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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 5, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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hello. this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines: a teenager has been charged with the murder of 17—year—old yousef makki who was stabbed to death in greater manchester on saturday. police investigating the fatal stabbing of 17—year—old jodie chesney in east london say they've arrested a man in leicester. britain's most senior officer, cressida dick, head of the metropolitan police, says there is a link between falling police numbers and violent crime. counter—terror police are investigating three packages containing explosives found at heathrow airport, london city airport and waterloo train station.
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one of the soldiers on duty on bloody sunday in londonderry in 1972, when 13 civilians were shot dead by the army, tells the bbc he has no regrets. bmw is warning it might consider moving production of the mini from cowley in oxford in the event of a no—deal brexit. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me is the talkradio presenter daisy mcandrew, and the editor of the politicshome website, kevin schofield. bombs and knives have been exercising the minds of fleet street's editors throughout the day. the continuing issues over rising knife attacks, and today's explosive devices discovered across london. the metro goes with
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the investigation into the three packages containing explosives that were found at heathrow airport, london city airport and waterloo station. the telegraph also leads with that counter—terrorism investigation, with the paper detailing a possible link to irish dissidents. the ft leads on a warning issued by the head of the civil service in northern ireland that the country faces grave consequences if britain leaves the eu without a deal. the guardian details the findings of a parliamentary report which claims that the home office is still failing despite the windrush scandal. the daily mail has on its front page details of a case involving an eighteen year old man who has been given a suspended prision sentence for a second weapons offence. and the explosives sent to busy london transportation hubs is the mirror's lead. for you to enjoy tomorrow morning with cornflakes for you to enjoy tomorrow morning with cornfla kes or for you to enjoy tomorrow morning with cornflakes or induce or
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whatever you're having for brea kfast. whatever you're having for breakfast. bombs sent to airports came from ireland. dublin addresses, apparently, irish stamps, all hastily written, all to give you the impression that they have just sent these things out. i suppose we all thought the troubles were over as far as the thought the troubles were over as faras the uk thought the troubles were over as far as the uk was concerned. yes, and obviously this has been tha nkfully and obviously this has been thankfully not... there has been no loss of life or any injured as a result of this. maybe it was a warning shot, maybe it was a message being sent by some irish republican group to say we haven't gone away. the irish postal service say it came from the love and wedding range. 0k. kind of inappropriate, i suppose. there has been a lot of talk about brexit, whether a no—deal brexit
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would lead to the return of hard border between the republic and northern ireland, and whether that would lead to an upsurge in violence. there has been the odd incident here, obviously nothing approaching the scale we had before the good friday agreement. but i think it isjust the good friday agreement. but i think it is just a warning the good friday agreement. but i think it isjust a warning sign the good friday agreement. but i think it is just a warning sign as well that maybe we have let down our guard. these three packages got through the jacks. although they we re through the jacks. although they were not viable as far as they didn't cause injury, they were obviously dangerous enough. i mean this one here at heathrow airport caught fire, something very alarming for people who saw it happen. the other one went to waterloo, the other one went to waterloo, the other one went to waterloo, the other one went to the city airport, so other one went to the city airport, so clearly they were choosing their targets quite carefully, and i think it is just targets quite carefully, and i think it isjust a targets quite carefully, and i think it is just a sense that we need to be on our guard and it is almost as if irish republican terror has fallen off the radar. yes, and many have been warning that we have taken oui’ have been warning that we have taken our eye off the ball and there is a
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lot of trouble bubbling away that we in london or in you know the mainland are not paying attention to. on the other hand we don't know whether this is. obviously lots of papers are saying that there is an ira connection, dissident connections, we don't know that. we have some dublin stamps. i mean i'm sure we know —— they no more than we know behind—the—scenes but we don't know behind—the—scenes but we don't know whether this is an actual terrorist attack. i mean, obviously oi'i terrorist attack. i mean, obviously on paper it is. or whether it is meant to increase publicity around this, brexit, and as you're saying the good friday agreement, there are other things going on as well, there's a lot of consternation in northern ireland at the moment because we are about to find out whether the paratroopers from the bloody sunday are going to be prosecuted, you know, octogenarian soldiers who may be prosecuted 46 years after the event. so there are
