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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 10, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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people not trusting politicians. when westminster caught fire in 1834, big when westminster caught fire in 183a, big crowd turned up to cheer on the fire. but this time, the scale of promises and depth of mistrust and the evidence that the allegiance of people to particular parties is as loose as it's ever been. that's arguably driving on ever more extravagant promises. what is certainly true is that the tories are promising spending on a scale not seen since before the financial crash and labour borrowing on a scale not seen since the 19705. a big factor in this election could arguably be who is trusted lea5t big factor in this election could arguably be who is trusted least as much as who is trusted more. it's not just about the economy. there much as who is trusted more. it's notjust about the economy. there is a lot of controversy about a report by the house of commons‘ intelligence committee into russian influence and the fact it hasn‘t been published yet. 0ne influence and the fact it hasn‘t been published yet. one report says the report discusses the ins and out5 the report discusses the ins and outs of donations to the conservative party by wealthy russians, not about illegality but it‘5 russians, not about illegality but it‘s about influence and that sort of thing. one senior official at mi6
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from the past i spoke to today said the controversy itself was de5tabilising, which is exactly what president putin wants. all the leaders are telling us they are concerned that trust could be a big i55ue concerned that trust could be a big issue and at stake in this election. whether you believe them or not, for tho5e whether you believe them or not, for those who really care about the health of british politics, it is true. thank you. seven 5evere flood warnings remain in place along the river don in yorkshire this afternoon — with a further a0 5uch warnings elsewhere in england and in wales. 0ne community, fi5hlake in south yorkshire, has been completely engulfed by floodwaters. 0ur correspondent fiona trott is there now. fiona. michelle, there‘s a real sense of urgency here tonight. doncaster council are telling people here that there is a risk to life, but some are deciding to stay. tho5e there is a risk to life, but some are deciding to stay. those who are 5taying are deciding to stay. those who are staying here have told us they believe more could have been done to maintain the river don and the land here, but the environment agency 5ay5 here, but the environment agency says this serious situation here tonight has been caused by the sheer
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levels of rainfall. a village that‘5 a village that‘s been abandoned. mo5t a village that‘s been abandoned. most people here have locked up and left. the safest way to get through i5 left. the safest way to get through is by tractor. pari5h councillor pam webb has decided to stay. she is touring the village with the emergency services. the environment agency put out i noticed at 5pm on friday, basically, "stand down, there won‘t be home5 flooded". thi5 i5 there won‘t be home5 flooded". thi5 is what‘s happened. —— put out a notice to stop farmerjohn duckett has worked on these fields all his life. he says poor land management i5 life. he says poor land management is to blame. there is no doubt about it. part of the problem is the river don, which drains this area, is not receiving any maintenance whatsoever. the local pub in fi5hlake has whatsoever. the local pub in fi5hla ke has become whatsoever. the local pub in fi5hlake has become a refuge. it‘s on higher ground and has gas, a
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place to sleep and get a hot meal. the first night, everyone was devastated, weren't they? absolutely devastated. we had grown men crying, which were horrific but spirits have left it, haven't they? they are able to cook meal5 because people have been donating food at the local church. and volu nteer5 been donating food at the local church. and volunteer5 likejosh have been wading through the water to deliver it. i'm going back and forth from the church with supplies in my day sat, delivering them to people who need them. there‘s a lot of elderly people stuck with nothing. if it wasn't for the volu nteer5 nothing. if it wasn't for the volunteer5 like these local farmers, this village would be struggling to cope. they‘ve been praised by the emergency services and will be here for many days to come. fiona trott, bbc news, doncaster. the royalfamily, senior politicians and diplomat5 havejoined veterans and religious leaders at the cenotaph in central london to mark remembrance sunday. the prince of wales led the wreath—laying in memory of those who‘ve died in conflict. 0ur royal correspondent,
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nicholas witchell, reports. it is that morning of the year when we pau5e, when the matters, which seem so pressing on other days, are set are set in a broader perspective, as the nation comes together to remember those who lost their lives in the world wars and other more recent conflicts. the leaders of the main political parties took their places at the cenotaph with their wreaths of red poppies. watching from a balcony, her majesty the queen, with the duchess of cornwall and the duchess of cambridge. the prince of wales led the other principal members of the royal family to their positions in front of the cenotaph‘5 northern face in readiness for the national two—minute 5ilence at 11 o‘clock. big ben chimes the hour.
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music: last post at the summit of the prince of wales placed the wreath in tribute to tho5e placed the wreath in tribute to those who lost their lives in 5ervice those who lost their lives in service to the country. reed5 were al5o laid by the dukes of york, su55ex al5o laid by the dukes of york, sussex and cambridge. and then, after the official wreath laying by political leaders, military chiefs and high commissioners, it was the turn of the former servicemen and women who attend the parade year after year. at war memorial5 acro55 at war memorial5 across the country, the nation remembered. in saint all 5till the nation remembered. in saint all still in cornwall, the normandy vetera n still in cornwall, the normandy veteran harry billinge left a wreath in memory of those who died in the
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d—day landing 75 years ago. and in kent, a wartime decoder scattered 750,000 poppies, a ribbon of scarlet above the white cliffs of dover in memorie5 above the white cliffs of dover in memories of those home never came home. nicholas witchell, bbc news. firefighters tackling around 100 bushfire5 in australia say they could now start to threaten sydney. at least three people have died in the fires in new south wales and queensland. helena wilkin5on has the latest. the scale and ferocity of these fires is clear. this is new south wales on the east coast of australia being ravaged by the flames. three days since the wildfire5 began, they‘re still burning and spreading. more than 1,000 firefighters are working across this state in queensland to try and contain them, but conditions are difficult. mate, it‘s just the worst thing i‘ve ever seen. hone5tly, the fire front was coming at us and there‘s nothing you could do about it.
