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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 6, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm martin stanford. our top stories: cold air the us entrepreneur, elon musk, is cleared of defaming 4 a “94.2? of the jet stream. cold air working out of north america is a british cave diver by calling him supercharging the jet stream and on saturday it will reach winds are 180 "paedo guy" on twitter. miles an hour, often exhilarating jet streams deep in areas of low pressure. and look at this. this in the last big debate before next week's uk election, pa rt pressure. and look at this. this part of the pressure charts just boris johnson and jeremy corbyn year, you will see an area of low clash over security, the economy and brexit. pressure form, rapidly deepen, and then down towards ireland. this is storm atiyah. it is an example of the economic drag anchor of brexit on this country pressure dropping more than 2a should not be underestimated. millibars and 2a hours, so some it is stopping investment, people call this a weather bomb. it means that people are uncertain saturday, bright and windy, outbreaks are rain and sunday will about making purchases, sunday will generally be a windy about taking on newjobs at... what conservative governments day. for most of us, a mixture of always do is look after the very richest within our society. sunshine and heavy showers. the they have done very, very well in the years of austerity weekend starting off not on a bad while it is communities all over note. it will be a windy kind of the country that have paid for it. day. bright skies for many of us and a shooting at a naval base in florida leaves three dead. lots of dry weather was sunny officials say the gunman spells. across the north of the uk was a member of the saudi air force. cloud will thicken at times to bring swedish activist, greta thunberg, attends the un climate conference outbreaks of rain across northern ireland, reaching cumbria, but the heaviest rain in the north—west of scotland. temperatures up to 11, relatively mild for this time of year, a couple of degrees above average. sunday, to squeeze in the isobars here, this is storm atiyah,
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bringing its strongest winds to the western coast of ireland, where gusts are expected to reach 80 miles an hour. northern ireland is not too far away from that low. the strongest winds are expected to be on the southern flank of the low pressure system. so some wet and windy weather for a time in pressure system. so some wet and windy weatherfor a time in northern ireland. scotland, england and wales seeing a mixture of sunshine and showers. those blustery showers will extend right across the country and those strong winds. some of the strongest winds across the uk are probably going to come through on sunday evening, sunday night and into monday, especially around coastal parts of wales in south—east england, where gusts could reach 70 miles an hour. the storm system itself will continue to push east and we will see some heavy showers overnight and some pretty lottery winds as well. sunday into monday, severe gales for some of us. there isa severe gales for some of us. there is a risk of some localised disruption. probably in the next couple of days or so. on into monday, the low pressure is worked out into europe, we get these cold northerly winds feeding in which will bring loads of showers across northern areas of scotland, very
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u nsettled northern areas of scotland, very unsettled here and we will see plenty of showers working down the north sea to affect the east coast of england as well. it is going to feel chilly, temperatures lower than they have been. factor in the strength of the wind and they will bea strength of the wind and they will be a significant windchill effect. you say, low pressure is still with us you say, low pressure is still with us and this funny looking weather front approaches the british isles. ultimately that will bring a band of heavy rain and squally, gusty winds as well. now, head of that, for england, wales, scotland, lots of cloud around, drizzle, tending to lengthy outbreaks of rain later in the day, but it is in northern ireland that we will see the wettest and windiest weather through tuesday. this swathes of wet and windy weather will sweep east across scotland, england and wales as we head through the night time. now, and look at the weather charts beyond that and you can see we have gotan area beyond that and you can see we have got an area of high pressure to the south—west of the british isles. these lows are moving around the top of the high, targeting the british isles. in other words, of the high, targeting the british isles. in otherwords, really, of the high, targeting the british isles. in other words, really, there is no change to the unsettled team to the weather. it will be rain at
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times and often it is going to be pretty windy. the winds are coming in from the west north—westerly direction, so temperatures close or perhaps one degree or so below normalfor perhaps one degree or so below normal for this perhaps one degree or so below normalfor this time of perhaps one degree or so below normal for this time of year. could be cold enough for a bit of snow in the highest northern mountains. that's your letter. hello, this is bbc news with lu kwesa burak. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment, first the headlines: boris johnson and jeremy corbyn have gone head to head
