wednesday, the 26th of april. also this morning: ten years after the disappearance of madeleine mccann, detectives say they're pursuing a significant line of inquiry. these are the drones helping to make oui’ these are the drones helping to make our skies safer. we get exclusive access to the latest technology being used. good morning. more of us
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are switching accounts for better service for our money. in sport, seven points clear now... chelsea close in on the premier league title with a vital victory over southampton. we'll also be looking at how your garden grows, as a new report says climate change affects the north and the south in very different ways. and carol has the weather. good morning. another cool day in prospect. still some wintry showers in the forecast but there will be some sunshine as well. later, cloud coming in from the north—west and the wind eases but i will have more detail in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. labour has promised to increase pay for nhs staff and to restore bursaries for nurses in training if it wins the general election. the party says it will abolish the current cap for staff in england which limits pay increases to i%. it also plans to introduce a law that ensures staffing levels
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in hospitals are safe. our health editor hugh pym reports. marchers by student nurses and midwives in protest at plans in england to scrap state funded bursaries. from august, nurses and midwives starting training will need to ta ke midwives starting training will need to take out student loans, as with other courses. the government argues this will encourage universities to create more places. but figures show the university applications were nearly one quarter lower this year in england. labour says if elected it will restore the bursaries due to be scrapped in august. the party also wants to end the i% pay cut for health staff it says its policies will be paid for by reversing corporation tax cuts. labour also plans to get regulators to draw up guidelines on safe staffing in hospitals and then legislate to make hospitals and then legislate to make hospitals abide by them. we will be guided by the recommendations
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proposed. we want an independent body to come up with guidelines and we will put those guidelines into legislation. the conservatives say the nhs budget in england had been predicted an increased and thousands more staff had been recruited by hospitals. the liberal democrats said labour was not being honest with the public about the revenue paid raised to pay for the policies. let's get more from our political correspondent whojoins let's get more from our political correspondent who joins us now from westminster. today, the nhs seems to hit the top of the agenda? i think they are trying to get onto one of their core topics and away from brexit where some of the leading politicians have been questioning just exactly what their policy is. they are very clear on the nhs. in the last election, so fa ct, on the nhs. in the last election, so fact, the conservatives outbid labour. now they say they will give the health service the money needs.
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candidates on the doorsteps in emphasising the social care and nhs are emphasising the social care and nhs a re key emphasising the social care and nhs are key issues. as we heard there is are key issues. as we heard there is a message there of course for people concerned about the health service, from labour, but also a message to the trade unions that lifting the public sector pay cap is a way of getting them out there to campaign. however, there has been a more hostile reaction because a fundamental point is that you need a strong economy and they do not sing labour can deliver on that. although they say their policies are fully costed, they do say, the liberal democrats, the labour are ducking difficult questions. they are not being straight with the general public about the extent of revenue. we will talk more about that later on. thank you. we'll speak to the shadow health secretaryjonathan ashworth and also to health secretaryjeremy hunt later in the programme. about ten past eight we will talk to
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jeremy hunt. detectives investigating the disappearance of madeleine mccann say they are still pursuing what they describe as "critical leads" in the case. next week will mark ten years since the three—year—old disappeared while on holiday with her parents in portugal. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. ten yea rs ten years mutton lancers. a desperate search with the media following every step. what happened here? where is madeline? this is still a missing persons enquiry, despite 2014's extensive police searches in portugal, there is no definitive evidence that she is dead. for six years with government money, the metropolitan police have been reviewing everything from scratch. we have a significant line of enquiry which is worth pursuing
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and because it is worth pursuing it could provide an answer. but until we have gone through, i won't know whether we will get there or not. and that is all the police are saying. this investigation was once pursued by up to 30 officers. now there are nearly four on the case and a handful of leads. while there is still something to investigate, there is still hope. madeline's presidents have described the ten year anniversary is a horrible marker of stall in time. they have released a statement promising never to give up. there have been many challenges and low points along the way, they said. but the warmth, encouragement and positivity we have experienced from the quiet majority has undoubtedly sustained us and maintained our faith has undoubtedly sustained us and maintained ourfaith in human goodness. this is how madeline might have looked as she has grown up. her 14th birthday is the week after next. surrey police have been strongly criticised for returning a collection of shotguns to a man who went on to kill his partner and her daughter.
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christine and lucy lee were shot by 82—year—old john lowe in 2014. a report by the independent police complaints commission has highlighted serious failings by the force and said the way firearms are licensed across the country needs to be improved. an annual survey of people treated in accident and emergency units after being assaulted suggests there's been a significant fall in violence across england and wales. 188,000 people attended a&e in 2016 — 10% down on the previous year. but the results are at odds with police statistics which show an increase in violent crime. as our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. across the police there is huge concern about levels of violent crime. in some areas like london, stabbings and shootings are on the increase. while the most recent set of figures for england and wales showdown of rural rise in violence
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of 22%. but a survey of casual to units and clinics which treat victims of violence paints a very different picture. it suggests that fewer people are suffering violent assaults. according to the survey, 188,000 people attended hospital last year for 188,000 people attended hospital last yearfor injuries 188,000 people attended hospital last year for injuries caused by violence. that's10% down on the figure for 2015. and is the lowest number since the survey began 15 yea rs number since the survey began 15 years ago. figures sharply at odds with the police statistics. for all kinds of reasons, police records are an unreliable measure of violence. the most accurate way of measuring violent is either through the crime survey 01’ violent is either through the crime survey or the a and d injury statistics. the only age category which registered an increase in violent injury cases was in children aged under 11. but researchers say that may be a blip because of the small sample size in that grouping.
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mps have criticised the system for providing school places in england describing it as "incoherent" and not cost effective. the public accounts committee says its concerned that free schools are sometimes opened in areas without a shortage of places, and where other schools are struggling to make ends meet. the department for education says free schools are popular with parents and provide excellent value for money. gardeners will be faced with having to adapt to new plants and new techniques as a report suggests climate change will transform the traditional british garden. the royal horticultural society says that with warmer temperatures a wider variety of plants can be grown. but the study also warns that there's a sharp divide across the country. here's our science editor david shukman. we usually think of mowing the lawn is one of the classic features of summer. is one of the classic features of summer. but rising temperatures mean that grass also has to be cut in the
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spring and the autumn and sometimes the winter as well. a new report says climate change is forcing a shift in british gardens. the royal horticultural society, best known for staging the chelsea flower show, has studied the potential impact of global warming. it says it will affect gardeners up and down the country in very different ways. certainly is not a one size fits all situation. the main thing that gardeners can do is understand the climate of their garden, understand when it rains we does the water go, when it rains we does the water go, when it rains we does the water go, when it is hot, where he gets particularly dry and planned accordingly. the report says along the growing season will be good for guidance but it also warns of risks in the decades ahead. in the south, a shortage of water. in the north, heavier downpours. the message is to get ready for change. and we will be out and about in the garden will be
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later. not just a out and about in the garden will be later. notjust a garden, is it? this is the future, this north south divide is something to look forward to, maybe. it depends on what sort of planting you want to do. this is in serious news out today, this one is not so but it did catch our eye. scientists have calculated the perfect way to throw something accurately — whether it's a dart, a basketball or the classroom favourite — a screwed—up piece of paper. researchers at yale university have concluded that a slow throw is generally more accurate, except in cricket, where fielders are more likely to strike the wicket with a fast underarm technique. let's give it ago slow is more accurate. 0h, you've missed. i love
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accurate. 0h, you've missed. i love a pressure moment. . . accurate. 0h, you've missed. i love a pressure moment... alan! come on, cats! yeah! 0h, a pressure moment... alan! come on, cats! yeah! oh, what was that? oh, no! however it does in... slow. slow. i was not listening to the advice. i will try one more. 0h, slow. i was not listening to the advice. iwill try one more. oh, no. right. that is it. i will rest with my success. louise is in charge there. i am sure we will be throwing more things throughout the morning full. you have such a big advantage than us, you shoot down on the hoop. amazing from diego costa last night. he did not star in the fa cup on the
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weekend and everyone was wondering what he was doing. they started here and proved that chelsea have the firepower to defeat the rest of the premier league. and, sure enough they did. chelsea took another step towards the premier league title with a 11—2 win over southampton at stamford bridge. diego costa scored two of chelsea's goals — his second this slick move through the saints defence. they are seven points clear of tottenham again — but they've played a game more. spurs will try to narrow that gap tonight. they travel to selhurst park to play a crystal palace side who've already beaten arsenal, liverpool, and chelsea this month. maria sharapova makes her return to tennis today, after a 15—month ban for doping. the former world number one is playing at the stuttgart 0pen as a wildcard. ronnie 0'sullivan is up against it in his world snooker quarter—final against ding junhui — 0'sullivan trails by ten frames to six. first to 13 wins — they resume at half past two this afternoon.
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ronnie 0'sullivan is running out of time to make it through to the quarter—finals. but if anyone can, surely he can. thank you very much. we will have some or paper throwing. let's have a look at the weather this morning. carol is with us. i mentioned earlier, look at the moody cloud. it's a cumulonimbus, they give thunder and lightning, we will see some of that in the forecast today but this morning we have a cold start again, temperatures hovering around or below freezing, sunny spells and showers and the showers will be a mixture of hail, sleet and snow, especially on higher ground, and rain. you can see where we have had the showers on the coastlines through the night but inland we are off to a drier started generally but a cold one, sunshine
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from the word go in southern counties, some coastal showers and showers in east anglia and eastern england has the wintry mix ijust described and in the midlands heading northwards, a lot skies but you can see those wintry showers hugging the east coast. in scotland, watch out for ice on untreated surfaces this morning, we are looking at the mixture of wintry showers, rain sleet and snow and the same in northern ireland, a lot of dry weather, a cold start and some sunshine. sun ju ahn dry weather, a cold start and some sunshine. sunju ahn in wales this morning, a few showers peppering the coastline —— sian shine. —— sunshine. the wind in the north is coming from the north—west and in the south, still largely from the north, so feeling cold still but not as cold in the north—west today as yesterday. through the day you can see where we have the showers, some of them will be heavy and possibly thundery and we also have more persistent rain coming in across the
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northern isles, later that will make its way into the far north of mainland scotland. through the course of the evening and overnight, there it is, heading to the north of mainland scotland and sinking south. the showers across england will fade quickly, slow to clear in the midlands and under clear skies it will be a cold night and once again we will see pockets of frost and also patchy mist and fog in southern areas. quite a few showers, though, once again in parts of the east and west. in the countryside it is going to be cold, cold enough for ice pockets of frost, we are looking at -3. pockets of frost, we are looking at —3. through tomorrow our weather front coming through scotland will continue to go south, taking its increasingly patchy rain with it. another one coming in across scotla nd another one coming in across scotland also bringing in some rain and showers. we end the day on a fairly cloudy note with a few showers around but in between them we are looking at drier and dispels, with sunshine coming in across parts
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of eastern scotland. —— drier and brighter spells. eight, nine of eastern scotland. —— drier and brighterspells. eight, nine and of eastern scotland. —— drier and brighter spells. eight, nine and 12. as we go into friday, there will be periods where we will see lots of cloud, but some breaks in them and largely dry for most, with the odd shower dotted around. temperatures, eight —14. on saturday, looking like a mostly dry day but on sunday, the bank holiday weekend, on sunday we could see rain coming in from the atla ntic could see rain coming in from the atlantic or from france. could see rain coming in from the atlantic orfrom france. if could see rain coming in from the atlantic or from france. if we see the rain coming from france it could be persistent. it won't last terribly long, though, because next week we are looking at a different forecast and it will be turning a bit warmer. thank you, carol. thank you very much indeed! excellent cumulonimbus knowledge as well! let's have a look at the papers with steph and kat. you wanted to look at the times? yes, let's go to the
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front page first. we will be talking about this later. government borrowing has dropped to its lowest level since the eve of the 2008 financial crisis. lots have the picture of ivanka trunk yesterday in berlin with christine lagarde and angela merkel, there are ports yesterday she was booed at this conference —— ivanka trump. the daily express, vital new clues in the hunt for maddie. police say the investigation is at a critical stage ten yea rs investigation is at a critical stage ten years on, we will look at that story later. front page of the sun, the world's biggest rabbit, good headline, sad story. does your bum look big in this paper? your opportunity to compare your rear to kim kardashian's. that is a bit much for breakfast, isn't it what else have you got? the front page of the
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daily telegraph, britain could face an eu bill until 2020, sending billions to brussels according to whitehall sources. this picture has made it onto so many of the front pages. this is the guardian and her lying about being booed at this women's summit. talking about the free schools policy as well. it seems to be either that picture or madeleine mccann on the front page of many papers. this is the daily mirror. the daily mail have gone for a similar headline. that the front page of the mail this morning. steph? following on from what you said about the budget deficit and the borrowing figures, it's interesting when we talk about deficit, that's the difference between what the government is bringing in from taxes and things compared to the muggy they are spending on things like benefits. at the moment we are in a deficit, like lots of european countries —— money.
