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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 3, 2019 11:30pm-11:46pm GMT

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narrowboats and holiday homes in england and wales, in what is being described as a scandal in the placement of children in care. it is a national scandal, yes. how can we be happy with children in tents, on boats, in all of these transitional things? 33 people have been injured in a coach crash in france. 11 of them are british. delhi's toxic smog forces airports to cancel flights. the city's chief minister says the air has become unbearable. and lewis hamilton wins his sixth formula 1 world title. he is nowjust one short of michael shumacher‘s record. hello and welcome to our look ahead
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to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the parliamentary journalist tony grew and the journalist and author caroline frost. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. in the metro, nigel farage says he won't stand to be an mp in the upcoming election, instead focusing on campaigning for his brexit party candidates contesting 600 seats. in the express, borisjohnson‘s pledge to cut taxes for every worker by boosting the national insurance threshold, and an extra £5 billion on welfare. in the mirror, jeremy corbyn says he'll save free tv licences for over—75s, a cash boost for 3.7 million pensioners due to start paying for the licence injune. leading the daily mail, hospitals deluged by 5,000 diabetes patients every day. one in ten of all admissions is down to the disease. in the times, trafficking gangs using top schools to get vietnamese migrants into britain on student visas, before disappearing as soon as they enter the country.
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and the sun's front page — midline crisis. a cocaine epidemic in the over—50s, with hospital cases trebling in five years. lets make a start on matters to do with the forthcoming election on 12 december, and on the times, the main parties are lying on the nhs, doctors warned. said the nhs is going to be a big issue in this election both for the labour party and the conservatives, and this is and the conservatives, and this is an unusually blunt message from the bma, saying that politicians are guilty of unrealistic expectations and empty promises. so doctors are annoyed, i guess, that the nhs, which many people think is in crisis, my mum was a doctor in the nhs for 30 years and she says the nhs for 30 years and she says the nhs is always crisis, and that is pa rt nhs is always crisis, and that is part of its nature, but doctors are annoyed that now, having spent years obsessing about brexit and not paying attention to butter issues,
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they are paying attention to these issues —— bread—and—butter issues. the nhs is short 100,000 nurses, for example. there are a lot of serious issues in the nhs which will not solved by people talking about how much money they are going to spend. but they know that a lot of people ca re enormously but they know that a lot of people care enormously about the nhs in this country, and they treasure it, and they want to see and believe that the politicians who have access to the money, who can change policy, will do something about it. dominic cummings's rulebook has told boris johnson that the three issues are, if you mention nothing else during this campaign, it is the nhs, it is police crime, and it is immigration. this is one of those issues that jeremy corbyn has similarly said there are things in this country people do care about other than brexit. the media bubble has been banging the brexit drum for three years now, but meanwhile, it has always been in crisis. i am surprised doctors have come out so sceptical. i would have thought they would welcome it after three years
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of pretty much everything being put to the side. they have gone front and centre again. perhaps i am being naive and they are the ones saying it is about reducing expectations. this could look like a political foot ball this could look like a political football that is being passed around and it is a case of who can promise more and there is no actual proof. let'sjust see what more and there is no actual proof. let's just see what comes out in the costings in the next week. each of the parties will be asked to provide actual, physical proof of where the money is coming from and where it is going. and i think perhaps a little more light will be shed on these at the moment kind of airy fairy promises. and whether we can be as voters about what is possible for the nhs, given that it does cost a huge amount of money to run it to the standard that we are told it could be. one of the things i find frustrating about our politics not just at the moment but basically since tony blair was prime minister, was the idea that we could maintain the nhs but also improve it while not raising taxes to pay for it. i think politicians are far too timid
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about this issue. you don't necessarily win elections by saying we will spend more, and you will have to stump up. that is counterintuitive, if you voters we are going to raise income tax by 1p, but that will be ring—fenced for the nhs, people wouldn't regard that is such a terrible thing. the thing is, there is a little bit of an federalisation of voters, this idea that people only think about brexit 01’ that people only think about brexit or that people are only motivated by that. people are sophisticated enough to understand that the cost of healthcare continue to rise, and that we are going to have to find a way to pay for it. looking at the daily telegraph, nigel farage could ruin the uk's hope of brexit, coming from some conservative eurosceptics. it sounds a bit counterintuitive. that is not a headline you would have expected to read two or three years ago, however it has all become a bit strangely realigned, evenjust in recent weeks. the point is that he has really stuck to his he has