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lost a few friends in the fire, lost all their possessions. posse55ion5 are nothing, it‘s the people that count, eh? the devastating power of these fires is clear to see. this used to be what someone called home. now, there‘s nothing left. 150 homes have so far been destroyed and thousands of people have had to evacuate. au5tralia‘5 prime minister say5 he‘5 proud of how people have helped each other. people have reached out, got people out of homes, made sure they've got to safety, looked after each other's livestock and animals, talking to each other, putting themselves in harm's way for each other. i've got to tell you, as a prime minister, i'm never more proud of australians than in moments like this. as the fires continue, officials say things are likely to get worse. extreme warnings for large parts of the new south wales coa5t are likely to be issued this week, with areas around sydney especially at risk. helena wilkinson, bbc news.
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now with all the day‘s sport, here‘5 holly hamilton at the bbc sport centre. england‘s cricketers have secured a 3—2 t20 5erie5 victory over new zealand after winning a thrilling final match in auckland. and in a repeat of this summer‘s 50—over world cup final, the game had to be settled by a super—over. adam wild reports. they say lightning never 5trike5 twice. but in auckland, the conditions were an ominous sign. when the rain finally stopped and cricket got started, the thunderous blows soon followed. new zealand with a lightning—fast start. the black caps batting lighting up those grey skies. 146 on the board, jonny bairstow took charge of the reply. but of england‘s one—day world cup winning side that so narrowly beat new zealand in the summer. surely it couldn‘t get so close this time? yet here was chrisjordan, four needed off the final ball to tie the scores. a boundary did just that.
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few could believe it happened again. so to the super 0ver and jonny bairstow once more going up and over, the target set. new zealand couldn‘t quite get there. and when eoin morgan did, the series was won. england once more winners in the most dramatic way. adam wilde, bbc news. hannah cockroft set a new world record as she claimed her fifth consecutive t34100 metre title at the world para—athletics championships in dubai. it was a british one—two with kare adenegan taking silver while maria lyle won her first title in the t35100 metre. kate grey reports. dubai is not used to the rain but for the british athletes, it felt like home. it also meant cooler conditions for the much anticipated head to head. world record holder versus the defending champion hannah
quote
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cockroft. the t 3a versus the defending champion hannah cockroft. the t 34100 metre dash. then kare adenegan struggling to keep her head down. she is going to get the world title again! the race was won from the gun. a new world record time. hurricane hanna is back. i think i had record time. hurricane hanna is back. i thinki had settled record time. hurricane hanna is back. i think i had settled with a silver in my head. i thought to myself i would be happy with a silver and if kare beats me, fair play. i got the race i asked for and i got the medal i wanted! duke completed the set this morning winning bronze in the f 41 shot put and in turn has boosted great britain‘s medal tally going into this evening‘s session which, too, has plenty of medal hopefuls. none more so has plenty of medal hopefuls. none more so than maria lyle, storming to victory in the t 35100 metres. her first individual world title. great britain‘s second gold of the day and
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if the form book goes to plan, there could be more to come. kate gray, bbc news, dubai. a crucial day in the premier league with leaders liverpool hosting champions manchester city at anfield, with the host leading 2—0 at the moment. earlier, wolves beat aston villa 2—1 in the west midlands derby. rauljimenez scoring the second for the home side. meanwhile, manchester united eased to a 3—1victory over brighton at old trafford. in the scottish premiership, rangers beat livingston 2—0. it was also a 2—0 victory for celtic over motherwell, which means the top two remain separated byjust one goal. that‘s all from me. there‘s more on the bbc sport website. thank you very much. that‘s it. we‘re back with the late news at 10pm. now on bbc one, it‘s time for the news where you are.
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hello.
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this is bbc news. let‘s return now to news that the royal family and senior politicians have joined military veterans and religious leaders at the cenotaph in central london to remember the fallen in conflicts over the last two centuries. as part of the commemorations, a spectacular 750,000 poppies cascaded over the white cliffs of dover. they were carried in a second world war dakota dropped from an altitude of 500ft over the battle of britain memorial. five veterans including former raf servicemen were on board the aircraft. the poppies were all purchased from royal british legion for nearly £a,000. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell has more on the poppy appeal and the events marking remembrance day at the cenotaph. as always, a very moving ceremony. the pavements absolutely packed with people that have been here for a couple of hours waiting to observe the two minutes‘ silence. you can probably hear the bands behind me. because it is the march of the veterans. up to 10,000 veterans
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who are marching past the cenotaph, organised by the royal british legion. from there, i have alex 0wen. this is a really important event for veterans to be involved in, isn‘t it? yeah, it is hugely important. for the veterans you see here today, but also for the 6.7 million members of the armed forces community up and down the country, this is just one event that happens in the nation‘s capital. in towns and cities across the county, we will see similar things. so it is important that we come out and recognise those who defended our freedom and liberty that we enjoy today. the poppy appeal this year, what have been the themes? what is the message you are trying to emphasise this year? anyone that saw the commemorations down at portsmouth for d—day 75 this year will know that it has been a pivotal moment for the battles that took place 75 years ago in 191m during the second world war when the tide turned. and our military people, our serving people made those amazing sacrifices, alongside our commonwealth allies to be able to bring us
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the freedoms we enjoy now. this year, i am personally thinking about veterans that i have spoken to recently who fought in monte cassino. a chap called boycey, who is 98—years—old now, and i spoke to him, and he said, "if it wasn‘t for the polish soldiers that he was fighting shoulder to shoulder with, he would still be in monte cassino." and i think that sense of comradeship really is spread across the generations that fought years ago but also the generation today. my troop in afghanistan, i had a nigerian serving with me, a south african. i was commanded by a ghanaian and we handed over to americans at the end of the tour. none of that we would have been able to do without the help of those guys. i would like to bring in, if i can, please, lieutenant colonel patrick jackson from the royal yeomanry. you were here today. how important is it to come and be a part of the ceremony and of course that are happening in all areas across the country. ifound it, as usual here, very poignant. there is a lot of formality to this event, and rightly so.