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france has been in deficit since 1974. what you get from that is the amount of money the government has borrowed, so lots of the papers looking at that. that figure has fallen, government borrowing has fallen, government borrowing has fallen to £52 billion in the last financial year, smaller than predicted because the economy has been doing better than people thought. predictions were that it would be quite a bit more money than this but at the moment it is at £52 billion, still bad we are borrowing rather than being in surplus, but compared to other european countries, good it is not as high as they thought. kat? a couple of interesting pictures stories in the sports pages, this in the times, anthonyjoshua preparing for that massive heavy heavyweight fight. it is cupping, michael phelps did it at the olympics, covered in those circular bruises. draws the blood to the service. exactly, it looks
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dramatic in real life. they set fire to the air in the cup and they put it on the skin and the air as it cools sucks the blood to the top. does it hurt? it does. have you had it done? not with a fryer but a suction pump, i had it on my achilles. i have a very low pain threshold, though. the other thing i liked the look of was laura and jason kenny getting their cbes at buckingham palace yesterday. laura kenney expecting a baby. i liked what jason said about the whole day, he said it was mega. and laura said all she does is ride her bike, certainly underselling herself! the times are talking about weddings and the arms race for the middle—class, weddings getting all the more elaborate, they say out of hand, but i think elaborate is a good word.
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pugs delivering wedding rings dressed in kilts, an owl delivered the rings at a wedding in america in 2015, it flew into the window and crashed to the ground. another in wiltshire in 2013 was delayed for an hour when the owl bearing the rings flew into the church roof and went to sleep. why would you get an owl? if you are going to have an owl you deserve a delay to your wedding, it is ridiculous! i am glad you have sorted it out, sorry to anyone who had owls! thanks for being with us this morning. britain has some of the best air accident investigators in the world. their work has saved countless lives. the bbc‘s been given exclusive access to film their latest equipment in the ongoing quest to find out why planes crash. here's our transport correspondent, richard westcott. a fireball after an executive jet
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overshot a runway and crashed into a busy hampshire carpark. people died, including members of 0sama bin laden's family. this 3—d photo taken by investigators using a special drone help them solve the crash. the quality‘s so good they can move around the scene, zooming in, checking for tell—tale clues. now the bbc‘s been given exclusive access to film investigators on a drone training exercise. it's becoming essential to help get to the bottom of accidents. we're looking for ground marks, which tells us how the aircraft hit the ground, whether it was in a bank or ina ground, whether it was in a bank or in a steep nosedive. propeller splash marks can give us information about the propeller‘s speed and then we're looking around the accident to to see if we're missing any bits, have we captured all four corners or has an important part broke off in the flight, which would be a clue to
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the flight, which would be a clue to the cause of the accident. they also used the drain to give a pilots iview, so with one accident somebody here hit some power lines and from the ground they were really easy to see but they realise when viewed from the cockpit those same lines we re from the cockpit those same lines were that surely it visible, they blended into the ground so they were actually able to see what the pilot was seeing. they don'tjust use drones to investigate care accidents, they use them to look at accidents, they use them to look at accidents at sea as well. we would then fly alongside the side of the wrecked... then fly alongside the side of the wrecked. . . at then fly alongside the side of the wrecked... at another training exercise, investigators tell me the simplest things can be a real giveaway. could be a door or a porthole left open, it could be somebody has opened or closed a valve incorrectly which has let water that could be feeding into the engine. it could be somebody has left freshwater or a hose pipe running on the upper deck and it could be a fishing boat could have been washing down the upper decks with water being pumped over the
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side and they have left it over and it spilt up one of the tanks and the free water affect has made the fishing boat tipped over. and this is how vital drone footage can be. a fatal crack in the middle of a ship's hull. shot a few weeks ago this was the wreck of the cargo ships one and, 80 metres down off the welsh coast, six people died as the welsh coast, six people died as the vessel snapped in heavy seas. these images help find early early a nswe i’s. these images help find early early answers. wrote drones in the wrong hands can cause terrible accidents but in the right hands it can help prevent them too. —— rogue. richard westcott, bbc news. when it comes to raising children are there any golden rules that all parents should follow? and are they the same for bringing up girls and boys? after 8:30am this morning we'll be speaking to the parenting author steve biddulph about his ten steps to help girls to grow up, in his words strong and free. but before then we've been asking mums and dads in manchester to give us their top tips.
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unconditional love and understanding of your children. give them time. just teach them respect for adults and your elders, show them the error of their ways. not get to cross with your kids and to listen to them but also make them clear about where the boundaries are. encourage your children to be involved in lots of activities, whether it's sporting or dance or anything to keep them busy and enjoying life. follow through with any sort of discipline that you're going to put into action for your child and not giving to them. make sure they get plenty of sleep, eat lots of good food and having some patients with them as well. giving them the time of day. not listening to what other people are saying or what labels are out there from society, what good parenting is, and do your own thing and go
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with the flow and enjoy your kids. some good advice there! some excellent advice. it's down to individualfamilies i'm excellent advice. it's down to individual families i'm sure excellent advice. it's down to individualfamilies i'm sure but i think everyone will take something from what our viewers have been saying. empty promises is one thing. if you don't put that back i will never allow you to watch television again. i like unconditional love. we all like a bit of that, don't we? we want to hear your top parenting tips and whether you have different ones for bringing up girls and boys. we will be talking about those at around 8:40am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. millions of households could be at risk from potentially lethal kitchen appliances unless mps take action, that's the warning from london fire brigade. a faulty tumble dryer was blamed for causing this fire in shepherds bush.
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the brigade wants the government to make it easierfor consumers to find out if products have been recalled over safety fears. mps are due to debate the issue tomorrow. one of the capital's largest fashion magazines is backing an initiative to keep talented young people in london by helping them find affordable housing. tenants are given a home currently standing empty and in return they furnish and look after the property. i want to bring creativity back to london and my big worry at the moment is that, you know, kids like me when i first moved down here, they no longer have those opportunities and what you will end up opportunities and what you will end up with is a capital that it actually isn't wonderful any more, isn't full of wonderful art and media and music because people simply can't afford to be here. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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already a couple of problems on the tube this morinng, there's a signal failure at king's cross which means no service between baker street and aldgate on the metropolitan line and severe delays clockwise on the circle and hammersmith & city lines. there are also minor delays on the jubilee line northbound because of a signal failure at baker street. and on the trains southeastern services between ebbsfleet and stratford are running with 15 minute delays due to overrunning engineering works. out on the roads and this is the m25 anticlockwise, there's a lane closed betweenj25 for the a10 and j24 for potters bar due to broken down lorry so it's slow around there. coming into town traffic‘s queueing on marylebone flyover eastbound from the westway. (pres) let's have a check on the weather now with........ a bright start for many, if a bit cold. the showers arriving a bit quicker through the morning, some heavy ones, maybe a bit of sleep over higher ground, hail and thunder
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elsewhere, maximum temperature between 9—11, so again feeling quite cold. those showers gradually dying away overnight, clear skies, temperatures into low single figures, if not below, so again a frost by dawn tomorrow. the cloud will start to roll in after a bright start on thursday, bringing with it some outbreaks of rain as we head through thursday afternoon. some slightly more mild air, temperatures around 11 or 12. that warm front continues to push through overnight on thursday, that mild air continues to moving. it's only slightly more mild soa to moving. it's only slightly more mild so a bit of a temperature change as we head into friday, just a slight rise. still going to see quite a bit of cloud around as we head towards the end of the week but the temperature recovering to a certain extent as we head into saturday and sunday. fairly unsubtle weekend, looking drier on saturday with the potential for rain on sunday. —— fairly unsettled. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. will hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's. -- it is —— it isjammed —— it is jammed 631. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. could the traditional british garden soon be a thing of the past? we'll look at the impact of climate change on some of our favourite plants and flowers. we'll speak to the 17—year—old superstar of british gymnastics, ellie downie, fresh from her historic medal winning performance at the european championships. after a three year gap comedian jason manford is back on tour, and he'll be here to tell us about his new prime time game—show. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. labour has promised to increase pay
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for nhs staff and to restore bursaries for nurses in training if it wins the general election. the party says it will abolish the current cap for staff in england which limits pay increases to 1%. the conservatives say the nhs budget in england has been increased and that thousands more staff have been recruited by hospitals. we will be guided by the recommendations proposed. we want an independent body of clinicians and experts to come up with guidelines and we will put them into legislation. detectives investigating the disappearance of madeleine mccann say they are still pursuing what they describe as "critical leads" in the case. next week will mark ten years since the 3—year—old disappeared while on holiday with her parents in portugal. although all four of the remaining suspects have now been released, surrey police have been strongly criticised for returning a collection of shotguns to a man who went on to kill his partner and her daughter. christine and lucy lee were shot by 82—year—old john lowe in 2014. a report by the independent police complaints commission has highlighted serious failings
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by the force and said the way firearms are licensed across the country needs to be improved. this was the moment police arrived atjohn lowe's farm to find he had murdered to women. he shot his partner and her daughter are closed range using a shotgun. he was 82 at the time and laterjailed for life. thejudges recommendation the time and laterjailed for life. the judges recommendation was that he serve at least 25 years. it emerged that one year before the murders, he had a number of shotgun seized by surrey police but then the weapons had then been returned to him. they included the shop gun he used on the two women. today, that decision by surrey police to hand the guns back was severely criticised the independent police complaints commission. we found
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systematic failings for the local force and we also that there are lessons to be learnt nationally for police services to ensure that their firearms licensing teams are up to thejob. firearms licensing teams are up to the job. surrey police have apologised to the family saying that the decision to hand back the shop guns was flawed. it said that one officer had been sacked and another retired. today's report said the death of christine and lucy was a shocking event but while these incidents were rare, all forces had to check carefully anybody who wa nted to check carefully anybody who wanted a gun. there was a significant fall in violence in england and wales last year, according to a survey of accident and emergency units. 188,000 people attended a&e last year being assaulted — 10% down on the previous year. but the results are at odds with police statistics which have recently recorded increases in violent crime. mps have criticised the system for providing school places
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in england describing it as "incoherent" and not cost effective. the public accounts committee says its concerned that free schools are sometimes opened in areas without a shortage of places, and where other schools are struggling to make ends meet. the department for education says free schools are popular with parents and provide excellent value for money. nasa's space probe cassini will make a dramatic orbit of saturn this morning, plunging through the gap between the planet's cloud—tops and its spectacular ring system. it's the first of a series of manoeuvres, before the satellite runs out of fuel and dives into saturn's atmosphere in september. cassini is currently moving so fast, it would take just over an hour to travel three times around the earth. just check that speed... 62,000 miles an hour. unthinkable. no
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wonder it is running out of fuel quickly. chelsea. top of the premier league again. they have been the top folk goodness knows how long... for ever. they have extended their lead and what antonio contura is saying 110w and what antonio contura is saying now is that they have the mental resolve to push themselves over the line. they lost to manchester united, came back at the weekend and defeated on and on the fa cup and then defeated southampton yesterday and he says that they have it now, they have in their mind. now pressure switches to tottenham why their nearest rivals. chelsea are back to seven points clear at the top of the premier league, thanks to a 4—2 win over southampton at stamford bridge. captain gary cahill was back in the starting line—up after a bout of gastroenteritis — and he gave his side a 2—1 lead right at the end of the first half.
