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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 28, 2017 6:00am-8:31am BST

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hello this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. a woman is shot and injured by police in an anti—terror operation in north—west london. gunshots. it happened after armed officers moved into a residential street in willesden. four people are arrested in the operation there. this is the scene this morning. the operation is thought to be continuing. officers say it's not connected to the arrest of a man near downing street. good morning, it's friday the 28th of april. also this morning, released from prison — former marine alexander blackman, who had his sentence reduced for shooting dead an injured taliban fighter, goes free after three years injail. vauxhall is accused of a reckless disregard for safety over the way it handled a series of car fires on its zafira b model.
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in sport, the manchester derby is marred by a moment of madness as united's marouane fellaini is sent off for headbutting sergio aguero, as the game ends in a goalless draw. the brownlee brothers have put triathlon on the map — the uk's first purpose built training base for the sport has been named after them. we'll be live there this morning. and sarah keith lucas has your bank holiday weekend weather. good morning. lots of dry weather on the cards. some of us will see some rain, especially on sunday. i will have the full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. a woman is under police guard in hospital in london, after being shot during an anti—terror operation. two other women, a man and a 16—year—old boy were arrested in raids in willesden and in kent last night. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack
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near the houses of parliament. officers say the operation was not connected. alexandra mckenzie reports. a residential street in willesden in north—west london. several gunshots heard yesterday evening. gunshots. as armed police raided a terrorist‘s house. —— terraced house. a woman was shot by police, and four people we re was shot by police, and four people were arrested. as darkness fell, police remained. the woman who was shot was taken to hospital. she is ina shot was taken to hospital. she is in a serious but stable condition under police guard. a 16—year—old boy and a woman aged 20 was arrested at the property. a 20—year—old man was arrested nearby, and they 43—year—old woman in kent a short
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time later. all four are under suspicion of the preparation of terrorist acts. they are in custody ina terrorist acts. they are in custody in a police station in london. police say this was an ongoing counterterrorism investigation. the house had in under observation, as had the people in connection to it. as the search of the house continued into the night, other searches related to this incident were being carried out at other properties gci’oss carried out at other properties across london. but police say there was no connection between these arrests and the one in whitehall yesterday. alexandra mckenzie is in willesden this morning. what is happening this morning? good morning. as you know, i have been here for most of the night. police have maintained their presence. they are still here, and the road here is still cordoned off. there is only access in and out to local
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residents. i have not seen anybody this morning, but last night we did speak to a couple of those local residents. they didn't want to go on camera, but some people did hear those gunshots and see those armed police go into the street. they spoke of their shock at what had happened. this morning, i have spoken to the police, and there has been no update, but four people remain in custody. they will continue to be questioned. 0ne remain in custody. they will continue to be questioned. one woman remains in hospital in a serious at sta ble remains in hospital in a serious at stable condition. alexander, thank you. —— alexandra. and we'll be speaking to a former head of the national counter terrorism security office on the latest developments at 6:40am. the royal marine alexander blackman, who had his murder sentence for killing a wounded taliban fighter in afghanistan quashed, has been released from prison. sergeant blackman, known as ‘marine a' during the case, had his conviction reduced to manslaughter on appeal last month. he has served more than three years of a 7—year sentence. we will be speaking to sergeant blackman‘s barrister at 7:40.
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a special fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned as a "huge waste of money." the cancer drugs fund, which ran from 2010 until it was replaced last year, cost over a billion pounds. but researchers say the majority of drugs failed to show clinical benefit. 0ur medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. the cancer drugs fund was set up to paper expensive medicines which the nhs was not funding. in part it was a political response to repeated negative headlines about patients being denied treatment. nearly 100,000 patients received drugs, but the study in thejournal annals of 0ncology found just one in five treatments delivered a significant benefit, extending life by an average of three months. researchers say it was an example of policy made on the fourth, and it failed. —— the
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hoof. it was a major missed opportunity for the nhs and the community to learn about the real world impact of actual new medicines. a great deal of money, over £1 billion, was expended on this. and we didn't collect the data to look at individual cancer patients. that is a need missed opportunity. the study concludes many patients may have suffered unnecessary side—effects from drugs. a leading breast cancer charity said the fund had a totally transformational impact for many, offering precious extra time with loved ones for terminally ill patients. the fund was brought under the remit of the national institute for health and care excellence last year, so there is greater scrutiny over which treatments are approved. president trump has again claimed that a major conflict could break out with north korea over its nuclear and missile programmes. in a radio interview with reuters, mr trump said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to persuade pyongyang to abandon the weapons,
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but warned it would be very difficult to achieve. well, there is a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with north korea. absolutely. the car maker vauxhall is being accused of a "reckless disregard for safety" over the way it handled a series of fires on its zafira b model. a report by the transport select committee has found the company was too slow to act, especially when it allowed people to drive in cars which were still a hazard. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, reports. you can see why many drivers described it as terrifying. their family car bursting into flames out of the blue, sometimes with their children inside. fire taking hold in a matter of minutes. even vauxhall says it is lucky nobody was seriously hurt. today's report is
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scathing about the way the company handled the issue. it took them a long time to act. when they did act and put things right, so they said, ca i’s and put things right, so they said, cars we re and put things right, so they said, cars were still bursting into flames. even at that point they did not recall the cars fully. this is totally u na cce pta ble a nd not recall the cars fully. this is totally unacceptable and is putting people's lives at risk. well over 200 zafira bs caught fire because of a problem in the heating system. the true scale only really came to light after a facebook group and the london fire brigade began noticing a pattern. worst of all, this report says, vauxhall let people drive around in cars which were supposed to be fixed but could in fact still catch fire. the company says safety is its top priority, and it has changed the way it deals with recall is to speed things up. now mps are calling for new laws to prosecute carmakers who fail to sort out a safety issue quickly. a 24—hour strike begins today on arriva rail north, as part of an ongoing dispute over the role of guards.
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members of the rail, maritime and transport union will walk out for the third time in a row over staffing for new trains which are due to come into service in 2020. arriva rail north said it was disappointing that the union were unwilling to change their position during talks. the pictures of a man being dragged from a united airlines flight sparked international outrage. now a settle m e nt sparked international outrage. now a settlement has been reached between the man and the line. david dao was violently removed by airline law enforcement officers earlier this month, after refusing to give up his seat to united staff. a video of the bleeding vietnamese—american doctor went viral online and sparked international outrage. the amount paid to him won't be released. a man crawling the london marathon dressed as a gorilla is approaching the course's half—way point, three days after the race began. tom harrison — who calls himself mr gorilla — is aiming to complete the 26.2 mile
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route on his hands and knees, "gorilla—style" to raise money for the gorilla 0rganization. setting off at about 08:00 bst each morning, mr gorilla is expected to finish on saturday. so far he has raised more than £20,000. getting some extra help there. so nice to see people turning out to give him a lift. that must be so out to give him a lift. that must be so hard. imagine the pain. out to give him a lift. that must be so hard. imagine the painlj out to give him a lift. that must be so hard. imagine the pain. i once took part in a 100 metres race, on all fours. this was after a new re cord all fours. this was after a new record was set, 15.7 one. it took me nearly a minute, and record was set, 15.7 one. it took me nearlya minute, and i was in record was set, 15.7 one. it took me nearly a minute, and i was in agony afterjust100 metres. it is so natural. to do that every day for a week, i don't know how he does it. good luck to him. what have you got us? well, manchester united and manchester city last night finished goalless, but united set a new premier league record, 24 games unbeaten. they held off city. the match,
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though, will be remembered for the wrong reasons. a minute of madness provided the main talking point in the manchester derby which ended goalless at the etihad. a headbutt by united's marouane fellaini saw him sent off, and came just 14 seconds after he'd been booked. that was on sergio aguero. not long now until one of the biggest fights in british boxing history. it was all respectful between anthonyjoshua and wladimir klitscho as the pair came face to face as we get closer and closer to saturday night's world heavyweight title clash at wembley stadium andy murray's into the quarter finals of the barcelona 0pen. the world number one enjoyed a straight sets win over feliciano lopez. but britain's dan evans is out of the tournament. in the semi finals of the world snooker championship, ding jun—wee leads the defending champion mark selby 5 frames to 3 going into this morning's session. while john higgins leads barry hawkins by the same score.
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iamso i am so relieved to see that that little frame with being generally, that didn't put him off and affect his game. —— ding jun wee. he is one of the rising stars, 10 million people watch his games in china. he is the david beckham of the sport. maybe you warm to mop.|j is the david beckham of the sport. maybe you warm to mop. i would like to think so. let's take a look at the weather. i don't know what it is like where you are. a gorgeous sunrise here in salford this morning. looking lovely. sarah, what can we expect for the rest of the day? will it stay nice? it will be a bit mixed. this was the sunrise in fife today. there is some more cloud waiting in the winds. this area of cloud will be heading infor many this area of cloud will be heading in for many of us by sunday. we have
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got a cloudy, slightly drizzly day today through parts of western scotland, north—west england, wales, down towards southern england. either side of that cloudy zone, quite a good deal of dry weather with sunshine. a fresh start to the day but mostly dry for cornwall, pembrokeshire, and one or two match showers dotted across wales and southern england. sunnier conditions through east anglia and the north—east of england. slightly cloudier as we had to the isle of man. much of northern ireland should see dry and bright weather this morning. the chance of a shower. a few showers across the western half of scotland. eastern scotland faring better with some sunshine and plenty of those showers easing away. moving through today, we will keep that cloudy and drizzly zone, but it will break up, so some brightness into the afternoon. the best of the sunshine around eastern parts of england and also for northern ireland in the afternoon. an improving picture for many of us. you could get caught by a rogue
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showery here and they are. lighter winds than we have seen in recent days. temperatures up to about 15 or possibly 16 degrees or so. what about the bank holiday weekend? things will turn milder. breezy at times. it wouldn't be a bank holiday weekend without some rain in the forecast, but for many of us that will arrive on sunday. saturday, a bright and dry start to the day. some sunshine around. and temperatures 16 or 17 degrees. in the west you can see those wind arrows. the wind will pick up and it will turn breezy late in the day. that is ahead of this area of low pressure moving in from the west. heading into sunday, a squeeze in the isobars and some rain arriving. so quite a blustery day on sunday. you can see rain for wales, the south—west of england as well, edging north—east through the day. temperatures up to about 17 degrees. probably the best of the weather across parts of scotland and northern ireland on sunday. that low pressure peters out and heads
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further recent as we move into bank holiday monday. at the moment it looks like we will be between weather systems for bank holiday monday. after some rain around on sunday, there will still perhaps be the odd shower lingering on the monday, but for many of us, not a bad picture. some sunshine, temperatures certainly milder than they have been. that warming trend continues into the start of may. this is how things look through the course of next week, and eventually it will warm up to about twitter degrees. —— 20 degrees. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a woman has been shot by police, and four people have been arrested, during an anti—terror operation in north west london. a former marine who shot dead an injured taliban fighter has been released from jail after his murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter. were hoping to talk to his lawyer
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later in the programme. now for a look through the papers. 0ne image dominating throughout, the incident yesterday. seized, with a rucksack full of knives on the front page of the daily mail. this is an incident in westminster. a few more details are emerging this morning. a man carrying a rucksack full of knives, according to reports. the same picture on the front page of the daily mirror.. their lead story is about a letter that 500 school heads have written to theresa may complaining about the education cuts to their schools. the front page of the times, the image once again and the times, the image once again and the main story about companies such as facebook and twitter are being
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fined if they fail to protect children online. in the guardian, they speak on the arrests yesterday. just metres from the side of the bridge attacks last month. it was a targeted raid carried out after a tipoff. one of the most famous men in boxing, charlie stapleton and selling nugent. that is not really doing just this. michael buffer, the man who has been announcing boxing bouts for decades. he trademarked the phrase let's get ready to rumble. he had throat cancer and survived that in 2008 but he has neverin survived that in 2008 but he has never in short his voice. he says he practices in front of a mirror. sometimes these common terries come from other places. the exaggerated football commentary came from
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spanish america. was there a story about how he came up...? he was spanish america. was there a story about how he came up. . . ? he was told off at first by some commentators but he stuck by his method and proved very popular with people like moore, na li. he is now part of the show. he says it is show business. it is, really, isn't it? speaking of show business, a picture here of sir ian and damejudi. they are unveiling a clerk to sirjohn gielgud. but they say that what is shocking about young actors is that they do not want to learn about the legacy we have been left. they are not curious enough about the actresses of time gone by. brilliant picture from yesterday. look at this. melania trump hoping for five minutes of peace but no
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chance whatsoever. is she waiting for other people to arrive?|j chance whatsoever. is she waiting for other people to arrive? i think they were on the other so far and you can hear the report is straining to listen in. getting a little peace and quiet. can you imagine the pressure? what happens if i fall over? don't blink, don't speak...m has been 100 days. let's talk about that now. he swept to victory with a promise to make america great again. the first 100 days of donald trump's presidency have been anything but boring or slow. but how much of it has been rhetoric and spin, and how much has brought real action? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin's been crunching the numbers. it was a seismic event, a shock win
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by the man with the seismic signature. from this day forward, america first. america first. so 100 days in, let's examine his record. well, numbers are a problem. as he hits this symbolic milestone, president trump has better at ridley been trying to get his first budget agreed and avoid a government shutdown. let's look at another one. 40% as the president's approval rating right now. far less than 0bama or george w bush or bill clinton at this stage. but polls show the vast majority of those who love trump that then still love him today. make america great again. here is another number. 45 million.