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in a live bbc tv debate, with just under a week to go before the general election. a man who carried out a string of sex attacks on 11 women and children, across england, over two weeks, has been found guilty of 37 offences. joseph mccann is a horrendously dangerous individual who has showed complete contempt for his victims. who has shown complete contempt for his victims. he is clearly one of the most dangerous sex offenders, i think, that we have ever seen in this country. a teenager has admitted attempted murder, after throwing a 6—year—old boy from the 10th floor of the tate modern gallery in london, in august. a jury in california has found the tech entrepreneur elon musk, not guilty of defamation, in a case involving a 64 year—old british cave explorer.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentator, jo—anne nadler, and the daily mirror columnist, susie boniface. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the times leads with the news that both the bbc and channel 4 have been accused of "hysterical election bias". it says senior media figures have warned that both broadcasters risk breaching broadcasting laws and regulations. the guardian reports that serial rapist, joseph mccann, had been released from prison as a result of an error. the i leads with tonight election debate saying that the gloves where off between the two main party leaders. the daily telegraph leads with the prime minister's warning
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to labour leaderjeremy corbyn not to lecture him on ireland. the mirror reports or more trouble for prince andrew who they say is at the centre of new allegation related to thejeffrey epstein scandal. and the ft leads with the news that a new global football league has been described as insane. the express give their verdict on tonight's debate — they say the event saw the prime minister borisjohnson win the evening. and the mail leads with an interview they have with the prime minister where he says the conservatives must fight for every vote. that was a look through a few of the front pages. the daily express, the headline is that boris is in front, according to the paper. we are not
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surprised the daily express from that opinion. i actually agree with that opinion. i actually agree with that but, by the same token, it is... nota huge that but, by the same token, it is... not a huge amount of subtlety in any of the coverage and what we have seen throughout this campaign and also with the websites of all the newspapers, they have often acted or seem to be acting as i would not say propagandist but putting forward one point of view. we are not getting the breadth of coverage we have had in previous elections. maybe that is idealistic of me but it is a shame that there are subtleties that... politicians need to be held to account and to a certain extent, it has been a rather facile election campaign and some of
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the coverage has not been so great either. i agree. generally, the news oi'i either. i agree. generally, the news on most of the front pages is used, things you would expect them to say. “ i'iews. things you would expect them to say. — — news. there things you would expect them to say. —— news. there is no revelatory moment. i offer you —— news. there is no revelatory moment. i offeryou milk —— news. there is no revelatory moment. i offer you milk and honey, 52-48, moment. i offer you milk and honey, 52—48, saying stuff we know and expect that fees into the general public attitude i seem to be picking up, ido public attitude i seem to be picking up, i do not know what you collar, a bit of despair, a bit of gloom, disaffected disorder but generally people fed up with everything and nothing here to get your teeth into, to be glad to read. wouldn't that be exactly their strategy? they need to
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ta ke exactly their strategy? they need to take it nice and steady... are you talking about the politicians? yes. both parties wanted to avoid making any big mistakes, the two big parties represented tonight. if there is a story that has come out of the debate this evening is the pole that was taken immediately afterwards which suggests 52% of people who watched felt that boris johnson had one the evening. 48%. jeremy corbyn had. if you look at the poles during the campaign, that is an error margin of support for borisjohnson but is an error margin of support for boris johnson but that when you look at the more detailed analysis of how each leader did on individual subjects, there are much bigger disparities. for example, jeremy, was considered by 57% of people to
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be in touch whereas boris johnson was 29% and yet, considered who was the best p.m., borisjohnson 54%. therefore being in touch is not considered a prime ministerial need. you look at trust. they have all one and lost something in that debate. if that is a strategy, it is a strategy of boring people into not voting against you. the strategy would have been to wed the debate and it was much meatier than others we have seen during the course of the campaign. have either of the leaders done enough to win over the floating, the undecided electorate? who are the floating voters? brexit
