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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  November 15, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11:00am and these are the main stories this morning: bringing the uk up to speed, labour promise to deliver free ultra—fast broadband to everyone in the uk over the next ten years, if they win the general election. most of the communities i've gone to, which are the small towns outside of the big cities and bigger communities, coastal towns for example, rural areas. all of them, four out of five in the latest survey of people are complaining about their connection. but speaking to the bbc this morning, the prime minister dismissed the plans. what we won't be doing is some crackpot scheme that would involve many, many tens of billions of taxpayers‘ money,
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nationalising british business. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, is in lancaster to deliver a speech in the next few moments on the broadband announcement. mrjohnson has also denied claims by brexit party leader nigel farage that the conservatives offered his candidates peerages to try to get them to stand down. i'm anita mcveigh. live in aberdeen. at the maritime museum. this is a city fuelled by the sea and oil. just as the election debate here is fuelled not only by brexit, but by independence.
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good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the labour party says it plans to deliver fast and free full fibre broadband to every household and business by 2030. they say they would part—nationalise bt to deliver the policy, and tax tech giants to help cover the cost — which labour estimates to be about 20 billion pounds. jeremy corbyn is set to outline these proposals at a speech here. at lancaster university. we'll bring you that as soon as it starts. 0ur poltiical correspondent nick eardley is at that event and can speak to us now.. i think we will get a broad pitch from jeremy corbyn and his team. why they think this is worth it.
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they think this will bring —— they will bring £20 billion in for this project, to part nationalised broad bt. this will see that three full fibre broadband across the uk. mr corbyn will be arriving any minute to tell us how he sees that panning out. we will hear from shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell. this is hard—nosed economics. if we do not get on and do this, we will —— we are already falling behind our competitors. future generations will not forgive us. it is visionary, i acce pt not forgive us. it is visionary, i accept that. but other countries are having these visions, and we are not. we are being held back. that is labour‘s pitch. we will hear more that any minute. there big questions about the cost and the viability. we
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have had suggestions that labour's estimate of how much this will cost are conservative at best. it will cost to some people say about £40 billion to make this happen. companies such as sky, talk talk, it is not certain what would happen to their services if there was a national, state owned broadband service. we heard earlierfrom bt‘s ceo. you have got a big capital investment of up to £40 billion. if you are giving it away for three, thatis you are giving it away for three, that is probably another £5 billion per year of revenue that currently gets in from customers. so you've got a big investment to make. from my perspective, what is important is my perspective, what is important is my employees from open reach, and
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oui’ my employees from open reach, and our shareholders don't like the bt group has over 100,000 people working every day. we also have thousands of people who used to work for bt, who have pensions they need to rely on. we have to make sure we can provide for those pensioners, and also for our shareholders, very importantly, because they currently owi'i importantly, because they currently own the company. these are very ambitious ideas, and the conservatives have their own ideas about what they will do by 2025. these are big numbers, so we're talking £30 billion or £40 billion for building. and in the next few years, it will need a further investment. so you're talking about many billions of pounds, and there isa many billions of pounds, and there is a question of who owns it. will it be owned by the government or the private sector? we had a reliability
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we owe private sector? we had a reliability we owe to our customers. so questions from the industry, and predictably, lots of rubbishing from the conservatives. we had the prime minister this morning calling it a, crackpot fantasy. also, they will have to push back against the sense that there will be a creeping project of nationalisation. absolutely, because we had heard john mcdonnell suggesting in the past that this wasn't going to be pa rt past that this wasn't going to be part of a big nationalisation project, but labour do have a long list of companies they want to bring into public hands. water is a possibility as well. it is part of the choice that voters will have at this election, because clearly boris johnson thinks this is nonsense, it is not going to work. he is going to
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spend the next five weeks saying this cannot happen, it is too expensive and impossible to deliver. labour are absolutely adamant that it is deliverable and it is the economic model we want to see, which if they are investing in things like massive infrastructure projects to make sure that every home in the uk and every business in the uk has high broadband, they want to be able to control that infrastructure. they don't want to put that money in, and just allow private companies to take control of it. jeremy corbyn will be arriving any minute now. there is going to be a genuine choice when it comes to the economic model. there will be a lot of questions over the next few days for labour, about where this money comes from. one of the ideas that has been floated by the ideas that has been floated by the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell is tax on tech companies. companies like facebook, google, amazon. in
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the past, it has been difficult to get that money from these companies. so another level of complexity there about how exactly that money is going to be raised. 0n the whole, labour say it is only the richest 5% whose tax rates will change an income basis. if all these projects we re income basis. if all these projects were implemented potentially in a fairly short period of time of one 01’ fairly short period of time of one or two decades, all these companies we re or two decades, all these companies were brought into public hands, is there perhaps going to be a lot of extra borrowing and higher taxes to? net, iam not extra borrowing and higher taxes to? net, i am not seeing signs of imminent arrival over your shoulder, so imminent arrival over your shoulder, so i'm going to lead you there for a few minutes. we welcomed back to lancaster as soon as we seejeremy corbyn. now, let's return to what mr johnson is up to.
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bbc viewers have this morning been putting their question to borisjohnson in a live phone—in. he answered questions on topics ranging from inthe in the past half hour, previous party mp ann widdecombe said she wasn't up to that role... can you play this up? on the one hand, we have the conservatives saying the one thing, the brexit party saying the other. this is something that has been rumbling during the past week, nigel farage saying that some of his candidates have been offered deals, jobs and peerages, in return for withdrawing from the election. he has been talking about his candidates being phoned up by number ten. in his words, he says that they
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have received thousands of phone calls and e—mails. he even goes on to say some of them have been threatened. he didn't specify where these threats have come from, but these threats have come from, but the conservatives have denied that this is the case. we've heard from the prime minister, as you say he was taking questions from the public. he denied that any deals have been done. the conservative party doesn't do deals of this kind. when mack well it's a choice for the voters at this point, who'd we believe? boris johnson or nigel farage? we don't do deals at this kind at all. so a complete denial there from the conservatives. we had fun and widdecombe, who is is a brexit party
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mp. she says he was offered some kind of deal —— she was offered a deal. i was rung up by someone at number ten. the first time, it was how i had a moral obligation to stand down, that sort of stuff. the second time it was to say that if i did stand down, it would be to offer a role in negotiations —— it would be an offer. i did play a role in the party for many years, but i cannot be buttoned up and flattered into doing things. so and we can bear saying she was called and offered something, so we have on record one mp saying she was threatened. but the conservatives say absolutely not, we would not do
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deals of this kind. it is curious, because farage says they have had thousands of approaches. yes, and i wonder if we were here for more candidates about whether they have been contacted or not. yes, you are right, he says there have been thousands of text messages and e—mails. some of them have received threats as well. anything else that p°pped threats as well. anything else that popped out of the prime minister's phonein popped out of the prime minister's phone in this morning? anything striking in that? they covered a lot of issues in that phone call. these are instances, situations that the prime minister —— in which the prime minister was very exposed. he was taking questions from the public about what labour was proposing if it got into government in terms of three and fast broadband for all
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households and businesses. what the prime minister described, he was asked about what he thought about that idea, and they've obviously got different ideas about how to approach broadband. but he said it was a crackpot scheme, that would cost billions of dollars —— pounds of taxpayers money. thank you. we are still waiting forjeremy corbyn to appear in lancaster, so while we wait, we're going to go to aberdeen. throughout the campaign, the bbc has been going to places where the election to be won or lost. these seats are very closely contested. todayit seats are very closely contested. today it is aberdeen in the north—east of scotland. the seat of aberdeen north was taken from labour by the snp in 2015. but the other constituencies in aberdeen are held by the tories. in 2015, the snp had
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a majority of 34,000, which dropped in 2017. it is very close now. thank you very much. welcome to the maritime museum here in ship row. it is very close to the harbour. it has a history of shipbuilding and fishery, and of course the oil and gas industry. just behind me here is the nine metre tall oil rig. 0ur cameraman the nine metre tall oil rig. 0ur cameraman is right down at the bottom of the bottom there. we are up bottom of the bottom there. we are up at the top floor today. it is a fascinating story. just as the election story in scotland is a fascinating one as well because it is where the leaves, remain, brexit
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debate clashes with the yes — no independence debate. that gives a fascinating choice for voters. who will they vote for any selection? the conservative's unseated snp leader from 2017 make this a key target for the snp this year. a lot up target for the snp this year. a lot up forgrabs in target for the snp this year. a lot up for grabs in this part of the uk. with me now to get her take on the election here is our scotland political correspondent, lindsay. good morning to you. when we talk about the election here and brexit, it is impossible not to mention independence in the same breath. that's right. brexit is the big issue facing voters across the uk, but here in scotland independence is arguablyjust as big an issue, we all the main parties in scotland offering a different combination on
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both of those issues. the snp put in their bid for a second independence referendum right at the heart of theircampaign. referendum right at the heart of their campaign. they tied that issue to brexit, and are set to remain here in the european union. the tories are focusing heavily in scotland on opposition to independence, not so much on brexit ina independence, not so much on brexit in a country who voted by a majority to stay in the eu. the lib dems offering a... labourare to stay in the eu. the lib dems offering a... labour are saying not to circumvent second referendum now, but they are not willing to out further. they are obviously going for a second referendum on the european question as well. so different combinations here by the parties. said that offers a complex picture. if you are a remain, for instance, but you also don't want scottish independence, would you