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that followers on twitter. should i keep twitter going or not? this is how he speaks to his fans. direct, making sure he cuts out... the fake news. it is also good news. it is phoney stuff. the number of times he has tweeted about fake news, 72. 35 positive tweets. 28 about fox news. that is his tv station of choice where he has to miss everything as —— spoke about everything such as military action. we just unleashed missiles. to the cake he was eating. we had the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake that you have ever seen. chocolate cake that you have ever seen. three. the number of times he has ordered military action. in syria. in afghanistan. and this when
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he said his powerful armada to the shores of north korea. as far as foreign relations, trump has appeared decisive if not conch red hairy. we can not continue to allow china to rate our country and that is what they are doing. china, once a sworn foe is now a sworn friend. we are going to have a very, very great relationship. in all there have been six handshakes with foreign leaders, hand held, hans yang sometimes and just for boston. and is there something else trump forgot? we will build a wall, don't worry about it. we are building the wall. progress on walls to be built. slow. in fact payment for the wall is one of the stumbling blocks holding up the budget so come to those pesky numbers. there is a sort
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of this artificial number that gets thrown out stock 100 days and you have for years in your first term. he signed that seismic signature to a 100 day pledge before he took office. in terms of legislation delivered, he is nowhere near as close as his predecessors. but immigration is down, trade is up. to supporters, he is delivering. immigration is down, trade is up. to supporters, he is deliveringm immigration is down, trade is up. to supporters, he is delivering. it has been a hugely successful first 100 days. numbers. controversialfor this administration from day one that president trump knows that this isa that president trump knows that this is a work in progress. that was breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin reporting. there's lots more on the bbc‘s website about president trump's first 100 days in office, including this trump tracker — which asks how much the president has achieved so far. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. later on we will get the official
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figures on how the economy grew in the first three months of this year and then is in birmingham to explain that to us. where better to come them one of our manufacturing heartlands because we are looking at all sorts of things. we got the letter economic growth figures later. it is expected to show that the economy grow like just under half of 1%. that figure is confirmed it will show the slowest rate of growth in a year. now why should we ca re growth in a year. now why should we care about individual figures? it tells us what the economy is doing in the that vote to leave the european union. and it comes amid all sorts of other statistics that could prove to be a bit worrying for the economy because we have seen inflation is starting to rise. that is the price of goods we pay in the price we pay for goods and services in the shops. we have also seen that the economy itself might be starting to slow over the uncertainty about brexit. about what happens next because business is now putting off
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decisions about hiring and expansion and that has an effect on the wider economy. we have also seen it in our wages, wage growth is starting to slow as well so that means we have a little less money in our pocket and that could have an effect on the overall economy. so what we do this morning is speak to business and consumers about what it may mean for the wider economy, what where we may be headed next and, crucially, what it means for things like our wages. so we are at this cash—and—carry here in birmingham. they deal with a lot of their own manufacturing and they import a lot of goods from around the world. they also export. we will ask the boss here about what it means for his business, what he wa nts to it means for his business, what he wants to see from any trade deal with the european union and, crucially, what it hopes and fears after the future for the economy. joining us in about 30 minutes. before that, let's get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. it's been revealed that homeless people in central london
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are being charged to store their possessions while they wait to be permanently rehoused. people in the borough of westminster have received letters telling them they'll have to pay £12 for every crate they use and £40 to collect their belongings. the local council says this is not its policy and is urgently reviewing how the letters came to be sent. as the capital's businesses continue to weigh up the challenges and opportunities of brexit, wine producers have been telling bbc london it could be good news for them. while the cost of imported wine will go up, local vineyards like this one in dorking say their products are becoming more competitive and popular. but as the chief executive of the uk's biggest wine maker says there's a lot of uncertainty ahead. there is always concerned that we have seen some benefits already. lastly we started exporting some of our own wine and we had been working
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on that for quite sometime. 0ur first export to america. with the devaluation in the pound last year after the brexit vote was may be double that order so that was already a benefit we saw. there are concerns going forward with labour costs going up. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is all looking good so far—if you take a look here— there are no reported problems on any of those lines. let's take a look at the roads this is the a2— it's fairly slow already heading into town from eltham to kidbrooke west drayton, the a408 stockley road is closed northbound at the cherry lane roundabout after a collision. let's have a check on the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini good morning. it is far milder this morning that it was this time yesterday. we're morning that it was this time yesterday. we' re lost morning that it was this time yesterday. we're lost a frost free
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and at which is five and eight celsius. today will turn into a pretty nice day. a great start but we will see sunny spells emerged it could just see another few early outbreaks of drizzle but they will not last for very long. 0therwise outbreaks of drizzle but they will not last for very long. otherwise we are looking at a dry day with sunny spells emerging through the day. top temperatures of 13 or 14 degrees. feeling quite warm than it did yesterday. a lot of sunshine around into this evening and then overnight tonight there will be variable amount of cloud and most of us will stay dry. temperatures dropped to between six and nine celsius and many of the towns although where they get clear skies they could fall lower. what goes on over the bank holiday weekend? it looks like we we re holiday weekend? it looks like we were seen holiday weekend? it looks like we were seen increasing temperature day on day. it will start of the warm again. sunny spells, particularly on saturday, lovely there on saturday, the best looking bad weekend. it will become windy on sunday with some sunny will become windy on sunday with some sunny spills around. there will be simmering, probably on sunday night into the first of monday morning but that will clear to leave
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us morning but that will clear to leave us with an improving the rest of the day and climbing temperatures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to sally and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and charlie stayt. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, as her ex—boyfriend begins a lengthy sentence for her murder we'll hear how alice ruggles' parents want to raise awareness of the dangers of stalking. monica evans was just 19 when she started herjob as an accounts clerk earning 12 shillings and sixpence a week. that was 70 years ago today — and she's still there! we'll speak to monica about being britain's longest—serving employee before 9:00. and they were the biggest girl group of the ‘80s, with their punk—rock attitude and perfect pop bringing them a string of top ten hits. yes, bananarama are back!
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they'll be here before the end of the programme. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. a woman is under police guard in hospital, after being shot during an anti—terror operation on a residential street in northwest london. two other women, a man and a 16—year—old boy were arrested in raids in willesden and in kent last night. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament, officers say the operation was not connected. alexandra mckenzie has got the latest. a residential street in willesden in north—west london. several gunshots heard yesterday evening. gunshots. as armed police raided a terraced house. a woman was shot by police, and four people were arrested. as darkness fell, police remained.
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the woman who was shot was taken to hospital. she is in a serious but stable condition under police guard. a 16—year—old man and a woman aged 20 was arrested at the property. a 20—year—old man was arrested nearby, and a 43—year—old woman in kent a short time later. all four are under suspicion of the preparation of terrorist acts. they are in custody in a police station in london. police say this was an ongoing counterterrorism investigation. the house had been under observation, as had the people in connection to it. as the search of the house continued into the night, other searches related to this incident were being carried out at other properties across london. but police say there was no connection between these arrests and the one in whitehall yesterday. the royal marine alexander blackman,
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who had his murder sentence for killing a wounded taliban fighter in afghanistan quashed, has been released from prison. sergeant blackman — known as "marine a" — during the case — had his conviction reduced to manslaughter on appeal last month. he has served more than three years of a seven—year sentence. a fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned by researchers as a "huge waste of money". the cancer drugs fund ran from 2010 until last year and cost nearly 1.3 billion pounds, but a new study by king's college london claims most of the drugs failed to show clinical benefit, and many patients may have suffered unnecessary side effects. the cancer drugs fund was set up to pay for expensive medicines which the nhs was not funding. in part it was a political response to repeated negative headlines about patients being denied treatment. nearly 100,000 patients received drugs, but the study in the journal annals of oncology found just one in five
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treatments delivered a significant benefit, extending life by an average of three months. researchers say it was an example of policy made on the hoof, and it failed. it was a major missed opportunity for the nhs and the medical community to learn about the real world impact of actual new medicines. a great deal of money, over £1 billion, was expended on this. and we didn't collect the data to look at individual cancer patients. that is a missed opportunity. the study concludes many patients may have suffered unnecessary side—effects from drugs. a leading breast cancer charity said the fund had a totally transformational impact for many, offering precious extra time with loved ones for terminally ill patients. the fund was brought under the remit of the national institute for health and care excellence last year, so there is greater scrutiny over which treatments are approved.
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president trump said there was a chance of what he called a "major, major conflict" with north korea over its nuclear and missile programmes. in a radio interview with reuters, mr trump said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to persuade pyongyang to abandon the weapons, but warned it would be very difficult to achieve. ajury has concluded a jury has concluded that gross failures in the care given to a woman suffering from a rare post—natal condition in a london hospital contributed to her death. alex gibson watt, a jewellery expert who had the —— appeared on antiques roadshow, suffered a psychotic episode after giving birth in 2012. she died following a cardiac arrest at a mental health unit. her husband anthony spoke of his relief of finally having some a nswe rs. yes, ms relief, i would say. that it
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is done, and a good job was done on behalf of my wife and of course my daughter, whom one day i will need to wane, as best possible, what happened. —— needs to explain. now we have some answers. the car maker vauxhall showed a ‘reckless disregard for safety‘ over the way it handled a series of fires on its zafira b model, according to mp5. a report by the transport select committee found that the company was too slow to act, allowing people to drive in cars which were hazardous. the company says safety is its top priority and it has changed its procedures. a 24—hour strike against an arriva rail north today. members of the union will walk out for the fourth time ina union will walk out for the fourth time in a row over the staffing of new trains due to come into service in 2020. arriva rail north said it was disappointing the union was unwilling to change its position
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during the talks. a man crawling the london marathon dressed as a gorilla has reached the 19—mile point, four days after the race began. tom harrison — who calls himself mr gorilla — is aiming to complete the 26.2 mile route on his hands and knees for the gorilla 0rganization. setting off at 0800 each morning, mr gorilla is expected to finish this saturday and has raised more than £20,000. and he is still getting cheered as he goes along, so well done to him. he has a way to go. yes, he does. so, we had the man united and man city game last night, with no goals, but drama? talk about red mist. think about the game first of all, jose mourinho and pep guardiola, two of the most respect that managers in the world. at the start of the season they would want to fight for the title at this stage, but they are scrapping just for a place in the top format. 0ne
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are scrapping just for a place in the top format. one could indeed miss out. but the game will be remembered for this moment of madness. what excitement there was came in the last ten minutes. united's maroane felaini was shown a straight red card for headbutting sergio aguero, just seconds after he'd been booked forfouling him. right in front of the referee, as well! city had a goal ruled out for offside and then aguero almost won it in the last moments of the game. but that red card was the biggest talking point of the game. it says that... with another player, probably not a red card. it says that aguero was intelligent, the way he reacted, but he has to control. lam i am satisfied, i know how difficult it is to play against manchester
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united, how aggressive they are. of course, united, how aggressive they are. of course , we united, how aggressive they are. of course, we missed the last shoot, the last pass, it is not easy to defend with ten players behind. it is not easy you have to be always ina good is not easy you have to be always in a good position to avoid the counter—attack. so ironically, the main winds were liverpool, who stay third and didn't even play last night. —— winner is. the burnley manager sean dyche says the 18 month ban imposed onjoey barton for breaching betting rules is "harsh". the football association released a 63 page document yesterday revealing the extent of the charges. barton made over 1200 bets on matches over a ten year period. he's said he will appeal against the ban. andy murray is finding his form again — he is in to the quarter—finals of the barcelona 0pen. the world number one beat feliciano lopez in straight sets, to continue his preparations for next month's french open. but britain's dan evans is out of the tournament. maria sharapova says she is "way over" responding to comments about her comeback from a doping ban. this was after another player, euginie bouchard called her a cheater. instead, sharapova appears to be doing her talking on the court, with another win in stuttgart —
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in straight sets too, against another russian, ekaterina makarova, 7—5, 6—1, to clinch her place in the next round. but yohanna konta won't be joining her, she was beaten in the second round by anastasija sevastova. the british number one, who was the sixth seed for the tournament, was defeated in straight sets by the latvian. china's most famous sportsman, ding jun—wee, is living up to the hype, he leads the defending champion, mark selby, 5 frames to 3, at the world championship. selby took an early lead in the contest, but ding delighted the estimated 10 million watching back home on chinese state tv, by winning the final three frames — ending with a century of 110. they will resume this morning. in the other semi—final, john higgins leads barry hawkins by the same score. leeds rhinos missed the chance to move top of the super league after a 31—12 defeat to huddersfield giants.