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vote rs who are the floating voters? brexit voters who are voting for a party that would not normally vote for, tory remained voters, and labour remain. people voting for a party despite the leader people voting for a party because they are not the other party and a huge amount of churn in the political system. literally everybody is floating. this is why they went for a general election rather than a referendum to settle the brexit issue. they could concentrate the fire on particular electorates. whereas a referendum in every constituency every vote would make a difference and they are not fighting for 17.5 million but rather for nine million and, however brexit
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is decided, it is 9—10 million votes for the winner... this evening's debate would have reinforced the key m essa 9 es debate would have reinforced the key m essa g es of debate would have reinforced the key messages of the two parties and if you were wavering about supporting borisjohnson, it you were wavering about supporting boris johnson, it probably you were wavering about supporting borisjohnson, it probably would have reassured you because this was a more authoritative performance, less jokey, a more authoritative performance, lessjokey, more a more authoritative performance, less jokey, more focus. a more authoritative performance, lessjokey, more focus.|j a more authoritative performance, less jokey, more focus. iwant a more authoritative performance, less jokey, more focus. i want to finish off quickly, what did you make of the intervention by tony blairand make of the intervention by tony blair and john major coming just hours before the debate, saying, tell you place a labour voters, supporters, should vote for a party that wants to stay in the european union at the same thing forjohn major. not news. they have both said it before. i think the timing from
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john major was arresting an incredibly disloyal of him, quite frankly but not surprising over the substance. this is something he feels very strongly about. i think it would have been outraged if he was treated in the same way by lady thatcher... he was... not as a similar point... he was outraged when there was an intervention. indeed. i think we're done with the general election. thank goodness? let's get on with important stuff. how about football? the book i read this the more i thought, another moneymaking spin. have i got the wrong idea? private equity investors freight money therefore the chance
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of making money are high. the guy behind real madrid and some of the biggest equity investors in football talking about a mega leg, something with the best football teams in the world competing. we have had problems earlier this year with very small clubs having to close or facing bankruptcy and what happens if we have this huge leg where all the investment, gambling firms, suck money out of the game and everything... how do you develop the new talent, it is very shortsighted. you do not have fans that have access to see their club because they are so big and the tickets and prices will be so enormous. how do you enter this leg? go to let
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america or asia, who is going to be this super mega leg? do you have to buy your way into it? league —— who is not agreed with this? everybody else. the coyte behind fifa and the quy else. the coyte behind fifa and the guy behind real madrid and the bankers are for it. ufr and everybody else is a no thank you, we do not want anyone else in our pockets. —— uefa. do not want anyone else in our pockets. -- uefa. and the fed would be saying how do we fit into this? an horrific story today in the
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guardian. joseph mccann found guilty of 37 counts of attacking 11 people. his crimes under the age of his victims, it is just shocking. his crimes under the age of his victims, it isjust shocking. it is an absolutely horrific story, in every way. the crimes themselves, which i believe we are being spared the details of because they were, i believe, too horrific to report in detail. and the circumstances in which this person was able, was freed by accident, it would appear, by error, and was able to carry this out. so i think this is going to develop into something of a big political story in terms of accountability over the next few days, and i am quite surprised, in a way, but it didn't come up at the debate this evening. it really