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a lot of different stories bubbling around in northern ireland and in ireland that i think we should be paying more attention to. it is likely to early to tell what this is all about. absolutely. let's go to the front of the sun, interesting, call in the arnie, top cops plea on knife crisis. who said that? we don't know gavin williamson... they made it up? he made it up, didn't he? ithink made it up? he made it up, didn't he? i think it is... you have put their name on the front page...” left three and a half years ago! they have a quote from gavin williamson who said he would always be ready to respond as... that is one of those things. of course he isn't going to say i am prepared. we will keep the cops off the streets
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no matter how hard it gets.” will keep the cops off the streets no matter how hard it gets. i don't care... if you put the negative on it, i think you see apologies, how ridiculous this story is. it is a sign that all of the tabloids are looking for an angle on knife crime and they want their own angle and this is the son's angle, which i think is rubbish. the issue of knife crime is a huge problem that people are terribly, quite rightly, upset about. linda it is difficult to see what with the arnie could do. a p pa re ntly what with the arnie could do. apparently cressida dick said she wouldn't rule out calling in the army. -- the army. you of little faith. i have never worked in the papers. what was interesting was cressida dick contradicted the prime minister today by saying there is obviously a link between falling police numbers and a rise in violent crime and knife crime. theresa may yesterday said there wasn't a correlation which has been roundly
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mocked. maybe she is saying, if i can't get more police officers, i will... maybe that is the only way to get more bodies on the ground. and of course we know that gangs and kids being used in games is one of the reasons we have so many awful knife attacks. and you can see if there was a really terrible gang wa rfa re there was a really terrible gang warfare incident that may be the local police could say can you send in some soldiers, but still i think the story is ridiculous. this is day two of a really big story about knife crime. and you can see the mail is also doing that. they have taken their own angle. they have this is smirking at softjustice britain. and clearly the editor of the mail has said to all of his journalist, go and find me some kid who has been caught carrying a knife and isn't being given a custodial
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sentence. this is how the papers work? yes, it is. i am sure you know that, clive! laughter. find the angle, get out there! this is the angle. it is the wrong angle. yes, stronger, longer sentences would be a deterrent for some kids. but it's not the whole story. and this kid, we don't know his circumstances. he was caught with cocaine and a knife. it is his second offence. the mail said it is appalling he wasn't sent to prison. we know that they go into prison having perhaps not hurt anyone and they come out more likely to sta b anyone and they come out more likely to stab someone. the fact it was the magistrates' court would suggest the cps and police didn'tjudge it as magistrates' court would suggest the cps and police didn't judge it as a serious offence, but, yeah, the mail have blown it out of proportion because i think they are worried about the moral panic over knife crime. i think what it does show is that young people, not all young people, a lot of young people are carrying knives just
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people, a lot of young people are carrying knivesjust as people, a lot of young people are carrying knives just as your wallet, phone and your knife, you know, as a means of self defence. it doesn't means of self defence. it doesn't mean that you intend to use it. was at the children's commissioner who said last week that 2700 kids are now in games? only around 6500 are known to the authorities. they have done a lot of research. and how many of those kids are carrying knives?‘ huge proportion. it isn'tjust gangs as well, you have kids who refused to go into gangs and they become targets because they have refused to get involved in whatever it is the gain is involved in, and they are disrespecting the gang and as a result they can become targets as well. that is the thing which is rightly terrifying all of us because the knife at the damage as it is called is the biggest growth market of it, the kids, 10—17 —year—olds
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who are carrying the knives and being victims of knife crimes and the nhs saying that knife attacks on children, teenagers on the whole, have gone up 93% over the last few yea rs have gone up 93% over the last few years and that is why parents and everybody are in such a panic about it. absolutely, 0k. the times, pupils given a lesson... giving lessons on how to treat stab wounds. this is an interesting angle and on the one hand you say, how depressing that kids have to be taught this life—saving first aid but the same time it is a great idea that you would rather be aware of what can be done if, god forbid, they come across someone who done if, god forbid, they come across someone who has been a victim ofa across someone who has been a victim of a knife attack. so it is in areas where knife crime is particularly high asa where knife crime is particularly high as a charity, called street doctors, and kids are trained on what to do if they come across someone what to do if they come across someone who has been attacked. it could be the difference between life and death. i totally agree that this
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isa and death. i totally agree that this is a decent angle on the story if we talk about the journalistic merits of the different front pages because this is talking about the actual problem and telling the reader something they didn't know about these lessons, but i think these lessons' value is twofold, the practical nature of a kid who might not panic if they are faced with a child who has established, but also it teaches children that you can die from stab wounds, and one of the extraordinary things as many of these kids literally think you can die from a gunshot wound but they
