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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 17, 2018 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: the number missing in california's biggest wildfire rises again. more than 1,000 people are reported missing. 71 people are confirmed to have died. she's weathered the political storm for now, but as theresa may battles to sell her brexit deal — there's fresh pressure from some in her cabinet to change the plan. applause. another record—breaking year for children in need. the charity's raised more than £1 billion since it began almost a0 years ago. good morning. in sport, wales aren't going up. they miss out on promotion in the nations league. a 2—1 defeat to denmark means that ryan giggs side must wait for next time. he shoots, he scores. mike's riding the wave of women's basketball success with a little help from his friends. good morning. after a grey start to
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the weekend, things are set to turn much right, with lots of sunshine developing, but next week it does turn colder. i will have all the details here on breakfast. good morning. it's saturday the 17th november. our top story today: the number of people missing in california's wildfires has now risen to more than 1,000. 71 people are known to have died. president trump will visit the state later today. 0ur correspondent dave lee has sent this report from what is now the devastated town of paradise. this is the first step in a very long process. crew of firefighters lifts away large degree and make sure the area is safe. soon, a second him with cadaver dogs will sweep the area, if they find remains, the coroner ‘s office will
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arrive. it takes time, even with the more than 400 specialists now on the ground in paradise, the town worst hit by this fire. progress seems to be going backwards. each day we hear about several confirmed deaths, but with it comes news that there are a growing number still unaccounted for. as of tonight, the list that we will be releasing, the current list of unaccounted individuals stands at 1011, which is an increase on yesterday by 380. the majority of those on that unaccounted for list are in their70s, those on that unaccounted for list are in their 70s, 80s and 905. some are in their 705, 805 and 905. some of them may have lived in a place like this, this mobile home park used to be known as the enchanted forest, but is now one of the focus of the enormous rescue operation. the impact from these fires are being felt acro55 the impact from these fires are being felt across the state of california, more than 100 miles away in different ci5co, calls and i5 this is were closed down due to
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trouble a quality currently measured a5 trouble a quality currently measured as being the worst anywhere in the world. on saturday, it is expected that president trump will pay a visit to teams fighting the5e fires and maybe meet some of those who have been evacuated. dave lee, bbc news, in paradise. bbc news understands that a group of five cabinet brexiteer5 is hoping to persuade there5a may to change her eu withdrawal deal. sources say their efforts are being co—ordinated by the leader of the commons, andrea lead5om, with the aim of changing the agreement into something they consider winnable and supportable. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. thi5 this weekend, there5a may will take to the papers, television and social media to try to sell her brexit deal to the public. but she may have a tougher task selling it to her party. if 48 of her mp5 call for it, she will face a vote of no—confidence in her leadership.
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last night she called dozens of leading lights in local parties to try and persuade them to support her. and one of her allie5 has returned to the cabinet with this message. this is not a time for changing our leader. this is a time for pulling together, for making sure that we remember who we are here to serve and to help, the whole of the country. i worry sometimes that my colleagues are too concerned about the westminster bubble rather than keeping their eye on what ourjob is, to serve people. but other cabinet members are not quite as supportive. five leading leave campaigners including michael gove, andrea lead5om and liam fox will meet within days to call for further changes to the brexit deal. if the prime minister or the eu will not give away, then further resignations can not be ruled out. so far, there5a may has confounded conventional wisdom by 5urviving a series of setback5. any further loss of support could leave her vulnerable. iain watson, bbc news. one of britain's biggest newspaper groups, johnston press, is going into administration. the company print5 more than 200 local and regional titles, including ‘the scot5man‘
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and ‘the yorkshire post', as well as the ‘i'. it's blamed changes to the way facebook and google di5play stories, which has led to a fall in advertising. the move into administration is part of a rescue plan to keep the papers in circulation. the un envoy to yemen says both sides in the war have promised to attend peace talks. martin griffiths told the security council that the commitment could be a crucial moment in the conflict between the government and houthi rebels. the war has triggered a humanitarian cri5i5 threatening million5 of yemenis with starvation. thi5 this is a crucial moment for yemen. i have received firm assurances from the leader of the parties, the government, that they are committed to attending the5e consultations. i believe they are genuine and i expect them to continue in that way
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and to appear for those consultations and indeed, so do the yemeni people. the inland revenue is warning that university students are being bombarded with fake tax refund emails, in a bid to steal their banking and personal details. thousands of reports have been received in the past few weeks. fraud5ters are using email addresses that appear to be from a genuine university. officials say emails, texts or voicemail5 would never be used to inform a customer of a refund. the bbc‘s annual children in need appeal has raised a record amount, of more than £50 million, taking it past the £1 billion mark since it first started. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back on last night. cheering. the knights record—breaking total. —— night's.