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vote for? the liberal democrats would state vote for us, but the snp would state vote for us, but the snp would say, us your votes now, because we are the best in the best position to take that forward. we may not be able to give you independence yet, that is a question for another day, but the question should be put to the scottish people. the snp are very strong as a main party, but there are a chunk of snp supporters who voted to leave, said they are now have to having to weigh up their priorities now. people wanted independence, but they wanted to leave the eu, so this is a party that is weighing its self towards remain. so for the seats that are marginal broadly across scotland, how would that fit into the jigsaw post election? there are a lot of marginal seats in scotland,
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some very close, like in fife. just two votes for the snp. there are lots of other examples of that across scotland, so a very volatile picture, actually, and you talked about the north—east. there are seats in the north—east that have changed hands in the last few elections. for example, gordon from the liberal democrats went to the tories. a package really trying to encourage voters to think of quite tactically about who they send to westminster. that could have quite an impact on the pitch across the uk. thank you. follow us through here to the old part of the maritime museum, the original congregational church. a beautiful ceiling here. joe is here with us. he has escaped from the studio, normally we are talking about the digital election at nine o'clock on the bbc news at nine. we are going to talk about that now, and what a digital
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election is like for voters in scotland. is it different to the re st of scotland. is it different to the rest of the voters in the uk? very different. 0ne rest of the voters in the uk? very different. one group of voters i have one thing, another another thing. nowhere is that more clear thanif thing. nowhere is that more clear than if you wear a scottish voter because you will have a very different experience to if you are in england or wales. 0ne different experience to if you are in england or wales. one of the adverts for the remaining parties is on instagram, it is where most of the money is being spent. going back to the 1st of november, they have not targeted any advertising at all to scottish voters. we have seen some examples of advertisement brought out only went to england and wales. it no targeting was explicit for scottish voters. the sort of m essa 9 es we for scottish voters. the sort of messages we are saying there are things like final say on brexit, and labour gets a second chance for a
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brexit referendum. labour are doing some targeting for scotland, and the sort of thing we're seeing from them is, stop brexit. they doing some targeting where they have seats, but it isa targeting where they have seats, but it is a completely different picture. you are pointing out that the targeting was coming not from local leaders but from a different level. we are seeing it on a local level, either by the associates of the snp... scottish either by the associates of the snp. .. scottish conservatives, scottish labour are not putting out many adverts either, so it seems to be all happening on a very small level. that is the scene set for a day of coverage here in aberdeen. we are finishing here, becausejeremy corbyn is about to begin his speech. thank you. it is fantastic to be
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here in lancaster. fantastic university, beautiful campus, and you've got a wonderful mp as well. i hope kat smith is re—elected as the mpfor hope kat smith is re—elected as the mp for lancaster and fleetwood. i was proud to come here and to support her when she was first elected, and i am so proud of the work she does in our shadow cabinet and in parliament. cat, you are absolutely brilliant. we agreed on that? applause at the start of this election, i promise to put forward... we haven't even launched a manifesto yet. it is coming, don't worry stop new media is so excited, they keep asking me for a leak. 0ur
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is so excited, they keep asking me fora leak. 0urcampaign is so excited, they keep asking me for a leak. 0ur campaign is already electric. 0n the ground, it is bigger and more exciting than at this stage in the 2017 campaign. the numbers of people coming out and helping us is phenomenal. i will let you into a little secret. when our ma nifesto you into a little secret. when our manifesto arrives next week, it is going to knock your socks off. you are going to love it. but i will still not tell you what's in it. i don't want anyone to be able to say a few years into a labour government that nothing ever changes, or all the politicians all the same. i want eve ryo ne the politicians all the same. i want everyone to feel be positive difference to their own life. when you have government and the people working together collectively to ta ke working together collectively to take on the system and make life better for the many, not take on the system and make life betterfor the many, not the eu. that is our fundamental message. you know what? we are so confident that what i manifesto will do, today we will give you a little sneak preview. you're not going to get to
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the whole thing, but you're going to get a little bit. taste the fresh, transformational policies that will change your life. a labour government will make broadband three for everyone. —— free for everyone. and not just any for everyone. —— free for everyone. and notjust any broadband, but the very fastest, full fibre broadband, to every home in every part of our country. for free, as to every home in every part of our country. forfree, as a universal public service. and once it is up and running, instead of you forking out for your monthly bill, we will tax the giant corporations fairly. i hope they are listening to this, we are going to taxi fairly. that includes facebook and google. that will help to cover the running cost of this. this is a policy for the
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many. making broadband three and available to all, —— free and available to all, —— free and available to all, an opportunity for everyone. it will put us at the cutting—edge of social and technological change because that is what we're about. building a country thatis what we're about. building a country that is fit for the future, for the generations to come as well as the generations to come as well as the generations we had with us now. the internet has become such a central pa rt internet has become such a central part of our lives. it opens up opportunities for work, entertainment and social lives. you saw that on that video before we came in. what was once a luxury is now an essential utility. that is why full fibre broadband must be a public service, bringing communities together with equal access in an inclusive and connected society.
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fast and free broadband for all will fire up our economy, deliver a massive boost to productivity, and bring half a million people back into the workforce. it will help our environmental issues and tackle climate change emergency by reducing our need for commuterjourneys. it will make things fairer, more equal and more democratic. the full fibre broadband labour will deliver is the gold standard. it is the fastest, most secure, and best broadband. it will take the internet directly to peoples homes and businesses. it will help to boost sg peoples homes and businesses. it will help to boost 56 on peoples phones too. full broadband will deliver lightning fast download times, will put an end to the patchy, slow coverage, once and for all, which i'm sure everyone in can no doubt understand and has expense
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for themselves. in the average household —— that it will save the average household £30 per month on bills. britain's broadband is lagging well behind that of other countries. just about 8% or 10% of the uk has access to full fibre broadband at the moment. compare that to 98% in south korea. something clearly is not working. this is core infrastructure for the zist this is core infrastructure for the 21st century. absolutely essential to our needs as a society. i think it is too important to be left to the corporations. the most efficient and rapid way to deliver a broadband network fit for our times and make ita network fit for our times and make it a genuine public service for all, is for the public to take control of it. so under our plans, we will create a new public enterprise, and we will call it, british broadband.
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title case british broadband will oversee. . . applause british broadband, will oversee a public broadband and three broadband to every home. a phased roll out over ten years. to do that, parts of bt will be brought into public ownership, including open reach. we will lead to the world in using public investment to transform our economy. it will improve people's quality—of—life, as we saw from that video. it will have national security benefits too. to me, that is common sense. the corporations have been unable or unwilling to roll out full fibre fast enough.
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they have little incentive to invest in ruraland they have little incentive to invest in rural and remote parts of britain, particularly hilly and mountainous areas. but under our plans, the priority will be first, to those with the least connectivity, mainly in rural and remote areas, but also, in city communities as well. unlocking new opportunities across huge swathes of our country. we will then move into the towns, giving a boost to local economies, making it easierfor people to run a successful business outside the big city. it will help develop the whole of the uk. finally, a complete roll—out in well—connected urban centres. ask to be people about their experience of private broadband companies, and many will tell you about internet dropouts, and hours spent in a hole listening to vivaldi, and other
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wonderful bits of music, which you'll get to hum in the end, waiting to speak to some poor, overworked and underpaid customer service worker, who probably can't fix the problem anyway, despite their unbelievable patients in the job that they do. full fibre will provide the most reliable service and british broadband will be properly staffed, with guaranteed jobs for everyone currently working in broadband. under public ownership, key universal services can be run for the british people instead of for profit. injuly, when he was running for conservative party leadership, borisjohnson also promised to make broadband available across the country. except he expected you to pay for it. but it will be a surprise to nobody that this was just another case of boris's signature move to have a
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broken promise. what is he offering instead ? broken promise. what is he offering instead? a broken promise. what is he offering instead ? a local connection broken promise. what is he offering instead? a local connection using old, copper cables that are already out of date. isn't that an allegory for the conservative party? cables that are out of date. that sums them up, doesn't it? johnson's plans of yet another billionaire bringing public money to corporations, including richard branson's virgin, —— we need to be a change. i know the question will be on everyone's lips, how are you going to pay for it? it is a derek question. let me tell you. the initial upgrades of our infrastructure will be funded by our infrastructure will be funded by ourfund. when our infrastructure will be funded by our fund. when it our infrastructure will be funded by ourfund. when it comes our infrastructure will be funded by our fund. when it comes to the running costs, we are not going to put that onto the british public. we had already fought for that far too much. instead, a labour government
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will close down on tricks used by glatt -- will close down on tricks used by glatt —— giants like google who make millions in this country, while pay next to nothing for the public services that they benefit from. i pay my tax, everybody in this room pays their taxes. small businesses pays their taxes. small businesses pay their taxes, so why can't the giant multinationals? they think they can get away with not paying their share. i've got news for them. not any more. labour believes that the british people deserve the very best. as a country, we should be proud of our mastery of building treasured public institutions and services. in the 19th century, it was the public water works. in the 20th century, it was our fantastic health service, train people from the fear of having to pay for their illnesses. british broadband will be our treasured public institution for
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the 21st century. delivering a fast and free broadband to every single home. 0nly and free broadband to every single home. only the government has the planning and possibilities of scale and admission to take this on. this isa and admission to take this on. this is a mission for everyone to get behind. together, we will build a new public service delivering the fastest public broadband, free to everyone. this will be all at the heart of labour's plans to transform the future of our labour will put wealth and power in the hands of the many whilst boris johnson's tories will only look at the privileged few. it is time to make the fastest broadband available to all in every home in every corner of our country. it is time for a real change. thank you very much.