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the other memorials and ceremonies taking place across the country that you‘ve mentioned can be perhaps a little bit more affecting. but the two—minute silence always makes one, as one should do, reflect. i suppose the main thing one remembers or recalls are people, friends, who sacrificed their lives over the last campaigns and the friends i knew but also my forebears. you were on several tours of afghanistan so, like you say, this will remind you of people you have known. yes, it always does. i suppose doing that two minutes, probably a sea of faces perhaps passing through one‘s mind and considering what they did and the sacrifices that they‘ve made, freedom doesn‘t come cheap.
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and every year, for these two minutes, we are reminded of that. alex, if i canjust come back to you. the poppy appeal this year is asking people, it‘s directly aimed at young people, it‘s directly aimed at young people to put down devices for two minutes today and tomorrow. i5 people to put down devices for two minutes today and tomorrow. is there a concern that as the distance between the two world wars gets further away, events like this means less to young people? i‘m not sure it means less. tomorrow marks 100 years of us marking the end of the walk with two minutes‘ silence. now we mark the ball in from all conflicts. tomorrow, 100 yea rs from all conflicts. tomorrow, 100 years on, we have a chance to look at how society is acting, get them to put down the laptops and phones, turn off the technology and reflect for two minutes. they gave their lives and the least we can do is give them two minutes of our time.
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not much more to say than that, is there? take two minutes to reflect those people who gave so much in the service of their country. the greetings card chain clintons is considering shop closures and rent cuts as part of a survival plan to save around 2,500 jobs. it comes after reports that the retailer wants to close 66 of its 332 shops. a clintons spokeswoman told the bbc that "discussions are continuing" with landlords "but no decisions have been made". let‘s return now to one of our main stories. thousands of people are having to deal with a third day of chaos from severe flooding in parts of england with damaged homes, disrupted businesses and travel disruption. seven severe flood warnings are in place on the river don in yorkshire meaning there‘s a danger to life. there‘s also concern that water levels are rising on sections of the river trent near newark.
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earlier this afternoon doncaster council advised local residents to leave the village of fi5hlake, asking anyone still in the village contact the council to organise immediate evacuation with the council saying it can only offer dedicated support to people who are not in an area where there is a threat to life. any threat to life has to be dealt with by emergency services. well, joining me now by phone is peter pridham, he‘s the church warden at st cuthbert‘s church in fi5hlake, the village where people have been told they must leave. he‘s opened up the church for anyone seeking refuge from the floods and hejoins me now on the phone. thank you for talking to us. as darkness falls, what has been the situation there today? that evening. the situation today is that the village is in a critical condition because the large amount of fluid
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that has run into it has left the village four orfive that has run into it has left the village four or five feet deep. many people have been evacuated, some people have been evacuated, some people are too ill. many older people are too ill. many older people are too ill. many older people are now in their homes and are being served by a large community effort. i‘m glad to say people from 20 or 30 miles away going long distances to avoid flooded roads, to bring supplies into the local church. what is absolutely critical, and any listener who can hear this, please respond. we desperately need to large diesel pumps. we need pump work to match. we need to get rid of the illuminated water in the village because of the river rises again tonight or tomorrow, in conjunction with the high tide and a further fall of rain, from the pennines and we have more water flowing over the banks into the village, the village will not be to cope. millions of pounds of damage has been called
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already. thankfully no loss of life, we have the merciful creator to thank for that. we need heavy duty pumps immediately to remove the water from the village before moore arrives. i know you have put out that appeal via local radio but if anyone is listening, we are happy to put them in touch with you if they get in touch with us. just in terms of what the environment agency has said, it has said that it doesn‘t expect the to go down for at least the next 2a hours. in some ways do you feel this isa hours. in some ways do you feel this is a more dangerous moment than a couple of days ago when you had initial flooding? when couple of days ago when you had initialflooding? when is couple of days ago when you had initial flooding? when is the existing pumping system, it is nowhere adequate to cope with the floodwater the village. there is water three or four feet deep which i have walked through to get here. there is a danger to life in the present time through weakness in the
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walls adjacent to the bridge. the environment agency should look seriously at that. we asked them this afternoon to drop sandbags by air. if the water gives way at high tide today, the volume of water flowing into this village could lead to serious loss of life. it is not a time to delay and procrastinate, it is time for immediate action. they have said in their statement and this has been backed up by doncaster council who have said, the council can‘t send people in because if there is any risk, they can‘t put their people at risk but that is what the crews are therefore. they we re what the crews are therefore. they were urging people when the statement was issued at 2:50pm this afternoon to get out and if they can‘t, get hold of the emergency services. i5 can‘t, get hold of the emergency services. is that not what people should be doing? you are doing admirable work but isn‘t it better to leave the village? it wouldn‘t be practical for people to leave because there are
