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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2019 6:00pm-6:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at six: cambridge graduate jack merritt has been named as one of the victims killed in yesterday's attack on london bridge. the 25—year—old was working for one of the university's education initiatives. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at six: cambridge graduate jack merritt has been named as one of the victims killed in yesterday's attack on london bridge. the 25—year—old was working for one of the university's education initiatives. the attacker‘s been named as usman khan, released from prison on licence, despite a terrorism conviction. police say there's no evidence of a wider plot. our investigative priority at this time is to ensure that there is no one related as an outstanding
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threat to the public. to this end, we carried out two searches at addresses both in staffordshire and in the stoke—on—trent area. the prime minister says he wants longer sentences for violent offenders , and says the attack is proof serious criminals shouldn't be released from prison early. the practice of automatic early release, where we cut a sentence in half, and lets serious violent offenders out early, simply isn't working, and we have some very good evidence of how that isn't working, i'm afraid, in this case. but the mayor of london sadiq khan says ministers are to blame for reducing sentences for serious offenders. judges used to have the power to give an indeterminate sentence to protect the public. and in other news, millions of commuters will have to pay an average of 2.7% more for rail tickets in the new year. and england will face croatia in their opening game for the euro 2020, on 14th june.
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good evening. one of the victims of yesterday's terror attack has been named as jack merritt, a cambridge graduate who was helping coordinate a conference on prisoner rehabilitation near london bridge. he was one of two people killed by 28—year—old usman khan, a former prisoner who'd been convicted of terrorism offences, and released from prison on licence last year. khan, who'd been invited to the conference, was shot dead by police after members of the public tackled him. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. 25 years old and a keen traveller, jack merritt had a masters from cambridge university. he was described by his father today as a beautiful spirit who always took the side of the underdog. yesterday, he was stabbed to death in a frenzied
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attack by a former prisoner at a conference that he had helped organise. in the aftermath, his killer was wrestled to the ground by other former prisoners who had been attending the conference and then shot dead by police. the man who stabbed him, usman khan, was released from prison last year halfway through a sentence for plotting to bomb the london stock exchange. 11 years ago he told the bbc he was no terrorist. i have been born and bred in england, in stoke—on—trent and all the community knows me and if you ask them, they will know, these labels they are putting on like terrorist, they will know, i am no terrorist. today, his lawyer said his client had wanted help with de—radicalisation but had not got the right assistance. he requested assistance with addressing some of his thinking. he recognised that. his extreme violent ideology
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was wrong and he wanted to correct himself and move on. a police forensic tent marks the place where usman khan was shot dead by police. but the building where he carried out his attack is just on this side of the bridge. that was where he was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation. a conference at which he turned on some of those who had invited him and killed him. ——had invited him and killed them. this picture was taken just before the attack at the conference in fishmonger tall where usman khan also stabbed a woman to death. the attacker then left the building and ended up on london bridge. he was pursued and detained by members of the public, as well as a british transport police officer who was in plain clothes, before armed officers from both the city and metropolitan police arrived, confronted the attacker and shot him. the actions of the police and the public are all the more remarkable as we now know the attacker was wearing what looked like a very convincing explosive device. thankfully, we now know
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that was a hoax device. today, this address where usman khan had recently been living was being intensely searched. but police say at this stage there is no evidence to suggest anybody else was involved in the attack. this way, please. which leaves the burning question, how was a convicted terrorist released from jail while still dangerous? and how did he, still wearing a tag, kill two people at a meeting focused on the rehabilitation of prisoners? daniel sanford, bbc news, london bridge. borisjohnson visited the scene of the attack this morning, and pledged to toughen up sentences. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn called for a full investigation into khan's early release from prison. our political correspondent jessica parker reports. hello, how are you doing? visiting the scene at london bridge, the prime minister, alongside the met police chief, cressida dick, as people try to take in what has happened and understand
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what lessons can be learned. boris johnson today said that the case of usman khan raised the issue of sentencing. i have said for a long time now that i think that the practice of automatic early release, where you cut a sentence in half and let really serious violent offenders out early simply isn't working and i think you have had some very good evidence of how that isn't working, i am afraid, with this case. general election campaigning has overall been more muted today, but the labour leader said there needs to be a full investigation into what has happened. clearly, there has been a complete disaster and lives have been lost because of his behaviour and i think there is also question about what the probation service were doing. were they involved at all and whether the parole board should have been involved in deciding whether or not he should have been allowed to be released from prison in the first place. the details of this case will inevitably come under great scrutiny, but today politicians across the board have been
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offering their sympathies to the affected families and paying tribute to those who rushed to the scene. our emergency services as always rise to the challenge, so, you know, we need to make sure there is a robust response to incidents like this. any lessons that need to be learned are learned but at the moment i think everybody‘s thoughts are with everybody who has been affected. there are clearly questions that need to be answered and answers found to how this happened and the process for that is very important, i think today that the focus is on those who are mourning. during the 2017 general election there were two terrorist attacks, at manchester arena and another at london bridge. it can lead to greater political focus on security issues. parties' records and their future plans for keeping people safe.