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offered he has really stuck to his he has offe re d pa ct he has really stuck to his he has offered pact with the tory party which has been turned down. now farage is saying he will stick to his no deal policies, he is going to go to the people, the country, not himself, obviously, he is counting himself, obviously, he is counting himself out of the candidate's seat, but he is going to help up to 600 people in various seats across england, scotland and wales, and this could in theory split the vote, which means that borisjohnson's rate campaign to get brexit done would be seen as turning into tatters if nigel farage succeeds. how much of a risk is it, then, that the brexit party are going to divide the brexit party are going to divide the vote and therefore mean brexit doesn't happen, despite the name of their party? the honest answer is we don't know. that is why there is a significant nervousness about it from conservatives. that is the kind of honesty you think politicians should be given? absolutely agree. my should be given? absolutely agree. my personal view is that as the campaign goes on, the brexit party's m essa 9 es campaign goes on, the brexit party's messages going to get drowned out, both by the major parties, but by the fact that they are a one track pony. they only have one thing to
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talk about. you mean they won't talk about the nhs, they won't talk about the police? there are any policies wa nt to the police? there are any policies want to get brexit done. boris johnson has tried to do a deal and has run into trouble with the parliament and so the whole point about this election is from his point of view to try and deliver a majority. but the concern amongst tory mps is that in key marginals where labour currently hold the seat, the brexit party could advantage them in some cases, disadvantage them and others. the other thing about this, by the way, is this is going to be a six—week campaign. effectively, the last majority of voters won't even engage until a week or two before. do you think anyone will even vote?|j until a week or two before. do you think anyone will even vote? i think they will. do you think there will bea they will. do you think there will be a low turnout, close to christmas? two i would have thought after the chaos of the last three yea rs, after the chaos of the last three years, i feel instinctively people feel motivated to express themselves. we have seen people on marches, campaigners on both sides are stepping out, we have seen them tireless with their shouts and their protest. 0n social media it has become more extreme. i would have
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thought if you are going to vote in one election, this would be it. then again, the brexit result was delivered by significant numbers of people who didn't vote before and may not again. basically it is extremely unpredictable and we don't know what is going to happen. the daily mirror, exclusive election pledge. labour, we will save free tv licenses for the over 75 ‘s. pledge. labour, we will save free tv licenses for the over 75 's. at last, someone who is speaking my language. as long as i have my telly, nothing else matters. we know that it was very controversial when it looked as though the tories had taken the tv licence away from the over 75 taken the tv licence away from the over75 's, and taken the tv licence away from the over 75 's, and now labour on paper look as though they are promising to rectify that great wrong. we know it was complicated because it got moved around in sort of trust deals with the bbc. it was about negotiations for the licence fee during gordon brown's tenure which have rippled through. however, it is all part of
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this sort of airy fairy language. this morning it was about insulating people's houses and in the meantime creating 200,000 jobs in the whole rippled out effect of wringing this insulation. so we're going to be eco— friendly, everyone will be in employment, and you will have a lovely telly to watch age you are. the point of this is it would make ita the point of this is it would make it a welfare benefit again, which the conservatives chose to remove by basing the responsibility for the policy and the cost on the bbc. yes, it is not actually clear what labour is going to do. they have just said they are going to restore it. there area they are going to restore it. there are a whole series of options they could legislate to make it legally the responsibility of the bbc, for example, or they could pay for it out of taxation. but the point about it is, actually, again, this is an issue where people are being infantilised. there are many over—75s who can afford a television license, and many under the age of 75 who are in prison because they can't pay for their tv licence. this