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applause thank you, thank you so much. labour are thank you, thank you so much. labourarea team thank you, thank you so much. labour are a team and we have some fa ntastically labour are a team and we have some fantastically talented people in our shadow cabinet, cat who i've spoken about earlier is absently brilliant. the next person who i want to introduce to you has done an incredible job introduce to you has done an incrediblejob in both treasury introduce to you has done an incredible job in both treasury and business and leading the way in our green industrial revolution. an imaginative brilliant thinker and superb person to work with. i am so proud to introduce to you our shadow business secretary who will talk about how we will bring this huge broadband initiative for it. thank you for coming here today. applause
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thank you, it is a pleasure to be in this constituency today and it is a pleasure to follow my friend jeremy corbyn who only in a couple of weeks' time will be walking into number ten, we hope, weeks' time will be walking into numberten, we hope, to weeks' time will be walking into number ten, we hope, to deliver the transformational change we desperately need. and what better an example of the way labour will transform the fabric of society for the betterment of the many bad this announcement today. free full fibre broadband for all at the fastest possible speed. and asjeremy has outlined, the next labour government will deliver this to all individuals and businesses by 2030. we will roll out the remaining 90% of the full fibre network across the country and acquire the necessary access rights to those parts that are already in
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place. this network will be publicly owned and coordinated through a new public provider, british broadband, formed by bringing relevant parts of bt into public ownership. in this way, labour will transform the uk's digital infrastructure, providing fast, secure, reliable internet connections for everyone, no matter where they are. as shadow business secretary, i know all too well the importance of strong digital infrastructure for businesses right across the uk. the federation of small businesses highlights that 95% -- 9496 small businesses highlights that 95% -- 94% of small businesses highlights that 95% —— 94% of small—business owners small businesses highlights that 95% —— 94% of small— business owners rate a reliable broadband connection is critical to the success of their business and the cbi said that over 90% of businesses believe that digital technologies are a crucial driver of increased productivity. yet despite this the uk is lagging behind the of the world in
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technological diffusion. 0ne behind the of the world in technological diffusion. one example i will give today is automation. the uk currently has 71 installed robots per 10,000 manufacturing sector employees, below the world average, and far behind other leading economies like germany and france. if we are to be at the forefront of the next industrial revolution, the fourth industrial revolution, and a global economic player, then we have to speed up the adoption of those technologies across our economy. this can only be done with the best possible digital infrastructure in place. research by the centre for economic and business research says that a full fibre broadband network would boost productivity by 59 billion by 2025 alone and the cbi have highlighted research that in general, a 10% increase in broadband connection could result in 1% gdp
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increase every year. the plan set out today will ensure we realise these economic gains. all businesses will have three full fibre broadband, lowering costs facilitating the latest development in technology and software and supporting 5g technology. for those business people operating in rural communities or people who want to start out companies from their home but are not in a town or city that is well served at the moment, this will provide the infrastructure they desperately need. reports have estimated that overi million more people in the uk could work from home with full fibre. imagine if all those currently shutout home with full fibre. imagine if all those currently shut out of the labour market, such as those with childcare or caring responsibilities, those unfairly disadvantaged due to disability or older people, imagine if they could participate fully through fast internet access from wherever they
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are in the country. when more people are in the country. when more people are able to work from home, it has clear environmental benefits as well. if 1 clear environmental benefits as well. if1 million people do so that would mean an estimated 300 million fewer commuting trips, 3 billion kilometres travelled by car and 20 and 60,000 tonnes of fewer carbon dioxide emissions in the uk. an substantial and economic benefits we re substantial and economic benefits were not enough, the roll out of the fibre broadband could improve everybody plasma quality of life. for families being able to stream what they want at the same time, for children being able to take part in interactive homework, for access to online education and services through to older people being able to communicate with family and friends from the comfort of their home. every single person across the uk should have access to these services which have become a fundamental part of our everyday
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lives but unfortunately, not everybody does have access and do not have access is to be excluded from society. that is not something that labour could ever condone and that labour could ever condone and thatis that labour could ever condone and that is why we are setting out these plans today, connecting every single corner of the uk and everything in between with fast, reliable, secure full fibre broadband, ensuring our businesses and industries have the infrastructure they need to thrive and keep pace with our international competitors, wherever they are in the country. eradicating digital exclusion and bringing people into the workforce. and ultimately improving the richness of every person's lives by bringing the world to their fingertips, to their living room. i have always said that the role of government for me is to better the lives of its people through the economic foundations that it lays but today is more than
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that, it is about delivering the future to our people and our businesses sol future to our people and our businesses so i am proud of today's policy announcement and without further adieu, to tell us more about this, i further adieu, to tell us more about this, lam proud further adieu, to tell us more about this, i am proud to introduce my friend and the next chancellor of the exchequerjohn mcdonnell. applause thanks, thanks, thanks. thanks, thanks, thanks. thanks, becky was the shadow secretary in my treasury team. she does a terrificjob. you can see the new generation of women coming through at the moment as the labour party, i tell you, through at the moment as the labour party, itell you, it makes through at the moment as the labour party, i tell you, it makes you proud, doesn't it? how is the campaign going? brilliant. i know it is cold and wet and at times dark but everywhere i go we are finding
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hundreds of people turning out in all sorts of weather. the enthusiasm is unbelievable and the hope i think, is even higher. i want to be there. on decemberthe think, is even higher. i want to be there. on december the 13th when jeremy turns up on his bike and walks down to downing street to numberten, it will walks down to downing street to number ten, it will be more than just a new labour government coming to power, it will be giving so many people so much hope and we are going to transform people's lives. applause there might be something wrong with me but i really enjoy election campaigns even if it is december. i just wish sajid javid would enjoy it as well and come and talk to me every now and then. i want to thank
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jeremy, just for showing us in his speech what sort of prime minister he will be and i think the type of prime minister desperately needs. he isa prime minister desperately needs. he is a prime minister who will, i think, knows and understands the communities across all our country but also someone who will stand up for them. but also someone who will stand up forthem. i but also someone who will stand up for them. i think he will be a principled prime minister, always giving expression to the values we can all live up to. care, solidarity, socialjustice, these are embodied byjeremy corbyn and i think will embody that vision as it goes into number ten. but also, as he mentioned earlier, we have a bold vision for the future of our country. it is about being connected, principled and visionary. i think these are qualities our country is crying out for at the moment. we are into the second week of the general election campaign and i tell you, we will continue to be,
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no matter what they throw at us, we will continue to be read relentlessly positive in this campaign about the future of our country, aren't we? apparently? —— arent we? just as jeremy did earlier, we are going to map out the different kind of society we are going to create, and we are doing it with care, absolute position, yes, and discipline. we are costing every new spending announcement, we are describing, in detail, how we will carry out the individual plan that we have set out to stop just contrast that with what our opponents are doing. the tories campaign is based upon attacks on us and scaremongering. i am going to send them a new calculator. there is
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something wrong with their calculator that keeps on putting additional knots on every time they put labour in there and get the figures wrong. i don't know where sajid javid learned his maths but we are going to offer him another course. applause what is interesting is here we are, asi what is interesting is here we are, as i say, we are exercising the discipline of making sure everything we promise and we are costing, and to engage in the debate about that as well, the tories are refusing to cost their policies. again, while the chancellor refuses to participate in a debate with me on our respective policy, we were supposed to be having a debate on sunday and i was really up for that, isaid 0k, sunday and i was really up for that,
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i said ok, we can have an honest discussion about what labour's policies are, we have not published our manifesto but we can go through the ideas we have got a look at the costings then and then he pulled out. he pulled out. i don't want to be personal about this but i think it is running scared. i actually think he is terrified of coming out and having a proper debate about what our policies are, and also what the tories are advocating. i think it is the same, and what they are doing now is they are rehearsing the same doing now is they are rehearsing the same old tory attack lines, it is a must like going back in time and it just repeat them. it is the same tory tactics in the campaign. the issue for me, and i think this is the most worrying bit, i actually don't think they understand the scale of the challenges our country is facing at the moment and that is worrying, a major political party does not understand the society that we have or what we are up against. it is notjust brexit, it is about
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what those children who came out on strike at extinction rebellion taught us, we are facing an existential threat from climate change. when jeremy moved existential threat from climate change. whenjeremy moved a motion in parliament he said, this is a climate emergency that we are facing, and they seem to have no idea of understanding that. i also have to say this is a human emergency. it is a social emergency. it has been caused by nine years of tory austerity. some of the figures published have been startling about independent reports, one of them, 87 people died a day waiting for the ca re people died a day waiting for the care they need. remember this, this is the fifth largest economy in the world. 726 die in the last year because they had no home to sleep m, because they had no home to sleep in, 726 of our fellow citizens who are homeless died. i tell you this
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now, let's make this absolutely clear to everyone watching, where i am chancellor, i will not allow or tolerate this to go on with in our society. applause to tackle both those emergencies, climate change emergency and the social and human emergency we are facing as a result of austerity, i announced last week, yes, ambitious investment plans. this guilt was big because the scale of the crisis we face are big as well. —— the scale. 250 billion transformation fund over ten years, more money fora 250 billion transformation fund over ten years, more money for a social transmission fund. investment on a scale that matches the scale of the climate and social emergencies we face. in the world that we live in
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today, let's be clear, all of our infrastructure has to be green, all of it. and we cannot ignore the social infrastructure, that is the glue that holds our communities together, but what we are saying todayis together, but what we are saying today is we have also failed to be ambitious enough about the digital infrastructure. becky has mentioned andjeremy infrastructure. becky has mentioned and jeremy mentioned it as well, it is extraordinary how far behind we are. in the mid—19 905 the south korean government launched a nationwide project, an infrastructure project. so, a state project. in 1995 they had just one internet user for every 100 citizens, now, partly because of the mi55ion oriented government approach and government investment, thi5 e5tate and government investment, thi5 estate investment, they have 98% of the population covered by full fibre band. we have got nothing new that.