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england football manager gareth southgate was among the spectators at headingley. he and the rest of the crowd were treated to a remarkable second half performance from the giants. they ran in three tries after the break, including this one from darnell mcintosh. huddersfield stay tenth but move to within one point of warrington. finally, something so very rare. a polite and dignified press conference ahead of a big rocks in contest. 0ne conference ahead of a big rocks in contest. one of the biggest nights in british boxing ever, really. anthonyjoshua against the mighty wladimir klitschko. 0nly pleasantries were wladimir klitschko. 0nly pleasa ntries were exchanged. wladimir klitschko. 0nly pleasantries were exchanged. there is 14 years of age between them, but just a few inches, and nothing but respect between these two ahead of the fight. it is amazing to have this promotion where we are actually polishing the sport of rock scene, without any
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f—words, punching each other in the faces without this, or throwing chairs or glass bottles in each other‘s faces. so i'm very happy about that. it doesn't matter about who i am fighting. ijust enjoy what ido,| who i am fighting. ijust enjoy what i do, i embrace every opportunity. and i think failure is without trying. that is why i would always step up to any occasion, without a shadow of a doubt. and there is no fear whatsoever that trembles through my body. that is the way to do it, building up that is the way to do it, building up to that is the way to do it, building uptoa that is the way to do it, building up to a boxing match. civilised. i would love to know what he is listened to on his headphones. music, i would think. 0r inspirational words. he says to win would be the first step to real greatness in the sport. armed officers have shot a woman during a counterterrorism operation in which four suspects, including a teenage boy, were arrested in north—west london. the metropolitan police said the operation was part
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ofan police said the operation was part of an ongoing counterterrorism investigation, but stressed it was not connected to an incident in whitehall earlier that day. we can speak now to chris phillips, a former head of the national counter terrorism security office. good morning. we know that this street in willesden is still cordoned off this morning. the investigation is clearly still under way. give us your sense of the scale of this particular operation? it does appear that this is an ongoing investigation. that means almost certainly that the police will have had that area under surveillance for some time. as soon as they are able to get into the premises, they need to get into the premises, they need to do an awful lot of digging around to do an awful lot of digging around to find out exactly what these people have been doing over the last few months, six months, maybe a year. it just goes few months, six months, maybe a year. itjust goes to show, though, the sheer amount of counterterrorism policing that is having to be done at the moment. we have to operations effectively coming to fruition, from the police's perspective, on the same day, with a couple of hours of
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each other, actually, and of course both teams, both locations, whether it is whitehall or walliston, actually having to have a full team of police officers with guns and also be surveillance capability that goes with it. —— whitehall or willesden. a difficult time for the match, but they did a brilliantjob yesterday keeping us safe. —— for the net. one of the reasons there is so the net. one of the reasons there is so much interest in what happened in willesden is that the events were filmed locally by people looking at their windows and watching events unfold, and of course that the police use firearms in what is a residential area. —— used firearms. well, they have to use the tools they have to deal with the situation. you are absolutely right, what this shows, both situations, whitehall and willesden, pretty much everything now is done under the spotlight of social media, of the individual journalists with spotlight of social media, of the individualjournalists with cameras, taking pictures. vatican adds to the
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difficulty for the police. —— vat again adds. —— that. the police do a great job, again adds. —— that. the police do a greatjob, this is critical stuff and if things go wrong somebody can get killed. let's hope that lady doesn't get killed. it is important that we support our police in a difficult time for policing. chris, thank you for your time this morning. that was chris phillips, a former detective chief inspector with the metropolitan police. it is just with the metropolitan police. it isjust coming up with the metropolitan police. it is just coming up to with the metropolitan police. it isjust coming up to 6:45am. sarah has the weather. of of us and improved day, not as chilly ‘s recent days and there will be sunshine as well. cloud across the middle part of the country, save for parts of north—west england, wales and central southern england.
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that stays fairly cloudy, particularly through the morning but even side of that there should be spells of sunshine. so if you step out this morning at eight a.m., perhaps just the light shower across wales down to south—west england, one of two towards the south—east. for london up towards east anglia in north—east england it is a fresh start to the morning but some dry and bright weather. by the cloudy skies across the north—west of england and ireland with a few showers in the west. should brighten up showers in the west. should brighten up later in the day. and for scotland, many places dry with a few showers in the west in the best of the sunshine across the eastern side of scotla nd the sunshine across the eastern side of scotland full of moving through today will keep this zone draped north to south across the country. cloud ahead with your shower around. either side of our more on the way of sunshine but the cloud tends to think as we head on into the afternoon. an improving picture for many of us. lighter winds in recent days and for most of us a degree also warmer. temperatures reaching 15 or 16 degrees also, said wakool across england and scotland today.
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the bank holiday weekend, it looks breezy but milder than it has been and there will be a little bit of rain around at times. particularly by the time we get to sunday. saturday is shaping up to be not too bad, actually. a dry bright start the day for many of us and it remains that way for much of central and parts of the uk. 16 or 17 degrees further west the breeze pricks up with a view showers. some uncertainty about the detail in this area of low pressure as it squeezes in from the south—west, moving through into sunday. during sunday, some rain around particular cross south—west england and wales, nudging north eastwards through the day. many of us, particularly in scotla nd day. many of us, particularly in scotland in north—east england for insta nce scotland in north—east england for instance get away with a largely dry day. breezy, howeverwith temperatures around 17 degrees or so. temperatures around 17 degrees or so. moving through sunday into bank holiday monday, it clears towards the east so between the weather systems on monday. a dry and bright
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weather around, still the chance of an odd shower lingering the temperatures reaching 16 degrees and not as chilly nor breezy by the time we get there. a mixed forecast with a quick look ahead and the first week of may and for some of us temperatures will creep up to around 20 degrees but it will feel a little cooler than that in the east. getting warmer. the economy is set to be one of the key battlegrounds in the forthcoming general election and later this morning we'll get official figures on how the economy grew in the first three months of the year. we already know that exporters are doing well, but consumers are noticing a squeeze on their incomes. ben's at a cash and carry business in the midlands. 0h, oh, my goodness it looks like you could live for a decade on that i'll alone. yeah, you should see the adventures i have had this morning finding all sorts of things i want to ta ke finding all sorts of things i want to take home with me. you are right. we're here at eastern foods in birmingham. an interesting story because as you see they are
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cash—and—carry firm but they manufacture a lot of stuff right here in birmingham. they import raw materials to that from around the world so they are story of manufacture and retail but also one of importing and exporting and it is interesting because it gives us a sense of what the economy is doing. i want to run you through where we currently a re i want to run you through where we currently are with the economy because for last year, the economy grew by a 2%. axa in a 1.8% growth. pretty decent growth by anyone's standards. but there is a worry that things may start to turn a little worse as the coming months on fold because we have had retail sales figures through already the give us an indication of what consumers are feeling. they fell by 1.4%. that is in the latest set of figures. it tends to suggest that people are feeling that they have a lot more a squeeze on their income. it is interesting is what because we will also see that the fall in the value of the pound since a vote for brexit has made a difference for importers and exporters. it makes things we
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import more expensive but exports are cheaper abroad so we have been seeing a big increase there. let's find out what it means for business. jasonis find out what it means for business. jason is the boss here and henrietta is from the chamber of commerce. jason, as virus economy as it turned u ni nterested jason, as virus economy as it turned uninterested in what the uncertainty means for your business. if you take brexit for a start, after the referendum last year the currency saw a lot of volatility. we are net importers, we import from around 150 countries to processor manufactured here in the uk. that has affected cost. it is quite difficult to pass those costs on to retailers and certainly to consumers. it has created a squeeze in the business. henrietta, there is an assumption that if you are an importer exporter then things will iron out and you see a boost in a fall in the other. it is not quite so simple, is it? no. many exporters in poor parts of the products or machinery to make them. they have been affected as
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well. that being said, there are still positivity among manufacturers in particular but also in the services industry. hats are manifest for business day today. it also felt other retailers, will what is the uncertainty means of these businesses? it does mean a lot of looking at what you can and can't afford and trying to keep your business in a strong place, particularly on the exchange rate front. the cost of imports going up means people that new options for sourcing their products, looking at new suppliers and looking to export mortal abroad. when you hear that, you have opportunities elsewhere but do you think that in this time of uncertainty you should keep things as they are? what do you want to do? in business you are always optimistic that first and foremost you cut your cost accordingly, you see what the landscape looks like and adapt. i think the certainty piece is one of the most important thing. the next two years leading up
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to the exit from the eu will be definitive. i think that the importance really lies on keeping the status quo as closed the status quo as possible in terms of the single market and the ease of exporting out. it is difficult to build export markets, actually, and gain customers and get knowledge of those market. for now, thank you very much. we will stay here all morning because we do keep an eye on that figure that we got later. it is due at 930 so expected to show in the first quarter, the first room of the first quarter, the first room of the year, the economy grew by 0.4%. we will get official confirmation later that i will probably doing my bit this morning to help the economy grow by snapping up a few of the things done here this morning. not necessarily these, i should say, these are chopped tomatoes. everybody needs tomatoes. it is a grocery staples. i will text you my shopping list. watch out for that
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forklift behind you as well! they're two of the most famous sportsmen to come out of yorkshire, so it's no wonder alistair and jonny brownlee are being honoured today, with the uk's first purpose—built triathlon training base being named after them. ‘the brownlee centre', in leeds, will be the focus for the next generation of sports—hopefuls who want to replicate the incredible 0lympic success of the brothers. our very own triathlete louise minchin is there for us this morning. if i'm correct, lou, a little sunshine for you as well. oh, my goodness. it is a beautiful day. good morning and what fantastic experience this is. we are the first, we are allowed to preview the brownlee centre, the first cycling circuit in the uk. 1.6 kilometres, round their around the site, it is called the brownlee centre. and who would you want to speak at what you hear? look! we have alistair brownlie here. thank you very much
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for coming to see us. —— alistair brownlee. what lovely honour to have a named after you. tell us why this place is important. a massive honour to be named after me and it is a place that i have trained and runaround, e place that i have trained and ru na round, e ru na round place that i have trained and runaround, e runaround those fields as we can see behind us, thousands and millions of times over the years. started doing cross—country here when i was 11 or 12 years old so here when i was 11 or 12 years old soi here when i was 11 or 12 years old so i gota here when i was 11 or 12 years old so i got a history here and it was just playing fields, i guess. now we have a cycling circuit that we stand on ourand in have a cycling circuit that we stand on our and in the distance behind as is the pavilion that will be revamped and that will be the specific triathlon centre on the bottom floor which has purpose—built facilities that about the poll. wonderfulfor you and facilities that about the poll. wonderful for you and for members of the public as well who will be able to come out and cycle on the track. the circuit, i need to call it. absolutely. the circuit is obviously brilliant for us because we can train hard on it and not on the open road but i think it is probably a
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lot more valuable for people getting into sport, children, people who are not so confident of riding on the road because this is a safe traffic free environment. surfer now it is open to the public and clubs and people becoming news. and you will be here as well, you will be using it as well so you can keep whizzing past them? i will be using it as well. most weeks. you have had an amazing couple of years. the gold—medals, you now have in none of them. you just won a long distance rates, the double distance were used to seeing you raise. is that exciting level for you? to seeing you raise. is that exciting level for you ? you to seeing you raise. is that exciting level for you? you fill in new affection for the sport?|j exciting level for you? you fill in new affection for the sport? i think so. new affection for the sport? i think so. idid new affection for the sport? i think so. i did along the distance race thatis so. i did along the distance race that is about double the distance last weekend and that was the first timei last weekend and that was the first time i had ever done one so it is good to get one done and for it to good to get one done and for it to go out. i have a far more competitive one next weekend in america so that will be more interesting to see. i run that against some of the guys are from race against. and your brother is a racing? tell us a little bit
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about... i know it you got this other sports did you see the two minute amounts on on one helping the other. we saw you do that with your brother. what you think when you that kind of sportsmanship? 0bviously that kind of sportsmanship? obviously i think sportsmanship is fantastic and until i did it i would have been oh, that's why they're doing it. but when you are in the moment... someone you know, someone to tell the time, look at this present at the school helping is person out. so, i think, present at the school helping is person out. so, ithink, now present at the school helping is person out. so, i think, now people are kinder recognising as for doing it. people are telling other people how to build the time. as the change due in some way? that moment you decided to help. you look back at it with affection. i don't want to admit to it but... i don't know. there is a new admit is, however. it isa spurof there is a new admit is, however. it is a spur of the moment and, in, i reckon that is the moment, you don't really know what you are doing. you have to do it. lovely to be here.