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don't think that most people will die from establishment. and a lot of the doctors, nhs doctors in the trauma units are saying the education needs to be given to children, teenagers, so they understand that you can die from one stabbing attack and that may be that will give them cause to think again. so this is really interesting. and this goes to the holistic approach we've been talking about on bbc news, we seniors in scotland, the idea that this is a public health emergency. they did it ensure cargo and the united states in dealing with knife crime, this idea that it is not just potentially with knife crime, this idea that it is notjust potentially gangs or cops on the streets, it is about social services, mental health, education, giving kids this kind of education, giving kids this kind of education, a whole package needs to be looked at, and as a result it is long—term solutions, not just be looked at, and as a result it is long—term solutions, notjust quick fixes. yes, you've club services, productive things people can be doing rather than hanging around on the streets, they have seen funding reduced from the local authority, so there are not as many opportunities for young people to spend their time doing fun, good stuff. we talked earlier about the education and the longer sentences and the stop—and—search, but that is why the
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obsession with, you know, do police numbers increase knife crime? it is so skewed and so wrong. yes, of course there will say we need more police to deal with this. police don't create criminals, they catch criminals. headlines tonight, two arrests have been made, that is what the police do. how do criminals become criminals? how do kids get into gangs? not because of police numbers, youth services and education. it is because of parents and poverty. it is because of the probation system and the judicial system not working. all of these different things, that is what creates crime and criminals. police are there to catch them. part of the issue, this would be cressida dick's argument and the police federation's as well, if you have more police on the beat in individual areas, they
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can look out, they can keep an eye on what's going on and the local community as well can have confidence in them and they can tip them off on what is happening. i think that is the argument of the police federation. we all want more police, that is a good thing, but it is not the cure of society's problems with creating criminals. pa rt problems with creating criminals. part of the solution. politicians pretend it is because it is easier. not from theresa may. there was a bus stop in the cabinet this morning because sajid javid said the police need more money, more police on the beat and theresa may was pushing back on that, along with philip hammond, saying i give you plenty of money —— savid javid. and theresa may cannot say that there is a and theresa may cannot say that there is a connection and theresa may cannot say that there is a connection between and theresa may cannot say that there is a connection between police numbers and crime because in all her yea rs numbers and crime because in all her years at the home office, she said that was not, and she is half right and half wrong, but with politicians there is no grey area, you have to
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stick to the line or you will reputation suffers. the possibility of rape case jury trial being scrapped. yes, well the home office minister is going to announce a review basically, tomorrow, suggesting thatjury review basically, tomorrow, suggesting that jury trials for rape cases may be scrapped, so it would become a judge sitting alone listening to the evidence. now, the backdrop of this, the context is that conviction rates for rape cases are pitifully low. and the idea is that if you have a judge sitting who isa that if you have a judge sitting who is a guest divorced from the emotion of it, is purely looking at it from a legalistic point of view, they will be able to i guess address the case ina will be able to i guess address the case in a cold way, i suppose, as opposed to members of the public
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might become a bit emotionally invested in it. now, on the one hand, you can see the logic behind it, in the moment, why would a woman come forward if she think she is going to put an ordeal on the stand? and the chances are the? is going to get off with it at the end. however, the bedrock of ourjustice system has always been trial byjury. —— and the offender. sol has always been trial byjury. —— and the offender. so i am a bit uncomfortable about this becoming an accepted, even if it is with the best of intentions, it could become the thin end of the wedge. that something has got to be done, daisy. well, it has. i was looking at the figures earlier, last year there we re figures earlier, last year there were 31,000 alleged rapes that police were told about. 5000 out of 41,000 went to court and about half of those were convicted. —— 41,000. you are talking about two to 3000 at
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the possible more than 40,000 rapes that actually ended up in each ends, so the incentive for women to put themselves for a court case a very, very slim, then when you do get to court it is completely humiliating and the adversarial nature of the barrister against the barrister, slagging you off, telling you that you are aside, telling you that you asked for it, that becomes... —— is that you are a slag. other countries do not have the adversarial system, they have the judge that system without juries, which is they have the judge that system withoutjuries, which is much more about points put forward. it is less traumatic and it has better conviction rates. there are other reasons and i think it is very interesting and brave that they are thinking about whether there will be a trial or pilot or whatever it might be, but i think something has got to be done. ok, the guardian.