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the evening kicked off with a performance from west end mu5ical, school of rock. the cast of eastender5 took part in a watford wa lt eastender5 took part in a watford walt disney song and dense extravaganza. while boy band boyzone competed for the district we come dancing glitter ball trophy. —— strictly come dancing. eight doctor who 5upercentre to visit the robot. and workers in projects who thought they were making a video, got to duet with some of their favourite 5ta r5. duet with some of their favourite 5tar5. celebritie5 also went to visit some of the places where the
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money raised by everyone watching end5 money raised by everyone watching ends up being spent. it was a night of historic fundraising to help disadvantaged children across the uk. lizo mzimba, bbc news. we got involved in the fundraising too, didn't we? blink and you'll miss it moment. taking part in one of the nights big set—piece routine5. see if you can spot a. —— spot u5. no business like 5how no business like show business, everything about it is appealing. i haven't seen it. yes, what you don't necessarily get a sense of, watching the tv images, the amount
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of money raised, is the scale of what they are doing. everything is ona what they are doing. everything is on a massive scale. so big, such an organisational feat, on a massive scale. so big, such an organi5ationalfeat, isn't on a massive scale. so big, such an organisational feat, isn't it? the live audience and the millions watching, it is terrific. extraordinary 5um5 watching, it is terrific. extraordinary sums of money raised every time. excellent, really good fun, i have had enough. that is enough now, done. the time is nine minutes past six. we will be getting reactions about a code of —— chaotic brexit week. will ta ke code of —— chaotic brexit week. will take a look at the front pages, the time5 looking at what there5a may is 110w time5 looking at what there5a may is now up to. amber rudd returning to the cabinet a5 amber rudd returning to the cabinet as work and persons —— pensions
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secretary. if i show you this picture, you can work out these key individuals, nigel farage and boris johnson having drink5,. thi5 taken on the most turbulent day of there5a may's past week. not sure where it was taken but that was then having a get—together 5omewhere. was taken but that was then having a get-together somewhere. something 5lightly get-together somewhere. something slightly more personal in the daily mail. it is saying that the prime minister has told the newspaper how 5he minister has told the newspaper how she has come through the toughest week of her prime mini5tership, thanks to her husband, philip. she has paid tribute to" —— her rock. he 5ay5 has paid tribute to" —— her rock. he says he feels pain of the abuse from her mp5 says he feels pain of the abuse from hermp5 are than says he feels pain of the abuse from her mp5 are than she does. says he feels pain of the abuse from her mps are than she does. the times going on, if you have been following closely, regrouping has happened within cabinet with those new
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appointments. thi5 within cabinet with those new appointments. this is the story going around today in political ci rcle5 going around today in political circle5 that there is a group, including michael gove, within the cabinet to ourtrain including michael gove, within the cabinet to our train together, i think it is five of them, a gang of five, they are saying, to exercise a certain amount of pressure on specific issues around the withdrawal deal. will try to find out the bit more about that for you this morning. and this very important report that came out yesterday, the duck —— the guardian has put on its front page. au5terity has put on its front page. au5terity has inflicted misery on it. the this i5a un has inflicted misery on it. the this is a un report on extreme poverty and, permission to britain with this declaration, despite the uk being the fifth—largest economy, levels of poverty are not only a disgrace, but a social calamity and an economic disaster. the time is 12 minutes past six. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. goodbody to both of you. a bit of a
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grey start of the weekend acro55 mo5t grey start of the weekend acro55 most of the uk. a little bit drizzly at places, but it will be one that brightens up for many, with increasing amounts of such a. if given citizenship and come out today, you certainly will through tomorrow. thing5 today, you certainly will through tomorrow. things will gradually turn that bit colder. high—pre55ure across that bit colder. high—pre55ure acro55 continental europe feeding in this big clear scott towards us pushing away, the cloud would have this morning, northwards and we5twa rds this morning, northwards and we5tward5 and breaking it up. it was a very —— saint area of high pressure which 5hepherded in the cold there. this morning it is quite funny in places, particularly over the hills and we are seeing light rain or drizzle the hills and we are seeing light rain ordrizzle in the hills and we are seeing light rain or drizzle in parts of england and wales especially. it is he with clear skies acro55 east anglia, that which has its way northwards and mo5t which has its way northwards and most will see 5un5hine into the afternoon. it does mean that it will ta ke afternoon. it does mean that it will take a bit longer acro55 afternoon. it does mean that it will take a bit longer across the 5outh—we5t, can you reduce the more cloud and i5 5outh—we5t, can you reduce the more cloud and is being cloudier acro55 eastern slope5 cloud and is being cloudier acro55 eastern slopes of the peak shtick and the pennine5 with that
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5outh—we5terly wind. staying with cloud for much of the day in northern ireland, maybe not until later on that as he eastern areas brighten up and around southern eastern part of the grampians holding on to the cloud that we start with 5un5hine in the north—west highlands and we will finish with it as well. two temperatures 14 degrees, mo5t around 10-13 temperatures 14 degrees, mo5t around 10— 13 celsius. into tonight, a bit of cloud acro55 10— 13 celsius. into tonight, a bit of cloud across the far north—east of cloud across the far north—east of scotland, especially shetland. rest of the areas clear and we were 5ee tempertaures drop widely. ring5 on the map uk wide world out in decemberfigures on the map uk wide world out in december figures and a touch of fro5t here to start your sunday morning. a slightly added chill tomorrow exacerbate —— exacerbated by the breeze, it will be a lovely day, lots of sunshine throughout. is in the cloud north—east scotland will break up at times, shetland holding onto the cloudy conditions, more of a breeze acro55 holding onto the cloudy conditions, more of a breeze across the south coast wa5 more of a breeze across the south coast was the south—west. temperature i5 coast was the south—west. temperature is still in double figures for the vast majority but that changes into next week, that
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high—pre55ure scamp5 5aid that changes into next week, that high—pre55ure scamp5 said that across high—pre55ure scamp5 said that acro55 scandinavia, wind on the 5outhern flank of it rings colder airourway. 5outhern flank of it rings colder air our way. the return5 5outhern flank of it rings colder air our way. the returns the cloud to our skies on monday, a grey day in places, the best of any brightness tending to be the west with sunny spell5. a little bit of cloud break5 with sunny spell5. a little bit of cloud brea ks here with sunny spell5. a little bit of cloud break5 here and there but the shower can be expected, especially in the east and it may turn to sleep over the pennines, all of us in 5ingle figures by then but by tuesday, increased breeze, greater chance of rain and help sleet even further south, you can see some showers and don't be surprised, over the chiltern, the cotswolds and the moors you could see a bit of wet 5now mixed in with rain and this is what it will feel like. the temperature is made to feel more like close to freezing, especially in southern areas as that wind picks up in southern areas as that wind picks up too. set to get much colder, back you both. you didn't see -- say that yesterday in the studio, he said 5ix 01’ yesterday in the studio, he said 5ix or seven. why are they down our?