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will you watch what's happening yorkshire and reddington?m will you watch what's happening yorkshire and reddington? it is quite long way away but both tomorrow and sunday will go through the day so i will try and get out and find a good spot to see it. this is making me nervous now. i'm going to go through bike riding you will watch me which is a lot of pressure, really. any advice? don't fall off. thank you so much. it is lovely to see you. that is great advice. don't fall off. do we have the stopwatch going? it is all very competitive. let's see how far she gets. indeed, they mentioned a tournament in yorkshire, we will be there later this morning as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup.
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it's been revealed that homeless people in central london are being charged to store their possessions while they wait to be permanently rehoused. people in the borough of westminster have received letters telling them they'll have to pay £12 for every crate they use and £40 to collect their belongings. the local council says this is not its policy and is urgently reviewing how the letters came to be sent. as the capital's businesses continue to weigh up the challenges and opportunities of brexit, wine producers have been telling bbc london it could be good news for them. while the cost of imported wine will go up, local vineyards like this one in dorking say their products are becoming more competitive and popular. but as the chief executive of the uk's biggest wine maker says there's a lot of uncertainty ahead. there is always concern, but we have seen some benefits already. last year we started exporting some of our own wine and we had been
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working on that for quite sometime, our first export to america. with the devaluation in the pound last year after the brexit vote was made, they doubled that order so that was already a benefit we saw. there are concerns going forward with labour costs going up. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is all looking good so far. if you take a look here, there are no reported problems on any of those lines. west drayton, the a408 stockley road is closed northbound at the cherry lane roundabout after a collision. and in wembley, wembley park drive is closed between 0akington avenue and wembley hill road. let's have a check on the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini. good morning. it is far milder this morning than it was this time yesterday. we're frost free and temperatures
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between five and eight celsius. today will turn into a pretty nice day. a grey start but we will see sunny spells emerged. we could just see another few early outbreaks of drizzle but they will not last for very long. otherwise we are looking at a dry day with sunny spells emerging through the day. top temperatures of 13 or 15 degrees. feeling quite warmer than it did yesterday. a lot of sunshine around into this evening and then overnight tonight there will be variable amount of cloud and most of us will stay dry. temperatures dropping to between six and nine celsius in many of the towns although where they get clear skies they could fall lower. what goes on over the bank holiday weekend? it looks like we will see increasing temperature day on day. it will start to feel warm again. sunny spells, particularly on saturday, lovely there on saturday, the best looking bad weekend. it will become windy on sunday with some sunny spells around. there will be some rain, probably on sunday
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night into the first of monday morning but that will clear to leave us with an improving the rest of the day and climbing temperatures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to sally and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast. a woman is shot and injured by police in an anti—terror operation in north—west london. gunshots. it happened after armed officers moved into a residential street in willesden — four people
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are arrested in the operation this is the scene there this morning — the operation is thought to be continuing, officers say it's not connected to the arrest of a man near downing street yesterday. good morning, it's friday the 28th of april. also this morning, released from prison — former marine alexander blackman, who had his sentence reduced for shooting dead an injured taliban fighter, goes free after three years injail. vauxhall is accused of a reckless disregard for safety over the way it handled a series of car fires on its zafira b model. in sport, the manchester derby is marred by a moment of madness, as united's marouane fellaini, is sent off for headbutting sergio aguero, as the game ends in a goalless draw.
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and sarah keith lucas has your bank holiday weekend weather. good morning. a milder day today than we have seen recently. some rainfor than we have seen recently. some rain for the weekend, for money of us by sunday, but also some sunshine. i will have a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. a woman is under police guard in hospital, after being shot during an anti—terror operation on a residential street in north—west london. two other women, a man and a 16—year—old boy were arrested in raids in willesden and in kent last night. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament. officers say the operation was not connected. alexandra mckenzie has got the latest. a residential street in willesden in north—west london. several gunshots heard yesterday evening. gunshots. as armed police raided
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a terraced house. a woman was shot by police, and four people were arrested. as darkness fell, a police presence remained. the woman who was shot was taken to hospital. she is in a serious but stable condition under police guard. a 16—year—old man and a woman aged 20 were arrested at the property. a 20—year—old man was arrested nearby, and a 43—year—old woman in kent a short time later. all four are under suspicion of the commission and preparation of terrorist acts. they are in custody in a police station in london. police say this was an ongoing counterterrorism investigation. the house had been under observation, as had the people in connection to it. as the search of the house continued into the night, other searches related to this incident were being carried out
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at other properties across london. but police say there was no connection between these arrests and the one in whitehall yesterday. let's cross live to willesden and our reporter alexandra mckenzie. alexandra hills been there most of the night for us. what can you see happening this morning? well, there is an ongoing police investigation. there is still a heavy police presence here. i have been here for much of the night and we have seen lots of activity, which is continuing this morning. the street is closed to all but local residents and there is a police presence on both sides of that street. i have spoken to some local residents through the night. they didn't want to go on camera at they did say that they were shocked. —— but they did say. they had heard gunshots and some had seen the armed police entering the street. as i said, this investigation continues. four people
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are in custody, including a 16—year—old. they will continue to be questioned today. there is one woman who was shot by police and is still in hospital, in a serious but sta ble still in hospital, in a serious but stable condition. police continue to search the house here, and also other properties across london. police said those searchers are all connected to this incident. alexandra mckenzie, thank you. the royal marine, alexander blackman, who shot dead an injured taliban fighter in afghanistan in 2011, has been released from prison. sergeant blackman, or ‘marine a' as he was known, was originally found guilty of murder, but last month the court martial appeal court replaced that conviction with diminished responsibility manslaughter. andrew plant is outside the prison where he was held. we will be speaking to sergeant blackman's lawyer in just over half an hour. a special fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned as a "huge waste of money." the cancer drugs fund, which ran from 2010 until it was replaced last
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year, cost over a billion pounds. but researchers say the majority of drugs failed to show clinical benefit. 0ur medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. the cancer drugs fund was set up to pay for expensive medicines which the nhs was not funding. in part it was a political response to repeated negative headlines about patients being denied treatment. nearly 100,000 patients received drugs, but the study in the journal annals of oncology found just one in five treatments delivered a significant benefit, extending life by an average of three months. researchers say it was an example of policy made on the hoof, and it failed. it was a major missed opportunity for the nhs and the medical community to learn about the real world impact of actual new medicines. a great deal of money, over £1 billion, was expended on this. and we didn't collect the data to look at individual cancer patients. that is a missed opportunity. the study concludes many
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patients may have suffered unnecessary side—effects from drugs. a leading breast cancer charity said the fund had a totally transformational impact for many, offering precious extra time with loved ones for terminally ill patients. the fund was brought under the remit of the national institute for health and care excellence last year, so there is greater scrutiny over which treatments are approved. president trump said there was a chance of what he called a "major, major conflict" with north korea over its nuclear and missile programmes. in a radio interview with reuters, mr trump said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to persuade pyongyang to abandon the weapons, but warned it would be very difficult to achieve. the car maker vauxhall showed a "reckless disregard for safety" over the way it handled a series of fires on its zafira b model, according to mp5. a report by the transport select committee has found the company was too slow to act,
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especially when it allowed people to drive in cars which were still a hazard. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, reports. you can see why many drivers described it as terrifying. theirfamily car bursting into flames out of the blue, sometimes with children inside. fire taking hold in a matter of minutes. even vauxhall says it is lucky nobody was seriously hurt. today's report is scathing about the way the company handled the issue. it took them a long time to act. when they did act and put things right, or so they said, cars were still bursting into flames. even at that point they did not recall the cars fully. this is totally unacceptable and is putting people's lives at risk. well over 200 zafira bs caught fire because of a problem in the heating system. the true scale only really came to light after a facebook group and the london fire brigade began
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noticing a pattern. worst of all, this report says, vauxhall let people drive around in cars which were supposed to be fixed but could in fact still catch fire. the company says safety is its top priority, and it has changed the way it deals with recalls to speed things up. now mps are calling for new laws to prosecute carmakers who fail to sort out a safety issue quickly. a 24—hour strike begins today on arriva rail north, as part of an ongoing dispute over the role of guards. members of the rail, maritime and transport union will walk out in the north of england for the third time in a row over staffing for new trains which are due to come into service in 2020. arriva rail north said it was disappointing that the union were unwilling to change their position during talks. you are watching bbc breakfast. "utter barbarism." that's how a judge described
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the murder of alice ruggles. she was killed by her ex—boyfriend who had stalked her, knocking on her bedroom window at night, and leaving flowers and chocolates on the windowsill. this week lance—corporal trimaan dhillon was sentenced for a minimum of 22 years. following the trial, alice's parents spoke to the bbc‘s alison freeman about the moment they learnt of their daughter's death. it was crazy. i woke up and i could hear the dog barking and the knock on the door, it was two o'clock in the morning. i went down and there we re the morning. i went down and there were two police at the door, saying, can we come in? and immediately, i thought, this is just like can we come in? and immediately, i thought, this isjust like it is in films. and they said to us that alice had been killed. and i think we looked at each other and said, it was harry. we knew. we knew even then. it was really horrendous, because only two days before i had
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been talking to alice on the phone and she told me about the whole thing, and the second call to the police, and i sort of reassured her that that was ok, that the police knew what was going on, that it would be all right, and that if she just ignored him he would ignore her. and i only put the phone down to ten minutes. and emma said, you cannot say that to her, he is going to kill her, you have to tell her to do something. i thought she was overreacting, i told do something. i thought she was overreacting, itold her do something. i thought she was overreacting, i told her not to be silly. as soon as i saw the police, i knew that was what it was. and i felt such a sense of guilt, for having first of all, told alice not to worry, and secondly, told emma not to be silly, when actually, if i hadn't said that, alice might still be alive. it is myjob now to try to carry on and help emma and my other children and sort of ultimately help other parents and other girls who
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the same thing might be happening to, and not to say, don't be silly. because it is nothing silly at all. it is realistic. northumbria police said at the time, no—one knew the level of threat dhillon posed, but the force has referred itself to the independent police complaints commission. so what should the police look out for in possible stalking cases? jane mockton—smith is a former police officer who is now a criminologist at the university of gloucestershire. absolutely awful to hear that family's story. but is there a familiar ring to it? is there a pattern of behaviour you have seen before? unfortunately there is a very familiar ring to this story, it is not unusual at all. i think most of our murders, homicides, of women, follow this particular pattern. what is it that a family can do? you know, that family, that mother
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there, she thought she was doing the right thing, and now she will carry that with her forever. right thing, and now she will carry that with herforever. if right thing, and now she will carry that with her forever. if other family members see a situation that concerns them, what should they do? because this is so common, this is a message we really need to get out there, notjust to professionals but to members of the public, that when this kind of behaviour, when you start to see this kind of the harry dear, and when you are first looking at it it might seem really innocuous and benign, you might think there is nothing wrong there, but start to measure it in slightly different terms. if somebody is leaving flowers or texting a lot, think about how much time it is actually taking them to do this. this particular person drove for five hours. that takes a lot of time out of their day so you start to think, this looks like and session, and thatis this looks like and session, and that is dangerous. how much confidence to you think people can have? it is interesting, talking about the science, whatever they may be. that moment in time that goes
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from something which is innocent or does not seem to have any alarm attached to it, to the point where you start to think it is getting uncomfortable. how much confidence can somebody how that if they go to the police saying, nothing much has happened, but i am a bit worried, how much confidence can they have that they will be taken seriously? at the moment i think people's confidence is quite low. but you must persist. if you go to the police, mention that you think you are being stalked. do not talk about it in terms of, i think my ex is a bit of a worry recognise that when somebody keeps on contacting you and somebody keeps on contacting you and somebody is upsetting you, trust your instincts, say to the police that i think i am being stalked. this is your area of expertise, and iam sure this is your area of expertise, and i am sure that one of the things that occurs to people when they are making that enormous decision to go from having a personal worry, maybe you have spoken to your friends or yourfamily, you have spoken to your friends or your family, and then