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businesses here. it is not easy for people to ever eat like that. —— to uproot like that. there is scope for substantial pumping to be put into improve the situation. i am speaking on behalf of those who have been taken ill from the stress or lost their phones and communication. it is not a time for procrastination. i would urge the environment agency to ta ke would urge the environment agency to take it seriously and consider the fa ct take it seriously and consider the fact that when they were asked on friday to do certain things they weren‘t done and it‘s time action was taken. i take your word for it but obviously we haven‘t heard from the environment agency. we will try to get a response from them to what you are saying. in the meantime, what volu nta ry are saying. in the meantime, what voluntary effort is going on in the village? there are a certain number of people who are fortunately drive. there are few that are helping visiting every house. we are visiting every house. we are visiting every house with an old
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person. we believe everyone who has a need at the moment is being met. the risk is that now the initial evacuation has taken place, those who feel they can stay as things are, they need this floodwater pumping out before any more arrives andi pumping out before any more arrives and i put the case is strong as i can. you are getting an engineers assessment, not just a can. you are getting an engineers assessment, notjust a politician. you are saying those from your background in engineering as well. it is crystal clear that the capacity at present is insufficient and if that was overwhelmed, the situation becomes very much more serious and there would then be a serious and there would then be a serious danger of loss of life. evacuation isn‘t always possible. peter, thank you. not only for that but for the photographs that we have been showing. that is actually one of the hotels that has been inundated. we have been seeing pictures peter has provided us with. we will try to get a response from
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the environment agency and his appealfor 12 inch the environment agency and his appeal for 12 inch bore the environment agency and his appealfor 12 inch bore pipes and the pump and connections they are trying to get into the village. that is the picture in fi5hlake this evening and we will keep monitoring that over the course of the evening here on bbc news. turkey says eight civilians have been killed in a bomb attack in northeast syria. the explosion happened near the town of tal abyad, an area controlled by turkish troops and their syrian rebel allies. images from the scene show a column of black smoke rising into the air. rescue workers say a bomb in a vehicle exploded outside a bakery. turkey has blamed the syrian kurdish, ypg militia for the blast. the ypg hasn‘t yet responded to the allegation. turkey regards the kurdish fighters as terrorists, and wants them pushed away from the frontier. voters in spain are returning to the polls for the country‘s second general election injust over six months. the socialists, led by the acting prime minister, pedro sanchez, won the most seats in the last ballot in april but were unable to form a government.
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spain has been struggling to put stable governments together since 2015 and this year‘s vote has also been overshadowed by fresh unrest in catalonia. 0ur correspondent guy hedgecoe has more from madrid. five or six years ago, spain had a two—party system. the socialists and the conservative popular party, who had dominated the political landscape for over three decades. and then, suddenly, new parties started arriving. podemos on the left, ciudadanos further to the right. and then, more recently, the far—right vox party. so now we have five parties vying for power, in the political the mainstream. and that makes it much more difficult to form a parliamentary majority and therefore much more difficult to form a government. and we saw that in april‘s election, which pedro sanchez won, but he wasn‘t able to form a leftist majority with podemos, and that triggered this new vote today. there has been a huge amount of focus on the catalan issue overall — the catalan crisis, how to resolve
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it — on the campaign trail. and this has been an issue which has really dominated politics for the last few months. there is a lot of pressure from the right, on prime minister pedro sanchez, to take a much tougher line against the pro—independence catalan government, against the independence movement overall. there are calls, for example from the far—right vox party, for him to declare a state of emergency. now, so far, he has resisted such calls. he says he wants to take a moderate line in catalonia, but in catalonia itself, the independence movement says he has been anything but moderate, and that he is part of this repressive state apparatus. so, it has been very difficult for pedro sanchez, but it has been a dominant issue, throughout this campaign, and the feeling is that it‘s going to be crucialfor spain, if it wants to resolve the catalan crisis, to have a stable government in place,
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after this election. earlier i spoke to the spanish journalist sara canales, who explained that the central issue for this election has been the catalan crisis. 0n the one hand, the spanish supreme court imprisoned the catalan leaders who organised the referendum of independence two years ago, which triggered mass protests across catalonia, also social unrest, and even a week of violent episodes. also, the supreme court sent new warrants of arrest to those who fled spain after this failed attempt to declare independence and who are now living in belgium, in scotland, in switzerland. so there has been a lot in this last few weeks and months. so it has been the main topic of the campaign, and there has even been little discussion for issues like the economy or education or health care, or even climate change. so the whole campaign has been mainly focused on how
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to approach this crisis. is there any indication that the election itself will offer any kind of hope for resolving it? given that the parties in madrid say they are upholding the constitution by opposing moves towards independence, and the pro—independence parties, of course, you have some seats, some at least in the madrid parliament, and they are saying, "no, this is about democracy." exactly. well, this election again will be another opportunity for the catalan pro—independence parties to evaluate the momentum of the independence movement as a whole. they did get more than 20 seats in the last elections, and we will see what happens tonight. but if the pro—independence parties achieve a good result, this could be used as a bargaining chip to maybe negotiate or achieve some dialogue. 0rjust make some moves. also, on the other hand, we have seen how the far right groups have adopted a tougher stance on catalonia as well.