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but for some those conversations may be for another day. jessica parker, bbc news. let's hear more from the news conference held by the assistant commissioner of the metropolitan police, neil basu, just over an hour ago. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'd like to update you on our continuing investigation into the terrible attack of yesterday near london bridge. officers from london's counterterrorism command have been working flat out with security services over night, as you would expect, to continue to try and establish the full circumstances of what's happened. at this time, we've found no evidence, no evidence, to suggest anybody else was involved in this attack. however, we are still making extensive enquiries to make sure that no one else was involved. 0ur investigative priority at this time is to ensure that there is no one related as an outstanding threat to the public.
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to this end, we've carried out two searches that addresses both in staffordshire and in the stoke—on—trent area. 0ur officers have therefore been supported by officers from staffordshire and the west midlands counterterrorism police. i would like to thank them as well as the local community in those areas for the support they've shown as we carry out those crucial enquiries. the investigation team is also speaking to many of those who were present at fishmongers' hall, but i would appeal to anyone who was there on friday, anyone who hasn't been spoken to, to contact police on 0800 789 321 immediately. we now know this attack began inside fishmongers' halljust before 2pm yesterday. the attacker, whose identity we confirmed last night, stabbed a number of people inside the building, and as a result, five people have suffered injuries. three people, a man and two women, were injured and remain in hospital. theirfamilies have been contacted, and specialist officers are
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supporting them. tragically, two people, a man and a woman, were killed during the attack. and of course, i'm fully aware that the media and social media have named one of those victims. you must understand that i have to wait for formal identification from the coroner. but i will provide you an update as soon as i can. on behalf of the entire policing family, can i offer my heartfelt thoughts and condolences to those families of the victims, both the deceased and those still in hospital, and everyone who has been affected by this incident. we are still piecing together the exact details of what happened. it's already clear that this cowardly act was immediately countered by some incredible acts of bravery, both by members of the public and from police officers. we know this attacker was attending an event called learning together, and some of those present at that event were people who confronted this
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attacker to try and stop him. the attacker then left the building and ended up on london bridge. he was pursued and detained by members of the public, as well as a british transport police officer who was in plain clothes, before armed officers from both the city and metropolitan police arrived, confronted the attacker and shot him. the actions of the police and the public are all the more remarkable as we now know the attacker was wearing what looked like a very convincing explosive device. tha nkfully convincing explosive device. thankfully we now know that was a hoax device. detectives and forensic officers remain in the london bridge area, and cordons continue to be in place as we meticulously gather the evidence required for the investigation, and this obviously may take some time. we are working as fast as we can. we would ask the public to continue to avoid the area, and we really thank those affected by this for their patience
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and understanding. 0n affected by this for their patience and understanding. on that point, cani and understanding. on that point, can i also thank the public for their tremendous support and cooperation in response to this incident. the the public have shed nearly 500 images and videos with the investigation team so far, and we are grateful. if you have any images or video and haven't spoken to the police, please do so as soon as possible. it is vital that the empty ideology of terror is rejected by all of us, and that communities come together side by side to ensure that those seeking to divide us will never succeed. as that those seeking to divide us will never succeed. as a that those seeking to divide us will never succeed. as a precaution, we have enhanced police patrols across london of both armed and unarmed officers, and the public expect to see an increased police presence throughout the weekend, as collea g u es throughout the weekend, as colleagues from the metropolitan police, city of london and british transport police carry out those patrols. 0ur transport police carry out those patrols. our advice to the public is to continue with your plans as usual. please be vigilant, but be a