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temperatures are six or seven, this i5 temperatures are six or seven, this is what it will feel like the wind, much colder. in his defence, can i ju5t much colder. in his defence, can i just say that the weather doe5 change. but it has not changed. the point that is making is that hasn't changed. i didn't fear the! it's to feel like that. it is good to be a long morning, isn't it? each weather and i5 long morning, isn't it? each weather and is up in that category. he is laughing now but he is not happy. 615 is the time. he it's one of the biggest mile5tone5 for strictly celebritie5, when the competition move5 to the historic blackpool ballroom. but with makeshift dressing rooms and sound equipment stacked in corridors what makes it so special? peter marshall has been behind the scenes to find out. isa is a gentleman, a'5 showtime —— ladies and gentlemen. hello. our are
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you doing? it's strictly spiritual home. ask a professional dancer about it and they go all gooey. this i5 about it and they go all gooey. this is history for us. this is tradition. it is like wimbledon is to tennis. it's the big one. because of the technology involved, this is what gets all those sweeping 5hots of those dancers. 0ver there is where they do the interviews after the dancing. you can almost see before bouncing up and down. a p pa re ntly before bouncing up and down. apparently during the saturday night 5how apparently during the saturday night show some of the audience it on the floor and they spend all night out in up and down in their seats. some of the celebrity dancers say the re5ort of the celebrity dancers say the resort has an air rock familiarity. for me, personally, i used to go to black all the time we've ran an grandad, 5ee
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black all the time we've ran an grandad, see the elimination, the lights come on, and my grandparents we re lights come on, and my grandparents were dancer is a socially a5 lights come on, and my grandparents were dancer is a socially as well. my were dancer is a socially as well. my mum is really looking forward to getting back here from warrington a5 well. rehearsals start in brighton early. the strip experience is full on. so much work is required. -- be strictly. we are try to keep up with the professionals may been dancing for hundreds of years. they are the be5t for hundreds of years. they are the best at what they do. collectively. so you really have got to push your5elf. to try to make it work. when strictly i5 your5elf. to try to make it work. when strictly is concerned, blackpool rocks. i wanted to blackpool. i am already in blackpool. i am already in blackpool. we are here. we made it. it isa blackpool. we are here. we made it. it is a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. it will be epic. i really excited. that is happening tonight. blackpool, the stage is
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set. that was peter marshall reporting and strictly is on bbc one tonight at 6:45. now it's time for the film review with mark kermode and ben brown. hello and welcome to the film review here on bbc news. taking us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what delights do you have for us this week? very interesting week, we have the latest in thejk rowling wizard world, fantastic bea5t5: the crimes of grindelwald. we have a remake of a horror cla55ic and we have a documentary about the intersection of art and commerce. so, fantastic bea5t5: the crimes of grindelwald,
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how do we pronounce it? e even within the films of the 5ound5 e even within the films of the sounds are floating. are you a harry potter fan? up to a point. 0k. there is some question about whether or not if you had not kept up with the expanding harry potter wizard in universe, how much of this you would follow? it follows on from the previous one, obviously. e55entially he was imprisoned at the beginning and there is a fantastic e5cape sequence, he goes to europe to spread his message, grindelwald, meanwhile, and redman‘s character... but dumbledore i5 conflicted, here is a clip. why can't you go? i cannot move against grindelwald, it has to be you. i can't blame you.