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you have spoken to your friends or yourfamily, and then making it official, as you say, going into a police station and saying that they think they are being stalked. 0ne police station and saying that they think they are being stalked. one of the concerns people might have is that it can escalate a situation, that it can escalate a situation, that the worry about what the impact of accusing somebody of stalking you might be. guide us through that. well, if somebody is stalking you, they are already absurd stand fixated. really, it is not going to stop anyway. — — fixated. really, it is not going to stop anyway. —— obsessed and fixated. so i do not think going to the police puts you in any more danger. it is something that needs to be stopped officially. do you think that in this country maybe we have the wrong attitude towards stalking? that idea that if we do not think about it, it might go away? it does not go away. that is what the word obsessed means, it does not go away, it is a preoccupation. we do have a big misunderstanding of stalking, where we always think it is strangers. my research has shown that it is not
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strangers, it is people you are in a relationship with, who pose the most danger in these situations. police procedure in these situations, again, you going to a police station for the first time and say that you think you are being stalked. are the police then obliged to go to talk to the individual? if they take what you are seeing at face value, what procedure run folds next? -- what you are saying. what they should do is go and see the person. what usually happens with stalking is that it will go away the first time a person is warned. we need to get in really early and stop the sheer numbers. you can get involved in stalking behaviour through social media. so that does work? because some people would worry it would make it worse. the earlier you can intervene the better. it is more likely to get worse the longer you let it go on. interesting that you say it should happen. that implies that quite often, the first alarm
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bells are ignored by the police?” think what the police see sometimes is that doesn't look very serious, which is what i talked about earlier. that isjust texting, that isjust leaving earlier. that isjust texting, that is just leaving flowers. but they really need to be able to see the intention behind that, and that is usually fixation and obsession and they need to force contact with that person, which is dangerous. jane, thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a woman has been shot by police, and four people have been arrested, during an anti—terror operation in north west london. a former marine who shot dead an injured taliban fighter has been released from jail after his murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. things are turning a little bit warmer than they have been. we have
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had some wintry weather this week so it isa had some wintry weather this week so it is a little bit milder today and through the weekend. this was the sunrise captured by one of our weather watchers in bristol earlier on in the day. it is relatively quiet day out there today we hasn't sunshine, particularly across eastern england, eastern scotland as well. further west across the country, a bit more cloud here bringing just a few like drizzly showers. eight o'clock this morning, then, one or two showers across parts of wales down towards central southern england but there will be some brighter skies in between. some sunshine after a fairly fresh start across east anglia, towards the north—east of england as well. cloudy skies the north—west england, south—west scotland and northern ireland with the drizzle but it should clear through. across scotla nd should clear through. across scotland it is towards the east where you have the lion ‘s share of the sunshine. further west to be
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more cloud and a couple of light showers. through the day today we have lighter winds than recently. it will feel a little warmer. still call around parts of north—east england and eastern scotland as well but the cloud across central and western area tends to thin and breakable albeit through the afternoon. it is an improving picture. still a couple showers lingering from south—west scotland towards central, southern england. temperatures generally 15— 16 degrees also. moving through this evening and overnight the cloud and showers tend to peter out as they had their wake eastwards. so please quys had their wake eastwards. so please guys for many of us cold mark would be an odd misty patch so a fresh start saturday morning although the most start saturday morning although the m ost pla ces start saturday morning although the most places it will be frost free. how's the bank holiday weekend shaping up? it will be breezy, milder than it has been and there will be a bit of rain around, i think particularly on sunday but certainly not a right. saturday a decent looking day across much of the country. dry with some sunshine, just the chance of an isolated shower. the breeze picking up in the west lea g u e shower. the breeze picking up in the west league runners was attending quite windy and temperatures at 16 or 17 degrees. getting through into sunday we can see an area of low pressure of preaching from the
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atlantic, a squeeze on the isobars ahead of the low pressure system and will also bring some rain across parts of the south—west of england, wales as well, some uncertainty about the exact details as it urges thatis about the exact details as it urges that is when of eastwards. the moment so much of north—east england and scotland getting away with quite and scotland getting away with quite a decent day. and reasonably mild, 17 degrees also. 0nto bank holiday monday, low pressure tends to peter out, moving its way eastwards to look so we're between low pressure systems during the bank holiday monday. quite a lot of dry weather on the cloud, still a chance that you could catch a shower or two but it is milder and it is certainly looking less windy than sunday. looking ahead into the start of may, the trend is for temperatures to start to rise that it will still feel fairly cool around the east coast. thank you very much, sarah. transport for london has launched a badge for people with "invisible impairments" who need to sit down on public transport. the "please offer me a seat" badge hopes to help those without an obvious disability or issue find comfort without having to explain their ailment. amanda parker found it hard to stand on the tube after undergoing surgery for cervical cancer.
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you are wearing a special badge. you have been wearing this now for... about four weeks. you do look well. i probably would not have thought to offer you a seat. no. and that is the whole idea of the badge. i had cervical cancer and i don't look like a typical... what you would think someone who had cancelled like. you look fine on the outside but, unfortunately, inside you are suffering. i was part of a trial for the badge because after the surgery i had the badge because after the surgery ihad hip the badge because after the surgery i had hip and back pain and bladder wea kness i had hip and back pain and bladder weakness and needed a cpu are to embarrass to explain this. we were the standing desperate to sit down, not really knowing what to do? what happened? not really knowing what to do? what happened ? you not really knowing what to do? what happened? you klingon, really. people cannot see you, you cannot get to the seat and you are just
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trying to wait for the next stop so... trying to wait for the next stop so... you don't want to then have to explain, i'm really sorry, i don't so explain, i'm really sorry, i don't so well because people look at you and think you look fine. you just don't want to tell your story. what has been your experience in the month you have been using tubes and buses and trains. some people don't look up, unfortunately, so you have people stuck on phones or books and they can't actually see that the badge is visible. 0ther they can't actually see that the badge is visible. other people look and read and think, oh, 0k, badge is visible. other people look and read and think, oh, ok, you are asking for a seat and they get up. soa asking for a seat and they get up. so a mixed experience but the fact that it so a mixed experience but the fact thatitis so a mixed experience but the fact that it is launched today, people are not that it is launched today, people a re not really that it is launched today, people are not really aware of the badge but once today it is launched, and people are made aware of it i think it will be a lot better. awareness is clearly the key. to me it looks vaguely unofficial. it kind of looks like a badge someone could have just made them self, almost for a laugh. it does. 0nce... 0nce
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made them self, almost for a laugh. it does. 0nce... once the big launches done and once people become aware of it and it is for all sorts of illnesses were people don't actually look ill. 0ne of illnesses were people don't actually look ill. one other illnesses, for example? multiple sclerosis, anything, really, any form of cancer treatment where you are going through treatment, you may be travelling on the tube to get chemotherapy or radiotherapy. you look fine but you could do with a seat on that tube home. it does make a lot of sense. i think many people... i don't know what the experiences are other people but on the whole i think of somebody sees someone who needs help there are many people who are happy to offer their feet. that seems to happen quite routinely. yes. and i think as soon as quite routinely. yes. and i think as soon as people become aware of it i think people will get up. if you see someone think people will get up. if you see someone in need or someone asks for a seat and it takes embarrassment away. it is awareness, isn't it, because it is not that long since we
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started to see the baby on board badges. and now people will routinely be offered a seat. and i think they hope that that will be the same for these stages. first, you think it's cute, that is a nice badge but then you realise it is an official that so i think the same thing will happen. one more thing. people on the whole are very proud, aren't they? you see this a lot with elderly people on tubes buses were sometimes you offer them a seat and they say no. i am fine. not that they say no. i am fine. not that they are offended, that is the right conversation to have. are you 0k wearing a bed which is almost like... at the beginning you are slightly embarrassed because you think it does look like... oh, what people think i made this myself. so you are a little bit... but it is much better the next planning your story. and i think that is the key thing. to take where the embarrassment they have. they do very much rex planning that. —— thank you very much for explaining
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that. later this morning we'll get the official figures on how the economy grew in the first three months of the year, so we've sent ben to birmingham to find out if consumers there are feeling flush or feeling the pinch. good morning. mayi good morning. may i be clear, when you said you are going to text me a shopping list i did not expect it to be so long but i will pick up those things that you asked for this morning. good morning from birmingham. we are here at east end foods, a cash—and—carry but an interesting business because not only does it sell to retailers began small it also manufactures a lot of goods. it sells them around europe andindeed goods. it sells them around europe and indeed the rest of the world but also imports. it is a perfect business to help us is that the state of the economy because we know in the wake of the vote to leave the european union, the value of the pound fell quite sharply. so good news if you exported because it makes some of the staff cheaper around the world. but, and this is a big bite. things we import become more expensive. so all the raw
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materials come in a more expensive— tomatoes, rice, corn, power, it is all a bit more expensive to buy. we also know that there has been a fall in our average earnings, there has also been a fall in things that retail sales and it could mean that the economy starts to slow. we are expecting for the first quarter of the year rose to come in at around zero .5%. it will be the slowest rate in a year. we will be here this morning assessing what it means for business, what it means for customers. we will have much more detail on that in about 30 minutes. for that, let's get the news travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. police are investigating after a man in his 40s was found stabbed to death on a bus in central london. he was found just after midnight near
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gloucester place. he was declared dead at the scene. it's been revealed that homeless people in central london are being charged to store their possessions while they wait to be permanently rehoused. people in the borough of westminster have received letters telling them they'll have to pay £12 for every crate they use and £40 to collect their belongings. the local council says this is not its policy and is urgently reviewing how the letters came to be sent. as the capital's businesses continue to weigh up the challenges and opportunities of brexit, wine producers have been telling bbc london it could be good news for them. while the cost of imported wine will go up, local vineyards like this one in dorking say their products are becoming more competitive and popular. but as the chief executive of the uk's biggest wine maker says there's a lot of uncertainty ahead. there is always concern, but we have seen some benefits already. last year we started exporting some of our own wine and we had been working on that for quite sometime, our first export to america. with the devaluation in the pound last year after the brexit vote was made, they doubled that order so that was already
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a benefit we saw. there are concerns going forward with labour costs going up. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is all looking good so far. if you take a look here, there are no reported problems on any of those lines. there's been an accident in west drayton as you can see the a408 stockley road is closed northbound from the m4 to the cherry lane roundabout. there are queues on the m25— clockwise betweenjunction 5 for sevenoaks and junction 6 for godstone after an accident. let's have a check on the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini. good morning. it is far milder this morning than it was this time yesterday. we're frost free and temperatures between five and eight celsius. today will turn into a pretty nice day. a grey start but we will see sunny spells emerged. we could just see another few early outbreaks of drizzle but they will not last for very long. otherwise we are looking at a dry day with sunny spells emerging through the day.
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top temperatures of 13 or 15 degrees. feeling quite warmer than it did yesterday. a lot of sunshine around into this evening and then overnight tonight there will be variable amount of cloud and most of us will stay dry. temperatures dropping to between six and nine celsius in many of the towns although where they get clear skies they could fall lower. what goes on over the bank holiday weekend? it looks like we will see increasing temperature day on day. it will start to feel warm again. sunny spells, particularly on saturday, lovely there on saturday, the best looking day of the weekend. it will become windy on sunday with some sunny spells around. there will be some rain, probably on sunday night into the first of monday morning but that will clear to leave us with an improving the rest of the day and climbing temperatures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent.
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a woman is under police guard in hospital, after being shot during an anti—terror operation on a residential street in northwest london. two other women, a man and a 16—year—old boy were arrested in raids in willesden and in kent last night. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament, officers say the operation was not connected. alexandra mckenzie has got the latest. i know you have been there most of the night. what can you tell us about the police activity this morning? this is part of an ongoing police counterterrorism operation and there is still a heavy police presence here this morning. i have been here most of the night and there has been significant police numbers here overnight and this morning. the house in the street
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behind me, which was under observation by the police, and that people connected to that house were also under observation, now, we have spoken to local residents as well, as you can possibly see behind me, the street has been closed off and remains closed off except to people being escorted in and out of their homes. i have spoken to some of those residents, they did not want to go on camera, but they did say they were shocked to hear what happened. some people did hear those gunshots and saw armed police entering the street. today this investigation continues. police are remaining here. four people are in custody, including a 16—year—old boy. police will continue to question them. there is a woman in hospital who is part of this investigation. she is in a serious but stable condition. alexandra mckenzie, thank you. the royal marine alexander blackman, who had his murder sentence for killing a wounded taliban fighter in afghanistan quashed, has been released from prison.