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diego costa hadn't scored in seven games for chelsea — but he put away two last night, to make sure of victory. you must be ready to this mental effort, also. not only physical effort, also. not only physical effort but mental as well. it is not easy and... but we are fighting and we are ready to fight from now on till the end. spurs are chelsea's nearest rivals — and they'll try to narrow that seven point gap tonight. they travel to selhurst park to play a crystal palace side who've already beaten arsenal, liverpool, and chelsea this month — and they'll need to bounce back from losing to chelsea in the fa cup semi—finals last weekend. when you are competing at that level it is so difficult. there is no time to regret, no time to complain, you just need to be ready under pressure
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and to look at the game we have ahead and try to give your best. world number one andy murray is in action at the barcelona 0pen today, where he takes on bernard tomic. and maria sharapova makes her return to tennis, following a 15 month suspension for doping. the former wimbledon champion is a wildcard at the stuttgart 0pen and that doesn't sit well with her opponent, italy's roberta vinci. she is, of course, a great player personally. i have nothing against her but she made mistakes and she paid, less, but she paid and i think that she can return to play but without any wild cards, any help. the former undisputed world heavyweight champion lennox lewis says now is the right time for anthony joshua to take on wladimir klitschko. their heavyweight unification bout at wembley on saturday night is being called the biggest live event in boxing history. at 41, klitschko is far more
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experienced thanjoshua — but the briton is unbeaten in 18 fights since he turned professional four years ago. i commend them for that because it ta kes i commend them for that because it takes somebody to do that, to say listen, i am takes somebody to do that, to say listen, iam ready, i believe i takes somebody to do that, to say listen, i am ready, i believe i can beat you. now is the time, now is the perfect time for him because, you know, he has a chink in his arm in. was defeated by tyson fury and to prove yourself you need to beat him as well. ronnie 0'sullivan is up against it in his world snooker quarter—final against ding junhui — the chinese number one leads by ten frames to six. 0'sullivan spent a lot of last night's session sitting down, ding, who was the beaten finalist last year, won five frames in a row. but at 10—5 down, ‘the rocket‘ came back with a century break in the last frame of the session. first to 13 wins. they will resume at 230 and that will be live for you later. back at
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the table this morning, mark selby versus marco fu. selby leads. finally, behind every sportsperson is a proud parent. yesterday the bbc news channel reported on the great britain ice hockey team's 5—1 victory against estonia last night. one of the scorers was liam stewart... recognise the surname? his dad was chuffed to say the least. presenter: great britain's ice hockey players won their second game in their world championship group beating australia 5—1 in belfast last night when liam stewart, the son of music legend sir rod stewart and son of former model rachel hunter, scored his first international goal. britain join japan and lithuania at the top of the table on six points.... stewart: my boy! don't you love that? i think that could catch on. it is lovely. does
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that go as an embarrassing father thing? no, i think that go as an embarrassing father thing? no, ithink that is that go as an embarrassing father thing? no, i think that is okayed. the joy thing? no, i think that is okayed. thejoy in his thing? no, i think that is okayed. the joy in his voice. thing? no, i think that is okayed. thejoy in his voice. rod stewart fa ns thejoy in his voice. rod stewart fans will now be following great britain's ice hockey team to see the scores again. in what is expected to be the first in a series of policy announcements on the nhs in england, the labour party has laid out it plans to tackle staff shortages and ease recruitment pressures if the party wins the general election. we're joined now from westminster by our political correspondent, iain watson. last week when we were talking about the general election being called it seemed like it would be that brexit election but there are domestic issues coming in now, and today it issues coming in now, and today it is about the nhs? that is correct. brexit is difficult for some parties such as labour. some backed leave,
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some backed remain, some say their own position is not there at desperately clear. so they are back on safes territorian now, nhs, saying they will lift the 1% pay cut, and reduce bursaries due to be abolished this year for trainee nurses and midwives. they also say they will legislate to ensure that there are safe levels of staffing in hospitals as well. they are claiming that these policies are fully costed, that cuts in corporation tax will pay for some of that burden as you can imagine the opposition parties are not taking that lying down. the liberal democrats are saying that they are ducking some difficult questions are not being honest with the public and saying how much revenue will need to be race specifically when it comes to, for example, increasing staffing levels in hospitals. the conservatives want to get back onto their safe territory so their main attack on labour is not so much on the nhs itself it is saying that you need a strong economy to pay for a
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strong nhs and labour can be trusted to deliver that. and a few as politicians are at the moment, they say wait we publish a manifesto. do we have a definite date yet to the ma nifestoes ? we have a definite date yet to the manifestoes? not for all of them but labour is will be on the 15th of may so over labour is will be on the 15th of may so over two weeks to wait for the them. the conservative should come before that. labour will also have a meeting on the 11th of may to go through its various plants. what they have done if they are saying that every single policy in it will be fully costed so people are going through at the moment with a fine tooth comb. what we are also seeing before the 15th of may, almost halfway through the election campaign is what i am told will be big—ticket items, individual policies like this one lifting the nhs pay cut and we will get similar policies in different areas with a determination to get the debate on to the public the economy, social ca re to the public the economy, social care and away from brexit. thank you very much and we will try
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to one pick a health policy later on. it is 6:44. labour is pledging to abolish the nhs pay cap and reinstall bursaries if it wins the election. british detectives investigating the disappearance of madeleine mccann a decade ago say they are investigating at least one significant line of enquiry. carol, i know you told us it was cold yesterday but i cannot tell you how why you were. —— how right you were. this morning is no different. another cold start to the day with the kind of ted richards that will greet us as we step outside. some frost around as well and generally todayit frost around as well and generally today it is going to be cold regardless of where you while although across north—western parts will not be quite as cold as it was yesterday. what we have this morning is some showers around, mainly
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draped around the coastline and there is a lot of sunshine around this thing. the showers will develop further through the course of the day and some of them will be heavy and thundery as well as having a mixture of sleep, rain and hail in them. possibly some snow on the higher ground. the narrator you can see where we have had showers through the coast at overnight. as we move through eastern parts of england we are back into the showers, they are hit and miss as a lwa ys showers, they are hit and miss as always but they do have a wintry component to them. in northern england, lots of dry weather, north and east that is, the risk of ice on untreated surfaces in scotland and a winter even a better here, especially in the north, and in northern ireland, sunshine and showers here. —— wintry flavour here. the wind will still be an
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element of the weather today coming from the north—west, which is why it's not as cold in the north—west. here there will be more cloud in scotla nd here there will be more cloud in scotland and northern ireland with showers later and more of a northerly in the south but not strong and the wind easing down and through the day the showers will develop in central and eastern areas, a few in the west but fewer in the west than the east and won't be as heavy, some will be thundery. in the afternoon the cloud will thicken and persistent rain will move in and in the evening that will go south into mainland scotland and a weather front you can see is making its descent southwards through the night. generally speaking it will be a quiet night. in the south under clear skies it will be cold enough for frost, our weather front comes south taking the rain with it and patchy mist and fog forming, but nothing too substantial. a cold night in the countryside in particular, temperatures going down two —2 or _3’ temperatures going down two —2 or —3, similar values to this morning
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for some —— down to. a weatherfront world d rift for some —— down to. a weatherfront world drift south taking its cloud and rain, turning more showery through the day —— will drift south. tomorrow not as cold, 8—12. as we head on into friday, a drier day for most with one or two showers dotted here and there. thanks very much, carol. that's the weather sorted out. we are talking about bank accounts 110w. we are talking about bank accounts now. how many people are doing it?l few but it is still quite slow. apparently we're more likely to switch our partners than switch our bank account, but could that be changing. according to bacs, who manage the process of switching, just under 250,000 switches took place in the first three months of the year.
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that's up significantly on the previous three months, about 40,000 more than usual. it's been easier to change banks since a seven—day service was launched in 2013. nearly four million current accounts have been switched since then. that sounds a lot but it's a fraction of the 70 million active current accounts in the uk. still feels like a hassle for a lot of people, but it's estimated that bank customers could save an average of £70 a year by switching. kevin mountford is a banking expert at moneysupermarket.com. good morning. good morning. what do you make of these numbers, is it becoming more popular, and of anomaly, what's going on? it's good to remind ourselves of why this was introduced —— an anomaly. the big four banks owned around 80% of the bank accounts and they were trying to boost competition and the
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switching process was one of the reasons people weren't switching. it's been a success from that point of view. from the 3.7 who have switched, around 96% have gone through this process in seven working days, which was the standard set down. unfortunately even though we look at q1 this year compared to last year, it's a slight increase, but year—on—year it isn't improving and that is disappointing because awareness is improving. as it increased competition within the banks, we were talking yesterday about mortgage deals and higher competition, but is the same applying to current accounts? through banking a lot of the products are becoming more commoditised. we think this switching is problematic and the system proves that isn't the case. we have to look deeper as to why we're not switching. i think then
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each to be more competition. there are around 40 different providers that participate in the scheme but there's not a great deal of innovation generally. the other thing is the point of around saving £70 a year, that's generally aimed at those with an overdraft and the industry needs to improve transparency around the different price structures and tariffs that you charge. there's definitely options for us to get better value as consumers. that's what a lot of people will think, they all think how am! people will think, they all think how am i going to save money by switching my current account, surely there can't be that much to save?m you look at moneysupermarket.com and the different products, there is in credit interest, that has been strong in the past, a number of its savers switch, you have cash back and other rewards mechanisms. santander and other rewards mechanisms. sa ntander introduced their and other rewards mechanisms. santander introduced their one to three account and we shouldn't lose sight of the fact more established
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banks like halifax has shown a net gain, so they have raised the bar and they have realised there is competition and they have to fight harder. there's different options. i would always say don't look at the headline of. if you are going to go through the switching process, get the product that best suits your need —— headline offer. the product that best suits your need -- headline offer. we will be talking later about cash and have fewer of us are using cash and we are using cards a lot more.|j fewer of us are using cash and we are using cards a lot more. i may not have changed my bank account but iam doing not have changed my bank account but i am doing that a lot more. thanks very much. the quintessential british garden with lush green lawns and beautiful summer flower beds could become a thing of the past. a new report from the royal horticultural society says climate change is going to affect gardens in the north and south of the uk in very different ways. breakfast'sjohn maguire is at rhs wisley for us this morning. looking glorious. good morning.
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thanks, dan. just had my hair done so thanks, dan. just had my hair done so very kind of you to notice. i was looking at these rhododendrons earlier and i said looking at these rhododendrons earlierand i said i had looking at these rhododendrons earlier and i said i had never seen them this small, they were brought over and artificially produced from the himalayas, but we are now looking at these artificial changes to the environment. as the climate changes, as we get more dry and arid conditions in the south and wetter and warmer conditions in the north, things will change, more work to do, there will also be more of a variety of plants, that could be good or bad depending on your point of view. and more and more pests. win know the warm, wet winters are liked by things like ticks and slugs —— we know. at the this stir at wisley, looking glorious, i'm joined by a
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couple of expert gardeners —— look at this. have we seen much change in the last 15 years? we are looking back 20 or 30 years and in that time the growing season has got longer and average temperatures have gone up, the warmest years and winters have become more common as time has gone on. in the 15 years since the la st gone on. in the 15 years since the last report the science has moved on and we can take a more nuanced view of it, 15 years ago we thought it would be mediterranean in the summer and wet and warm winters but now because of the climate being more variable we will have more downpours in summerand more heavy variable we will have more downpours in summer and more heavy rainfall in the winter. in the south—east certainly the availability of water will be considerably less. water supply is already stressed in the south—east so less water for watering gardens so we will have to
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choose more drought resistant plants and it's a chance for plant breeders to grow more drought resistant plants and shrubs. challenges or opportunities. tomorrow, you are going to run through a couple of plants. we won't have the time to do all of them, we will look at more later, but what would work in the south and the north? we have a collection of plants that would do really well in the dry weather, we have this lovely iris here. we will have this lovely iris here. we will have the chance to grow more things like this one here. what they will he is the free draining but coping with dry conditions. in the winter it is important the soil is free draining. tell me about these routes, if you cant get a closer shot of this? there are nodules —— if you can. this is the plan's ability to cope with tough times and store their water and nutrients ——
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plant's. it can cope with everything, including dry shade. really handy. it will be important to choose plants that can cope so they won't have to rely on us watering them. this is a spectacular looking specimen, what do we think about this one? what conditions would suit? this will cope with the drive son that we will hopefully have more of. as long as it is in free draining soil... —— dry son. we will have more of this mediterranean type plant but in the north we will have more of the hydrangeas and the solomon seal that will cope with the warmer, wetter climate of the winter. thanks to you to. much more from us at wisley later on and i will ask you about what i'm doing wrong with my hydrangeas, because they are really struggling at the moment. it might not be you, it
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could be the temperature. moment. it might not be you, it could be the temperaturem moment. it might not be you, it could be the temperature. it is me, it is my pruning. you might have over pruned it. thank you so! we will try and sort outjohn's hydrangeas. if you have noticed any changes with your plans or your garden you can get in touch with us. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk we would like some pretty pictures if possible. we will be withjohn at wisley later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. millions of households could be at risk from potentially lethal kitchen appliances unless mps take action, that's the warning from london fire brigade. a faulty tumble dryer was blamed for causing this fire in shepherds bush and there are calls to make it easier to find out if products have been recalled over safety fears. mps are due to debate the issue later. a man in his 20s has died
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after being stabbed in wandsworth. police were called to melody road at 7am last night and are appealing for witnesses. one of the capital's largest fashion magazines is backing an initiative to keep talented young people in london by helping them find affordable housing. tenants are given a home currently standing empty and in return they furnish and look after the property. i want to bring creativity back to london and my big worry at the moment is that, you know, kids like me when i first moved down here, they no longer have those opportunities and what you're going to end up with is a capital that actually isn't wonderful any more, isn't full of great creatives, isn't full of wonderful art and media and music because people simply can't afford to be here. let's have a look at the travel situation now. already a couple of problems on the tube this morinng, there's a signal failure at king's cross which means no service between baker street and aldgate on the metropolitan line
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and severe delays clockwise on the circle and hammersmith & city lines. there are also minor delays on the jubilee line. and on the trains southeastern services between ebbsfleet and stratford are running with 40 minute delays due to overrunning engineering works. out on the roads is the m25 anticlockwise, it's slow between j25 for the a10 and j24 for potters bar after a lane was closed earlier. traffic is returning to normal. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another cold start this morning and a day of fairly dramatic april showers. fairly similar to yesterday. now, there is a bit of frost around for some this morning, especially to the west of london. that's going to be followed by sunshine and showers. a bright start for many of us, if a bit cold. those showers arriving a bit quicker
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through the course of the morning. some heavy ones, maybe a bit of sleet over higher ground. hail and thunder elsewhere. the maximum temperature ranging between nine and 11 celsius, so again it is going to feel quite cold. now, those showers gradually dying away overnight. in the clear skies the temperature drops down again, down into low single figures if not below. so again we're expecting a frost by dawn tomorrow morning. the cloud will start to roll in after a bright start on thursday, bringing with it some outbreaks of rain as we head through thursday afternoon. some slightly more mild air, temperatures at around 11 or 12 celsius. now, that warm front continues to push through overnight on thursday. that mild air continues to move it. it's only slightly more mild, so a bit of a temperature change as we head into friday. just a slight rise. still going to see quite a bit of cloud around as we head towards the end of the week, but the temperature recovering to a certain extent as we head into saturday and sunday. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. labour promises higher pay rises for nhs staff in england. they'd abolish the pay cap and bring back bursaries for student nurses.