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whole thing is skewed towards the idea that over—75s are some sort of special category. the bbc, as i understand it, were looting having a means understand it, were looting having a m ea ns test understand it, were looting having a means test for it. if you receive a pension credit, you would get it. exactly, if you are a low income get getter, you would get it, and if you are not you are not. which to me seems like a sensible approach. the point is, isn't it, a 745 million town built the bbc has to foot, and town built the bbc has to foot, and to do that they will have to be cuts. yes, and so again it comes back to this idea of the people being treated both as one homogenous group, everyone over 75 is the same, but also that voters aren't sophisticated or intelligent enough to understand that there are trade—offs in all of those scenarios. looking at the express, boris, i will cut taxes for every worker. boosting welfare spending by £5 billion. what happened to austerity? what? no, that was last
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week. i just austerity? what? no, that was last week. ijust think it is really interesting. the comparison between the daily mirror, a labour supporting paper, a big promise, and the express, a conservative backing paper. boris, iwill cut the express, a conservative backing paper. boris, i will cut taxes for every worker. we only a couple of days in, and this election hasn't officially started. it won't start until wednesday when parliament is dissolved. so buckle up because we are going to have six weeks of these are going to have six weeks of these are sort of declamatory headlines. the detail is interesting. boris johnson is looking at plans. he hasn't committed to anything. he is looking at plans to give employees a tax cut with £460. but in the way of these things, the tabloids trumpet thatis these things, the tabloids trumpet that is a hard and fast promise. it is only in paragraph two that you realise the detail is that he is only looking at it and hasn't actually committed to it. and again, this may be floating an idea ahead of the manifesto launch, to see if people. this will be focus groups, politicians will be paying attention to how people in key marginals react to how people in key marginals react
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to this —— focus grouped. is it a cut in national insurance people are interested in? this is part of the sophisticated electioneering already upon us. and whatever you're going to do, how are you going to pay for it? this is it, the money has to come from somewhere. this is the gift, this is also the gift. there is no such thing as a free gift. somebody is paying for it. theresa may told us there was no such thing as the magic money tree. john mcdonnell sort of hinted where they we re mcdonnell sort of hinted where they were coming from. he said it was all about that top 5%, he will skim off the cream, and they are at least in theory transparent about that. costings are yet to come out exactly where that will happen, but he is all about projecting the —— protecting the majority of people so they are not paying more tax. in theory borisjohnson has gone a step further and will be giving people this little windfall. whether people think that £460 a year is worth it when it comes to all the other things that were kind of disappear into the small print, as i say,
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early days. what has happened in australia, several times in australia, several times in australia, is that the australian government has effectivelyjust sent every taxpayer a cheque for $700, and said there is your rebate. that isa and said there is your rebate. that is a much more obvious way of giving people money, and that tends to boost the economy, and people get free money, spend it. the one that hasjust lost power, though?m free money, spend it. the one that hasjust lost power, though? it is not that this prime minister, a series of australian premises have done this to boost the economy. you feel like you have won the lottery or something. staying with the daily express, the lady leaves strictly as mike bushell survives again. he survives the dance off for the umpteenth time. this is the lady weymouth, of course. normally you hear about the great journey that people have been on, and it is all smiles and cheers. and anneka rice
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went out unseemly early in the competition. normally they make a friend for life, is the headline, but we as —— we are seeing tears and tea rs. but we as —— we are seeing tears and tears. mike is seen as a proper disruptor, because tears. mike is seen as a proper disru ptor, because he tears. mike is seen as a proper disruptor, because he keeps staying in the competition. it is becoming very nasty about vote rigging, but clearly the man has legs and will probably be making his way to blackpool. and somebody said to him on social media, you know, he works ha rd on social media, you know, he works hard and he is nice. maybe that's the way people vote.|j hard and he is nice. maybe that's the way people vote. i don't know about the dancing programme, but i assume when you talk about people making a friend for life that was a euphemism given the strictly curse? know, that was last year. there are relationships that have blossomed, as you rightly point to. the baby is on its way. what baby? rachel,
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riley, and pascha. they are so busy not looking at their partners because they don't want to be caught by the other curse. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. a big thank you to my guests this evening, tony and caroline. that's all from us tonight, and goodbye. next on bbc news it's time for the film review. hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this
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week's cinema releases, as ever, is mark kermode. hi, mark.

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