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sergeant blackman, known as ‘marine a' during the case, had his conviction reduced to manslaughter on appeal last month. he has served more than three years of a seven—year sentence. a fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned by researchers as a "huge waste of money." the cancer drugs fund ran from 2010 until last year and cost nearly 1.3 billion pounds, but a new study by king's college london claims most of the drugs failed to show clinical benefit, and many patients may have suffered unnecessary side effects. however one leading breast cancer charity said the fund had transformed many lives. the royal bank of scotland has announced a profit £259 million in the first quarter of this year. this compares to a loss of almost £1 billion in the same period a year ago. the bank has not made a full—year profit in nine years, as it battles restructuring costs and conduct fines resulting
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from its years of over—expansion leading into the 2008 financial crisis. president trump said there was a chance of what he called a "major, major conflict" with north korea over its nuclear and missile programmes. in a radio interview with reuters, mr trump said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to persuade pyongyang to abandon the weapons, but warned it would be very difficult to achieve. a 24—hour strike begins today on arriva rail north north as part of an ongoing dispute over the role of guards. members of the transport union will walk out in the north of england for the third time in a row of the staffing of new trains due to come into service in 2020. arriva rail north said it was disappointing the union was unwilling to change its position during talks. it was great watching the london marathon on the weekend, wasn't it? full of heroes. yes. guess what? somebody
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who started is still going. that is because he is crawling, dressed as a gorilla. he has reached the 19 mile point, four days after the race began. this is tom harrison, in his suit, as you can see. he calls himself mr gorilla. he is aiming to com plete himself mr gorilla. he is aiming to complete the route on his hands and knees. it is all for the gorilla 0rganisation. he had a few people join him on the way. i think that was spiderman. lots of people still turning out to give him support, which is nice. he is going to need back support. must really hurt. he is trying to raise £20,000. we wish him all the best. i think you start at eight o'clock every morning.” think we should all embrace how difficult it is by trying it around our living rooms. 100 metres, i did that once, and it took me nearly a minute. i had to keep stopping. how he is doing 26 miles, i don't know. now, let's put ourselves in the emotion of a heated manchester derby, towards the end. you have
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just been booked right in front of the referee. what do you do? keep a low profile? hide. most of us would. but there is a thing called the red mist, which descends, and all reason goes out the window. it certainly did for marouane fellaini. fans were left frustrated as it finished goalless between manchester city and united, in the race for the top four champions league places. what drama there was came in the last ten minutes. united's maroane felaini was shown a straight red card for headbutting sergio aguero just seconds after he'd been booked forfouling him. city had a goal ruled out for offside, and then aguero almost won it in the last moments of the game. but that red card was the biggest talking point of the game. it says that... with another player, probably not a red card. it says that aguero was intelligent, the way he reacted, but he has to control. i am satisfied, i know how difficult it is to play
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against manchester united, how aggressive they are. of course, we missed the last shoot, the last pass, it is not easy to defend with ten players behind. it is not easy you have to be always in a good position to avoid the counter—attack. so the main winners of that draw at the etihad were third placed liverpool. meanwhile their former captain steven gerrard is to take charge of the club's under 18s side next season. the 36—year—old joined liverpool's academy in february after retiring from playing. during his time at anfield, gerrard scored 186 goals and helped the club win eight major trophies, including the 2005 champions league final. andy murray is finding his form again — he is into the quarterfinals of the barcelona 0pen. the world number one beat feliciano lopez in straight sets. but britain's dan evans is out of the tournament. china's most famous sportsman, ding jun—wee, leads the defending champion mark selby 5 frames to 3 at the world snooker championship.
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selby took an early lead in the contest, but ding won the final three frames. they will resume this morning. in the other semi—final, john higgins leads barry hawkins by the same score. next, something pretty rare. a polite and dignified press conference ahead of a big fight — in fact, one of the biggest nights in british boxing. anthonyjoshua and wladimir klistskho went head to head, and it was only pleasa ntries exchanged. there's 14 years between them, but at the press conference just a few inches, and nothing but respect. let's hearfrom both now. firstjoshua, and then klitchko has something surprising in his dressing gown. it doesn't matter about who i'm fighting. ijust enjoy what i do, i embrace every opportunity. and i think failure is without trying. that is why i would always step up to any occasion, without a shadow of a doubt. and there is no fear whatsoever that
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trembles through my body. 0n on this usb stick i recorded a video last week, and the outcome of the fight. this stick is going to be integrated in my robe, which i am going to wear this saturday night, sealed. do not ask me after the fight what is on this stick. he has the mystic, which quite confusing. guess what question one will be, after the fight? well, what is on the stick? but whoever bids on his gown will get to find out. so it will be a charity auction. they then get to see, they get to play the stick and see if his petition was right. hopefully we will find out, anyway. it is live and exclusive on
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radio 5 live from wembley stadium tomorrow night. now today, yorkshire will once again be showcased to the world, through one of cycling's biggest and most popular races, the tour de yorkshire. now in its third year, the event has cemented itself on the professional racing calendar — and also in the hearts and minds of the yorkshire people, as being one of the most thrilling weekends of the year. 0ur reporter victoria holland is on the start line for us this morning in bridlington. we can see the ocean behind you, it looks beautiful. good morning, yes. a picturesque start here in edlington. 0rganisers are just beginning to set up the grand arch that will mark the ceremonial start that will mark the ceremonial start that riders will go through at 12:35am today. —— 12:35 p.m.. this road is closed and preparations are under way. it is the third year of the tour de yorkshire, and it is there much cemented as a big cycling event. it will cover 300 miles over the next three days. there are 18
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teams competing, but one of those thatis teams competing, but one of those that is not here is team wiggins. they missed out, and bradley wiggins is not here, because it is such a popular event. team gb are here, but they will be looking to put behind recent controversies like the allegations about living and sexism in british cycling last year. —— bullying and sexism. they will be focusing on the 107 miles they have to do today. lots of people decorate and lined the route, it is not necessarily about the quick seconds whether cyclists whizz past, but about the whole event and a bit of yorkshire pride. thank you, it does look stunning. what an inspiration. i love the way this event fuses the french language with the yorkshire dialect. so, in cote, in english, that means a coop for small animals or pigeons. but in english —— in french it means a steep climb, or a
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hill. so that is what they will be going up today. very good. and we will bejoining louise going up today. very good. and we will be joining louise a little going up today. very good. and we will bejoining louise a little bit later on, at the new triathlon centre in leeds. yes, where alistair brownlee, or rather, both the brownlee, or rather, both the brownlee brothers, they spent years and years training and they were younger, and now it has been named after them. it's been almost 3.5 years since ‘marine a' was convicted of murdering a wounded afghan insurgent in helmand province — a conviction which was last month reduced to manslaughter. just after midnight last night, sergeant alexander blackman was released for time served. let's speak to his defence barrister jonathan goldberg now, who joins us from our london studio. a very good morning to you. thank you for your time. could you just tell us how alexander blackman is, just update us on how he is at the moment? here is a very happy man, his wife is a very happy wife. the two of them are just such salt of
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the earth people that i am sure you willjoin me in congratulating them on this wonderful day. well, i am assuming that for a time, maybe they wa nt assuming that for a time, maybe they want some priddis c, at what can you tell us about the plans for getting back to normality? —— want some privacy. well, obviously they want some time for decompression, they have gone to a country hideaway, i am not going to tell you where it is, they will have a few days there, andl is, they will have a few days there, and i am sure lots of champagne will be opened. bearing in mind that in her seven years marriage to him, claire has obviously not been with him for three and a half years of this awful prison term. then he was about a year fighting overseas, on many different battlefields. so she didn't see him then either. it has beena didn't see him then either. it has been a marriage where they have been more apart then together, and therefore they want to have some downtime together, and then i have no doubt they will meet the press, perhaps the week after next.
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0bviously over this period of time you have come to know alexander blackman well. clearly, huge celebrations for the family, as this verdict came through, and he was finally released. can you give us a sense of where his thoughts are in relation to everything that has happened, because clearly a terrible thing happens on a certain date and time and place. that did happen, thatis time and place. that did happen, that is a fact. what i his reflections on the sequence of events that ended up in him being convicted? -- what are his. it is a complicated story and in many ways not all of it has come out. but put yourself in his shoes. the taliban had just shot up a little fortress down the road. news was coming through on his headphones, telling him that communications had been intercepted and they were about to shoot up another fortress 800 yards away, and he might be called upon to ta ke away, and he might be called upon to take his men any minute to help the
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base and fight off the taliban and. and in those circumstances, he has a mortally wounded prisoner who, according to the pathologist, i called on appeal, and there was not even one called that this lamentable court—martial, the guy did not even have 15 minutes of life left in him anyway. so these were the kinds of dilemmas facing him. we do not have time to go into them further today. but the gravest pill for him to swallow was the fact that he was initially dismissed with disgrace from the armed forces. this is an exemplary soldier of 15 years service who has fought everywhere the british army has fought in the la st the british army has fought in the last 15 years, and who has killed, personally, over 30 enemies on the battlefield. so that was a grave pill to swallow. i am happy to say that that has gone. the court of appeal removed that stigma and he now gets all his pension
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entitlements and all the rest of it and he can call himself marine sergeant blackman until kingdom come. and that, for him, is a wonderful thing. many people will understand the nature and the tone of what you are saying in relation to how his family will feel now, but you will be well aware that there are people who are still mindful that the manslaughter conviction remains and that something truly awful happened on that day. some people have voiced the idea that they are not terribly comfortable that, notwithstanding the celebrations of the family and the battle they have had to get to this point, that they feel a little uncomfortable about possibly him being held up as almost a hero figure. you must be aware of that train of thought. well, this is obviously why the case is controversial. this is obviously why hollywood want to make a film about it. i was there last week meeting some important people and the idea
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is that kate winslet might be cast as claire. tom hardy as al. and can you believe it, al pacino as myself, although i am not sure he is good—looking enough, personally. you know, you place your money and you ta ke know, you place your money and you take your choice. if you are a left—wing bleedingheart, the idea of killing a terrorist who would have slaughtered you without compunction isa slaughtered you without compunction is a terrible thing, but i think the majority of right—thinking british people would say, you know, he had very little alternative in the appalling circumstances that confronted him at the moment of that split second decision. can ijust ask you, given what you have said about alexander blackman, and how they want some time and they are trying to reconstruct their lives as a family, trying to reconstruct their lives as afamily, are trying to reconstruct their lives as a family, are they comfortable with the notion of this being turned into a movie? and it is stepping into a whole different world? that feels, in some sense, the opposite of what
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you might imagine they would be wanting, or he might be wanting. all this is for discussion once they have had their time off together, and we are able to have a meeting. but i think if the public want to know more about this case, and if filmmakers want to make a film, of course, there have already been many documentaries, and if books are going to be written, and they will be written, about this extraordinary case, then good luck to them. and again, you are paid to be controversial and to be bleedingheart, but i am sorry to say, i think the majority ofjewish people will take the view, dined good luck to them. —— majority of british people. well, i don't agree that we are paid to be controversial, we just ask questions. and i answer them. yes, you are free to once a them. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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good morning. we still have a lot of dry weather on the cards through the bank holiday weekend. we could use some rain and there will be some on sunday. there this morning it is a fine start to the day for many of us with few scattered showers around. we have more cloud through parts of western scotland north—west england, wales, northern ireland down towards southern england as well. a few showers and a cloudier zone. either side we have more in the way of sunshine. at nine o'clock in the morning a better brightness to the likes of pembroke show but equally a few light showers across wales down towards central southern england. the middle of east anglia up towards the north—east of england, a fairly bright but fresh start to the day cloudierfor bright but fresh start to the day cloudier for north—west england, northern ireland and the west of scotla nd northern ireland and the west of scotland with a few showers. east of scotla nd scotland with a few showers. east of scotland fares better in terms of sunshine that there will be a couple of showers heading into aberdeenshire through the morning. as we had through the day, divested the sunshine today will be around
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eastern scotland, england. there will be some bright weather developing further west as well. this cloud is owned through central parts of the country tends to break up parts of the country tends to break upa parts of the country tends to break up a little bit onto the afternoon and still the light shall here and there. 0nly few and far between so for most of us it stays dry. which is reaching 15 degrees also surfing is reaching 15 degrees also surfing is turning a little bit milder they we re is turning a little bit milder they were earlier in the week. a dry evening to come in and for many of us we have clear skies overnight as many of those showers either way. some into the far north—west of the country. for many of us, a fresh start to saturday morning. could be the odd misty patch around, largely a frosty morning. during the bank holiday monday we will see the breeze picking up, things are milder than they have been over recent days. some rain on the cards, particularly for sunday. we will not all see it however. sunday shedding all see it however. sunday shedding a fine with a lot of dry bright weather with sunshine. you can see the wind areas and are we so that southerly wind is picking up a little bit later on in the day. towards the south—east, 16 or 17
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degrees and it should feel quite pleasant. it is a will have low pressure in a frontal system approaching from the atlantic, squeezing the isobars and we think sunday is going to be a breezy sort of day and there will be some outbreaks of rain, most likely across parts of wales in the south—west of england. that area just but its way north eastwards through the day. temperatures reaching 17 degrees also so fine weather across much of scotland as well. as we had through into the bank holiday, it looks like the rain eases away quickly. we are between weather systems during bank holiday monday. quite a lot of dry weather, and is still the odd shower around the winds look lighter and things are they're one of the best selling female bands of all time and later this morning bananarama will be here to talk to us about reforming and going on tour as a trio for the very first time. we have been paying tribute to them in ourown we have been paying tribute to them in our own special way to one of the biggest selling girl bands. much excitement throughout the whole team