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but the conservatives say labour's sums don't add up and would put the health service at risk. also this morning: ten years after the disappearance of madeleine mccann, detectives say they're pursuing a significant line of inquiry. these are the drones that are helping to make our skies safer, we get exclusive access to the latest technology being used by britain's air accident investigators. could you imagine getting through life without ever using cash? one in five of us in the uk now rarely uses cash — so i'll be looking at the future of money. in sport — seven points clear now. chelsea close in on the premier
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league title with a vital victory over southampton. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold start and a cold day ahead. a mixture of sunshine and showers, some will be wintry, some will be heavy and around the heavy ones who will be gusty with the temperature drop up to four degrees will not able have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. labour has promised to increase pay for nhs staff and to restore bursaries for nurses in training if it wins the general election. the party says it will abolish the current cap for staff in england which limits pay increases to 1%. it also plans to introduce a law that ensures staffing levels in hospitals are safe. our health editor hugh pym reports. marches by student nurses and midwives in protest at plans in england to scrap state funded bursaries. from august, nurses and midwives starting training will need to take out student loans,
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as with other courses. the government argues this will encourage universities to create more places. but figures show the university applications were nearly one quarter lower this year in england. labour says if elected it will restore the bursaries due to be scrapped in august. the party also wants to end the 1% pay cut for health staff. it says its policies will be paid for by reversing corporation tax cuts. labour also plans to get regulators to draw up guidelines on safe staffing in hospitals and then legislate to make hospitals abide by them. we will be guided by the recommendations proposed. we want an independent body to come up with guidelines and we will put those guidelines into legislation. the conservatives say the nhs budget in england had been predicted and increased and thousands more staff had been recruited by hospitals. the liberal democrats said labour was not being honest
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with the public about the revenue raised to pay for the policies. so much to talk about over the next few weeks. let's speak to our political correspondent iain watson who joins us from westminster. there are questions, aren't there about costings? indeed. ithink there are questions, aren't there about costings? indeed. i think what they are doing is two things. they are getting the agenda away from brexit and somewhere where they feel more familiar, something that the whole party can unite around, increased nhs funding. we think that is much safer territory to them. the advice the candidates is to go out and campaign on this. second, however, the lifting of the pay cut is also a big message to the trade unions to try and get them and individual trade unionists are out to support labour during the course of this campaign. it has been
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welcomed by the big health service union. there are some problems over costing so, for example, some things will be paid for by the cuts reversing corporation cuts. but they had already missed funds raised from that measure to other projects. they said a manifesto will be fully costed but the opposition will go through a with a fine tooth comb. a key argument by the conservatives is not so much about the nhs is simply says that ritter needs a strong economy to paper a strong nhs and labour can be trusted to deliver that. they need to be honest about whether revenues will come from. thank you very much indeed. just to let you know that we will speak to the shadow health secretary and the health secretary later on in the programme. detectives investigating the disappearance of madeleine mccann say they are still pursuing what they describe as "critical leads" in the case. next week will mark ten years since the 3—year—old disappeared while on holiday with her parents in portugal.
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our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. ten years but no answers. a desperate search with the media following every step. what happened here? where is madeline? this is still a missing persons enquiry, despite 2014's extensive police searches in portugal, there is no definitive evidence that she is dead. for six years with government money, the metropolitan police have been reviewing everything from scratch. we have a significant line of enquiry which is worth pursuing and because it is worth pursuing it could provide an answer. but until we have gone through, i won't know whether we will get there or not. and that is all the police are saying. this investigation was once pursued by up to 30 officers. now there are only four on the case and a handful of leads. while there is still something to investigate, there is still hope.
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madeline's parents have described the ten—year anniversary is a horrible marker of stolen time. they have released a statement promising never to give up. there have been many challenges and low points along the way, they said. but the warmth, encouragement and positivity we have experienced from the quiet majority has undoubtedly sustained us and maintained our faith in human goodness. this is how madeline might have looked as she has grown up. her 14th birthday is the week after next. surrey police have been strongly criticised for returning a collection of shotguns to a man who went on to kill his partner and her daughter. christine and lucy lee were shot by 82—year—old john lowe in 2014. a report by the independent police complaints commission has highlighted serious failings by the force and said the way firearms are licensed across the country needs to be improved.
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there was a significant fall in violence in england and wales last year, according to a survey of accident and emergency units. 188,000 people attended a&e last year being assaulted — 10% down on the previous year. but the results are at odds with police statistics which have recently recorded increases in violent crime. mps have criticised the system for providing school places in england describing it as "incoherent" and "poor value for money". the public accounts committee is concerned that free schools are sometimes opened in areas without a shortage of places, and where other schools are struggling to make ends meet. here's our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves. ministers believe free schools are key to meeting demand for more school places, and they plan to open 500 by 2020. they are state funded but are independently run by charities or groups of parents. the public accounts committee says while free schools are needed in some parts of england, in others they create as much as 20% of spare capacity and they are
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wasting public money. there is an ageing stock of buildings and the government is rushing to fund free schools, but in old office buildings, long—standing temporary accommodation, buildings without playgrounds or sports facilities. we don't think this is a long—term sustainable approach to the future education of our children. the mps' investigation builds on a national audit office report in particular highlighting how billions was being spent on free schools while existing school buildings were old and deteriorating. this new report notes last year the dfe provided over £4.5 billion to maintain schools but faces significant challenges still over the next years as buildings continue to deteriorate. the department for education says a free schools are popular with parents and provide excellent value for money. a rhino called sudan is looking for love on the dating app tinder.
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his keepers in kenya have posted his details on the site, hoping the 43—year old animal will find a female rhino to help protect the species, as tim allman reports. meet sudan. he is literally one—of—a—kind, the last male northern white rhino on earth. and what do you do if you are feeling lonely these days? go online. on his profile, sudan claims to perform well under pressure, says he likes to eat grass and chill in the mud, and admits to being six—foot tall and weighing 5,000 pounds. that is over 200 kilograms. 0bviously sudan is not really looking to hook up online.
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this is all about raising about $9 million needed for fertility treatment, sudan having failed to breed successfully the old—fashioned way with two northern white rhinos. but there are thousands of southern white rhinos who might be able to help. we will have a breeding programme in kenya, to continue to build the number of northern whites, so that eventually we will have sufficient numbers, ultimately, to be able to reintroduce them back into the national park. the whole project could take ten or even 15 years, and sudan is 43. that is almost 100 in rhino years. so swipe right while you can. i like that story. they have certainly raised his profile. it is
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ten minutes past seven and you are watching bbc breakfast. the side affects of alcohol are well documented, but now we're being told it can affect the pace at which our heart beats. at germany's oktoberfest, over 3,000 people took part in research to see how alcohol was affecting their heart rhythm while they drank. it revealed abnormal measures in a third of participants. dr moritz sinner was one of the doctors at oktoberfest, hejoins us from munich, and here with us is gp, dr farrah sheikh. doctor centre. 3000 people approached. how do they react? isn't this a unique study, to study these people while they are drinking? yes. thank you and good morning. as far as we know this has never been done before, to really steady people on a large scale while they were drinking. how did they react? vary positively. i was surprised. i thought there would be, kind of,
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they would not be so amused while they would not be so amused while they were having a good time with theirfriend at october they were having a good time with their friend at october one but when we approached them, the participation was completely volu nta ry participation was completely voluntary and they basically all participated voluntarily. maybe because they got a free alcohol test, that maybe one explanation but in the end everybody was happy and we got good results. what did the results tell you? they tell us that if you drink, the more you drink, two things happen. first your heart rate goes up. it goes inadequately up rate goes up. it goes inadequately up which means it is not appropriate to the occasion. the second thing is that the natural variability of the heart rate, meaning the heart rate usually in a healthy person is not fixed but it goes up and down slightly. this is a healthy condition. this is significantly reduced with the more alcohol you drink. the combination of the two,
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we believe, is the ground up for the development of arrhythmias, in particularly for the development of age fibrillation. that is a significant arrhythmia of the heart that requires treatment. we could not find it directly from our study but we think the pre— condition to the developments if she shown clearly. and what do you make of these findings? it is eye opening. something we have not really experienced before and it is like a gentleman 's experienced before and it is like a gentleman '5 ad when they were doing the study was actually in the real world so they were hooked up to the smartphone monitors that were recording the electrolyte activity of the heart while they were drinking, rather than tell developing an arrhythmia and going into hospital afterwards work out what was going on. what can we learn from this? i think we can learn drinking should be done in moderation. i am drinking should be done in moderation. lam not drinking should be done in
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moderation. i am not certain if people are aware that the guidelines changed a couple of years ago here in the uk. it used to be 21 units for men and 14 for women and now we say it is 14 for everybody. you should have at least two alcohol free days, if possible, during the week. what about the... i suppose, the practice of binge drinking. what does that tell us? what can we learn from your results? what my colleague just said is i think moderate alcohol consumption is not harmful and, to be frank, i will continue to do so this year. but what i think is harmful is binge drinking. that has been public knowledge before. it affects all sorts of organs, the liver in the brain, but we know now it also acutely affects the heart in terms of deterioration of the heart rhythm. and, briefly, you found out that was going on while they were
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drinking. are you concerned that it has a longer term effect than just those few hours? this is the crucial question that i cannot answer at the moment because we did a snapshot of an ecg out oktoberfest, recording the smart phone —based easyjet. what we cannot do is follow up examinations on all the participants. this is research that is going on at the moment, together with my colleagues and funded by our hospital and by the german cardiovascular research society. we are doing a follow—up study with long—term reporting on people who are voluntarily drinking lots of alcohol and we hope to find whether the findings that we have at the o kto be rfest the findings that we have at the oktoberfest will then transition into actual arrhythmias. of course we do not hope that for our patients
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or our participants for the sake of research it would be the hypothesised finding. it is worth reminding us what are the problems associated with an irregular heartbeat? the irregular heart rhythm courses a certain sort of serious teeth —— —— problem. it causes the muscles to go crazy, tim pump oddly and blood can pull at the bottom of the heart which can stagnate and increase your risk of developing stroke and blood clots. thank you very much, doctor farrah sheikh and doctor moritz sinner.l good place to do it, octoberfest, 7 million litres drunk every year there! that is quite a lot!