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nowhere near the sort of level of forward thinking in government or ambition in government at the moment. that changes today. that absolutely changes, mark this in your diarie5. tell your grandchildren. thi5 your diarie5. tell your grandchildren. this is the day when we turned around our infrastructure in terms of a broadband that we need for the future of our economy, because it is a fundamental change. we are announcing our mission to deliver free full fibre broadband to all by 2030. to achieve that, just a5jeremy ha5 all by 2030. to achieve that, just a5 jeremy has indicated, all by 2030. to achieve that, just a5jeremy has indicated, we will roll out the remaining 90% of the full fibre network, we will require the necessary acce55 full fibre network, we will require the necessary access rights to the existing the necessary access rights to the exi5ting10% of the full fibre network, it has already been ruled out, and remember, most of that, has been ruled out by outreach. what is interesting again on all of that, we
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have been meeting community after community where even, you expect it unfortunately in rural communities, but even in city area5 unfortunately in rural communities, but even in city areas there has not beena but even in city areas there has not been a full roll—out. so to achieve thi5 been a full roll—out. so to achieve this we will create a new entity, briti5h broadband and that entity will bring the broadband relevant part5 will bring the broadband relevant parts of the bt into public ownership. it includes open beach which has installed the majority of the existing coverage, part5 which has installed the majority of the existing coverage, parts of bt technology, beauty enterprise and bt consumer. ee, plu5 net, bt global 5ervice5 consumer. ee, plu5 net, bt global services will not be brought into public ownership and we will work with the workforce and unions to finalise the details of these plans. i want to thank the cwu for a55i5ting u5 i want to thank the cwu for a55i5ting us in developing the5e idea5. briti5h boy band will be a new public service for the 215t
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century, it is what we need —— briti5h broadband. it will have an infrastructure arm and a service arm. the infrastructure and will ta ke arm. the infrastructure and will take on the role of rolling out the full fibre network. the british broadband service will deliver free full fibre broadband to everybody. we will deliver that. we will begin with those with the worst quality of broadband, it is coming to lancaster, the north west and elsewhere. it is going to be a transformation in the way decision—making take5 transformation in the way decision—making takes place in this country as well. the priority will be needed. that includes rural and remote region5 be needed. that includes rural and remote regions and the city 5uburb5. we will move into the towns, ending with those parts of large urban centres with those parts of large urban ce ntre5 currently reasonably with those parts of large urban centres currently reasonably well served. british broadband is not a
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return to the 19705 and how it operates, they didn't have broadband at the 19705, this is public ownership of the future. public ownership of the future. public ownership where workers and consumers and other stakeholders work together to manage the service. and we will guarantee workers currently in broadband infrastructure and retail jobs employment. at the same time as all of this, we are going to pass a charter of digital rights and it will be providing the most cutting—edge protection of digital rights this country has ever seen. 0thers rights this country has ever seen. others have mentioned this, i can't help myself, you have to come period to what the tories are putting forward —— to what the tories are putting forward — — you to what the tories are putting forward —— you have to compare it. they suggested a £5 billion pay—out for part of this network. they won't even keep the ownership of the network so what they want is effectively a subsidy to existing
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operators like virgin. all the signs are they will use a procurement process that wastes tens of millions of pounds on legal and consultancy fees with suggestions that building won't get under way until november 2021. all they are aspiring to is gigabyte capable broadband broadband ofa certain gigabyte capable broadband broadband of a certain speed. that would keep all the copper cables in the ground and keep the uk lagging behind the technological revolution other countries have kick—started. it is just not enough for the times we are m, just not enough for the times we are in, we are facing a fourth industrial revolution and this is pathetically lacking in ambition. 0urs pathetically lacking in ambition. ours is pathetically lacking in ambition. 0urs isa pathetically lacking in ambition. ours is a plan that will provide a step up for people with 5g connections and businesses that are developing products. a plan that will challenge, rip off contract
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pricing, and eliminate bills for millions of people across the uk. what i want to underscore is that every part of the plan has been legally vetted, checked with the experts in the field and costed. so, the full fibre network will be paid for it with 15.3 billion out of our green transformation fund, that is based upon £20.3 billion costing by economics, ticking off the 5 billion already provided and promised by the government but not yet spent. the maintenance cost of the network, around £230 million a year will be more than covered by a new approach to taxing multinationals that we welcomed several weeks ago. let me explain, it is in approach that looks at where the multinational sales, workforce and operations are,
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asa sales, workforce and operations are, as a share of the global activity. for example, if they multinational has 10% of its sales and workforce operations in the uk, they're asked to pay tax on 10% of their global profits. to tax experts recently estimated the approach can raise, it raises between six and £40 billion for the raises between six and £40 billion forthe uk, so it is raises between six and £40 billion for the uk, so it is easy enough to pay for the maintenance costs for the network at any cost of servicing the network at any cost of servicing the debt from many parts of bt into public ownership —— £14 billion. that process will happen in the usual way, there will be government bonds swap for shares and parliament setting the final price, as in all other public ownership initiatives pursued by past governments. we know from our expert advice that this is deliverable and all the expert advice is telling us that the network will be delivered, just as in south korea, within a ten year
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programme. we can train and provide the skills engineers needed to rule out the network, including, through our programme with regards to the development of lifelong learning. we can implement this new tax on multinationals, yes, it is the tech giants like google and facebook, to pay a bit more for internet connectivity that they benefit from, so we can all share in the benefits of living in this growing digital world. people asked where there were shovel ready projects for our infectious infrastructure investment plans. this is one. we are ready. what we are offering in this election is real change. and what we have announced today is what real change looks like. and feels like. it looks and feels like thousands of
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people getting stuck in around the country to provide a service that will make all our lives better. it looks and feels like, yes, ticking on the multinationals —— taking on the multinationals, something people have said for years is too hard but is now necessary. in looks and feels like a service that people once paid for which will now be free and it looks and feels like having a future we can be excited about. what we are doing today is building the future and we are building it anyway that tackles the emergencies we face but also laying the foundation for our new economy and it will produce the jobs the skills and the high wages. ken loach has got a new film out, have you seen it? seen it. it is
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about work and the gig economy, it is shocking, it has reflected the type of economy the tories have created, which is long hours, low pay, pressurised work. it is a shocking film that unfortunately reflects the reality of what the tories are doing to our economy but there is an older film that i like quoting from. some of you might have seen this. which side are you on. 0ne seen this. which side are you on. one of the miners recite the words ofa one of the miners recite the words of a poem which speaks about how the miners were lost in the bowels of the earth and trying to make a future, but now what is that future worth? i think young people and others now are asking that question again now. about what future they have in an economy that is being created by the tories today, the torn social fabric, the climate emergency, they are asking what the future is worth. i think in the labour party, with all of your help in this campaign, i think we have an
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answer. i think we have a vision of answer. i think we have a vision of a society that is worth fighting for, and we won't despite this campaign, we will fight in government and it will be based upon a society of socialjustice and equality where we tackle the climate change and the social emergency we face. we will do it by laying the foundations of a new economy which has to be based upon a clean industrial revolution, a green industrial revolution, a green industrial revolution, a green new deal, it has to be based upon quality and investment in our public services, ending austerity and rebuilding our public services but also based on a forward—looking futuristic economy, laying the foundations of that. new technology, artificial intelligence providing us with the jobs of the future. the benefits of the proposal today are economic, environmental, but also social in overcoming isolation. this
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announcement today is ambitious, it is huge but it will transform our lives. solidarity. applause we are going to take if you questions. how we got libby, from itv, would you like to ask a question? mr corbyn. you say many people experience terrible problems with bt andl experience terrible problems with bt and i think if you would disagree with that. isn't the problem not so much it is a private enterprise but
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that it has very little competition from other people, and how would a state monopoly change that? i will take three questions. could we have nick, from the bbc? mr corbyn. many people will have questions about the deliverability of this. bt sl for saying the cost will be double what you had predicted. you have promised to nationalise other utilities on top of that with significant spending commitments, can you afford all of this? you are saying this broadband will be free, ultimately, will we not be paying for it through tax? and if we could have diana, from sky? mr corbyn. can you deliver this plan with a majority —— without a majority labour government. i will answer the last one, there
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will be a majority labour government so that issue does not arise! applause thanks for your questions. libby, yours. everybody does have problems at times with bt. it has a public service obligation which is how shall i put it sometimes not as well delivered as it might be in many parts of the country. what we are proposing here is a universal broadband system that will apply for the whole country, that will be publicly and freely available, and asjohn publicly and freely available, and as john and becky publicly and freely available, and asjohn and becky pointed out, it will become a public service like any other public service, you have a right of access to broadband which means you can run a small business from your home, work from home, and particularly in rural areas which are sadly particularly in rural areas which a re sadly left particularly in rural areas which are sadly left behind. we live, we are sadly left behind. we live, we are in this constituency lancaster