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lot, not alarmed. if you do see anything suspicious, then please act. report it to police. speak to an office or call oh 800, 789321. countering terrorism is not something that can be done by any single agency on its own. it needs the cooperation and support from every corner of society. they help and support we get from the public is incredible, and indeed the support from the media has been astonishing in the last 24—hour is. it isa astonishing in the last 24—hour is. it is a vital part of countering terrorism, and i'm incredibly grateful for your support. now, i'm happy to take a couple of questions. you will understand, the investigation is ongoing, so please make them short. duncan kennedy, bbc. do you know how long the attack we nt bbc. do you know how long the attack went on for in the hall, and was he wearing this fake device in the hole
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during this meeting? so, we know and we have already said that the attack took a number of minutes before it was effectively concluded. so, from start to finish of this incident, we are talking about a very few minutes. and we believe he was wearing the vest at the time. he was under the multi—agency arrangement. to the best of my knowledge, he was compliant with conditions. let's cross to london bridge now where we can speak to our correspondent katharine da costa. we can still see some police activity behind you, quite a lot of officers, but what is actually happening there now? this chord and remains in place on london bridge more than 2a hours after yesterday's attack. buses and vehicles that had been abandoned yesterday have yet to
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been abandoned yesterday have yet to be cleared while forensic officers continue with their investigations. this enhanced police presence will continue throughout the weekend and into next week. the public have been thanked for their patience while the cord and remains in place, and as you heard there, the assistant commissioner said 500 images had now been shared with the police. he also said that a british transport police officer in plain clothes had been among those who intervened and confronted the attacker moments before armed police arrived on the scene and shot him dead. earlier today, the prime minister, the mayor of london and the heads of both city police and the metropolitan police visited the crime scene. they met with officers that had been on duty yesterday. they then went into borough market, just around the corner from where i am now. borough market, just around the cornerfrom where i am now. they spoke to traders and members of the public, really is a reassurance.
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cressida dick said london remained resilient. the mayor, sadiq khan, said that no one individual would disrupt london life. the message here is very much that the city is open to business as usual. what do we know about the condition of those people who were injured in yesterday's attack. we know that two people died, a man that has been identified as jack merritt, a cambridge university graduate. the identity of the woman who died has not yet been revealed. there were three other people that were injured, a man and two women. we now know that two of them are stable, and the third suffered less serious injuries. again, they have yet to be named, but police have contacted theirfamilies named, but police have contacted their families and they are being supported by specially trained officers. thank you very much. this evening, the london mayor, sadiq khan, condemned the government
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for its handling of offenders. this government was wrong to get rid of the power to give an indeterminate sentence to protect the public. that sentence was removed by the government. i am concerned, and i have said it publicly before, that i think the cuts that have been made to the ministry ofjustice, the changes made to privations and prisons means their ability to rehabilitate and supervise is compromised. it is important that the government reverses those cuts and changes. it is a fact of life that the more successful we are in catching, arresting, prosecuting and convicting people of serious offences, we have got to think about what happens when they are in prison, and also whether they should be released and how they are supervised. earlier, i spoke to the former labour cabinet minister, yvette cooper, who said
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the government hadn't give proper resources to managing convicted terrorists. there are de—radicalisation programmes, but there is a big question about whether this attacker was a part of them, what the extent of them was, what the resorting is behind them, and that is also about the resourcing in prison, because particularly in prison, where someone particularly in prison, where someone has been convicted of a terrorist offence, there have been continued concerns about whether in fa ct continued concerns about whether in fact extremism is persisting in