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in your shoes i would probably refuse, too. it is late, good evening. no. come on. dumbledore... so, it's an odd one, on the one hand, i like this world, i like these characters and i was somebody who was very much seduced by the harry potter cinematic world because the first films i wasn't crazy about and then i kind of felt into them later on. one of the issues with this is, and this was something which was true of the star wars prequel, because the world that has been created is so big and expansive, when you start
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telling this story from this perspective, there is an awful lot of detail and plot and characters and threads and i do feel that there are times that this gets lost in its own back story, in its own thread in the narrative together. that said, there is a strange tonal mix, on the one hand you get moments of 5lap5tick comedy, which we have always had in the potter movies, there are times when you have spectacular set pieces, great big visual effects, set pieces, huge things happening on screen in a way which is rather delightful. you also get a return to hogwart5, which which was a moment where you could hear people in the cinema enjoying that. and there is also a lot of darkness in the same way that there was with the deathly hallows films and i think some of it works, some of it gets confused and tied up in its own back story and logic. however it does come together in what is kind of the third act, when all of these things about the central character, who is somebody who is basically
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spinning lies and deceit and has this area and philosophy of pure bloods, which is something which has run all the way through the stories and this is tied in with the politics of the era in a way which looks like it is setting us up for something very interesting in the next film and again that is one of the weaknesses of this, quite a lot of it felt like getting everything in the right place so that the next instalment can do something really interesting. i mean if you are a fan of this world and there's no question people will go to see it, there are very good things in it, some nice performances and touches, i did feel it not lost in its own expo5ition, there was almost too much plot fighting the space. and there are times when it lacked that central clear line which you need through this kind of narrative. but by the time we got to the end of it, it had gathered it altogether, 0k, fine, now i'm ready for the next
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instalment — that is going to be quite a way of. there is going to be quite a few more! there will be, yes. this one, supernatural horror, is that the right catheterisation? quick primer, in the ‘705, dario moved into suspense and horror and this was a huge hit, everything was very stylish american dancer comes to europe, enrols at a dance academy where she uncovers witchy 5ecret5. dakota johnson come5 to europe in this one, enrols in the academy, it is set in divided berlin and she goes to a dance academy where she uncovers witchy 5ecret5. but this one is pretty much an hour longer than the argento phocion. in this one there is a verbose feeling of explaining everything.
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my probelm with it is there are individual things in this which are very good, the dance numbers are evocative horror dance numbers in the same way that the film climax had evocative dance numbers. but when i watched su5piria by dario argento, there was no point where i thought, this is great but what it really needs is an hour of people holding forth about the politics! also, the dario argento one alludes to its time and setting whereas this one is very specifically set and there is a lot of stuff about what is going on in the news! and the weird thing is that if, like me, you are a horrorfan, you will think, the dario argento was pretty much untouchable and what this has done i5 demonstrate that there are interesting things you can do with that idea, but i'm not sure that weighing it down with all this padding and baggage is actually to anyone's benefits. however, i do know a couple
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of people who have seen it and said, well, i think it's the masterpiece that the dario argento version never was. they're wrong — but it is an interesting if utterly flawed opinion! they're wrong but it's there a valid opinion! they have every right to be completely wrong! you're so generous! it's not about being generou5, it's about being right! the next one a document tree, the price of everything. yeah, which leads us very nicely into this. it employs the price of everything and the value of nothing. it is a documentary about how we now live in a world in which a art commerce is this multibillion—dollar industry and in which modern art sells for millions and millions, not old ma5ters but modern art, which is being made now, selling the millions... speaking of that, we have been reporting on bbc news that a david hockney has sold at auction for £70 million and that is the highest value for a work by living painter. wow.
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in a way that makes this all the more timely because at the beginning of this, you see this montage of auctions in which huge amounts of money are going... we hear from artists and auctioneers and dealers, collectors and investors, about what it is that they are doing and what it is that they are investing in. and the thing i like about the documentary is, it's notjudgemental, it's not saying you can't possibly talk about art and commerce because the two things are bound up. at one point it says, all of this money is making people make more sun, and stop complaining about it! then there is the question of supply and demand, if there is more of it, is it worthless? then there is the people who wanted to go somewhere where it can be seen by the public — here is a clip. so, you want your work in museums. here's a clip.
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so you want to work in museums. museums are for the lack of a better word the gatekeepers of culture, to some extent. once you cross the threshold you are walking in and you're thinking, these are works that matter, not just for our generation but for future generations. so maybe things happen and i fall out of favour in a number of years, but someday, maybe in 50 years, maybe in 70, maybe in 150, it could come out, it doesn'tjust vanish. what i know about art would not fill the back of a postage stamp but i was really gripped by these debates about, how can you say that this painting is worth this much money and how is it that this has now become an investment strategy? if an artist isn't actually making the work of art, can they still put their name on it? i thought it was witty and fascinating and i came out of it thinking i knew more than i did when i went in but i was entertained throughout. speaking of entertainment, best out at the moment?