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and fleetwood, you have a vast rural area which is with very poor broadband services. any farm that wa nts to broadband services. any farm that wants to develop its business into food processing or other things must have access to broadband to trade. they simply cannot do it. we are proposing something that will improve the livelihoods of many people but also improve the economic opportunities in many parts of the country to give a universal access. ido country to give a universal access. i do not see a problem with that, i see it as an obligation of the state to provide broadband access for the entirety of the population. that is how people communicate with each other. i would how people communicate with each other. iwould imagine how people communicate with each other. i would imagine every person in this room uses a computer every day in some form. therefore need that kind of access. 0n the question of public ownership. public ownership of part bt seems to
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bea public ownership of part bt seems to be a very good thing. it was once in public ownership and was privatised by margaret thatcher and her tory government. let us not speak ill dog what has fallen over? —— let us not speak ill for that public ownership of pa rt speak ill for that public ownership of part of bt will mean we will be able to get this universal broadband roll—out across the country and is something well worth doing. what we have from the tories is an offer on broadband that doesn't add up offer on broadband that doesn't add up to offer on broadband that doesn't add uptoa offer on broadband that doesn't add up to a row of beans. not enough money to roll it out across the whole country, secondly, they will only roll it out through the private sector and only in places where they make the most money. we are talking about social cohesion in our society which means access to broadband in every pa rt which means access to broadband in every part of the country. we will roll it out in a definitive way, go to the places that don't have any at
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the moment, that had the worst reception at the moment. you will see over a short period how good it is. if you asked me this question in five years at the university of lancaster, you will be thanking me for bringing broadband to you and ensuring you have good connectivity everywhere. applause john mcdonnell is proving a tough negotiator around the shadow cabinet on the cost of everything. you think of him as this benign, cuddly, lovely individual but he is tough and when people have spending plans, he says, why are you doing this and that? and he cast it. when the grade book comes out, it is credible, doable, fully costed and we will move into government well prepared to deliver all these services. iam services. i am cuddly, really! except.
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the issue about bt in the past, they accept it themselves, is lack of investment which is what we are bringing, large—scale investment and the resource they want. 0n the figures about bt, we are using the 20 billion figure produced by the government's own review of digital infrastructure. we have taken that figure, a government figure, independently assessed, the basis upon which we will be delivering the project. can i say this as well. since privatisation, the latest estimate of how much has been paid out in shared dividends is £54 billion. that is twice the amount that could have been spent to actually roll out full fibre over that period. it shows you that what has happened is resources and profits have been poured into
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shareholders's pockets, at the same time not being invested in the long term. we need long term is in this country, not short—term profiteering. applause let us be clear the way this will happen is, yes, the 20 billion investment over ten years will be the normal way in which government raises funds through borrowing. the income that will come from the internet tax, the multinational tax, will cover all the costs easily. in addition, let us be clear as well, we will be swapping shares for government bonds. bt‘s shares has gone from £5 down to £170. we are offering a stable rate of return for those government bonds, exactly what people are saying they need, stability, exactly what pension funds once, the long—term prospect
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ofa funds once, the long—term prospect of a steady income in something that is secure. that is what we will give them. applause i will take another round of three questions. nicola, from the mirror newspaper. mr corbyn and nicola, from the mirror newspaper. mrcorbyn and mr nicola, from the mirror newspaper. mr corbyn and mr mcdonnell, your plans as i've understood them, the government will be taking total charge of running the uk's internet and broadband, you plan to stop people watching pawn? peter, from the guardian newspaper. the broadband plan sounds complicated. the other companies that provide broadband also provide things like tv streaming services, sometimes landlines, part of mobile deals, how would you separate out
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the broadband aspect of that? you say you will guarantee jobs, is that only bt workers or other companies? would you give these workers the same conditions and pay under the new company? sam, from the press association. are these proposals for renationalisation compatible under eu law and if they are not is this a tacit admission labour would favour leave in another referendum? 0n stopping pornography, it is important to note alongside all of this we will be rolling out a charter of digital rights to protect users of the internet and making sure our data is protected, and john and jeremy alluded to that. in relation to separating broadband services, the services we are referring to today are the delivery
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of free full—fibre broadband, any providers of additional services, upgrades, add—ons, we would not want to interfere with that market, and providers already providing those enhanced services, we welcome that continuation. 0n workers, we have guaranteed all workers involved in the companies we are bringing into public ownership will be transferred over, their rights and terms of conditions will be protected and we would expect them to have a full guarantee of rights. it could be possible with strong trade union involvement they could improve their terms and conditions and that is what we would encourage all workplaces in the public or private sector. 0n the issue of the process in regard to european legislation and we have ta ken regard to european legislation and we have taken legal advice throughout which has been extensive, and this is perfectly compatible.
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i will take another round of three questions. gail, from the lancaster guardian. i will come back to you. ed, from blue bag. —— bloomberg. the question i have is access rights, to lay fibre you have to dig up streets, through ways, alongside the railroads, a massive project. could you please elaborate on that aspect of the programme? and another question. hello. 0n the other side, i and another question. hello. 0n the otherside, lam and another question. hello. 0n the other side, i am changing a bit the subject, on the nonaggression pact between borisjohnson subject, on the nonaggression pact between boris johnson and subject, on the nonaggression pact between borisjohnson and nigel farage, do you rule out mr corbyn any nonaggression pact with the liberal democrats in order to stop
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wasjohnson into downing street, i ask this because i metjo swinson and she said you actually want brexit and she won't support you, not ina brexit and she won't support you, not in a minority government led by yourself. would you, would the liberal democrats in this scenario may be to blame for boris johnson into downing street and brexit? gail? you mentioned it was a ten year roll—out plan for broadband, thinking about the poorer communities in rural communities, what timescale would you be able to guarantee them that they would see any benefits from this sooner rather
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than later? i will answer some of those questions. thanks for your question. you will have heard clearly what i said about the diversity of your community here where you have rural areas with hardly any broadband, slightly better broadband in town and less good elsewhere. i would see that as a priority, this is over a ten year programme, so it would be in the early years remote rural areas that do not get any at the moment we'll get it early on. this helps boost the economy in those areas. i have spoken to many people in the federation of small businesses, and small businesses that want to expand in rural areas, and they say it is impossible without broadband access, we cannot work that way. university schools, colleges, cannot develop in rural areas and damages the learning abilities of young people and adult education. it is a huge social benefit. it will be a big project
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andi benefit. it will be a big project and i am proud of it. does it mean laying a lot of fibre cables? yes, it does, therefore some levels of disruption. but it is something we have to do if we are to get that degree of access to everyone all across the country. it is the up—to—date form of communication. most other industrial countries in the world are well ahead on broadband access. it is time we caught up with it. 0n caught up with it. on your question aboutjo swinson, nigel farage, nonaggression treaty is, the agreements between them. well. isimply well. i simply say this. we are fighting this election on a programme of ending austerity in britain and reducing inequality and poverty, ending universal credit and the horrors brought in by the coalition government of the conservatives and liberal democrats from 2010 onwards. 0ur liberal democrats from 2010 onwards. our government elected in december
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will produce a budget quite early on. that budget will be produced by john mcdonnell and will be about ending austerity in britain and starting down the path of giving hope and opportunities to the millions of people who have seen their living standards and wages fall their living standards and wages fa ll over their living standards and wages fall over the past ten years, their public services destroyed, and so, if other parties decide it is a point of negotiation with us whether we will end austerity or not in order to get into government, i simply say this. it is not up for negotiation, we are fighting this to win it, end austerity and bring hope to the people of this country. we are not going into coalition with the pro—austerity parties, with anybody, we are planning to win this election on our manifesto for labour. applause
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0n the issue of deliverability. the ability to coordinate for the first time the water industry because of public ownership, with bell and british broadband, will enable us to facilitate a much more effective and efficient roll out the full fibre network. that will enable those organisations, there is entities in public ownership to cooperate effectively, and have a consistency in policy—making which again, working with local authorities, will enable us to deliver within that ten year framework. as asked earlier, it is starting with those communities that are the least connected at the moment to get the biggest benefit. 0ne moment to get the biggest benefit. one final thing, only nonaggression