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you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: labour is pledging to abolish the nhs pay cap and restore student nurse bursaries if it wins the election. british detectives investigating the disappearance of madeleine mccann a decade ago say they're investigating at least one significant line of inquiry. carol has some lovely flowers for us. carol has some lovely flowers for us. beautiful. good morning. good morning. if you're stepping out it isa good morning. if you're stepping out it is a cold start, a cold day generally and what we have is a mixture of sunshine and showers but like yesterday some of the showers will be wintry as well and some of them will be heavy and thundery. this morning we've already seen some showers across parts of scotland, eastern england, the channel islands and also south—west england, one or two coastal showers in wales as well. they will continue for a while yet, especially down the east coast
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where we have the wintry mix but south victims, southern counties, a lot of sunshine. showers around the channel islands and the isles of scilly but come inland to the south—west, back into the cold weather with sunshine. some coastal showers blurting with the coastline of wales, a cold start inland but almost wall—to—wall lose guys in wales. in northern ireland the cloud is building all the time heralding the arrival of rain later on and we continue with wintry showers in scotland, the wind changed direction overnight to a north—westerly so not as cold. from northern england a lot of dry weather except for close to the east coast where we hang on to the east coast where we hang on to the wintry showers. through the day you will find in eastern england the showers will develop more widely, some will spread into central areas but in the west it will be drier and brighter but not completely bone dry. a few showers. temperatures between seven and 12. around the heavier showers the wind will be
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gusty and the temperature will drop, a noticeable drop, but as soon as the shower has passed the temperature will go back up again. more persistent rain in the northern isles and the north of mainland scotla nd isles and the north of mainland scotland through the evening. you can see where this weather front extends, taking its increasingly showery rain south through the night. ahead of it there will be clear skies. also some frost around and patchy mist and fog. these are the temperatures you can expect in towns and cities. all above freezing. but in the countryside they will be lower under those clear skies. similar to this morning, temperatures down to around —3, —4, even —5. tomorrow we picked up our weather front sinking south, after a sunny start in the south cloud will build as the weather front approaches. showery outbreaks of rain on it, nothing too heavy, and another weather front doing the same, coming from the east and drifting west. behind that there
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will be sunshine and the temperature starting to rise. as we head into thursday, a lot of bright weather around. afair thursday, a lot of bright weather around. a fair bit of cloud at times, the odd shower at times as well but relatively light winds and temperatures between eight and 14. temperatures picking up. if you like you're temperatures in the 20s, there's a good chance, i'm going to surround this with caveats, but by the middle of next week we could see that in parts of the uk once again. shorts out, carol! thanks very much! steph is with us this morning and we are talking about the deficit. steph is with us this morning and we are talking about the deficitlj like are talking about the deficit.” like the idea of being surrounded by caveats. me to, you can have some. you could get away with lots of things with that! good morning. government borrowing has fallen to its lowest level since before the financial crash of 2008. in other words the difference between the amount the government receives in taxes and spends on services. but yesterday annual public
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borrowing figures from the office for national statistics showed borrowing as a proportion of gross domestic product has fallen to its lowest level since before the financial crisis at 2.6% of gross domestic product. fast food chain mcdonald's is going to allow its uk staff a choice between working fixed hours or having zero—hours contracts. 115,000 people work for mcdonalds in the uk, the majority of them on zero hours contracts. mcdonald's has been trialling the move in 23 restaurants and said around 20% of staff chose to make the switch to a fixed hours contract. could you imagine getting through life without ever using cash? a fifth of people in uk said they now rarely use it according to a survey by the dutch bank ing. they spoke to thousands of people across europe and found we're more reluctant than our european neighbours to give up cash completely.
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i don't about you but i really like cash, i like the feeling of actually transacting. i'm getting out of the habit. i like the beep. i don't go like it but i'm finding it easier. thanks, steph. i don't rooting around in your pocket for the right change. but the change in your pocket is too heavy, you're not wearing the right belt. i like the way you bring your drink with you now. i'm paranoid about it now. we are getting messages for you about your dodgy cough. if anyone can help me then let me know! honey and lemon, honey and lemon! britain has some of the best air accident investigators in the world. their work has saved countless lives. the bbc‘s been given exclusive access to film their latest equipment in the ongoing quest to find out why planes crash. here's our transport correspondent, richard westcott. a fireball after an executive jet overshot a runway and crashed into a busy hampshire carpark.
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four people died, including members of osama bin laden's family. this 3d photo taken by investigators using a special drone helped them solve the crash. the quality‘s so good they can move around the scene, zooming in, checking for tell—tale clues. now the bbc‘s been given exclusive access to film investigators on a drone training exercise. it's becoming essential to help get to the bottom of accidents. we're looking for ground marks, which tells us how the aircraft hit the ground, whether it was in a bank or in a steep nosedive. propeller slash marks can give us an indication about the propeller‘s speed and then we're looking around the accident site to see if we're missing any bits, have we captured all four corners or has an important part actually broken off in the flight, which would be a clue to the cause of the accident.
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they also use the drain to give a pilot's eye—view, so with one accident somebody had hit some power lines and from the ground they were really easy to see but they realised when viewed from the cockpit those same lines were virtually invisible, they blended into the ground so they were actually able to see what the pilot was seeing. they don'tjust use drones to investigate air accidents, they use them to look at accidents at sea as well. we would then fly along the side of the wreck... at another training exercise, investigators tell me the simplest things can be a real giveaway. could be a door or a porthole left open. it could be somebody has opened or closed a valve incorrectly then let water that could be feeding into the engine. it could be somebody has left freshwater or a hose pipe running on the upper deck, and it could be a fishing boat could have been washing down the upper decks with water that was being pumped over the side and they've left it over and it's filled up one
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of the tanks and the free water affect‘s just made the fishing boat tip over. and this is how vital drone footage can be. a fatal crack in the middle of a ship's hull. shot a few years ago this was the wreck of the cargo ship swanland, 80 metres down off the welsh coast, six people died as the vessel snapped in heavy seas. these images helped find early answers. rogue drones in the wrong hands can cause terrible accidents but in the right hands it can help prevent them too. richard westcott, bbc news. the speed of the drone is very impressive. some beautiful pictures! still to come this morning, john maguire is looking at what the future holds for the traditional british garden. good morning. good morning. we are at rhs wisley in surrey and what we
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are looking at isn't a beautiful carpet of bluebells, it's a beautiful carpet of another plant that comes from north america. what the rhs has found in this major survey, the first one it has done on climate change for 15 years or so, is our gardens will change in the years to come, creating a north—south divide. wet up in the north, very dry in the south. we will need to adapt our gardens, plants will change, the way we work on our gardens will change, even pests will change. much more about that including some tips on how to future proof your garden after the news, travel and weather were you're watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. scotland yard has begun a fresh investigation into allegations
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of fraud and malpractice in the tower hamlets mayoral election in 2014. lutfur rahman was forced to step down as mayor after an election court found him guilty of corrupt and illegal practices, but he's faced no criminal prosecution. the met says it recognises that concerns have been raised about its previous investigations. a man in his 20s has died after being stabbed in wandsworth. police were called to melody road at 7am last night and are appealing for witnesses. one of the capital's largest fashion magazines is backing an initiative to keep talented young people in london by helping them find affordable housing. tenants are given a home currently standing empty and in return they furnish and look after the property. i want to bring creativity back to london and my big worry at the moment is that, you know, kids like me when i first moved down here, they no longer have those opportunities and what you're going to end up with is a capital that actually isn't wonderful any more, isn't full of great creatives, isn't full of wonderful art and media and music because people simply can't afford to be here. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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on the tubes a signal failure at king's cross earlier has left us with severe delays on the metropolitan, circle and hammersmith & city lines. on the trains, services between ebbsfleet and stratford are running with 40 minute delays due to overrunning engineering works. out on the roads there's a lane closed on the north circular westbound at the junction of palmers green lane and warwick road because of water main work. and in rotherhithe, brunel road is closed at swan road because of an accident. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another cold start this morning and a day of fairly dramatic april showers. fairly similar to yesterday. now, there is a bit of frost around for some this morning, especially to the west of london. that's going to be followed by sunshine and showers. a bright start for many of us, if a bit cold. those showers arriving a bit quicker through the course of the morning. some heavy ones, maybe a bit of sleet over higher ground. hail and thunder elsewhere.
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the maximum temperature ranging between nine and 11 celsius, so again it is going to feel quite cold. now, those showers gradually dying away overnight. in the clear skies the temperature drops down again, down into low single figures if not below. so again we're expecting a frost by dawn tomorrow morning. the cloud will start to roll in after a bright start on thursday, bringing with it some outbreaks of rain as we head through thursday afternoon. some slightly more mild air, temperatures at around 11 or 12 celsius. now, that warm front continues to push through overnight on thursday. that mild air continues to move it. it's only slightly more mild, so a bit of a temperature change as we head into friday. just a slight rise. still going to see quite a bit of cloud around as we head towards the end of the week, but the temperature recovering to a certain extent as we head into saturday and sunday. fairly unsettled weekend. looking drier for saturday with the potential for some rain on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and louise minchin. labour has promised to increase pay for nhs staff and to restore bursaries for nurses in training if it wins the general election. the party says it will abolish the current cap for staff in england which limits pay increases to 1%. the conservatives say the nhs budget in england has been increased and that thousands more staff have been recruited by hospitals. we'll speak to the shadow health secretaryjonathan ashworth at ten to eight and also to health secretaryjeremy hunt at around ten past eight. detectives investigating the disappearance of madeleine mccann say they are still pursuing what they describe as "critical leads" in the case. next week will mark ten years since the 3—year—old disappeared while on holiday with her parents in portugal. officers have confirmed that four people considered as possible suspects in 2013 have been ruled out.
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surrey police have been strongly criticised for returning a collection of shotguns to a man who went on to kill his partner and her daughter. christine and lucy lee were shot by 82—year—old john lowe in 2014. a report by the independent police complaints commission has highlighted serious failings by the force and said the way firearms are licensed across the country needs to be improved. the united states has started deploying a controversial anti—missile system in south korea in response to the threat of missile launches by north korea. 2,000 us and south korean troops have been practicing attacking targets in mountains. mps have criticised the system for providing school places in england describing it as "incoherent" and not cost effective. the public accounts committee says its concerned that free schools are sometimes opened in areas without a shortage of places, and where other schools are struggling to make ends meet.
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the department for education says free schools are popular with parents and provide excellent value for money. nasa's space probe cassini will make a dramatic orbit of saturn this morning, plunging through the gap between the planet's cloud—tops and its spectacular ring system. it's the first of a series of manoeuvres, before the satellite runs out of fuel and dives into saturn's atmosphere in september. cassini is currently moving at 62,000 miles an hour. at that speed, you need something that requires a bit more slowness. scientists have calculated the optimal strategy way to throw something accurately — whether it's a dart, a basketball or the classroom favourite. . . .a screwed up piece of paper. researchers at yale university looked at the physics behind releasing an object with your arm.
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they then calculated the best way to throw in sports such as basketball or darts. they say the rule that generally applies is ‘slow—is—more—accurate'. go on. i want to test this out. the! come on! cat, if you cannot get it from there... i am a much closer. that helps. the! he only spend an hour were practising. one more. oh, there you go! straight in. did not even touch the edges. let's discuss a proper sport now. chelsea are on target now, aren't they? and people were contacting me this morning saying
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that they took diego costa out of their fantasy games because the baht scored but now it has scored twice. they are now won through domestic double, chelsea, the premier league and the fa cup. chelsea are back to seven points clear at the top of the premier league, thanks to a 4—2 win over southampton at stamford bridge. captain gary cahill was back in the starting line—up after a bout of gastroenteritis — and he gave his side a 2—1 lead right at the end of the first half. diego costa hadn't scored in seven games for chelsea — but he put away two last night, to make sure of victory. you must be ready to this mental effort, also. not only physical effort but mental as well. it is not easy and... but we are fighting and we are ready to fight from now on till the end. spurs are chelsea's nearest rivals — and they'll try to narrow that seven point gap tonight. they travel to selhurst park to play
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a crystal palace side who've already beaten arsenal, liverpool, and chelsea this month — and they'll need to bounce back from losing to chelsea in the fa cup semi—finals last weekend. when you are competing at that level it is so difficult. there is no time to regret, no time to complain, you just need to be ready under pressure and to look at the game we have ahead and try to give your best. and just a quick mention for huddersfield — they beat wolves last night to make sure of a place in the championship play—offs. the former undisputed world heavyweight champion lennox lewis says now is the right time for anthony joshua to take on wladimir klitschko. their heavyweight unification bout at wembley on saturday night is being called the biggest live event in boxing history. at 41, klitschko is far more experienced thanjoshua — but the briton is unbeaten in 18 fights since he turned professional four years ago.