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yeah, they have reissued what was a brilliant film, 9to5. it still holds up and it has a very strong feminist message but it is funny and he has characters you can root for and i can't wait to go back and see it again in the cinema. and best dvd? this one is out on dvd and i was never a bros fan... i bet you were! assen, i liked showaddywaddy so i have no shame in pop music! but this documentary made me really like them. it is part spinal tap, part sibling rivalry and it is also a story of the fans got out of loving bros, it's very funny and very, very funny and i thought it was touching. mark kermode, secret bros fan,
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even though he won't admit it! quick reminder before we go that you will find more film news and reviews cross the bbc online and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. but that is it for this week, thank you so much for watching, goodbye from us. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time now is just coming the time now isjust coming up the time now is just coming up to 6:30am. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the number of people missing in california's devastating wildfires has now risen to more than 1,000. 71 people are known to have died. president trump will visit the state later today. officials say they don't expect to fully contain the blaze until the end of the month. after a turbulent week theresa may is continuing to try
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and sell her brexit deal to her party's grassroots and the wider public. but the bbc understands that five of the prime minister's leave—supporting cabinet ministers are considering pressing for changes to the deal which they consider "winnable and supportable". mrs may continues to insist her plan, agreed with eu negotiators, will deliver a brexit that works in the national interest. the cia believes that saudi crown prince mohammed bin salman ordered the murder of journalist jamal khashoggi, according to us media reports. mr khashoggi was killed in the saudi consulate in istanbul last month, his body has not been found. saudi arabia has called the claim false. one of britain's biggest newspaper groups, johnston press, is going into administration. the company prints more than 200 local and regional titles, including "the scotsman" and "the yorkshire post", as well as the 'i'. it's blamed changes to the way facebook and google display stories, which has led to a fall in advertising. the move into administration is part of a rescue plan to keep the papers in circulation.
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the un envoy to yemen says both sides in the war have promised to attend peace talks. martin griffiths told the security council that the commitment could be a crucial moment in the conflict between the government and houthi rebels. the war has triggered a humanitarian crisis threatening millions of yemenis with starvation. the inland revenue is warning that university students are being bombarded with fake tax refund emails, in a bid to steal their banking and personal details. thousands of reports have been received in the past few weeks. fraudsters are using email addresses that appear to be from a genuine university. officials say emails, texts or voicemails would never be used to inform a customer of a refund. a man is suing british airways after claiming that he was squashed next to an obese passenger during a 13—hour flight. stephen huw prosser says he suffered a pelvic injury and nerve damage in his neck, on the journey from bangkok to london. he's claiming damages and loss of earnings. british airways is contesting the case and the hearing continues. the bbc‘s annual children in need
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appeal has raised a record amount of more than £50 million. the annual fundraiser has now raised more than £1 billion since it began in 1980. the charity supports more than two thousand projects which help disadvantaged children across the uk. last night's programme saw boyzone take to the strictly dance floor. huge sums of money raised, thank you to ever and he got involved in that. there is something about this time of year when you cast your eye to happening in somewhere else where the weather is nice. seeing them in their shorts and t—shirts, fans in front of their faces. i was just watching then, thought we had
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another wicket, but it is on review. is all going very well, not something we can say often with an english cricket site abroad. no, i was saying this time last week it was saying this time last week it was awful, going really badly at the beginning. yes, it started badly and then all of a sudden on friday, it was like we are doing really well. it is all fine, we are going to win the series of. live cricket on—going this morning, and it's going to be exciting. england are in with a chance of winning a test series abroad for the first time in a couple of years. they've set sri lanka a target of 301 to win, and they've ta ken three early wickets. the hosts are currently on 93 slash three. -- 93/3. england's women are through to the semi finals at the world t20. anya shrubsole starred with the ball, blowing away the south african tail with a hattrick. three wickets in three balls. england knocked off the 86 runs they needed to win with 6 overs to spare. in football, wales missed out
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on promotion from their nations league group after losing 2—1 to denmark last night in cardiff. gareth bale was back for wales, but they missed chances and were punished when denmark scored before the break. and they went further clear late on when martin braithwaite smashed in a second. bale got one back but it was too little, too late. it was a bad night too for germany. they've been relegated from their nations league group without even playing. that's because netherlands beat world champions france 2—0. the germans, who won the world cup four years ago, will now play in the second tier of the competition. it hasn't been a good couple of yea rs it hasn't been a good couple of years for german foot all. —— football. we'll see the champions of the northern hemisphere against the champions of the southern hemisphere later in dublin as ireland take on new zealand. that's the highlight of another packed day of action in the autumn internationals as patrick gearey reports. the psychology of the haka is to
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beat you before you begin. to make battles seem futile, when faced with the all blacks, ireland would recognise the field. the unbeaten run of the irish lasted for 28 games over 111 years, through bruised bodies and broken hearts. until one day in chicago that is forever frozen in ireland's sporting history. since that 40— 2090 three to two years ago, the dynamic has changed. for this irish team, beating new zealand isn't an impossible leap, but a necessary step towards their aim, the world cup. is always an achievement to beat the all blacks, that is why we ourselves to every 115 years of. it is formidable and would be a huge gathering these players cap if they could topple them on saturday. gathering these players cap if they could topple them on saturdaym ireland are the northern hemisphere's smash hit, scotland are perhaps this is breakthrough. babe beat england in the four nations and
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beat england in the four nations and beat fiji on saturday. there are six changes for a very different match against the hulking south africans and whatever happens saturday, sunday is going to hurt.|j and whatever happens saturday, sunday is going to hurt. i imagine you ask any coach in world rugby who is the team that that provides the british challenge in the game physically with your forwards, it would be south africa. a select the biggest, strongest men they can find. arejust biggest, strongest men they can find. are just feel that south africa now are in the top two or three teams in the world in how they played and how they played against the best teams in the world. wales will be full of confidence after beating australia last weekend, but only one of that team will start against honda, they have the springboks a week later. meanwhile, it would make 11 changes to the time —— side that thought they had beating new zealand, only to have a try disallowed. they face japan, the country of eddiejones's heritage and the team used to be in charge of. international rugby allows little sentiment, jones says he wa nts little sentiment, jones says he wants england to physically smashed them. patrick gearey, bbc news.