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pact, i have never knownjeremy to be aggressive. when we discussed this proposal about broadband, it is asa this proposal about broadband, it is as a result of touring around the country, and so many raising it in town hall meetings. when they raise issues around rail and buses, broadband was immense that, it was about how we can ensure modern connectivity. 0ne about how we can ensure modern connectivity. one example was about, in terms of social deprivation, inequality, it was about large numbers of children being able to do their homework at home properly, having the speed of connectivity. it is an educational resource on a scale we have not seen before. it is interesting as well, there is a stark difference between usage between errors connected and not. the difference in some parts means a 30% difference in engagement. what that says about education and
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connectivity and social engagement is startling. this one issue, it may not seem to people it relates to inequality but it actually does. when you start falling behind it is difficult to pick up. this breaks through, breaks through on, yes, a large—scale, ambitious programme, because that is the sort of society we wa nt because that is the sort of society we want to create. studio: lets leave the speakers inside the room now. we have had quite a bit from all of those on the platform. let hear from quite a bit from all of those on the platform. let hearfrom our political respondent who has nipped outside to talk to us. quite a full explanation and an attempt to put it in the context of attempt to put it in the context of a wider social strategy. absolutely, a lot of talk about the benefits the labour party think it would bring to the country, not least giving better broadband,
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economic benefits, social benefits. an interesting part was whenjeremy corbyn reminded us of one of his co re corbyn reminded us of one of his core political philosophies which was if parts of bt were brought into public ownership, it would be run for the people rather than for private profit, something mr corbyn has fought for a long time and will bea has fought for a long time and will be a core part of his manifesto he will be launching. let us remind ourselves of how he made the case for this plan. britain's broadband network is lagging well behind that of other countries. just about eight to 10% of the uk has access to full—fibre broadband at the moment. compare that to 98% in south korea. something clearly is not working. this is core infrastructure for the 215t century, absolutely central to our needs as a society. i think it is too important to be left to corporations. the most efficient and rapid way to deliver a broadband network fit for our times, and make it a genuine
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public service for all, is for the public to take control of it. so, under our plans, we will create a new public enterprise, and we will call it, british broadband. this is one of the big spending pledges so far of the general election campaign. you can bet your bottom dollar it will be scrutinised to within an inch of its life. the conservatives have already said they think it is nonsense economics, it won't work. you might have heard the question asked of mr corbyn, whether they can afford notjust this but they can afford notjust this but the plans they have to nationalised railand the plans they have to nationalised rail and water, to invest a lot in other public services and the social security system. they insist, yes,
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it is all doable, it will be fascinating to see the calculations when they come along with the ma nifesto. when they come along with the manifesto. there are still questions about this individual policy. john mcdonnell it is 20 billion, their figure, is correct. bt continues to say it is a 40 billion. spending is a big part of this election campaign. ido a big part of this election campaign. i do not think we can say there is a real choice on offer when it comes to who does what. thank you very much from lancaster. our technology correspondent is chris fox. how h ow exa ctly how exactly will they do this, do things become clearer from what we heard in lancaster? yes, the labour party said it will ta ke yes, the labour party said it will take parts of the bt group related to rolling out broadband, 0penreach that lays the cable, and the enterprise and consumer broadband businesses, take all those into
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public ownership, that new company called british broadband. to do that they will need to buy back the shares because bt has shares owned by shareholders, and will have to come up with a fair price for those because they could be challenged in court to prove they gave shareholders a fair price. they will buy those back with government bonds rather than cash. that is their plan. that is what. that is their plan. that is what. that is their plan. that is what. that is their plan to renationalise the infrastructure. people are asking the question, why fibre broadband? there is a suggestion that will be updated by 2030. i have seen people on twitter asking whether for fibre broadband may i have seen people on twitter asking whetherforfibre broadband may be outdated. it is only ten years away. it is difficult to see. full fibre
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to the house is the gold standard, it is more than capable of sending ultra high definition videos, making holographic video calls in the future. fibre—optic cables are future. fibre—optic cables are future proof in that technology can be updated, you don't need to lay new cables, you can change the box in the telephone exchange and your house, to get faster speeds out of those existing fibre—optic cables. some are asking, why not leapfrog ahead? we have heard we are behind. we could take advantage of how behind we are and leapfrog ahead to sg. sg. 56 is wireless technology. in ten yea rs, 56 is wireless technology. in ten yea rs , we 56 is wireless technology. in ten years, we will be thinking about 66 or whatever it might be called. when you change mobile network and infrastructure, you have to replace the transmitters. if you decided to
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invest in a nationalised 6g network in future, that could also be outdated. well fibre cables be outdated. well fibre cables be outdated and 6g won't, there is no comparison because both could end up being redundant. sg being redundant. 56 is useful because wireless technology can connect remote properties to the internets without laying cables. any broadband roll—out will be using some element of wireless for some customers to get them connected. it is not always a solution. 56 does not have the same range, it does not travel as far as slowing networks like two g or 36 for phone calls. you need more transmitters. in some cases, every land —— lamp post on a street. they have to be connected to the network using fibre. if you are going to connect the lamp posts to fibre, why not connect the houses as well? thank you for clearing up some of
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those questions. we have been hearing about labour and their policies, let us turn to the tories. viewers have been putting their questions to borisjohnson in a live phone in. he answered questions on brexit and the nhs. when asked about claims by the brexit party leader that some of his candidates had been offered post—election role is to stand aside in target conservative seats, mrjohnson denied them. ann widdecombe told the bbc later she was offered this. i was rung up twice by somebody at number 10. the first time, it was all about how i really had a moral obligation to stand down, that sort of stuff. the second time, it was to say that if i did stand down, i would be offered, i quote, a role in the negotiations. now, i've no idea what
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that means because i immediately said that i'd played no role in the tory party for a number of years and i couldn't be flattered and buttered up and promised things. that's what happened to me, and that's all i can speak for. i'm joined by our correspondent helena wilkinson. it looks like a question of who you believe? nigel farage saying lots of his candidates, he said he had thousands of calls and e—mails, some had been threatened, and some candidates were asked to step down in exchange for variousjobs or asked to step down in exchange for various jobs or peerages. we asked to step down in exchange for variousjobs or peerages. we heard on the record from ann widdecombe saying she was contacted by number 10. however conservatives have denied this has gone on, that any deals have happened. we heard from the prime minister who gave the same
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message. well, the conservative party does not do deals of this kind. it isjust not the way that we operate. well, it's a choice. it's a choice for our listeners this morning. who do we believe, borisjohnson or nigel farage? bit of a dilemma for some. all i can tell you is we don't do deals. i think that should be pretty obvious from what has happened, actually. we make no undertakings. what else did borisjohnson have to say? the toughest of audiences for the prime minister, having questions put to him by members of the public. the other important question, issue, was to do with the report into alleged russian interference in uk politics, questions as to why that hasn't been released before the election. it was put to mrjohnson why that was not the case. he replied saying he saw no reason for
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changing the normal procedure for publishing these kind of reports just because there is an election. he said there is no evidence of russian interference in uk politics, no suggestion at all he had read that report. as well as policy issues and politics, he was asked personal questions, one about his children. he was asked whether he, any of his children went to competitive school. he replied, i do not comment about my children. he was asked do you have any children of school age. he would not comment. the presenter said to him, some listeners find it odd the prime minister is not transparent about the number of children he has. mrjohnson replied, your assertion none of my children had been to state schools is wrong, and one final question, light—hearted, what is he doing for christmas, he said he hasn't had time to think about it. thank you. a wide ranging interview.
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as we heard borisjohnson was speaking to bbc news viewers earlier — he was asked about what impact his brexit policy would have on the irish border. northern ireland will be offering for free trade deals around the world, the same tariffs as the rest of the uk, and northern ireland will be coming out of the eu along with the rest of the uk for customs purposes, and that is a fantastic thing. and what i can also say, emma, is that i, you know, this deal has been attacked by the labour party who say that it threatens the union, it doesn't at all. there will be no checks on goods going from northern ireland to the rest of the uk, to gb, absolutely not, we won't be doing that at all. let's take a closer look at how some of the claims the prime minister
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made during his bbc phone in stack up. here's chris morris from bbc reality check. what shall we start with? the northern ireland one, this will run and run. he says we are talking about trade from northern ireland into great britain. he says there will be no checks, asking for documents. what there will be is an export declaration will be need to be filled in, online, if you seconds, a minor administrative procedure. in such a sensitive situation for some people that matters because they have been promised unfettered access to great britain. and for them, there are those, the dup included, who say this is not quite the same as if you had to trade between newcastle and plymouth. even if it is only if it is different. this argument will run and run as we look the detail of the northern ireland deal.