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they suggest that they want to ban all the political parties that favour independence, and they also reject any sort of dialogue. so definitely all the parties that support independence in catalonia are really looking for where to get a representation in congress so they can maybe take further steps for a potential dialogue, or even a potential referendum. we have to remember that the catalan president quim torra had stated after the verdict came out that he would organise a second referendum of independence. which also actually triggered some division amongst the pro—independence parties. because there is also a division amongst the catalan parties, even though we have seen that in the streets, the social movement on independence is more united than what we see in the political arena.
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time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello. it has been, thankfully, much drier today. however, there are still several severe flood warnings in force currently and numerous flood warnings across parts of england. and there are now met office weather warnings for more rain, and you can get the details from the website. because the rain is already marching in across northern ireland. turning wintry over the pennines, the southern uplands. we are looking at the first significant falls of snow across the hills of scotland, mainly north of the central belt but blowing around with strong winds. clearly more rainfall. all in the areas we‘ve seen devastating flooding — a cause for concern. this rain band should move through fairly steadily overnight but it will be blown along with a strong wind, and it will be around in some areas and north and east first thing
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on monday morning. not a particularly pleasant morning rush with the spray and standing water on the roads, and the snow across the highlands of scotland. 200 metres is relatively low level roads that it will affect. through monday, that weather front still with us but we are by no means dry. we have a strong north—westerly wind blowing in showers, pestering northern and western areas. they will be blown further eastwards as well. because it‘s cold air from the north—west, that will turn to sleet and snow. not necessarily further south, but there could be a smattering across the pennines and north wales mountains. it will feel cold. still the low pressure with us, and showers and longer spells of rain meandering over that area of low pressure so again, areas where we have seen the flooding, we are expecting more rainfall and the met office warning out for this area as well. sixes or sevens. still a brisk wind coming down
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from the north and feeling chilly. temperatures will be below par this week. it will be a cold night tuesday night into wednesday, as it does look like we will have a brief window of dry weather, although already by the end of play on wednesday, we have the next weatherfront coming in. for wednesday morning at least, widespread frost. it could be quite icy given the amount of rainfall we‘ve seen quite recently. more rain coming in, becoming an issue for central pulse across the course of thursday. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the environment agency continues to warn there‘s a danger to life from high river levels in south yorkshire — with seven severe warnings still in place. we‘ve had no sleep for two days, we keep getting calls coming in from people who have got no supplies, no drinks, no food. the chancellor defends
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conservative party analysis of labour‘s spending plans, as labour says they are a complete work of fiction. ceremonies take place across the uk to mark remembrance sunday to commemorate those who lost their lives in conflict. a world war ii dakota plane dropped 750,000 poppies over the white cliffs of dover to remember the fallen. australia‘s prime minister warns of a "difficult" week to come from the "catastrophic" bushfire threat to sydney and surrounding areas. three people are known to have lost their lives. voters in spain return to the polls for the country‘s fourth general election in as many years.
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sport now. and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here‘s gavin ra mjaun. good evening. in the day‘s big premier league match, liverpool have the advantage in the top—of—the—table clash against manchester city. coming up to the start of the second half at anfield. liverpool struck early, an absolute rocket from fabinho in the fifth minute. so the best possible start forjurgen klopp‘s side. they made it two soon after. mo salah connecting with a superb cross from andy robertson. liverpool set to go nine points clear at the top, if it stays like this. city have it all do now to stop that from happening. imean i mean they would go nine points clear of city. there were two earlier kick—offs. manchester united gained a valuable three points with a win over brighton. andreas pereira and davy propper‘s own goal put 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s side two up by half time. lewis dunk pulled one back for brighton, but united hit back straightaway, marcus rashford restoring their two—goal advantage. the victory moves them up to seventh, just one point
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behind arsenal in sixth. excellent performance by the lads. i thought they were on the front foot, attacking. when you see these boys going forward, as we did today, it isa going forward, as we did today, it is a joy to watch. we need to keep on improving, keep on winning games, and see where it takes us. wolves have moved into the top half of the table for the first time since the opening weekend, after beating aston villa, in the west midlands derby. it was their first victory over villa in the top flight since 1978. jim lumsden reports. wolves were unbeaten in six league games and on the verge of qualification for the knockout stages of the europa league, evidence of fatigue would be understandable. the energy levels seemed unaffected. villa were co nsta ntly seemed unaffected. villa were constantly on the back foot, and as the half hour approached, diego giotto should have given wolves the leave. i doubtless much rehearsed
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free kick finished in style by the two portuguese. 11 of the player‘s goals have been scored from outside the penalty area. after the break, villa made a game of it before wolves gained control. villa got a lifeline with a late strike, but 2—1 is finished. wolves up to eighth, villa drifting towards the drop zone. 0ur idea in the first half, we controlled villa, we played them, we opened them and created many chances. the goal came late, but it was deserved. you could see a lot of chances. this is what makes me proud, not records, it is a daily basis through the competitions, and the way they run is amazing. bristol city have moved up to sixth in the championship after winning 1—0 at cardiff. the robins‘ captainjosh brownhill struck in spectacular style midway