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one man not involved in the internationals is danny cipriani. he's just got back from a three week suspension and was on form as his club gloucester beat leicester last night. in a lively match, the best of the tries was saved until last when 0llie thorley ran the length of the pitch to score under the posts to help his side win 36—13. gloucester are now third. a grunt of appreciation from charlie. were you watching that closely, that was an extraordinary try? that is why we played it. i thought it was the noise of appreciation. that's it! how would you describe it, if not a grunt? we can move on, can't we? novak djokovic will play south africa's kevin anderson in the semi final of the atp world tour finals later today. he beat marin cilic in straight sets last night, and is the favourite to win the tournment after easing through the round robin stage with three wins from three matches. it's been a good year
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for women's basketball. more girls are taking it up than ever before, helped by a silver medal for england at the commonwealth games. later, the first of two crucial games see england take on greece and, if they win both, they'll book a place at their first euros finals since 2013. mike's been along to training. 0ne one way, then the other, watch the ball they said, but i was in the first of the hypnotised by great britain'sjordan first of the hypnotised by great britain's jordan jones. —— great britain's. her dribbling skills have helped take the team to the verge of next yea r‘s helped take the team to the verge of next year's european finals. something she has been dreaming of since she was little when she tried to beat her brothers and her coaching days. in the back garden we we re coaching days. in the back garden we were playing too onto when we started beating the boys and then that was it then we started playing
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one on one, when she started eating me, ice. . for georgia, there is a place like home, one ofjust three players in return‘s 16 who play their club basketball in the uk, at manchester which stages the international this week and that is where ijoin georgia and had teammates to see why the game is booming. you can see why so many have attempted to take this up, inspired by the magic skills of georgia. you need to get down low, set —— sticking to it and be able to move laterally as well as forward. the most important thing is to keep your head up. where is the ball? you got to keep your head up. nearly half of the 11— 15 —year—olds now coming on and trying the skills are girls. it has increased quite dramatically and i think the big key is, it is very attractive to inner city, urban kids. this facility, like i said, we have a scheme where you can pay £1 to come in here for
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an hour. george chuvalo is inspired by the success and the commonwealth games silver medal. we need people from manchester to make that spot and people like george are an inspiration, they have called you and done it in the next generation will come up and do it. is very exciting time, we had two great games coming up in the next week or so, we get through those and we are into europe in 2019 and the pathway opens to the big games of. representing your country is just the biggest honour. these are the do all day games, if you like, these are the games every player wants to play in. also crucial to their chances will be the shooting price of teammate molly campbell. i had some beginners luck, scored early on, haven't scored since, the problem is you do a run and as you compose herself to shoot, look how far the basket is a way, 18 feet also. the power comes from your legs. a5 also. the power comes from your
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legs. as you shoot, you want to set yourself and it is up and shot. 0h yes! three point. scoring from distance is one thing, but nothing like the special feeling of reaping the rim of the basket and slamdunk in it in. all right, up a ladder. he got one in earlier!|j he got one in earlier! i know! it was like, oh my goodness, did you see that. we are so used to seeing him struggle! £1 to get involved for an hour, that is good. most places should do the same. we were talking about grassroots foot wall and the price of five aside each has increased 1000% in the last decade. so expensive to play. basketball,
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not so much a. especially in this weather. not bad to be indoors. it's time to say happy birthday to mickey mouse, who made his big screen debut on the 18th of november, 1928, 90 years ago. the disney mascot has become one of the most successful cartoon characters of all time, and he's still going strong, as peter bowes found out in los angeles. the world 's most famous mouse. whistling through his debut film, steamboat willie, in 1928. mickey mouse was first created and drawn by wa lt mouse was first created and drawn by walt disney himself. mickey went on to appear over 130 films. his distinctive appearance often changing with the times. they were
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cartoons that forever changed the entertainment landscape. some silent film comedians, when animation started to be popular, said things like, like charlie chaplin said how can we even compete? they don't even have to stop to take a breath of. and they don't! you know, and animation character can literally do anything that you can make physically believable. and i think mickey is the embodiment of that. the first mickey mouse comic strips we re the first mickey mouse comic strips were published in the early 19305 and they were drawn at desk by the legendary animator floyd conference in. this is one of his original pens and there is certainly lot of history here. mickey mouse is far from history, at 90 he is still alive and well on the screen and at disney theme parks around the world. mickey is real. mickey is the easiest guy to work with, i am glad he is my boss. it takes you back to