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i commend them for that because it takes somebody to do that, to say listen, i am ready, i believe i can beat you. now is the time, now is the perfect time for him because, you know, klitschko has a chink in his armour. he was defeated by tyson fury and to prove yourself you need to beat him as well. ronnie o'sullivan is up against it in his world snooker quarter—final against ding junhui — the chinese number one leads by ten frames to six. o'sullivan spent a lot of last night's session sitting down, ding, who was the beaten finalist last year, won five frames in a row. he won five frames in a row and now leads 10—6. the rocket came back with a century break in the last frame of the session. they will resume at 2:30 and that will be live for you later. back at the table this morning, mark selby versus marco fu.
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selby leads. we don't have time for another look at rod stewart's home video? we promise we will bring it to you in the next hour. his son was playing ice hockey and his son... oh, yes, we will watch it! presenter: great britain's ice hockey players won their second game in their world championship group beating estonia 5—1 in belfast last night when liam stewart, the son of music legend sir rod stewart and son of former model rachel hunter, scored his first international goal. britain join japan and lithuania at the top of the table on six points.... stewart: my boy! that was worth watching again. a proud father. liam stewart, one to watch in british ice hockey. after a
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15 month ban for doping, the former world number one, maria sharapova returns to tennis today at the stuttgart open. what sort of welcome do you think she will get? but speaks to a tennis reporter for the press association and to our tennis correspondent at the tournament in germany. russell, you first. we played quotes this morning from some other female player back tennis stars. how do you think her return is going to go down? it is not popular with many players on the tour and that is partly because over the years maria sharapova has made no effort at all to socialise with the other players. she is quite clear about it. she says that the tennis scene is not her social scene. her social hub is elsewhere. but many players find her distant and cold so she did not have many brownie points to start with. the and although she has spent 15 months away from the tour, they
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aren't happy that she is receiving so many invitations and wild cards from tournament sponsors and directors because of her status in the game she is entitled to accept as many invitations as are offered to her by the rules are far stricter if you do not have that status in the grain. an simona halep summed this up! the grain. an simona halep summed this up i don't know three when she said it sent out the wrong message to children and young players to hand out an invitation to somebody returning from a doping offence. and of course, maria sells tickets. she isa of course, maria sells tickets. she is a huge star and tour promoters who need to make money are queueing up who need to make money are queueing upfor who need to make money are queueing up for her. what do you think about this idea? it just up for her. what do you think about this idea? itjust doesn't sit particularly well, does it? this idea that you can serve a ban for something that is your own fault, it is not like you were injured or, as we have seen, you is not like you were injured or, as we have seen, you are is not like you were injured or, as we have seen, you are having a baby and you will come back and they have
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ranking which, you know, her ban was her own fault so, yeah, we should she be given a free pass? the tournaments that she has already been givena tournaments that she has already been given a wild card to our three of the biggest tournaments on the tour. so she does well, her ranking will return. but she puts people in the seats and if you are tournament director, seeing a list of players you can invite, she is at the top. of course. and essentially now, because it is such a huge story and with serena williams out as well and some of the other more marketable players also not around, she is the biggest name in women's tennis. so you can have maria sharapova at your tournament then, yeah, it is hard to turn that way. how she playing at the moment, russell? the word is that she is playing extremely well in practice and that they are impressed by how hard she is working. clearly they would say that byiam working. clearly they would say that by i am sure she has done absolutely
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everything she can to be in peak condition. the trouble is it is very difficult, after 15 months away from competitive action, even with the competitive action, even with the competitive instincts of maria sharapova, to be anywhere near your best friend view months. she has had no chance to practise on that score, let alone play on it. she will be here behind me in half an hour or so to hit herfirst here behind me in half an hour or so to hit her first practice session here and it is difficult to adapt to the court. her opponent is roberta vinci, and our former the court. her opponent is roberta vinci, and ourformer italian sharapova may fancy had chances but it would generally be hard to find consistency in the first few weeks. it is the decision—making and concentration that players find has gone missing after such a long break from the tour. it will be fascinating to see how she gets on. it has not been a great few days for tennis. i know you're at the davis cup tie against romania where the remaining captain said terrible things ina remaining captain said terrible things in a press conference and to you personally. yeah, as you probably know he made thisjoke, in
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inverted comments about the baby of serena williams and he was not happy that we had written a story. he came to find the british media on saturday morning, i happen to be the first person he found so, yeah, he began the thai raid at me, calling me stupid, asking me why i had written what i had written. and then later after he had had his encore meltdown which i think most people saw he was scored about the premises security. i and several saw he was scored about the premises security. land several of the people were filming from behind him ata people were filming from behind him at a discreet distance, he turned around, he saw me, yeah, he came amid pretty aggressively and security guys held him back. he was shouting at me why you filming me! why are you filming me! and other things i cannot say on television i now. that has got to be... you know, it is difficult, isn't it? quite intimidating. l was glad that security were there, for sure.
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should he be suspended? yes, for certain. the thing is he can only be suspended from the davis cup in effect cut so it is up to the grand slam and the other tours whether or not they suspend him from other things. i'm sure he will get a long suspension but i don't think it will particularly care. that is probably a safe assessment. thank you very much russell as well, although some light would be useful next time. you can listen to is that coverage of maria sharapova's match from 530 tonight on bbc 5 live sports extra. let's find out what is happening out and about where carol has the weather for us. another day of people waking up to extreme coldness? it certainly is a cold start to the day and it will be a cool day but today is the last day of the being as cold as it is all
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stock that amateur is set to rise as we go through tomorrow and into the weekend and more especially into next week. what we have today is a mixture of sunny spells and showers, thundershowers will still be wintry in nature with a mixture of rain, sleet, snow high ground, hail and thunder. and we have seen showers this point draped around coastlines as we can see here on the picture. there is also a lot of dry weather around surfing and a little bit of frost. so for many of us were going off toa frost. so for many of us were going off to a sunny start. not everywhere. it is bright rather than sunny everywhere. it is bright rather than sunny across most everywhere. it is bright rather than sunny across most of scotland and northern ireland. here is well we have showers with a wintry mix but the salient thing as the wind in the north—west has changed or north —— south—westerly direction. so it is not as cold. for the rest of the uk will feel cold and especially if you are around the showers which will develop more widely through the afternoon across central and eastern areas. some of the showers will be heavy, there will be squally winds around an attempt will drop barrera league. after the shower, that will
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return. in the south—west, looking at dry weather with you showers and they not be as heavy. the same for wales with a lot of dry weather this afternoon. lovely blue skies and a few showers and for northern ireland, you can expect the cloud to thicken again through the this morning, heralding the arrival of showery outbreaks of rain. they can be said also to western scotland. the same persistent rain across the northern isles. as we have through the afternoon, there is that the temperatures you can. so not as cold in the north but, still, if you are in the north but, still, if you are in the showers it will feel cold, in particular in central and eastern areas. through this evening and overnight with affray continues to bring rain, turning increasingly showery as it crosses scotland and northern ireland, getting into northern england. a header that we will have an clear skies. so that average will be lower and these temperatures indicate towns and cities in the countryside will be lowest bill. once again, lower north 4/ ofan lowest bill. once again, lower north 4/ of an edge is cold fault minus
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three. low was perhaps —5 in some places. tomorrow this. with clear skies, blue skies and we have a weather front careering southwards as the week feature that bringing cloud with it and the odd spot here and there. and showers, rather than rain. we also have another front doing the same thing, moving across scotland, heading towards northern england and northern ireland, taking showers the brightest guys coming in and not feeling as cold them by the time we got to friday, a lot of dry weather around once again, variable amount of cloud, some brad scott and sunshine, won the two data sunshine into my winds. of course we head into my winds. of course we head into the bank holiday weekend. the forecast is breezy. it will also be milder. there will be some rain around. thejury milder. there will be some rain around. the jury is out milder. there will be some rain around. thejury is out on milder. there will be some rain around. the jury is out on this. saturday does look like being the driest day. sunday we may expect rain from eitherfriends driest day. sunday we may expect rain from either friends of the atlantic. it comes from france it will be heavier than we have seen
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for a while. but it is not necessarily going to last. so its usefulness is open to question as is its placement at this stage. look at that rain! it might help steph out with her chesty cough, any solutions? thank you, everybody, i have had so many suggestions. are you trying every single one? that could take some time but some are pretty alternative, some involving steaming and some involving alcohol, lots of people telling me what i could do to solve this dodgy cough. there are nearly 100 million contactless cards in the uk and we're using them more and more. but according to the dutch bank ing, which has surveyed thousands of people across europe, we're more reluctant than our european neighbours to give up cash completely. so how often do you use cash. we asked some shoppers in manchester. the last time i used cash was today
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picking up my dry cleaning because they only accept cash, so i paid for that and invariably i always have cash on me. i use cash all the time, year. i tend to go to the cash machine and get it that way.” year. i tend to go to the cash machine and get it that way. i don't use cash very often because i've got a debit card, so it's more convenient to use that.” a debit card, so it's more convenient to use that. i don't really carry much cash around any more because i used my contactless ca rd more because i used my contactless card for most things when i can. i tend to only have a minimum amount of cash in my purse these days. claer barrett is personal finance editor of the ft. good morning to you. good morning. a mixed picture, some people that don't use it very often, a lot of people who still use it quite a lot. what are your thoughts?” people who still use it quite a lot. what are your thoughts? i think that co nta ctless what are your thoughts? i think that contactless cards make us spend more because it makes it easier, especially if you're in a sandwich shop or a place like that and the
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queue goes down quickly because people aren't fumbling with their purses and wallets any more on the tap and page and off you go. you're not handling cash and you're not aware of how much you are doing it and sometimes you tap twice bashed tap and paid. there's the risk of losing touch with the value of money —— tap and pay. we could be spending more than we should. it makes life easier, as you say, stuck in a queue and you can use your contactless card. it's notjust cards, you can pay with phones or a bracelet with some credit cards, you can tap a piece of jewellery some credit cards, you can tap a piece ofjewellery on the reader, which if you're at a festival it is brilliant, you don't want to be going to a cashpoint in the middle ofa going to a cashpoint in the middle of a field. taxis we are paying for with apps, we don't need £20 in the back pocket to get home any more like i did in the 1990s. that's really a revolution for the consumer but on the other hand we are
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throwing away all this data. our bank statements, you might notice this, because we are making so many co nta ctless this, because we are making so many contactless payments, our bank state m e nts contactless payments, our bank statements are a couple of pages longer, when i took out £50 of cash, imight make longer, when i took out £50 of cash, i might make five or ten small purchases, they are all listed in detail now so it's a lot of information for the banks about our spending habits. if you have an app on your phone you can track your own habits and generate pie charts to see how much you are spending and on what. there are lots of benefits.” have done that when you can look out your expenses. what about this idea ofa your expenses. what about this idea of a cafe in london that won't take cash any more. that will be tough especially for older people, a few people have told us about their experiences, one had a 75—year—old mum who only has cash and the use of cards is scary. there can be a delay
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as well of a couple of days, i was caught out by my youngest son who went overdrawn and he hadn't realised he had spent £30 with co nta ctless realised he had spent £30 with contactless and that had sent him over his limit. i think that lots of people want to use cash, they like the certainty of it and they don't wa nt to the certainty of it and they don't want to feel like they are being snooped on why big brother. paying people in cash, like a cleaner or a gardener, you don't want those payments to be traced. —— snooped on by big brother. it's good for some banks to know what we are doing but not for everyone. what do you do? i don't use cash that often, i left my wallet at home a couple of months ago and! wallet at home a couple of months ago and i thought a few years ago it would be a disaster but now it's not because of my phone. i love the convenience but i appreciate older consumers especially don't want to go down this route so we need both. the last time i saw you we were on the south bank in the freezing cold
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talking about the economy, you had toast in your pocket, anything in that pocket this time? no, not this time. nice to see you. do you remember, toast in the pocket?” thought i reckon advised her!” remember, toast in the pocket?” thought i reckon advised her! i have actually been doing it every day since! let's look at some of the front pages. we hopefully havejeremy hunt at 8:10 a.m., we are waiting for john ashworth as well, the shadow health secretary, let's look at some of the front pages. let's look with a couple of the stories, some of the tabloids are talking about maddie mccann, a major line of enquiry could provide an answer. that's the front page of the daily mail. this is how the mail have written it up. we don't know about the lead at the moment but they say it is at a critical stage. it is coming up to the ten year anniversary since she went missing. this is on the front
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page of many of the other papers, is anchor trump speaking yesterday at this conference in berlin alongside christine lagarde and angela merkel —— ivanka trump. a few of the papers have told about the reception she received. some of the papers saying she was booed when she arrived. the quintessential british garden with lush green lawns and beautiful summer flower beds could become a thing of the past. a new report from the royal horticultural society says climate change is going to affect gardens in the north and south of the uk in very different ways. breakfast‘s john maguire is at rhs wisley for us this morning. we have coming to look at all these flowers. we a re we have coming to look at all these flowers. we are talking about challenges and opportunities that climate change will present to
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gardeners in the future. what the rhs has found is climate change will cause a difference in our gardens. it will be drier in the south and wetter and warmer in the north. for everybody it will mean more work, more pruning and weeding and knowing. and a variety of different plants, is that good or bad? people well have different opinions on that and we will see more creepy crawlies. if the harsh winters don't kill them off we will get more slugs and chicks in the countryside. there will be different types of pests for gardeners to content with. —— ticks. we were talking earlier about this research last being done on this scale 15 years ago. what things have you discovered? scale 15 years ago. what things have you discovered ? should scale 15 years ago. what things have you discovered? should we be worried? in the 15 years since the last report the science of climate change has become more advanced than we have a more nuanced view of it.