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prisons, that there is in fact more radicalising of people in prison as opposed to de—radicalising, and therefore the investment in the de—radicalisation is crucial. and also what de—radicalisation support is available for probation and offender management as well. i think there will be questions about the scale of those programmes on what scale of those programmes on what scale they need to be as well. the other crucial question is about what the level of risk assessment and safety assessment is for anybody coming to the end of their sentence 01’ coming to the end of their sentence or part way through their assessment, and i think that will be assessment, and i think that will be a big focus. we used to have powers as part of control orders. they were replaced by something that was a way of being able to restrict movement and control the location of people who were thought to pose a continued danger or a continued risk, and we
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need to know for example whether those sorts of powers are being fully used in order to make sure that we keep the public safe. it's really important to say, i think, we heard in the statement that neil basu made, the tremendous amount of work the police are doing to investigate this case, and i think eve ryo ne investigate this case, and i think everyone will want to hugely support the police in that work. i think they are doing a superb job and it's really important that the public have been coming forward and supporting the police in that work, and we must continue to do so. we also need to make sure that serious questions are asked about preventing these kinds of things happening in these kinds of things happening in the first place, given the serious concerns there are in this case. yvette cooper, who chaired the home affa i rs yvette cooper, who chaired the home affairs select committee on the last parliament. i've been speaking to roger graef 0be, who is a criminologist and film—maker.
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he explained why usman khan should never have been moved off the indeterminate sentences for public protection scheme the public protection service was designed for people like this, people who really are very dangerous, and as some viewers may have seen the serious crime and punishment on channel 4, the first one was about the service. it is very surprising the court of appeal moved him off of one of those, because that is literally what it was designed for. the automatic release for people who hopefully learn something other than how to commit more crime is based on an optimistic view, and also just commit more crime is based on an optimistic view, and alsojust plain management of space. terrorists are a separate category, ideological driven, very different from most people who commit violent crime, and they shouldn't be treated with any
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automatic handling by the justice system. it makes the point that the pa role system. it makes the point that the parole board were making the point that they have nothing to do with this process precisely because it is automatic. presumably this would be one of the things that needs to be looked at. one issue is about the supervision of people after they have been released in this kind of category. we understand that he was tagged. having a tag on its own isn't an issue because he was at a public event to which he had been a p pa re ntly public event to which he had been apparently invited, so he wasn't a p pa re ntly apparently invited, so he wasn't apparently engaged in any activity that would have caused any question, but there will be people raising the question again of what sort of supervision takes place of people after they've been released when they have been convicted of such a serious offence. it's notjust that, it's the supervision of anyone who has been convicted and sent to prison. it is woefully inadequate. the probation service has been
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absolutely decimated by cuts. people have focused on entirely on the police cuts, but as they are, and the prison officer cuts, and they are serious in terms of potential rehabilitation. at the cuts to the probation service mean that a whole range of offenders who need the kind of attention that anyone else would need if they are going to try and go straight is lacking. i understand his lawyer was quoted in the newspaper today saying this chap asked several times while in prison to have a de—radicalisation worker to have a de—radicalisation worker to work with him because he realised apparently the error of his ways. when he came out, it looks like he was radicalised all over again and became violent again. he had been a model prisoner and wanted to change but there was no resources to give him. we have had a tribute this
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afternoon to jack merritt, a graduate of cambridge university and working with a charity connected to cambridge which helps with prisoner education in prison. this is from the musician dave, who won the mercury prize. he dedicated the price to his older brother, currently serving a prison sentence for his involvement in a murder at victoria station. presumably it is through his brother's case that he has become involved with a charity jack merritt was working for. he said: dutch police have arrested a 35—year—old man in connection with a stabbing incident that took place in the hague yesterday. two of the victims were 15—year—old girls and the other was a 13—year old boy.