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through the second half, to inflict cardiff‘s first home defeat of the season. the welsh side remain 14th in the table. it‘s been a day to forget for a number of league clubs in the first round of the fa cup. macclesfield were one of those to lose to lower league opposition. the league two side were beaten 4—0 by isthmian premier division team kingstonian. louie theophanous scoring twice. macclesfield were forced to play five loanees and six youth team players — as the first team continued a strike over unpaid salaries. and from sol campbell‘s old club, to his current club — league one southend — who have also been knocked out. they were beaten 1—0 by non—league dover. ruel sotiriou with the winner on his debut. a shock too for leyton orient, as they lost 2—1 to maldon and tiptree, who play in the eighth
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tier of the league pyramid. all the results, and highlights, can be found on the bbc sport website. absolutely loving it there, aren‘t they? celtic remain top of the scottish premiership following a 2—0 victory at home to motherwell. but rangers keep up the pressure on celtic by winning 2—0 away to livingston. joe aribo and alfredo morelos scored for rangers. it‘s tight at the top; rangers are level on points with celtic, but are behind on a goal difference ofjust the one. to the world para—athletics championships in dubai now, and more medal success for great britain at the games, including a world record. 0ur reporter kate grey is there for us. kate, bring us to speed with what‘s happened. it has been a very busy day for great britain, but as you mentioned there, there has been a world record, and that went to hannah in the tea party 100 metres. she is back on top after a difficult 2018, losing her world record at european title. she has come here to do by
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and become the world champion in a new world record time, beating her team—mate. she looked absolutely brilliant and was very pleased at the end of the race. emotional as well, glad that she is back where she wants to be. and carrie taking the silver. there was a further five medals won across the course of the day for great britain. and there was another gold, this time it was for maria lyle in the t35100 metres. there is quite a lot to get through. maria finally won her first world title at the age of 19. she has had a lot of ups and downs in her very short career so far, and at the end of the race, this is what she had to say. i am so happy, i fell over at the start of my race. they wait a few stu m bles. the start of my race. they wait a few stumbles. suitable of a performance like that, it means so much. it gives me confidence going into the paralympics next year. in the last few moments, we have just found out that aled davies has just defended his world title in the f 63
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shot put. he had to save it to the last couple of throws to pull out that winning shot. but he is very pleased to be back defending his title. there was also a silver medal and a bronze medalfor andrew small and a bronze medalfor andrew small and harryjenkins, respectively, in the t33. and earlier today, there was a bronze for karen duke in the shot put. we have very much enjoyed today, and i am sure there will be plenty more to come across the course of the competition. kate in dubai for us there for the world para athletics championships. history repeats itself for the england cricket team. they beat new zealand, in a thrilling final twenty20 match, to take their series 3—2. and they did after another dramatic super—over, just like they did against the same opponents to win july‘s world cup final. adam wild has more. they say lightning never strikes twice, but in auckland, the conditions were an ominous sign. when the rain finally stopped, and cricket got started, the thunderous
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blow is soon followed. new zealand with a lightening fast start. the black caps batting‘ lighting up the skies. jonny bairstow soon took charge of the reply, partnering and‘s one—day world cup winning side that so narrowly beat new zealand in the summer, surely it couldn‘t get so the summer, surely it couldn‘t get so close this time? yet here was chrisjordan, so close this time? yet here was chris jordan, four so close this time? yet here was chrisjordan, four needed off the final ball to tie the scores. the boundary did just that. few could believe it had happened again. and so believe it had happened again. and so to the super over, and bairstow once more going up and over. the target set. new zealand couldn‘t quite get there. and when eoin morgan did, the series was one. england once more winners in the most dramatic way. adam wilde, bbc news. in rugby union, two games in the premiership today — earlier london irish beat
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leicester tiger 36—11. and there was plenty of drama in the late kick—off, as bristol came back from a 17—point deficit at half time to claim a late victory against exeter chiefs. novak djokovic has made an impressive start to the season ending atp world tour finals. he won his first match with ease — beating italy‘s matteo berrettini in straight sets — djokovic winning the first 6—2. and he won the second 6—1, with the match lasting just over an hour. roger federer plays his first match tonight, he‘s up against dominic thiem. ahead of bmx freestyle making its 0lympic debut next year, one british rider has shown what she can do. charlotte worthington has won bronze at the urban cycling world championships — finishing behind american champion hannah roberts and chile‘s valentina perez grasset. it is surreal, it is ridiculous. i
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don‘t think it has sunk in yet. i set out today, everyone is going for gold. 0f set out today, everyone is going for gold. of course i was going for gold, but i will take a podium finish for sure. what does it mean to you to be riding for great britain? does it make you proud?m makes me ridiculously proud. when i won the european championship and they played the national anthem, there was definitely a tear in my eye. i love the country. england‘s tyrrell hatton has won the turkish 0pen, at the fourth extra hole, following a six—man play—off. the 28—year—old ryder cup player claimed the title after austria‘s matthias schwab missed a short par putt. they finished under floodlights after six players tied on 20 under par. a quick update on the premier league game between the top of the table side liverpool and manchester city. liverpool have a third now. sadia manet got it, so it is 3—0 with just over half an hour to play. it looks like liverpool will go nine points ahead of city in the race for the title. very much in favour ofjurgen klopp‘s side.