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previously we thought we would have a more extreme climate with mediterranean temperatures in the summer mediterranean temperatures in the summerand warm mediterranean temperatures in the summer and warm winters, there will still be warm summers and warmer winters but the climate appears to be changing in a more variable way. getting warmer but in that time there will be cold spells in winters and there will be fierce heat waves in the summerand and there will be fierce heat waves in the summer and more of them. droughts in the summer, more of them and more extreme. this divide is pretty much in the middle of the country around northampton, so the south and south—east will have the more extreme warning. there will be more extreme warning. there will be more extreme warning. there will be more extreme rain. there's already a threat on water supply in the south so it will be difficult to water gardens. in the north of the climate will become more equable, a longer growing season, we've already seen it extend in the last 20 years, the period between the first and the last frost. you can expect things like grapes that grow well in the south, not so well in the north, to
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do better and things like sweetcorn and sweet potato doing well in the south and can be grown in the south, they will be possible further north. very different. very different. somethings like lawns will suffer badly in the south, that is a worry, and when you're planting trees that have a 100 year life or more, you have a 100 year life or more, you have to be sure to plant trees that will survive whatever the weather doesin will survive whatever the weather does in the future. who knows! thank you very much indeed. more from slater, including a garden designer who will be here giving us some tips on the type of plants you choose to future proof yourself and your garden in years to come —— more from us later. hopefully we'll look at some of the pictures later. we have been saying we will speak to jonathan ashworth, the shadow health secretary, at 8:10am. we will speak to him at 8:30am. and journey hunt, the man
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responsible for the nhs, will be here in ten minutes ——jeremy hunt. we are trying to get up to date with timings as much as possible. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm katharine carpenter. scotland yard has begun a fresh investigation into allegations of fraud and malpractice in the tower hamlets mayoral election in 2014. lutfur rahman was forced to step down as mayor after an election court found him guilty of corrupt and illegal practices, but he's faced no criminal prosecution. the met says it recognises that concerns have been raised about its previous investigations. a man in his 20s has died after being stabbed in wandsworth. police were called to melody road near the junction with allfarthing lane at 7am last night and are appealing for witnesses. actorjude law returned to the london stage after four years
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last night in the play obsession. the barbican production is a new stage version of visconti's 1943 film and the star says its great to be back. particular experience is very special because i'm a member of a company, a company that are in rep in and around the world and are very used to each other and have a very particular dialogue with a really extraordinary director. so i was very fortu nate extraordinary director. so i was very fortunate to be invited into that and feel like i've been allowed to really opened my eyes to a new process. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes a signal failure at king's cross earlier has left us with severe delays on the circle and hammersmith & city lines and minor delays on the metropolitan line. and on the trains normal service has
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resumed on southeastern services between ebbsfleet and stratford but there are delays to southern service at victoria because of a signalling fault. and on the roads traffic is queueing on marylebone flyover from a40 northern roundabout because the traffic lights aren't phasing properly which is adding to usual rush hour delays. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another cold start this morning and a day of fairly dramatic april showers. fairly similar to yesterday. now, there is a bit of frost around for some this morning, especially to the west of london. that's going to be followed by sunshine and showers. a bright start for many of us, if a bit cold. those showers arriving a bit quicker through the course of the morning. some heavy ones, maybe a bit of sleet over higher ground. hail and thunder elsewhere. the maximum temperature ranging between nine and 11 celsius, so again it is going to feel quite cold. now, those showers gradually dying away overnight. in the clear skies the temperature drops down again, down into low single figures if not below. so again we're expecting a frost
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by dawn tomorrow morning. the cloud will start to roll in after a bright start on thursday, bringing with it some outbreaks of rain as we head through thursday afternoon. some slightly more mild air, temperatures at around 11 or 12 celsius. now, that warm front continues to push through overnight on thursday. that mild air continues to move it. it's only slightly more mild, so a bit of a temperature change as we head into friday. just a slight rise. still going to see quite a bit of cloud around as we head towards the end of the week, but the temperature recovering to a certain extent as we head into saturday and sunday. fairly unsettled weekend. looking drier for saturday with the potential for some rain on sunday. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. labour promises higher pay rises for nhs staff in england. they'd abolish the pay cap and bring back bursaries for student nurses. but the conservatives say labour's sums don't add up and would put the health service at risk. good morning. it's wednesday, 26th april.
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also this morning: ten years after the disappearance of madeleine mccann, detectives say they're pursuing a significant line of inquiry. these are the drones that are helping to make our skies safer, we get exclusive access to the latest technology being used by britain's air accident investigators. could you imagine getting through life without ever using cash? well, one in five of us in the uk now rarely uses it so i'll be looking at the future of money. in sport, seven points clear now. chelsea close in on the premier league title with a vital victory over southampton. and carol has the weather. jason man my lord will be here to tell us about his new show. it is called big heads and why he's going back on tour. and carol has the weather. we are looking at sunshine and
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showers like yesterday. some of the showers like yesterday. some of the showers will be heavy and wintry, but more cloud moving in across the north—west later. i'll have further details in 15 minutes. we've got you booked in for 8.15am, thank you very much. good morning. first, our main story. labour has promised to increase pay for nhs staff and to restore bursaries for nurses in training if it wins the general election. the party says it will abolish the current cap for staff in england which limits pay increases to 1%. it also plans to introduce a law that ensures staffing levels in hospitals are safe. our health editor hugh pym reports. marches by student nurses and midwives in protest at plans in england to scrap state funded bursaries. from august, nurses and midwives starting training will need to take out student loans as with other courses. the government argues this will encourage universities to create more places. but ucas figures showed university applications were nearly one quarter
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lower this year in england. labour says if elected it will restore the bursaries due to be scrapped in august. the party also wants to end the 1% pay cut for health staff. it says its policies will be paid for by reversing corporation tax cuts. labour also plans to get regulators to draw up guidelines on safe staffing in hospitals and then legislate to make hospitals abide by them. we will be guided by the recommendations that nice propose. we want that independent body of clinicians and experts to come up with guidelines and we will put those guidelines into legislation. the conservatives said the nhs budget in england had been predicted and increased and thousands more staff had been recruited by hospitals. the liberal democrats said labour was not being honest with the public about the revenue paid raised to pay for the policies. we'll speak to the health secretary jeremy hunt at 8.10am. detectives investigating the disappearance of
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madeleine mccann say they are still pursuing what they describe as "critical leads" in the case. next week will mark ten years since the three—year—old disappeared while on holiday with her parents in portugal. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. ten years, no answers. a desperate search with the media following every step. what happened here? where is madeleine mccann? this is still a missing persons inquiry. despite 2014's extensive police searches in portugal, there is know definitive evidence she is dead. for six years, with government money, the metropolitan police have been reviewing everything from scratch. we have a significant line of inquiry which is worth pursuing and because it's worth pursuing it could provide an answer but until we've gone through it, i won't know whether we're
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going to get there or not. and that's all the police are saying. this investigation was once pursued by up to 30 officers. now, there are just four on the case and a handful of leads. but while there is still something to investigate, there is still hope. madeleine's parents have described the ten year anniversary as a horrible marker of stolen time. they've released a statement promising never to give up. there have been many challenges and low points along the way, they said, but the warmth, encouragement and positivity we've experienced from the quiet majority has undoubtedly sustained us and maintained our faith in human goodness. this is how madeleine might have looked as she has grown up. her 14th birthday is the week after next. the united states has started deploying a controversial anti—missile system in south korea. it's in response to the threat of missile launches by north korea. 2,000 american and south korean troops have been taking
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part in firing drills in the korean mountains. a 24—hour strike on arriva rail north will go ahead on friday. the rmt union said the industrial action will take place following the failure of talks to resolve an ongoing dispute over the role of guards. it's the third time workers have walked out over the row. surrey police have been strongly criticised for returning a collection of shotguns to a man who went on to kill his partner and her daughter. christine and lucy lee were shot by 82—year—old john lowe in 2014. a report by the independent police complaints commission has highlighted serious failings by the force and said the way firearms are licensed across the country needs to be improved. an annual survey of people treated in accident and emergency units after being assaulted suggests there's been a significant fall in
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violence across england and wales. 188,000 people attended a and e in 2016 — 10% down on the previous year. but the results are at odds with police statistics which show an increase in violent crime. as our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. across the police, there's huge concern about levels of violent crime. in some areas like london, stabbings and shootings are on the increase. while the most recent set of figures for england and wales showed an overall rise in violence of 22%. but a survey of casualty units and clinics, which treat victims of violence, paints a very different picture. it suggests that fewer people are suffering violent assaults. according to the survey, 188,000 people attended hospital last yearfor injuries caused by violence. that's10% down on the figure for 2015. and is the lowest number since the survey began, 15 years ago, figures sharply at odds with the police statistics. for all kinds of reasons, police records are an unreliable
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measure of violence. the most accurate way of measuring violence is either through the crime survey for england and wales or the a&e injury statistics. the only age category which registered an increase in violent injury cases was of children aged under 11. but researchers say that may be a blip because of the small sample size in that grouping. mps have criticised the system for providing school places in england describing it as "incoherent" and "poor value for money". the public accounts committee is concerned that free schools are sometimes opened in areas without a shortage of places, and where other schools are struggling to make ends meet. here's our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves. ministers believe free schools are key to meeting demand for more school places and they plan to open 500 by 2020. they are state funded, but independently run by charities or groups of parents.
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the public accounts committee says that while free schools are needed in some areas in england, in others, they're creating as much as 20% spare capacity and wasting public money. there is an ageing stock of buildings and at the same time the government is rushing to fund new free schools, but it's not putting them in good buildings. often they are old office buildings, long—standing temporary accommodation, buildings without playgrounds, buildings without sports facilities. we don't think this is a long—term, sustainable approach to the future education of our children. the mps investigation builds on a national audit office report in february which highlighted how billions were being spent on free schools while existing school buildings were old and deteriorating. this new report notes that last year the dfe provided £4.5 billion to maintain and improve schools, but it still faces significant challenges over the next few years deteriorate.
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it is the first of a series of manoeuvres before the satellite runs out of fuel and then dives into saturn's atmosphere. it is travelling really, really fast. that's an under statement! 62,000mph! wow. we see it go there. a male northern white rhino called sudan is looking for love on the dating app, tinder. his keepers in kenya have posted his details on the site, hoping the 43—year—old will find a female rhino to help protect the species, as tim allman reports. meet sudan.