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if northern ireland gets a good deal, people in scotland are saying, if you get a good deal like that, why can't we? you talked about her possibility being two referendums next year in scotland, let's hear what he had to say about that. what the snp want to do is to force jeremy corbyn to go into a second referendum on scotland next year, and i don't thinkjeremy corbyn would have any power to resist that. so, you'd have next year, two referendums, one on independence for scotland. it is noticeable how comfortable he was on that territory, take the fight to the enemy as it were. he thinks he's is our strong political ground there. the other thing that came out of it was a technical issue was about vat. yes, he was asked, the first question of the day was from a fish and chip owner, he
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talked a lot about fishing and if he would take back the fishing waters. you could say that yes we will be controlling the waters for the eu will want to have access to our waters if they give us access to sell our fish waters if they give us access to sell ourfish in their waters if they give us access to sell our fish in their markets. its got onto a discussion about vat. let's have a listen to what he said about what he thinks will be different once we leave the eu when it comes to vat. don't forget that when we leave the eu, as we will, i hope, injanuary, certainly if we are lucky to be re—elected with a working majority. we will come out injanuary, will take back control of our vat, and be able to cut vat on things that we currently can't under eu rules — sanitary products, you name it — we will run a very different vat system. up up to uptoa up to a point that's true. at the moment, when you are in the eu you
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standard vat rate can be as low as 1596 standard vat rate can be as low as 15% and i was 20% of can reduce overall vat within the eu. there's also a list products in the eu rules which the minimum rate is 5% that includes women's sanitary products. a law has been going through the eu machine for ages which would allow people to reduce that rate to zero but it has been delayed and delayed in the uk would like to implement it as soon as possible. that is what he is talking about, specific issue that if we left the eu we'd be able to reduce that particular a —— rated to reduce that particular a —— rated to zero resist asking you, what is your sense about how fake news and how much hard reality there is the claim so farfrom how much hard reality there is the claim so far from all the parties? notjust claim so far from all the parties? not just the conservatives that labour and not just the conservatives that labourand lib not just the conservatives that labour and lib dems and the smaller parties. we have seen quite a lot of
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numbers this week we don't think adult. i could put out their labour‘s suggestion that after eight strength trade deal the nhs would have to spend another £500 million a week and medicines, we think that is based on the premise that all drugs in the uk would certainly be the same price as all the drugs in the us which would be unlikely. the tories have come out of the figure of £1.2 trillion. they've added together every pledge made in the last manifesto which every labour —— pledge the labour party has made. that didn't make sense either. people are putting out big numbers andi people are putting out big numbers and i think it's important that we look at those numbers and put them to proper scrutiny. until we see party manifestos, is a bit frustrating because we can't cost policies properly. i think will have one or two policies next week but it
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will be quite a while before we can say, never mind the bluster, what never mind what the opponents are saying, this is what they have in their own documents. saying, this is what they have in their own documentslj saying, this is what they have in their own documents. i am so -- relieved that he will be here. today we are in aberdeen — my colleague annita mcveigh is there for us. thank you. welcome back to aberdeen, welcome back to the maritime museum, the oldest part of this museum dates back to the 1500s. we are in the newer party and the next exhibit that staff are working on ringing as up that staff are working on ringing as up to date are to do with the renewa bles up to date are to do with the renewables sector. a lot of the museum exhibits are to do with the
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oil and gas industry and you may have seen us earlier standing in front of this nine metres tall model ofan oil front of this nine metres tall model of an oil rig from the field. interestingly, this model, the actual rig that it is based on the mother feel that it is based on, that field has now been decommissioned. at its peak back in 1982 it is producing an hundred 50,000 barrels of oil a day but production stopped in 2014. capacity their draft and costs increased. we are visiting lots of parts of the uk. we will be visiting ten parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today, we're in aberdeen, which is in north east scotland. this seat — aberdeen north — was taken from labour by the snp in 2015 — but the other two constituencies in aberdeen are held by the conservatives. taking a look at the demographics here. 90% of people living here in aberdeen north are white,
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according to the office for national statistics. and 71% are under the age of 50. the city has historically been central to the north sea oil industry, and it benefitted hugely from the oil boom. but the average annual price of brent crude fell from $112 per barrel in 2012 to $44 in 2016. a shock which led to mass redundancies in the north sea, some 20,000 jobs lost between 2017 and 2018. and, though the price has recovered since, this week, the scottish government said at least £1 billion of the north sea revenues expected to be raised over the next five years should be set aside to help areas heavily dependent on oil and gas, like aberdeen, switch to a greener economy and help tackle the climate crisis.
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it brings me along to our two guests. welcome morag and russell. to have you both here today. picking up to have you both here today. picking up on what we were just mentioning there, tell me about what your group does. our group is based in aberdeen and aberdeen is a very energy savvy city, we know an awful lot about energy. we have long recognised the opportunities in renewable energy in addition to our oil and gas. we have been helping companies win business and makea been helping companies win business and make a contribution to delivering renewable energy projects. has thus been quite a transition from city so used to talking about oil and gas to renewables, or has it been quite a natural transition? it has been com pletely natural transition? it has been completely natural. 0ne natural transition? it has been
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completely natural. one of the things about people who work in the oil and gas industry are passionate about energy. it —— if something new comes along, they are fascinated by it. as big a deal as the oil and gas industry is here in aberdeen, your organisation, russell, is about this region isn't a one trick pony, there isa region isn't a one trick pony, there is a lot more going on. politically, what you want politicians to do to boost growth here? the chamber of commerce as part of a global network, we represent this region, around 1200 businesses, about 125,000 people come across a whole range of sectors, notjust 125,000 people come across a whole range of sectors, not just the energy sector. as you said, a key driver of our economy has been oil and gas, as morag points out, we see this region not as being a cause of the global climate emergency but a huge part of the solution, so moving
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into hydrogen technologies, floating offshore wind, the world's first installation isjust off offshore wind, the world's first installation is just off the offshore wind, the world's first installation isjust off the coast here. they are all things we have the expertise, the skills and supply chain here to help drive those agendas forward, not just for the uk but for the wider world. outside of that, we are about more, we have our economic strategy, it is about diversifying from oil and gas to renewable energy. it is about making more of our strengths as a tourism destination. i am going to interrupt you because i think when about to see pictures of borisjohnson arriving on a bus and getting off that bus in the north west of england. his next destination on a busy morning. parliament is paralysed, it's like an anaconda that has swallowed
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something and it is like a blocked artery at the heart of the british body politics. it is refusing to get brexit done and we need to get on and get breaks ten. why? we need to get brexit done because we are democrats, aren't we? unlike the liberal democrats who are neither liberal democrats. whether you are a lever, whether you voted to remain, i think the majority of people in this country can see it is time for us as this country can see it is time for usasa this country can see it is time for us as a country to get on and deliver the will of the people. don't you agree? is a matter of democracy and about the economic health of our country because the delay and the acidity is starting to hold us all back. there are billions of pounds, tens of billions of pounds waiting to flood into the uk
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in investment has there is a massive opportunity if only we could get brexit done in the next few weeks. and we can do it. we can do it. it'll be like i think i referred to a metaphor, can you imagine that macro and angioplasty, that's what i'm looking for. it'll clear our arteries, and block our system and get us back on our feet and able to ta ke get us back on our feet and able to take advantage of all the things that we want to get for britain. it will allow us as a one nation conservative country to get on with all the things that we are already doing. ever since i stepped —— stood on the steps of downing street 15 days ago, three months ago or so, we have record investments in our nhs, more than in any times in recent
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memory, 40 new hospitals, 20,000 more police out on our streets to fight crime and bring crime down. a massive programme of investment, the northern powerhouse, rail funding, huge programme of investment in our roads, telecoms, broadband is. we will give people a gigabit broadband by 2025, it's fantastic. by the way, we will support electric vehicles of the kind that... thank you to dpd. applause we will support... they are going for 10% electric vehicles. at this governments will improve our air quality, to tackle climate change by
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reducing c02 and to drive employment in this country with high—tech, high skilljobs here in the uk making the batteries and making the cars and vehicles that will allow that revolution to take place. we want to deliver the biggest increase in the living wage, help people out of poverty across the country as we will continue to do. we can get on and do all those things because we have, do you know what we have? we have, do you know what we have? we have a deal with the eu that is ready to go. it is over and ready, you can put it in the microwave and their returns. we can get on with that deal, just add hot water, stir it. we can get it done byjanuary, come out of the eu, get on with the wonderful things we can do through trade deals to free ports around the
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country, from cutting vat to sanitary products to doing things the british people have wanted to do for years. we want to ban shark fin soupin for years. we want to ban shark fin soup in this country. it is cruel to cut a bit of a shark and then took it back in the water. we can't ban shark fin soup in this country because of eu rules but we will be able to when we come out of the eu. we will support tax breaks for investment in technology and in rnd. that is the programme that we are offering, uniting and levelling up, better education, infrastructure and what isjeremy better education, infrastructure and what is jeremy corbyn of the labour party offering? i'm going to tell you because i think it is absolutely terrifying. i have to say, i think their programme is truly scary, disastrous. i'm afraid, they will