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tories suspended over islamophobia claims, this is the claims today and is potentially the equivalent of labour‘s problems of anti—semitism. there's been lots of publicity around labour's issues of whether they are dealing with a quickly enough or not, but the islamophobia stock has not had the same level of attention but it has been there. we are certainly done stories on it, we did a story this morning actually on a conservative candidate at the upcoming elections, the may local elections, who had been previously suspended by the party for islamophobia comments on social media. it has been described as a slap on the wrist, he has served his suspension, back in the party again and then has been chosen as a candidate, which anyway, because of this story he has stood down, quit the party and it has been dealt with, but not really as a result of the tory party's great actions, but
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subsequent to that the party had now suspended 14 members. i think they can see suspended 14 members. i think they can see it as a political problem, they look at the mess that labour have got themselves into on anti—semitism and the tories are now trying to get on the front foot, but baroness warsi, it form of member of the tory party has been very, very strong on this. she is basically said that the tory party is institutionally homophobic and is insisting that they take it seriously and do something. she said that both the chairman and the prime minister theresa may have failed to deal with this comment it is interesting that the latest comments we re interesting that the latest comments were found on facebook page that was supportive of jacob rees—mogg. were found on facebook page that was supportive of jacob rees-mogg. and he went on to it and said there is no room for islamaphobes in the party, we have been very quick on
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it, but i do not think that is true. they have been a lot of comments about sajid javid, which is interesting. we were just talking about him obviously, we know he is at the home office and he has leadership ambitions, there are comments saying i could not bear to see islam lead the country about him being the leader. so it would be interesting to see his role in this because he is in the perfect position to really, and to assert his authority on this, and i think that would be very interesting. —— political posturing. but it is a real problem for the tory party, this. finally, i think i real problem for the tory party, this. finally, ithinki have heard of this very wealthy young lady. kyliejenner, there she is on the front page there. kyle. no, it is kylie. kylie jenner, she is the youngest billionaire ever. 21.
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extraordinary, this is a story about instagram basically. she has made... we had known for while she was going to be the first instagram billion and, so her age is relevant but actually, it is the fact that she has made pretty much all this money, people who are called influencers and they basically are people who pushed off on instagram. she is now a billionaire, it is nothing to do with the kardashians, obviously it is because of all their fame and all that, some of the other kardashians have 50 million, it is nothing compared to... kim kardashian has got about 50 million, she has got about a billion. it is not even the same all park. —— ballpark. and it
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is because of instagram. we have got to end it here. thank you for that. bye. good evening. here's your latest sports news. tottenham are safely through to the last eight of the champions league but holders real madrid have made a shock exit. the spanish giants have won the trophy for the last three years in a row but have struggled this season and their defeat at home to ajax may offer spurs the chance to advance even further. patrick geary reports. sound imported from anfield and the sidelight none in full or, borussia dortmund's fans are part of the theatre, designed to deflate
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totman's 3—goal cushion and remind them what is at stake. jan vertonghen was the first to be stretched his limit. germany's top score is attacking from all angles. totman were desperate to deprive dortmund have any hope of a comeback. something of a speciality for hugo parisse. totman survived and with a 3—goal advantage still bears, they knew the advantage of this goal. that, harry kane is priceless. one shot to drain all the pressure, now dortmund needed five. totman would not even allow them one. hugo louise once again an obstacle one. hugo louise once again an o bsta cle in one. hugo louise once again an obstacle in orange on the night totman conquered dortmund's yellow wall. the dutch side ajax are used to seeing their top players move, this was a nightjust to enjoy them.