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he is literally one—of—a—kind, the last male northern white rhino on earth. and what do you do if you are feeling lonely these days? go online. sudan claims to perform well under prerb oar and says he likes to eat grass and chill in the mud and admits to being six foot tall and weighing 5,000lbs. that's more than 2,000 kilos. sudan is not really looking to hook up online. this is all about raising around $9 million needed for fertility treatment. sudan having failed to breed successfully the old—fashioned way with these two female northern white rhinos, but there are thousands of southern white rhinos who might be able to help. we're going to have a breeding programme in kenya to continue to
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build the number of northern whites so that eventually we have sufficient numbers ultimately to be able to reintroduce them back into the national park. the whole project could take ten or even 15 years and sudan is 43. that's almost 100 in rhino years. so, swipe right while you can! and he is a very elegant looking rhino. i'm sure it will work out for him. steph has the details of the rail strike and other details as well. i'm going to start with the rail strike. a 24 hour strike on northern rail will go ahead on friday. the rmt says it is because talks failed to resolve a dispute over the role of guards. this is the third time that workers walked out over the row. following the controversy
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surrounding zero—hours contracts, mcdonald's is offering staff a choice between fixed term and flexible contracts. the chain employs 115,000 people across the uk and after a trial into 23 restau ra nts and after a trial into 23 restaurants it said about 20% of employees chose to make that switch off zero—hours contracts. now, final story, could you imagine getting through life without ever using cash? well, a fifth of people in the uk said they rarely use it. that's according to a survey by the dutch bank ing. they spoke to thousands of people across europe and found that actually we are more reluctant than our european neighbours to give up cash completely. i love the feel of cash. you know what you're spending. i like it when you put your hand in your pocket and find a fiver. does that happen a lot? no! but i like it! only 205! thank you very much. we've been hearing this morning what labour says it would do
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if elected to ease pressure on the nhs and tackle staff shortages in england. so what is the current health secretary's plan for the health service for the next five years? jeremy hunt joins us from our westminster studio. good morning mr hunt. thank you very much for your time this morning. good morning, dan. i'm sure you remember on this programme, a few weeks ago, we were looking at our bbc nhs week and you said, "there we re bbc nhs week and you said, "there were no excuses for some of the difficulties highlighted during that week. the government had to plan to help hospitals cope." what is your election pledge this morning for the nhs? well, since then we published a very detailed plan to help turn around things in our a&e departments. we've also had an independent report from the nhs that says that outcomes in most major conditions have dramatically improved in the last three, five and ten years. so, i think what we're seeing is that there are real pressures on the ground, but real progress is being made as well and looking forward the
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big issue is how we are going to continue to increase funding going into the nhs and the thing that looms overall of this is, of course, brexit and how we get the best deal for britain and i think that we all know if we get a good deal for britain that will protect the economy, protect ourjobs, mean we'll be able to carry on funding increases for the nhs and the social ca re system increases for the nhs and the social care system and the choice is very simple, do you think a strong theresa may can get that brexit deal that can mean we can carry on funding our public services or is it jeremy corbyn propped up by a rag tag of other political parties? i think that's the choice people have to make. brexit is one thing, i want to talk about the nhs this morning. are you saying in your mind things are genuinely getting better in the nhs? is that the point you are making? genuinely getting better in the nhs? 15 that the point you are making?m is not me saying that, a report published by nhs england looks at overall nhs performance compared to other countries. they said, for
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example, we have record cancer survival rates. patient satisfaction levels are at some of their highest levels are at some of their highest levels in the last 20 years. that safety of patients has never been higher. so, you can see that we have these huge pressures, because we have about half a million more over 755 then we had in 2010. nhs staff are working incredibly hard. you can also see some really positive things happening. one very good example, actually, is the improvement in mental health. we have probably the biggest expansion in mental health provision in europe. that's not to say we don't have lots of things that we need to do better on. that our ambition as conservatives, we wa nt our ambition as conservatives, we want our nhs to be the safest, highest quality health care system in the world. we need a strong economy to deliver that adan i am sorry to go back to that but the briton negotiations, having a strong by minister to get the best deal for britain is essential to that economy. i am britain is essential to that economy. | am sure britain is essential to that economy. i am sure you appreciate and you've met people on the street,
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you knock on doors, people listening to you this morning with their head in their hands probably shouting at you saying hold on. there is a record number of patients, record level of debt, deficit problem, nurses considering going on strike for the first time in over 100 yea rs. for the first time in over 100 years. you have doctors going on strike over pay for the first time in 40 years. you can'tjust paid a positive story about the nhs when it seems to be, whichever way you look at it, crippled at the moment.” don'tjust paint a positive story. i've been the health secretary who has championed transparency and honesty. i introduced a special measures regime and we put over 30 hospitals into special measures. 20 have now come out. i have said it's incredibly important. if we want to be the safest and best system in the world, that we are completely honest with the british people when our standards are not as high as they should be. it is also important to look at the bigger picture and recognise that when you look at what is happening in other countries,
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with cancer survival rates for example, colorectal cancer, we have overta ken example, colorectal cancer, we have overtaken germany and cervical cancer survival rates, we have overta ken cancer survival rates, we have overtaken france. there are some things that we're doing a lot better than we have in the past and other countries also facing the same kind of pressures that we are facing. the question is, with the ageing population, how do we continue to get more resources into our vital public services? theresa may is going to have 27 european countries lined up against her. if she wins the next election. do we want her to be the person that gets that deal that protects the jobs in the british economy? protects our nhs? that is the big nhs issue and the selection. i appreciate that the party line is to keep going back to brexit and give us a choice between theresa may and jeremy corbyn. brexit and give us a choice between theresa may and jeremy corbynm brexit and give us a choice between theresa may and jeremy corbyn. it is about the nhs. the nhs needs funding from a strong economy. the brexit deal is central to that economy. we
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are very deal is central to that economy. we are very proud that we have about 12,000 more hospital nurses. 11,000 more doctors than we have seven yea rs more doctors than we have seven years ago. and we want more. but that does depend on a strong prime minister getting the right deal for britain. let's be clear, every vote for theresa may ‘s strengthens her mandate and her ability to get the right dealfor mandate and her ability to get the right deal for britain.” mandate and her ability to get the right deal for britain. i will ask you a question about the nhs, let's see if you can answer it without mentioning brexit. because on the issue... we will talk tojonathan as hworth issue... we will talk tojonathan ashworth in about 20 minutes about labour proposals to pay of nurses. specifically, do you think nurses are paid enough in the nhs?” specifically, do you think nurses are paid enough in the nhs? i would love to pay nurses more. i do think that i want to have an nhs where we can get the funding in that allows us to pay nurses more. our priority, because we know how hard nurses are working, is when we have had these very constrained finances, following the financial crisis of 2007—2008,
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our priorities has been to get more nurses into the nhs to relieve pressure on wards. that has meant some very pressure on wards. that has meant some very difficult decisions about nurses‘ pay. but in the long run, of course, we want to be more generous with nhs staff because they do a fantasticjob. well with nhs staff because they do a fantastic job. well done for not mentioning brexit! jeremy hunt, thank you for your time this morning. we‘ll speak to the shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth in the next few minutes. about ten minutes. that is the picture painted of the health service, let‘s find out what is happening with the weather in the more immediate future with carol kirkwood and some sheep. good morning. it is cold if you haven‘t ventured out. it is still called in manchester but generallygenerally four and five. a bit of frost around but that won‘t last long. a mixture of sunny spells
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and heavy showers —— but generally four and five. gusty winds. the temperature will drop when it passes. some showers this morning. some of those showers have also been wintering in nature. we will continue with that scenario through the day. a lot of dry weather to start the day but as we had through the morning into the afternoon, watch how those shower was developed. especially across central and eastern uk. they will hang onto them in the north and figure cloud across scotland and northern ireland which will introduce persistent rain initially across northern isles. into the north mainland scotland later. northern england, a fine afternoon. one or two showers. the showers especially in central and eastern areas, the midlands, east anglia at kent. you will hear the odd rumble of thunder. some will be heavy with hail and in higher ground a bit of winter remix. southwest, the showers will be few and farther
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between and they will be lighter. more sunshine and dryness. the same across wales, any shower will be the exception rather than the rule. northern ireland, the cloud will continue to thicken and showery outbreaks of rain. the wind will be lighter today, not particularly windy through tonight. persistent rain comes across scotland and sinks south. turning showery as it moves across northern ireland, northern england and wales. ahead of it under clear skies it will be cold. these temperatures represent towns and cities. in waller areas under clear skies, we are looking at temperatures as low as —3 —— rural areas. or minus five. you could be scraping your car windscreen first thing. blue skies to start the day. our weather front continues to come south, taking its cloud with it and some spots of showery rain. another one across scotland doing the same thing, showery rain towards northern england and eventually northern
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ireland and behind it, it will brighten up. tomorrow won‘t feel as cold as it will today. neither will friday. friday, a lot of dry weather around. variable amounts of cloud, bright spells and some showers. light breezes. temperatures 8—14. if you have this bank holiday weekend off, while the forecast is one that will be milder, it will still be breezy at times and there will be some rain. saturday looks like the driest day, rain on sunday. the jury is still out as to how much rain we will get. into the south—west it could be persistent. but it will not last. some farmers and growers are crying out for some rain. this might not be as helpful as we are hoping. thank you. we certainly had some rain. nice picture the —— nonetheless. nice pictures. britain has some of the best air accident investigators in the world. their work has saved countless lives. the bbc‘s been given exclusive access to film their latest equipment in the ongoing quest
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to find out why planes crash. here‘s our transport correspondent, richard westcott. a fireball after an executive jet overshot a runway and crashed into a busy hampshire car park. four people died, including members of osama bin laden‘s family. this 3—d photo, taken by investigators using a special drone, helped them solve the crash. the quality‘s so good, they can move around the scene, zooming in, checking for tell—tale clues. now the bbc‘s been given exclusive access to film investigators on a drone—training exercise. it‘s becoming essential to help get to the bottom of accidents. we‘re looking for ground marks, which tells us how the aircraft hit the ground, whether it was in a bank, whether it was a steep nosedive. propeller slash marks can give us an indication of propeller speed. then we are looking around the accident site to see if we‘re missing any bits, have we captured all four corners
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or has an important part actually broken off in flight, which would be a clue as to the cause of the accident? they also use the drone to give a pilot‘s eye view. with one accident, someone had hit some power lines and from the ground, they were really easy to see but they realised that when viewed from the cockpit, those same lines were virtually invisible, they blended into the ground. so they were actually able to see what the pilot was seeing. they don‘tjust use drones to investigate air accidents, they use them to look at accidents at sea, as well. we would then fly along the side of the wreck. at another training exercise, investigators tell me the simplest things can be a real giveaway. could be a door or a porthole left open, it could be that somebody‘s actually opened or closed a valve incorrectly, that‘s then let water feed into the cooling system and the engine. it could be that somebody‘s left freshwater or a hosepipe running on the upper deck and it could be
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a fishing boat, washing down the upper decks with water that was being pumped over the side and they‘ve left it over and it‘s filled up one of the tanks and the free water effectjust made the fishing boat tip over. and this is how vital drone footage can be. a fatal crack in the middle of a ship‘s hull. shot a few years ago, this is the wreck of the cargo ship swanland. 80 metres down off the welsh coast. six people died as the vessel snapped in heavy seas. these images helped find early answers. rogue drones in the wrong hands can cause terrible accidents, but in the right hands, they can help prevent them, too. richard wescott, bbc news. fascinating. amazing. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. headlines at 8:30am. good morning. there is some milder
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weather on the way. today is a cold one. there is showers across the eastern side of the uk. initially along the coast, but developing further inland, we‘ve got more cloud coming down across scotland and northern ireland. that will bring light showers as well, but rain showers here. some more organised rain coming into the far north of scotland later on in the day. more cloud for southern scotland, but probably dry here. temperatures nine or ten celsius. for the western side of england and wales, it should be largely dry. come the afternoon, just one or two rogue showers around
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here, but through the midlands and into eastern england from the humber southwards those showers could be heavy, possibly with hail and sleet and the odd rumble of thunder. it will feel chilly in the wind. those showers though will fade away quickly this evening. we will have clear skies across the south. there is more cloud coming down from the north and with that some outbreaks of rain and drizzle. that will keep the temperatures significantly higher here, but further south, southern parts of england and wales in the countryside we‘re going to find temperatures down to minus one or minus two celsius. some early sunshine here, but we will see the cloud continuing itsjourney southwards across the whole of the uk, bringing with it some pockets of light rain or drizzle. some brighter skies and sunshine coming into scotla nd skies and sunshine coming into scotland and in the central belt temperatures could be as high as 13 or 14. underneath the cloud which is where most of us will be, temperatures 11 or 12. a lot of the rain and drizzle will have cleared away on friday leaving behind just one or two showers. quite a bit of
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cloud around, but a lot of dry weather and sunshine and those temperatures nearer where they should be at this time of the year. there is milder weather on the way, but breezy, for southerly winds, but that will bring an increasing risk of rain as the weekend goes on. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and rachel horne. he‘s promising a big announcement on taxes today. but can president trump really make good on his ambitious pledges on tax reforms? live from london, that‘s our top story on wednesday, 26th april. mr trump has promised a "phenomenal" tax plan. he‘ll unveil the details in just a few hours time. also in the programme, paying the price for regional
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tensions. the south korean carmaker hyundai sees profits plunge as sales in china take a dive.

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