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that‘s all the sport for now. now it is time for the film review. hello. welcome to the film review on bbc news. and to take us through this week‘s cinema releases is mark kermode. so, mark, what do we have this week? a very mixed bag. we have the good liar, which is a super—ripe drama starring helen mirren and ian mckellen. we have the irishman, martin scorsese, a netflix film that is playing in cinemas. and luce, a very intriguing psychological thriller. so, are we starting with the good liar? we‘re starting with the good liar. so, helen mirren and ian mckellen. they are silver surfers who meet online. in the very opening sequence,
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they are filling out the online dating forms and they are both fibbing about themselves. so the good liar sets itself up at the very beginning. we learn early on that he is a con man. he meets helen mirren, she is looking for companionship. but gradually, a relationship forms between them. but her grandson does not trust ian mckellen — and, frankly, neither would i. here‘s a clip. chuckles. the size of your estate, there'd be a windfall every week! so, what would you...? mmm? steven? i thought you were in spandau. huh, did you? well, they let me out early. 0h, steven! why didn't you let me know you were back? you should've called! what have you got her doing? so he moves in here with his gammy leg and the first time i leave you alone with him, he‘s got you giving him all your money? no! here now. no, no, no. that's not what's going on here! that‘s jumping a few fences! listen, roy. do you know what? this isn‘t your house. steven. he‘s an intruder. can you see that? you're embarrassing me in front of mr halloran and roy, who i... don't, don't. don't touch me.
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0h! so this is adapted from a novel by nicholas searle and there is, at the beginning, we are being set up for a twist — which i have to say, if you didn‘t see it coming, then you really were asleep on thejob. there is then a second and third twist further down the line which made me go, "oh, for heaven‘s sake!" if you are to enjoy this, the best way to do it is to enjoy the sight of helen mirren and ian mckellen chewing the scenery for all they are worth. i mean, it is — it is preposterous tosh. 0h! that‘s strong language! but that does not mean that it is not without its enjoyable side. i know several people who have kind of enjoyed it for all its ridiculousness. apparently, the novel seems slightly less fanciful. it‘s kind of a weird cross between, like, miss marple sunday afternoon tv and something which is slightly more sweary than that. it makes no sense whatsoever. the pleasure in it is seeing two actors enjoying themselves — although, i have to say, i never believed that they were anything other than two actors enjoying themselves. you never actually believed in the characters, as they were.
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i mean, it‘s a really odd film. it falls between several stalls. it‘s directed by bill condon, who is a very good director, and it has a very fine cast but it is absolutely ridiculous nonsense. is that an opportunity missed? i mean, the world is full nowadays of con men, you know, trying to wrangle people out of their savings. but here‘s the thing — at the beginning, the premise which is set up is the good liar — who is the good liar? and that‘s a nice little idea and, you know, obviously, one expects there to be twists and turns in the narrative, which it does exactly what you expect. but then it goes into the realms of the utterly ridiculous. but, you know, there‘s a certain pleasure in seeing very, very fine actors having fun. it doesn‘t make any sense. 0k. any sense! let‘s move on to your... no sense! i think we got that message! let‘s move on to your second film — does this make sense? — another film with fine actors, the irishman. yeah, i thought this did a lot more than i expected. so this is martin scorsese, joe pesci, robert de niro,
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al pacino, so big stars. robert de niro kind of back working with scorsese and making the kind of movie they made when they were making goodfellas and casino. it‘s made for netflix, but it has got a brief theatrical window — i think it‘s 21 days. and it‘s the story of frank sheeran. it goes over six decades. al pacino plastimmy hoffa, the union leader. joe pesci is playing very, very underplayed. stephen graham is playing the kind of character thatjoe pesci would‘ve played in a previous incarnation. the thing there‘s been a lot of talk is that the film uses digital de—ageing technology, because we see the characters go from the 19405 through to... and there‘s lots of question about, you know, is it distracting? i have to say, i didn‘t think it was. the only distracting thing is occasionally, their bodies move like old men, although their faces look young. 0h, weird! yeah. but in a 3.5—hour movie, for that to only be occasionally distracting is actually pretty good. and the fact of the matter is it‘s a very interesting story, it‘s well told, there‘s real film—making brio, it has a terrific soundtrack, there are, you know, the performances are all solidly good and it does — i mean, it takes full advantage of the fact that it‘s a netflix
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film, therefore it‘s 3.5 hours long, which is the probably thing that will make a lot of people think "you know what? i will stay in and watch this at home." but i watched it in the cinema, and the 3.5 hours pretty much flew by, with the exception of the last act, which did feel like "0h, 0k, you‘re making this for a home audience". but i thought it was — i was — pretty entertaining and the digital de—ageing bothered me much less than i expected. and frankly, if they could digitally de—age me in that way, i would be very happy. i don‘t like the idea of that, though. it‘s well done. it‘s well — it‘s just make—up. it‘s digital make—up. that‘s all it is. it‘s like, you know, performance capture. it‘s just digital costumes. digital de—ageing is just digital make—up — if you use it properly. it‘s gonna do a whole profession out of a job! well, it — i mean, you still need to use ordinary make—up, as well. there are older periods in which they do do the standard ageing thing. but i think it is, you know, it‘s the future. but you just have to be careful that the technology — it‘s not the tail wagging the dog. fairenough! now, we need to move on to the third one, luce. yes. so this is based on a stage play byjc lee. naomi watts and tim roth
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are a liberal white american couple who adopted a child who had grown up in war—torn eritrea. now he is a model student, he is fantastic at sports, he is fantastic at debating, but one of his teachers has started to have worries about him. is something up with him, or does she have a hidden agenda? here‘s a clip. like, what are the criteria for evaluating what is a violation of privacy? is privacy a civil right? i think so. maybe the law isn't so sure. if i went through your desk without your knowing, would you feel like your privacy was violated? yes, i would. so? feelings aren't a legal argument. in the newjersey case, the teacher assumed the girl was guilty, because of her feelings. that's called reasonable suspicion. it's all the police need to search your car. so it's about what's reasonable? that's what courts are for. really, it's just about people though, right? whether they conform