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watching cartoons on saturday mornings and mickey mouse was the car to. mickey mouse has evolved over the years, he car to. mickey mouse has evolved overthe years, he is car to. mickey mouse has evolved over the years, he is still that classic character that rings happy memories. for a company built on the image and fortunes of a mouse, the carter character is an invaluable asset. mickey is a mouse of many talents, he is the comedy mascot and here at disneyland he has taken part in countless parades and ceremonies over the past 50 plus years, one of his mainjobs is to pose for photographs, isn't it? goodjob. you are not looking your age. you are looking pretty good. the timeless gloria of mickey mouse. —— allure. peter bowes, bbc news. what was happening while that was playing was we were reminiscing in the sugar about the cartoons were used to love. celebrating 90 years commuting about the ones you love most. mickey mouse, i do not if it is wrong to say so, latest respected
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him, was never my favourite cartoon character. i actually agree with you for once. donald duck was more my men. thinking reminiscing about favourite cartoon. my favourite was will 0wen the west. favourite cartoon. my favourite was will owen the west. yes, i do remember that. if you have a favourite you want to send this morning, feel free to dig up mickey mouse and his 19th if he is your favourite. what do you say? have you got a favourite? to the mouse. but i liked the whispers well. i once dressed up as evil edna for halloween. whispers well. i once dressed up as evil edna for halloweenlj whispers well. i once dressed up as evil edna for halloween. i see it. she was a television. it was a case of me in the box. let us it was a case of me in the box. let us talk weather. it is grey and
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misty. there will be some drizzle. but do not lose heart. this weekend will be one where many of you will be bathed in sunshine. things are set to turn chilly. i will give you a heads up of that. called across europe. this is where we have the clear skies. high pressure, across the baltic sea, that will bring easterly winds, taking the clear skies towards us more and more. with us across skies towards us more and more. with us across parts of east anglia. brexit nicolaou to the north and west. where you have the cloud it is misty. for the over the hills. —— a little bit of wind. more of a chill to the day. blue skies later on. it will take a good part of the day for them to reach the south west where them to reach the south west where the winds will be at the strongest. elsewhere will be under blue skies through the afternoon. to the east of snowdonia and eastern hills of the peak district, the pennines, we
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will stay with the cloud. the same across the grampians to the east. and across 0rkney, shetland. it may struggle to brighten up through daytime today. across north—west scotla nd daytime today. across north—west scotland you start with the sunshine once again and you will finish with it. temperatures around 14. most around 1013 by day. tonight a cold and that they knew had been used to. __ 10- and that they knew had been used to. -- 10- 13. and that they knew had been used to. --10-13. the and that they knew had been used to. —— 10— 13. the temperatures should not drop too much. for many, the green colours on the temperature is an indication well down into weed if not lower single figures. a touch of frost for some of you as you start your sunday. a sunny sunday it will be. a little cloud across the of scotland. the peak district will —— the cloud of the peak district will break up at times. temperatures are starting to drop a little bit. in double figures at this stage. into next week we bring the blue colours on the chart from europe. the much colder air and winds towards us. a
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noticeable chill on monday. the temperatures lower than they have been of late. there could be limited drizzle in the air. at the top of the hills it could turn to some sleet. mostly dry and feeling colder. back to you both. thank you very much. we will see later. time now for the latest technology news in this week's click. here on click, we're constantly coming across jawdropping medical marvels. from robo—nurses, to ai which can outdiagnose experts. we have seen the future of medicine evolving before our eyes. it is fair to say medicine has come a long way.
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this is the old 0perating theatre museum in london. of course there is an 0ld 0perating theatre museum, why wouldn't there be? back in the late 18005 for example, this was the cutting edge — literally. and in the 130 years since, surgery has changed beyond recognition. but, as with all technology, we mustn't become overreliant on it. we mustn't think that it will do everything and we mustn't think that it will work every time. last week, we were given a sombre reminder of this when an inquest found that a cardiac patient, stephen petit, had died as a result of undergoing pioneering heart surgery using a da vinci robot. had the surgery had been of the traditional kind, he almost certainly would have survived. i think if a surgeon is going to use a robot,
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and use is the right technical term, he has to be very well practised with it. i think that was an example where the team were not sufficiently trained or prepared to do that operation. and therefore, it was a very, very, very long operation that ultimately went badly. we reached out to intuitive surgical, the company behind the robot used in stephen petit‘s operation. they provided a statement expressing their condolences to his family and reiterating that patient safety is their priority. but they said they don't provide and can't enforce a mandatory medical training regime before a surgeon uses their robotic system. this training and validation remains with hospitals. they say that more than 5 million da vinci robot procedures have been performed by more than 40,000 trained surgeons worldwide. so, where now for robotic surgery?