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zeyich levelled the score. still, real madrid were ahead on goals, but that advantage was about to go to the mark. the next goal was scored by dusan tadic. something special was happening. dusan tadic made it three, or had he? in the first leg, the video referee is denied a goal, this time it ruled the ball had been in play, goal. ajax were now scoring from everywhere. lasse schone 4—1 in the bernabeu against a team that had won this competition three years in a row. this will not be forgotten. the weslh rugby union players's union says it is is "deeply concerned" about plans to merge two of wales's most succesful sides, ospreys and scarlets. as part of project reset, the rival regions could merge, with a new team created in the north of the country. the controversy‘s led to the resignation today of ospreys chairman mikejames, who blamed the welsh rugby union's "catastrophic mismanagement"
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of revamping regional rugby. i know things happen quickly, they are as straightforward as they are and will shrug the, but there is still that decision of some boys have got offers over the bridge. do they take that offer to secure their livelihoods or do they wait to see what is happening in wales? and i think there is a bit of anger at the uncertainty. meanwhile, the welsh national side are back in action in the six nations this weekend against scotland. just one change for that game at murrayfield. adam beard comes in for the injured cory hill in the second row. gareth anscombe continues at fly—half with dan biggar on the bench. scotland will be without backs sean maitland and chris harris for that clash. the pair suffered calf and foot injuries on duty with their respective clubs in the weekend's english
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premiership. british number two katie boulter has failed to reach the indian wells main draw, after being beaten in the final round of qualifying by viktorija golubic. the world number 85, who was seeded sixth in qualifying, was aiming to reach the main draw in california for the first time. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories and how england's women are getting on againstjapan in the she believes cup live on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. goodbye for now. hello there. there isa goodbye for now. hello there. there is a really strong jetstream propagating right the way across the atla ntic propagating right the way across the atlantic and it is heading right into the uk. that is going to steering or our weather from the west, this area of cloud will arrive later on in the week to bring us some rain. this area of cloud has already arrived and brought wet weather, that is pushing its way northwards together with this weather fronts, around an area of low pressure where we are seeing is a very strong and gusty wind, especially for wales in the south—west of england. northern
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scotla nd south—west of england. northern scotland starts chile with a touch of frost on wednesday morning. milder elsewhere, that wet weather get stuck in scotland and northern ireland and we will see bands are showers pushing across england and wales. there will be some sunshine in between those showers that the showers could be heavy potentially with some hail and thunder. we are going to find temperatures perhaps as high as 14 or 15 degrees in the south—east, east anglia and lincolnshire. contrast that with the temperatures in scotland and northern ireland, where it stays wet with some snow over the hills in the highlands and grampians. it stays wet throughout much of scotland and northern ireland and properly into the north of england as well. to the south, clearer skies as most of those showers move away. —— probably. it will feel colder i think as we head into thursday, let's trace where our air is coming from, all the way from the arctic. cold, nor the north—westerly winds pushing across the uk. low pressure
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by this stage is out in the sea and around the edge of it, we have all this wet weather across eastern scotland, northern england, all the way down to east anglia. some showers following it and then again wintry over the hills, the best of the dry weather in england and southern wales. near the six in scotland. the low pressure is heading away from the north sea and out into scandinavia and it will ta ke out into scandinavia and it will take away those strong winds as well, but with clear skies overnight, we may well start with a touch of frost on friday morning. some sunshine early on, it is going to cloud on from the west. we saw the cloud earlier on and on the satellite picture and that is arriving to bring some rain and particularly into northern ireland, wales and the west of england and temperatures may get as high as nine or10 temperatures may get as high as nine or 10 celsius. even into the weekend, very unsettled weather, very windy as well because of the wind, rain and snow, it ill rather cold. —— it will.
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this is newsday on the bbc. i'm rico hizon in singapore. the headlines: a tough struggle ahead. china's premier tells the annual parliament the economy faces slowing growth as the us—china trade war bites translation: downward pressure on the economy is increasing, consumption and growth is slowing. will carlos ghosn be going home? we're watching this jail in tokyo after the ex—nissan boss was granted bail. i'm kasia madera in london. also in the programme. a race against time. efforts to limit the oil spill that's threatening a protected coral atoll in the solomon islands.

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