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not get brexit done, the only thing ican not get brexit done, the only thing i can understand from the bermuda triangle of confusion in the brexit policy is they want more dither and delay. they will have two referendums next year, one on scotland, that is the price nicola sturgeon will demand for putting jeremy corbyn in power and that is the only way they can get there, in a collision with the snp. you have a referendum in scotland and break up one of the most successful political partnerships of 300 years in the form of our uk. i don't want it to happen. do you want it to happen? we had a referendum on scotland and the union in 2014, the people the tilt isa union in 2014, the people the tilt is a one in union in 2014, the people the tilt isa one ina union in 2014, the people the tilt is a one in a generation thing. i do have another referendum on the eu. what toxic, tedious, torpid waste of
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time. acrimonious, divisive, more deadlock among more division for our country, more dither, more delay. that is what he is going to present and will wreck the economy. whacking up and will wreck the economy. whacking up borrowing massively, whacking up taxation on every family. do you wa nt taxation on every family. do you want to go down that route? do you wa nt want to go down that route? do you want to go down that route? do you want to have jeremy corbyn plasma disaster? that is the choice. come with us, a government that supports our police force, helps them take knives off the streets by putting more police officers out there, or go with corbyn who thinks stop and search is illegal. go with corbyn and his lot who actually think the armed services should be disbanded. come with us, a party that believes in helping people as well as you
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possibly can to have the satisfaction that comes from home ownership. or go with jeremy corbyn who thinks home ownership is a bad idea. come with us and we believe in standing up, standing up for our country, standing up to the foes of this country around the world and standing tall for our values around the world, or go withjeremy corbyn... he the world, or go withjeremy corbyn. .. he wouldn't the world, or go withjeremy corbyn... he wouldn't even stick up for this country when it came to the poisonings in salisbury, he kept side with russia. come with us above all, come with us and get brexit done. all waste more time and more of this country's precious, precious economic future on another referendum that will dither and delay. we don't want it. it's a total, total mistake for this country and what i want to do with
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your help is to get brexit done and get on with our fantastic one nation agenda. to make this country, which i believe but we can do, the greatest place on earth to live, the greatest place on earth to live, the greatest place on earth to breathe clean air, the greatest place to raise a family, the greatest place to send your kids to school, the greatest place on earth to be. that is what this country could be. if we can get brexit done and take this country forward. thank you for your support. if we can get brexit done in the next few weeks, as i'm sure we can, we will have a fantastic future before us. thank you all very much for your support and i look forward to seeing you in the campaign. thank you all. by the way, i want to say a particular shout out
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while we are still on live tv to ki rsty while we are still on live tv to kirsty who is here campaigning. and everybody else. borisjohnson is everybody else. boris johnson is on everybody else. borisjohnson is on the site of the best behind them, it is on his lips, their key campaign message is get brexit done. we will leave him there in the north west of england unveiling his campaign bus and now we're going to get all the news here. lloyds shareholders have lost a multimillion pound high court action over the acquisition of hbos. carpetright has agreed terms to sell the business to its biggest shareholder meditor in a deal that values the floor specialist at £15.2 million. countries including australia have asked for trade compensation from the uk and the eu over brexit disruption. 15 countries, including the us, india
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and new zealand, have been setting out brexit concerns at a world trade organization meeting in geneva. australian officials said their beef and lamb exporters had already been hit after several brexit delays. pop star taylor swift has said her performance at the upcoming american music awards is in doubt because she is being barred from performing her own songs. in a message to fans on social media, the singer said music managers scooter braun and scott borchetta would not let her perform songs from her past albums, which they own the rights to.she said a netflix documentary about her life had also been put in jeopardy. are we seeing the dawn of a new era of ultra long—haul commercial flights? in the last few hours a boeing 787 belonging to australian airline qantas has landed after flying non—stopfrom london to sydney. our correspondent luke jones was on the flight, and earlier he spoke to the business team about his experience. around me on the flight were scores of really smug people who ate
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exactly the food they were meant to do, they slept when they were meant to, they avoided light when they were meant to. i had lots of work to do so i was there beavering away on my laptop and requesting as much snacks and coffee and things like that, so i stayed awake all the way through. i saw every inch of that 19 hours, 19 minute flight. but you were in business class and you did eat the steak though, right? yes, i'll plead guilty to that. all right, what was your perception of it? having done it, would you opt for, you know, all—in—one go to sydney or would you now opt for a stopover, if, let's say, the price was the same? well, that's the thing, it's all about price, isn't it. the ceo of qantas group alanjoyce was telling me that if this flight happens, they expect 35% premium minimum on the flight that is direct rather than stopping
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in singapore or in perth. if money is no object for you, it's really handy, you get on, you can have a long, long snooze and you can wake up halfway around the world. but if you're trying to do that route with your mind on your wallet, that's not really possible. they are confident, they think they've got a great business case for it, they are expecting to see lots of first—class passengers, lots of premium economy, lots of business class passengers, that's who they are targeting. when they launched their direct london to perth recently, that's the market growth they've had there. they say those flights are 95% full, it's one of the best routes. they think there's an appetite for it. london' s blue chip index ftse100 followed other indices around the world higher after a senior us official hinted that atrade deal with china might be imminent. bt slipped after as we've been hearing labour vowed to nationalise
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the digital network arm of the company — 0penreach. it's part of a plan to give every home and business in the uk free full—fibre broadband by 2030, if it wins the general election. that's all the business news. the green party has pledged to introduce a universal basic income by 2025, which would see every adult receiving a minimum of £89 per week. additional payments would go to those facing barriers to work, including disabled people and single parents. here's the green's co—leader sian berry making the announcement. as winter sets in, so does the brutality and the reality of what the tory cuts have done to britain. just walking down the street you can see the horror of rough sleeping getting worse and worse every day. the queues at food banks getting longer and longer. you see the system of means tested benefits
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getting harsher and harsher. we need a decisive break or business as usual to take action against poverty important. today, i'm proud to announce the green party's plans to introduce a universal basic income that every single citizen by 2025. the baking —— basic income abolishes the cruelty of benefit system and ta kes the cruelty of benefit system and takes us back to the principle of real social security. whether universal basic income every permanent resident in the country get a monthly payment is made directly to their bank account from the government. no strings attached, no forms to fill in, no hoops to jump no forms to fill in, no hoops to jump through, no sanctions, no conditions. a safety net when you need it and there every month to help. people on low incomes and see a real improvement in their living standards with the basic income, people on higher incomes pay more than what they receive through taxes on their incomes and wealth and
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consumption. security for every one is the responsibility of society and this is a fundamental part of the green party is green new deal. greens believe that one of the building blocks to build a society and a green society is for people to be free of financial insecurity. greens want to open up opportunities and choices, greens wants to tackle poverty head on. most of all, greens wa nt to poverty head on. most of all, greens want to end for good the inefficient, cruel and callous system of benefits we make people face today. the green party there. ben will be here with the news at one o'clock but first let's take a look at the weather. low pressure will be sticking around for the weekend. a lot of cloud around that time, further rain to but they will be some sunshine at
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times as well. it will remain quite chilly for the time of year. this bigotry of low pressure has brought problems the mediterranean, flooding rains across parts of italy and it has been affecting us, bringing a lot of cloud, rain and chilly air from the north—east. this afternoon, stays chilly, not as cold as it has been. we'll have lots of cloud, outbreaks of rain for england and wales. the weather front line across parts of southern scotland, northern england into wales and the south—west by the end of the night. a few clear spells in the north—east but the longest clear spells will be in the north—west but it will be quite chilly to start saturday. we've got low pressure with us for most of saturday and it will bring further patchy cloud and outbreaks of rainfor further patchy cloud and outbreaks of rain for parts of southern and eastern scotland, northern england, parts of wales in the south—west. because he's housebreaking in the cloud across the midlands and south—east, they will be a few
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showers. some fine weather for northern ireland. as we look to the west at this next weather front which will slowly make inroads into sunday. the stagnant picture as we head into saturday night, outbreaks of rain continuing across seven scotland, northern england and will see some rain piling into the north as this next with a front moved in from western areas. it be a chilly night to start sunday. sunday looks cloudy across scotland, northern england, rain affecting areas affected by floods of us would be an issue. it will slip southwards, brighter skies for much of scotland and northern ireland and a nice day on sunday here. we could see a little bit of brightness across the far south—east as it will be another chilly day. high pressure building from the west for monday and tuesday, we look to the atlantic at this area of low pressure which was swinging to bring more rain. but we will start to see the wind coming in from the south. next week, we
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started fine and then more rain, quite windy at times is not low pressure m oves quite windy at times is not low pressure moves in with southerly winds pushing in and it will turn milder.
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labour promises free full—fibre broadband for every home in the uk by 2030. the party says it would fund the plan with a tax on the big internet companies, and nationalise part of bt. together we will build a new public service delivering the fastest broadband, free to everyone. this will be all at the heart of labour's plans to transform the future of our economy and our society. what we won't be doing is some crackpot scheme that would involve many, many tens of billions of taxpayers' money nationalising a british business. the other main stories this lunchtime... swans in the streets as heavy rain brings more misery

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