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well, paul carter has been to see one robo—manufacturers centre of operations, as well as getting an inside look at real—life surgery. at london's royal marsden hospital, we have been allowed to see the surgical robots in action. following the death of stephen petit, it was interesting to find out more about how surgeons are trained in vr and how they overcome the sense of touch they would have if they were using their hands. before anyone goes anywhere near a patient they are expected to do a good deal of training on that system in virtual reality beforehand. yes, you lose the tactile feedback but you have got very clear imaging and you can very clearly and precisely define your dissection. in this procedure, robotic technology will be used to remove a cancerous tumour in the patient‘s stomach, with fluorescent dye used to light up the area. during the procedure,
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surgeon miles smith, assisted by assif chowdry, controls three robotic arms which he manipulates to remove the tumour. the aim is to greatly reduce surgical trauma as the robot method is far less invasive than more laparoscopic traditional surgeries. the da vinci robot makes it possible for surgeons to operate deep inside the body through microscopic incisions. can you keep your voice down a little bit because this is quite a critical part of the operation and what is actually happening behind me is that they are putting in ports into the patient‘s stomach where the robot will dock onto in order to perform the actual operation a little bit later on. the robot has four arms, three of which carry tiny surgical instruments and one of which sports a camera. ports need to be put in place before the robot can be wheeled in to dock its arms. what is remarkable about this system is it is generally remote. you can see the arms moving behind me and they almost look
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like they are moving independently, they are actually being controlled by miles, who is sat at a console several feet away from the patient. the remote consoles provide the surgeon with 3d visualisations and magnified images allowing complex dissection or reconstruction. the surgeon controls the arms through finger loops that mimic the hands natural movement. so the tumour has just been cut off, for lack of a better phrase. it is just extraordinary, put in a little tool and bagged it up. yes, that's it. let's take it out of the ports. intuitive surgery, who make the system used at the royal marsden, have almost complete market dominance. but now, new robotic surgery players are starting to emerge. we've come to california to visit alaris health, who are developing robotics for a different type of surgical procedure. alaris' monkier platform concentrates on endoscopy, a procedure which allows treatments
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to be given to organs through natural openings, such as the mouth, meaning no incisions are required. it can manourvre through a patient‘s airways, even into the far and narrow parts of the lungs, and combined with ct scans, it can provide a gps map of the patient‘s internal organs, allowing surgeons to navigate precisely on areas of concern. i am using what is essentially a modified games controller to operate this scope here. and i am no surgeon, i have been using this for a couple of bits and i am able to make quite precise movements. it's pretty extraordinary. it's clear that robotics finding different surgical niches is one area of growth, but what else does the future hold for surgical robotics? there's no reason why in the future we shouldn't be able to train robots to differentiate between structures that we want to preserve and structures that we want to remove.
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perhaps a bit like driverless cars, but in this case a surgeonless robot. possibly under the control of the surgeon. next we're going to talk golf — a stubbornly traditional sport, but one which is ready to embrace the newest technology, as lara lewington has been finding out. this is wentworth club, which in just a few years is going to be celebrating its centenary. but over that 100 years, a lot has changed. in recent times, much of that has come down to technology. so we are going to go and see how both amateurs and professionals in the making good use of that. lasers, radars, sensors, and motion capture have transformed data collection. and analysing these statistics means training and play can be more precise than ever before.
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and who better to show us in one of the greatest golfers on the planet? francesco molinari, fresh from wins this year in both the ryder cup and the open championship. one of the difficulties of golf is that there are so many elements, and even so many parts of the body moving through the swing, that any little difference, any little difference makes a change. those tiny differences are captured by the kind of tech usually reserved for big budget hollywood films. 27 reflective markers over his body helped to create a digital double francesco's swing to be analysed in detail. 0ptical motion capture analysis uses high—speed cameras to capture every movement in the body and club. this provides francesco's team
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with data that would have been impossible to measure a few years ago. this is trackman. the radar basically picks up all the data surrounding the golf course, surrounding the golf club. it picks out points of that will stop and that gives us the data that we can see. so we have ball speed, we've got launch angles, we know how high the ball launched out of the golf club. 15 years ago he would have been in the field watching the ball, whereas now we can physically see. slightly intimidating being this close, but i guess he does know how to hit the ball the right way. the technology tracks the distance, power, and trajectory of the ball, using a combination of hd cameras and a doppler radar. it also registers microwave transissions that move away from a golf club and ball. it is a crucial measuring tool. 0therwise, if you think about it, old school, you would hit all five balls and go look at them
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and measure them and write them all out. that's the only way that you are going to learn — to have immediate feedback — and this is sensational for that. but is this in some ways ruining the game? before it was a lot of guessing going on, and really going on the feel of the players, and ourfeel. there is now just a lot more feedback. these people with lasers zapping our ball after every shot so we know exactly how far we hit every shot, how far off—line, how farfrom the flag. so far, it has been impossible to track everything, but with the technology you've seen today, we're getting closer and to getting exactly an idea of what is going on. definitely technology has been a massive help in tracking every ball and getting immediate feedback, so i would would not be as good a player, for sure, without that technology. and that may well be true.
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but ultimately the player has to be skilled enough to act on the data that is being recorded, and, of course, this is not there to turn just anyone into a star player. and that is it for the shortcut of click for this week, the full—length is available to watch right now on iplayer. don't forget, we are all across social media. youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter. all you need to say is bbc click and we'll be there. thanks for watching and see you soon. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: the number missing in california's deadliest wildfire rises again. more than 1,000 are unaccounted for and 71 people are confirmed to have died. she's weathered the political storm for now, but as theresa may battles to sell her brexit deal, there's fresh pressure from some in her cabinet to change the plan. theresa may fights to sell her eu deal, but five cabinet ministers
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join forces to try and get her to change the plan.

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