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about the imminent arrival of ba na narama at 830 about the imminent arrival of bananarama at 830 this morning. they are getting back together and they will be going on to and it is a chance for everyone to get a little nostalgic. —— going on with art. —— going on tour. # i'm yourvenus, # i'm yourfire # at your desire # i'm your venus, i'm yourfire # at your desire # come on baby, can't you see # i stand accused of love in the 1st degree some people are more enthusiastic
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than others about dressing up.” will just say that, because than others about dressing up.” willjust say that, because it is the truth. we'll chat to bananarama after half past eight this morning. i salute you. you did brilliantly. you who we were missing? then. cunningly he made sure he was not here yesterday. good morning. i was iwas in i was in birmingham. sadly i could not take part but i am relieved. you too did well in the video and i am quite impressed. good morning and welcome to birmingham. we are here to talk about economic growth
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because later today will get the first estimate the growth of the economy in the first three months of the year. it is expected to come in pretty wea k, the year. it is expected to come in pretty weak, it will be about 0.4% and if that is concerned will be the slowest rate in about a year and it is because the economy has a lot to contend with right now, not least that uncertainty. so we have come here, this is east end foods in birmingham and is a great example of a business dealing with that uncertainty because not only does it sell to retailers big and small it also manufactures here and import stuff from around the world, processes it and then exports it. it is that a import—export story that is that a import—export story that is so important. let me run you through the numbers as we know them so far because for last year, the uk economy grew by 1.8%, nearly 2%. rather robust. but there is a big blot on the horizon because we have or be had retail sales figures that tellers consumers have stopped spending. they have dropped by 1.4% in the last of that we have. as they said, it is the import—export story
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thatis said, it is the import—export story that is interesting because a fall in the value of the pound means that stuff that we make in this country and sell abroad, exports, they are cheaper, that is good news. but things we import from overseas such as raw materials or anything like energy and oil, that is more expensive. so what's it mean for business? jason is the boss and he is with me this morning. most of the year,. and it cost? give me an indication of what it means for you, the fall in the value of the pound. we have products from all over the world, rice from india, almonds from california, black pepperfrom vietnam, lentils from turkey and so on. we import from all over the world and since the referendum vote last year the currency and steady devaluation has affected business in a big way. so is not causing any thing more to make these things, it is not that there is a drought or anything this is purely exchange—rate. yes. that is correct. 15- 20% exchange—rate. yes. that is correct. 15— 20% devaluation and yes the commodity rises have an influence whether or so because it is
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agricultural product in the main it is the currency. so what does that mean day today? we talk about economic growth. doesn't mean that you are, for example, not going to ta ke you are, for example, not going to take on new staff or maybe you think it will hang on for you build a new factory? not only are prices going up factory? not only are prices going upfor factory? not only are prices going up for you factory? not only are prices going upforyou and factory? not only are prices going up for you and you can really pass on to consumers, you also may see a in your profit as well. in business you always have to be an optimist but it is very difficult to pass on those price increases directly to consumers in one foul swoop. so the issue have is to take a cut in margin and that could well mean less money to invest in the business in the future. good stuff. most of the year, jason and thank you for having this morning. using your shopping list, guys, earlier, sallyi this morning. using your shopping list, guys, earlier, sally i have what you wanted the teabags and the beans. last orders. i'm heading back soon so beans. last orders. i'm heading back soon so let me know of there is anything else you need me to pick up. and it will be purchased in bulk so, big orders, please. chocolate. chocolate then more chocolate, please. ok. i will nip
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chocolate then more chocolate, please. ok. iwill nip over chocolate then more chocolate, please. ok. i will nip over there now and make sure i bring it back. why does he assume i want baked beans? i don't know. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. police are investigating after a man in his 40s was found stabbed to death on a bus in central london. the man was found on the 189 bus at gloucester place just after midnight. detectives are trying to find out exactly when and where he was attacked. it's been revealed that homeless people in central london are being charged to store their possessions while they wait to be permanently rehoused. people in the borough of westminster have received letters telling them they'll have to pay £12 for every crate they use and £40 to collect their belongings. the local council says this is not its policy and is urgently reviewing how the letters came to be sent.
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as the capital's businesses continue to weigh up the challenges and opportunities of brexit, wine producers have been telling bbc london it could be good news for them. while the cost of imported wine will go up, local vineyards like this one in dorking say their products are becoming more competitive and popular. but as the chief executive of the uk's biggest wine maker says there's a lot of uncertainty ahead. there is always concern, but we have seen some benefits already. last year we started exporting some of our own wine and we had been working on that for quite sometime, our first export to america. with the devaluation in the pound last year after the brexit vote was made, they doubled that order so that was already a benefit we saw. there are concerns going forward with labour costs going up. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the tube is all looking good so far. if you take a look here, there are no reported problems on any of those lines. there's been an accident in west drayton as you can see the a408 stockley road is closed northbound from the m4 to the cherry lane roundabout.
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that is causing serious queues. there are queues on the m25, clockwise betweenjunction 5 for sevenoaks and junction 6 for godstone after an accident. let's have a check on the weather now. here's elizabeth rizzini. good morning. it is far milder this morning than it was this time yesterday. we're frost free and temperatures between five and eight celsius. today will turn into a pretty nice day. a grey start but we will see sunny spells emerged. we could just see another few early outbreaks of drizzle but they will not last for very long. otherwise we are looking at a dry day with sunny spells emerging through the day. top temperatures of 13 or 15 degrees. feeling quite warmer than it did yesterday. a lot of sunshine around into this evening and then overnight tonight there will be variable amount of cloud and most of us will stay dry. temperatures dropping to between six and nine celsius in many of the towns although where they get clear skies they could fall lower. what goes on over the bank holiday weekend? it looks like we will see
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increasing temperature day on day. it will start to feel warm again. sunny spells, particularly on saturday, lovely there on saturday, the best looking day of the weekend. it will become windy on sunday with some sunny spells around. there will be some rain, probably on sunday night into the first of monday morning but that will clear to leave us with an improving the rest of the day and climbing temperatures. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to sally and charlie. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. a woman is shot and injured by police in an anti—terror operation in north—west london.
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it happened after armed officers moved into a residential street in willesden. four people are arrested in the operation. this is the scene there this morning. the operation is thought to be continuing. officers say it's not connected to the arrest of a man near downing street, yesterday. good morning, it's friday the 28th of april. also this morning: released from prison, former marine alexander blackman, who had his sentence reduced for shooting dead an injured taliban fighter, goes free after three years in jail. vauxhall is accused of a reckless disregard for safety over the way it handled a series of car fires on its zafira b model. in sport, the manchester derby is marred by a moment of madness, as united's marouane fellaini is sent off for headbutting sergio aguero, as the game ends in a goalless draw. three cheers for monaco. —— monaco.
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hip, hip, hurray! is 89—year—old monica evans a record breaker? she's been in the same job at the same company for 70 years, she'll be with us before 8am. that is loyalty. and sarah keith lucas has your bank holiday weekend weather. good morning, looking milder over recent days, sunshine and one or two showers. all the details about the bank holiday weekend in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. a woman is under police guard in hospital, after being shot during an anti—terror operation on a residential street in north—west london. two other women, a man and a 16—year—old boy were arrested in raids in willesden and in kent last night. it happened hours after a man was arrested for allegedly attempting a terror attack near the houses of parliament. officers say the operation was not connected. alexandra mckenzie has got the latest. a residential street in willesden, in north—west london. several gunshots heard, yesterday evening. gunshots. as armed police raided
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a terraced house. a woman in her 20s was shot by police. four people were arrested. as darkness fell, a police presence remained. the woman who was shot was taken to hospital. she was in a serious but stable condition and is under police guard. a 16—year—old man and a woman aged 20 were arrested at the property. a 20—year—old man was arrested close by and a 43—year—old woman in kent, a short time later. all four on suspicion of the commission, preparation and instigation of terrorist acts. they are in custody in a police station inside london. police say this was an ongoing counterterrorism investigation. the house had been under observation, as had the people connected to it. as the search of the house continued into the night, other searches related to this incident were also being carried out at other properties across london.
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however, police say there is no connection between these arrests and the one in whitehall, yesterday. let's have a look at the scene right now in willesden. it's just after 8am. you it'sjust after 8am. you can it's just after 8am. you can see there is still a significant police presence and we have just had confirmation from the metropolitan police that there will be a news conference in around 25 minutes time. they will give a bit more information about the investigation and what has been happening overnight. we will keep you up—to—date. and we'll be speaking to a former head of the national counter terrorism security office on the latest developments in just a few minutes' time. the royal marine, alexander blackman, who shot dead an injured
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taliban fighter in afghanistan in 2011, has been released from prison. sergeant blackman, or ‘marine a' as he was known, was originally found guilty of murder, but last month the court martial appeal court replaced that conviction with diminished responsibility manslaughter. our correspondent andrew plant sent us this report from outside the prison. this is where alexander blackman has been held, behind the bible wired fence, out in the wiltshire countryside —— barbed wire fence. convicted of murder in 2013 of shooting and killing a wounded taliban fighter while he was on a tour of duty in helmand province in afghanistan. ever since then, there has been a campaign by his friend and family and supporters to try to get that conviction overturned. last month, the court martial appeal heard evidence that alexander blackman had been suffering from a mental disorder at the time and his murder conviction was quashed, overturned and changed to one of manslaughter on the grounds of
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diminished responsibility. in fact, his lawyers have been hoping that he would be released even sooner than this. over easter, but they had to wait a few more weeks. but we understand now he has been released from here, sometime last nightjust after midnight we think, taken away under cover of darkness and in a police escort. to be reunited with his wife and his family to start a life outside of prison now as a free man. earlier alexander blackman's lawyer told bbc breakfast that sometimes in war tough decisions need to be made. if you're a left wing bleeding heart kind of individual, the idea of killing a terrorist who would've thought of you without compunction isa thought of you without compunction is a terrible thing. but i think the majority of right—thinking british people would say, you know, he had very little alternative in the appalling circumstances that confronted him at the moment of that split second decision. a special fund set up to improve patient access to cancer drugs in england has been condemned as a "huge waste of money".
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the cancer drugs fund, which ran from 2010 until it was replaced last year, cost over £1 billion. but researchers say the majority of drugs failed to show clinical benefit. 0ur medical correspondent fergus walsh reports. the cancer drugs fund was set up to pay for expensive medicines that the nhs was not funding. in part, it was a political response to repeated negative headlines about patients being denied treatment. nearly 100,000 patients received drugs, but the study in the journal annals of oncology found just one in five treatments delivered a significant benefit, extending life by an average of three months. researchers say it was an example of policy made on the hoof, and it failed. it was a major missed opportunity for the national health service and the counsellor community to learn in the counsellor community to learn in the real world about the actual impact of new medicines. —— cancer
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community. a great deal of money, over £1 billion, was expended on this. and we didn't collect the data to look at individual cancer patients. that's a missed opportunity. the study concludes many patients may have suffered unnecessary side—effects from drugs. but a leading breast cancer charity said the fund has had a totally transformational impact for many, offering precious extra time with loved ones for terminally ill patients. the fund was brought under the remit of the national institute for health and care excellence last year, so there is greater scrutiny over which treatments are approved. a man has died after being stabbed on a bus in london. police and paramedics found the man, believed to be in his 405, at gloucester place in the early hours of friday morning. he suffered a fatal stab wound while travelling on a route 189 bus at about 12.10am. he was declared dead at the scene and no arrests have been made. the royal bank of scotland has announced a profit £259 million in the first quarter of this year. this compares to a loss
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of almost a billion pounds in the same period a year ago. the bank has not made a full—year profit in nine years, as it battles restructuring costs and conduct fines resulting from its years of over—expansion leading into the 2008 financial crisis. president trump said there was a chance of what he called a "major, major conflict" with north korea over its nuclear and missile programmes. in a radio interview with reuters, mr trump said he would prefer a diplomatic outcome to persuade pyongyang to abandon the weapons, but warned it would be very difficult to achieve. the car maker vauxhall showed a "reckless disregard for safety" over the way it handled a series of fires on its zafira b model, according to mp5. a report by the transport select committee has found the company was too slow to act, especially when it allowed people to drive in cars which were still a hazard. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, reports. you can see why many drivers described it as terrifying. theirfamily car bursting into flames out of the blue, sometimes
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with children inside. fire taking hold in a matter of minutes. even vauxhall says it is lucky nobody was seriously hurt. today's report is scathing about the way the company handled the issue. it took them a long time to act. when they did act and said they'd put things right, cars were still bursting into flames. even at that point, they did not recall the cars fully. this is totally unacceptable and is putting people's lives at risk. well over 200 zafira bs caught fire because of a problem in the heating system. the true scale only really came to light after a facebook group and the london fire brigade began noticing a pattern. worst of all, this report says, vauxhall let people drive around in cars that were supposed to be fixed but could in fact still catch fire. the company says safety is its top priority, and it's changed the way it deals with recalls to speed things up.