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images and videos on social media show dozens of black friday shoppers running away from the scene. the three people who were stabbed were treated in hospital and later discharged. rail fares will rise by an average of 2.7% injanuary, according to the body that represents the rail industry. it means some commuters will see their season tickets go up by more than a hundred pounds. the independent watchdog transport focus said a majority of rail users did not feel they were getting value for money. katie prescott has the details. christmas is coming and for commuters on south—western railway that means almost a month of scenes like these as strikes on the line start on monday. so the news that train fares will rise again next year, above the standard rate of inflation, has not gone down well with these passengers in bristol. i think the rail service probably needs to be improved nationwide before they can think
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about putting up fares. i've just come from cambridge and it would have been cheaper for me to go to paris. today's announcement means many commuters face an increase of more than £100 on the annual cost of getting to work. for example, a season ticket from eastbourne to london goes up £136, tipping it over the £5,000 mark. a season ticket between glasgow and edinburgh will set you back by £4200 a year, up £116. but the rail industry defends the increases, saying 98p from every pound spent on fares goes into running the railway. at the moment we're going through like a record splurge on the railway network, more money is being put onto the network now than at any other time since the victorian era. so, we are replacing half of the entire nation's fleet, but we are also putting money elsewhere, by adding extra services where they really needed. both train companies and passengers
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say they would like to see a new, more flexible system forfares put in place. but the future of fares and indeed the railways will be in the hands of whoever wins the election. the draw for the 2020 european championship has been held in romania. england have been drawn against their world cup semifinal conquerors croatia, and the czech republic, who beat them in the qualifying games. they'll face one other team from those who qualify via the play—offs — that could be scotland. meanwhile, wales will play italy, switzerland and turkey. john watson is in bucharest and joins us now. jon, you have been following the ins and outs of the draw this afternoon. what should we make of these early matches for england and wales? i think england's —— england will be fairly pleased with the draw, id
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like to have some of the bigger nations and opponents that could have been drawn against them. they will open up against croatia, the first match of the tournament, on the 14th of june, first match of the tournament, on the 14th ofjune, before going on to play potentially scotland if they can qualify through the play—offs, one of the four remaining teams that can still qualify for the european championships. that would be an interesting tie if scotland manage to qualify. then they will finish against the czech republic, their final group game. a huge advantage for england because they will be playing all of the group games at home at wembley, so you can imagine a huge amount of support, and that could prove a huge boost for england in their attempts to reach the latter stages. worth pointing out that if they win their group they would play the runners up of group f. would play the runners up of group f, which looks a very tough group, with germany, france and portugal all in there. actually, there could be an argument made for england finishing second in their group as runners up finishing second in their group as runners up and that would see them
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go on and face the runners up of group e, anyone from spain, northern ireland, poland or sweden. there could be an argument there if england want to reach the latter stages potentially to finish second in theirgroup. as stages potentially to finish second in their group. as for wiles come knew they would be in group i or b. they have been placed in group i. —— in group a. they will play their opening group games in baku in azerbaijan, so there is a logistical issue facing wales. they won't get the same support as england will, with their home matches at wembley. a huge amount of travel for whilst factoring, but they will feel confident, of course, having reached the semifinals of the last european championships, as will england, who we re championships, as will england, who were knocked out in the semifinals of the world cup by croatia, and they will meet again in their
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opening match at euro 2020. john watson in bucharest, thank you. if you want more on that draw, as well as what is on the bbc sport pages, we have our sport programme coming up we have our sport programme coming up in around five minutes. the annual christmas tree lighting ceremony in bethlehem's manger square has taken place. the tree is outside the church of the nativity — where christians believe jesus was born. the tree lighting coincides with the beginning of advent and the four week run up to christmas. and staying in bethlehem, a tiny wooden relic, believed by christians to be from jesus s manger, has been returned to the town after more than a thousand years in rome. it was briefly put on display injerusalem yesterday before continuing its journey to the holy land on the orders of pope francis. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. temperatures in places have struggled to get above freezing,

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