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to what we think they are? it's not that simple. nothing ever is. now that‘s kind of the nub of it. and what you see from that is, you know, what i was saying about the first film, there are twists, but you can see them coming a million miles away. the great thing about this, it is based on a stage play and it does feel a little bit stage—y. but all the way through, you are kept guessing as to what is actually going on. does it tell you at the end? i don‘t... it is, in my opinion, impressively unresolved. yes, things do get solved up to a certain amount, but it is a film of great ambiguity. there‘s a terrific soundtrack by geoff barrow and ben salisbury, whose soundtrack all the way through is telling you this is awkward, this is off—kilter, there are strange things at work here. and what i really liked about it is it‘s actually very hard to sustain a movie in which, right up until the very end, you are questioning people‘s motives, you‘re questioning people‘s characters. but also, you also start to realise that the film isn‘t going to tie itself neatly up. it is going to leave questions unresolved. i thought it was very, very well played. i think it‘s a great performance
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by kelvin harrisonjr. 0ctavia spencer is absolutely terrific. it is a very sort of satirical take on the middle class couple and their presumptions about things, and one of the things that... kind of the white saviour stuff? yeah, but one of the things that it does also is it wrong—foots the audience. it plays to the audience‘s expectations and then it wrong—foots them — or does it? all the way through this, i kept thinking, because i saw it immediately after watching the good liar, "this has the sense of ambiguity, the sense of uncertainty that the film before didn‘t have". i don‘t think it‘s gonna have a huge cinema audience, but i think it was really well worth seeing. my only reservation — it is based on a stage play and it is quite stage—y. but actually, i thought the story was really well told. great, 0k. you‘ve got 30 seconds for best 0ut? best out is monos which is this extraordinary film which, on the one hand is a story about child soldiers, but is so much more than that. it is a modern—day lord of the flies. and extraordinary soundtrack by mica levi, which is one of the weirdest soundtracks i‘ve heard all year, and a brilliant ensemble performance by a cast,
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some of whom are very well known, some of whom are completely unknown, but all of whom mesh together brilliantly. brilliant, disturbing, overwhelming, wonderful. wow! that sounds incredible! now, then — and very quickly — best dvd? yesterday. so the story is everyone has forgotten the beatles, except for our central character. and, you know, what would it be like if you woke up and you were the only person who remembered heyjude? i think it‘s really fun. i‘m a sucker for richard curtis scripts anyways. i think it‘s really well played. i mean, i — it‘s one of those things that you either love it or you go, "oh, for heaven‘s sake! this is — this doesn‘t make any..." but i really, really enjoyed it. i laughed, cried — and i‘ve watched it twice and the second time around, it was just as powerful. i — i thought it was... i‘m a sucker for really well—done sentimentality and this was like a great pop song — you can listen to it over and over again. thank you, mark. i‘ve gotta see that. still haven‘t seen it yet, and you‘ve made me want to watch it. that‘s it for this week, though. thanks for watching us. goodbye.
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it has been, thankfully, much drier today. however, there are still several severe flood warnings in force, currently, and numerous flood warnings across parts of england. there are now met office warnings out for more rain, more details on the website. already, that rain is marching in across northern ireland, it will turn a little bit wintry. we are looking at our first significant fall of snow across the hills of scotland, mainly north of the central belt but playing around with the strong winds. more in the areas where we already seen such devastating floods, a cause for concern. this rain down should move fairly steadily overnight, it will be blown along by a very strong wind, still around in southern areas and in the north—east first thing on monday morning. not a particularly pleasant morning rush with all the spray and standing water on the roads, out of the snow across the highlands of scotland.
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through the course of monday, that weather front is still with us across the north—east of scotland in particular, it should clear elsewhere. by no means dry, that strong north—westerly wind will blow in showers. given the strength of the wind, they will be blowing further eastwards as well. because it is cold air from the north—west, we will see sleet across the hills of scotland, not necessarily further south but there could be a smattering across the pennines. it will feel cold on tuesday, the low pressure still with us, showers and longer spells of rain meandering around that area of low pressure. again, some areas where we have seen that flooding, we are expecting more rainfall, hence a met office warning for some areas. still a brisk wind coming down from a new north, still a brisk wind coming down from the north, a really chilly feeling, temperatures below par this week. a cold tuesday night into wednesday, it does look as though we will have a brief window of dry
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weather, but by the end of wednesday, the next weather front comes in. a widespread frost could be quite icy on wednesday morning given the amount of rainfall we have seen recently, there will be more rain rolling into the western side of the uk, there could become an issue for central parts through the course of thursday. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. i‘m shaun ley. the headlines at 1800. seven severe flood warnings remain along south yorkshire‘s river don — meaning there‘s a threat to life for those in the area if the river rises again tonight or tomorrow, and it‘s in conjunction with a high tide and a further fall of rain, the village simply will not be able to cope. the tories say a jeremy corbyn government could cause an economic crisis within months of coming to power — labour calls the claim a complete work of fiction. remembering the fallen of the world wars — and the conflicts since. a world war ii dakota plane dropped 750,000 poppies over the white cliffs of dover to remember those who lost their lives.

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