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now mps are calling for new laws to prosecute carmakers who fail to sort out a safety issue quickly. richard wescott, bbc news. a 24—hour strike begins today on arriva rail north, as part of an ongoing dispute over the role of guards. members of the rail, maritime and transport union will walk out in the north of england for the third time in a row over staffing for new trains, which are due to come into service in 2020. arriva rail north said it was disappointing that the union were unwilling to change their position during talks. those are the main stories and one other story. a man crawling the london marathon dressed as a gorilla has reached the 19—mile point, four days after the race began. take a moment and give him some applause. tom harrison, who calls himself mr gorilla, is aiming to complete the 26.2 mile route on his hands and knees for the gorilla 0rganization.
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he had some special help from spiderman, which must have been great. mr gorilla is expected to finish this saturday and has raised more than £20,000. something tells me that when he does finally go over the finishing line, i think there will be quite a good turnout. he will need a bit of a rest as well. it is 8:11am. the sport and weather coming up. armed officers have shot a woman during a counter—terrorism operation in which four suspects, including a teenage boy, were arrested in north london. these were the scenes. when officers raided the area in the early hours. you can clearly hear the gunshots. the metropolitan police said the operation is part of an "ongoing counter terrorism investigation" but stressed it was not connected to an incident
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in whitehall earlier that day. we can talk to alexandra mckenzie on the scene. one or two developments this morning, bring us up to date. that's right. it's an ongoing operation and the house behind us had been under police surveillance for some time. also, the people connected to it had been under surveillance for some time as well. there has been a heavy police presence here overnight. i've been here for much of the night. there remains a heavy police presence here this morning. local residents have started going to work, going to school, this morning. some had been aware of what happened, some had heard those shots. some had seen the armed police and the street yesterday. for others, it has come asa yesterday. for others, it has come as a bit ofa yesterday. for others, it has come as a bit of a shock, they have been asking what went on last night, yesterday they had been unaware of
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it and expressed shock at what had happened. thank you. we were just told in the last few minutes that at 8:30am, there will bea minutes that at 8:30am, there will be a press conference and that will be a press conference and that will be taking place at new scotland yard in connection with the ongoing counterterrorism policing operation. that is at 8:30am this morning and we will bring you any developments. it is 30 minutes past eight. —— 13 minutes. he swept to victory with a promise to "make america great again" and the first 100 days of donald trump's presidency have been anything but boring or slow. but how much of it has been rhetoric and spin, and how much has brought real action? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin's been crunching the numbers. it was a seismic event, a shock win by the man with the seismic signature. from this day forward, america first.
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so 100 days in, let's numerically examine his record. # quick talking numbers # well, numbers are a problem. as he hits this symbolic milestone, president trump has desperately been trying to get his first budget agreed and avoid a government shutdown. let's look at another number. 40% is the president's approval rating right now. far less than 0bama at this stage, or george w bush or bill clinton at this stage. but polls show the vast majority of those who loved trump that then still love him today. make america great again. he will. here's another number. he will! 45 million.
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that's followers on twitter. should i keep twitter going or not? this is how he speaks to his fans. direct, making sure he cuts out... the fake news. it's all fake news. it's phoney stuff. it's all fake. the number of times he has tweeted about fake news, 72. 35 positive tweets. 28 about fox news. his tv station of choice where he has discussed everything from military action... we just launched 59 missiles heading to iraq. headed to syria? yes. headed to syria. to the cake he was eating and the exact point that military action was launched. we had the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake that you have ever seen. and three — he number of times he has ordered military action. in syria. in afghanistan. and this what he called his "powerful armada" diverted
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to north korea as a threat. as far as foreign relations, trump has appeared decisive if at times contradictory. we can not continue to allow china to rape our country and that is what they are doing. china, once a sworn foe is now a sworn friend. we are going to have a very, very great relationship. in all there have been six handshakes with foreign leaders, hands held, hands yanked, sometimes hands just forgotten. and is there something else trump forgot? we will build a wall, don't worry about it. we are building the wall. progress on walls to be built. it's gonna start soon. slow. in fact payment for the wall is one of the stumbling blocks holding up the budget. so back to those pesky numbers. there is a sort of this artificial number that gets thrown out.
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100 days and you have four years in your first term. trump signed that seismic signature to a 100—day pledge before he took office. in terms of legislation delivered, he is nowhere near as close as his predecessors. but immigration is down, trade is up. to his supporters, he is delivering. it has been a hugely successful first 100 days. numbers. controversial for this administration from day one but president trump knows that this is a work in progress. lots more on the website about president trump's first 100 days in office including this tracker which looks at how much the president has achieved so far. we live in washington talking about why the
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first 100 days are so important. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a woman has been shot by police, and four people have been arrested, during an anti—terror operation in north—west london. a former marine who shot dead an injured taliban fighter has been released from jail after his murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter. it isa it is a bank holiday weekend. another bank holiday weekend full of it means people are more interested than ever in the weather. it would not be a bank holiday without the mention of rain and a forecast not too much. this picture is from essex. as we head through the day, there will be eight cloudier zone of weather in western scotland, north—west england, wales and central and southern england as well. the showers should break up into the afternoon. towards the east and west of that we should see a
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good deal of sunshine developing. this is four o'clock this afternoon. there will be brightness across the rest of wales and the west of england. the london region 14, 15, should feel quite pleasant with the afternoon. as we head northwards, the cloud tending to thin out. a few showers lingering across parts of scotland. lighter winds out there today than we have seen recently. not the wintry feel we have seen over recent days. any showers in central areas dying away overnight was it will become drier with rain in the far north—west. for the bulk of the country are fresh and dry start to saturday. the odd misty patch around and the isolated touch of grass frost. most of us are frost free on saturday morning. milder thanit free on saturday morning. milder than it has been. some rain around, particularly through the course of sunday. we could do with some rain.
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during saturday it is looking largely dry with sunshine. you can see their wind hours picking up in the west. turning breezy for western parts of the country. —— the wind is picking up. on saturday night into sunday will start to see this area of low pressure moving in from the west, squeezing the isobars. that means it will be more breezy on sunday. the rain is gradually nudging north eastwards. some uncertainty about the detail of the rainfall. the rain will push its way eastward as we move into bank holiday monday. i think we will be between weather systems on bank holiday monday. you cannot allow the odd shower lingering into monday. temperatures up to about 16 degrees. you will be pleased to hear that as we head through the first week of
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may, for many of us, the trend in temperatures is upwards. it could feel cooler around the east coast. quite a lot of cooler and unsettled weather on the coast. they're two of the most famous sportsmen to come out of yorkshire. so, it's no wonder alistair and jonny brownlee are being honoured today, with the uk's first purpose—built triathlon training base being named after them. the the brownlee centre, in leeds, will be the focus for the next generation of sports hopefuls, who want to replicate the incredible 0lympic success of the brothers. our very own triathlete, louise minchin, is there for us this morning. she is not sitting still. she is not standing still and she is already on her bike. very good morning. it is the most stunning morning. you mention the fantastic 0lympic athletes we have. these could be the
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future, couldn't you. they are from leeds university. this is the first, purpose—built cycling circuit in the uk. you happy to be here? yes. they will cycle of far more professionally than myself. if you area professionally than myself. if you are a cyclist, there will be no potholes. that is a good thing. new go. show us how it is done while i interview somebody. enjoy. an absolutely fantastic place to be. it is worth alistair and johnny brownlee learned their schools. —— skills. you better to talk about the centre than a browlee. earlier i spoke to alistair about how important this place would be to him and other athletes. what a lovely honour to have it named after you. tell us about the place on why it is important?‘
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massive honour. it is a place i have trained and run around these fields behind is probably millions of times over the years. started doing cross country here when i was 11, 12 years old. i have a real history here. it wasjust old. i have a real history here. it was just playing old. i have a real history here. it wasjust playing fields. now we have a cycling circuit we stood on now. in the distance behind us, the pavilion has been revamped. that is the specific triathlon centre on the bottom floor with purpose—built facilities we have never had before. it is fabulous for you. members of the public will be able to come out and cycle on the track. absolutely. the circuit is brilliant for us. you can train hard on it. a lot more valuable for people getting into sport. some people are not so confident riding their bikes on the road because it is a traffic free environment. you will be here as
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well. you will be using it as well and whizzing past them.” well. you will be using it as well and whizzing past them. i will be using it most weeks. that was alistair brownlee. i really wa nt to that was alistair brownlee. i really want to hear more about how they have become so brilliant. i can speak to the coach of alistair and johnny brownlee. tell us about the two boys you met them when they were boys, didn't you? ithink two boys you met them when they were boys, didn't you? i think they were 16 and 14. i met them at a running track. the dad was looking for a run coach to try to improve that arm of theirtraining. i remember coach to try to improve that arm of their training. i remember him saying alistair, the tall one when he is quite a good runner. a bit slow at first. do not take any
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notice ofjohnny and you did. i decided it was better to occupy johnny while he was watching his big brother and the rest is history, also they say. you used to coach them right here for many years, didn't you? we came here every saturday morning for about ten years ina saturday morning for about ten years in a row. it is a vast expanse of grass, which is rare to get. an ideal place was that this is where the boys became the best runners in world triathlon. you have this incredible circuit. it is notjust opened to them and students from the university of leeds, it will be open to anybody, won't it? whilst we will have the high centre here, funded by our partners, british cycling have put this in in order to encourage people to start learning in a safe environment. we hope that the mix,
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if you like, of world—class athletes and beginners, will produce another 16 and 14—year—old in a few years' time coming along with their mum and dad and saying, can we be better, please? they are fantastic. what makes them so special, do you think? a numberof makes them so special, do you think? a number of factors. a lot goes into it. they are very special. they have a fantastic work ethic. they do not think the grass is greener elsewhere. the greenest grass is here in leeds. the sun always shines, in one way or the other. and so they are not off to the gold coast or san diego, they want to grow and develop here and grow and develop others here as well. that is lovely. i don't put on my helmet and cycle i am nervous. i thought alistair's by stu was excellent...
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don't fall off! i will try to catch up don't fall off! i will try to catch up with them, which is unlikely.” will tell you what. if anyone can catch them, it is that lady there. look! she will catch them. leedsis leeds is where the new triathlon centre is. after a chilly start the best of the early sunshine. more cloud developing into the afternoon. further west where we have the cloud, that should break up a little and there will still be some showers around. highest averages across southern england, perhaps 15 degrees and the far south—west may still be dry. in the afternoon, some showers loitering in the west country and wales and merseyside. in eastern england, likely to be dry with sunny spells in the afternoon and though showers near the coast will have moved offshore. it will brighten up across northern ireland, drying off. 0ne across northern ireland, drying off. one or two showers in scotland but some sunshine around. a bit cooler
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perhaps around the north sea coasts. for the bank holiday weekend, the wind will pick up turning more southerly. it will be a bit warmer. there is a chance of rain although i don't think it will amount to very much at all. saturday should be a fine day just about much at all. saturday should be a fine dayjust about everywhere. just a chance of a light shower here and there but otherwise dry, good spells of sunshine and the winds starting to turn southerly, those temperatures will be higher and it feel warmer. 0vernight, the winds picked up and into sunday. at the same time, we will find an area of low pressure on this weather fronts developing close to the south—west of england. most of the rain will come into the south—west of the uk during sunday. into the south—west of england, wales, not far away from northern ireland. other areas likely to stay dry with some sunshine. warm in the sunshine but quite a keen wind and touching gale force in places. not as warm on monday, the rain peters out north across england and wales, leaving one or two
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