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should have done. the ministry of justice, who would have been responsible for parole and probation and release and so on, as soon as the sky was arrested they would have started an internal enquiry to find out exactly what happened and what we nt out exactly what happened and what went wrong. they will be some findings and documents already, even if they haven't come to any conclusions until after the court case. what is going to be looked into will be almost definitely, were there any particular... i think there any particular... i think there has been a couple of probation office rs there has been a couple of probation officers demoted or disciplined or fired as a result of this. it will be looking into whether their funding was an issue, whether cuts we re funding was an issue, whether cuts were an issue, whether was private contractors, because we had all these problems with the probation service being privatised at a cost of half £1 billion and then being taken back international ownership because it didn't work very well, there was a massive reoffending rate. —— back into national ownership. this was a man who was originally injail for ownership. this was a man who was originally in jail for aggravated burglary and when he came out he gravitated to a much more serious kind of offending, and that is something that his original indeterminate sentence could have been that should have been assessing as he went through the process. but
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burglars are not expected to do this kind of thing when i come out and reoffend. the kind of supervision he was under was not the kind of supervision a potential rapist would be under. interesting to know what made him worse, what made him reoffend. was it something that happened in prison, was it something that happened before he was convicted for burglary? was he not convicted for burglary? was he not convicted for burglary? was he not convicted for previous offences? so many things to be investigated, and we will not find out until well after the election unless somebody decides to lick the information. on that point, you say you are both —— lea k that point, you say you are both —— leak the information. you say you are both surprised it did not come up are both surprised it did not come up during the debate. perhaps that criticism following the london bridge attack, and the electioneering, people said... well, quite right. the circumstances are different, as we discussed an hour ago. nonetheless, it puts the criminal justice system, rehabilitation, probation, all of these things under the spotlight
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again. how on earth does whoever come into power, when you start fixing the system? how? there are not enough prisons, there are not enough spaces in the prison. so they have to move the prisoners out quickly. and it is more complex, obviously, thanjust quickly. and it is more complex, obviously, than just building quickly. and it is more complex, obviously, thanjust building more prisons or locking people up for longer. all of those things have a place. it is fundamentally, one of those things elizabeth fry was looking into, in prison reform in the victorian era. banging people up doesn't stop them committing crime. it can make things an awful lot worse. you need to rehabilitate. what is your take, then? not everybody can be rehabilitated... well, we have to change something because it isn't working. we have got —— politicians, seem to be tougher and stricter and meaner and have long sentences, and yet they don't want to increase taxes to pay
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for what that would involve, which is much more prisons and incarceration. what do you it was something david cameron raised early in his leadership, and although i disagree with david gauke oi'i although i disagree with david gauke on many issues, i think that he was the front page of the sun. the story
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of the week! this is what people wa nt to of the week! this is what people want to talk mine is on its last legs. moulded into my image. there is a story that but we do not have time. into my image. there is a story that but we do not have timelj into my image. there is a story that but we do not have time. i would go to pieces if i want that kind of money. i feel to pieces if i want that kind of money. ifeel much more
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to pieces if i want that kind of money. i feel much more excited winning £500. an amount that you can imagine doing something with immediately. this is absolutely daunting. silly money but i would still have it! you cannot give up what gives you a structure to your life. but good on him. we can all talk about it. we would all love that problem. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, seven days a week. and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you, jo—anne nadler and susie boniface. goodbye. good evening.
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i'm lizzie greenwood—hughes, here with your latest sports news. it's less than 2a hours until the rematch between anthonyjoshua and andy ruinunior who stunned the boxing world world earlier in the year when he took all three ofjoshua's heavyweight belts. but the headlines today have been about the huge difference in their weight. 20 kilo heavier than anthonyjoshua ruiz. this will be the largest for anthonyjoshua. an indication of the strategy. the real surprise ruiz, when he announced the rematch, his trainer wanted him lighter than before and yet he came in over a
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stone heavier and you will have to wonder whether that puts the advantage in anthonyjoshua's place. the wayne was the first time we really got a sense of the big fight atmosphere. lots of people there. lots of travelling fans and may an indication of what we can expect. so much buildup and are so many opinions. ruiz coming in so heavy, has he given anthonyjoshua the edge? not long now before we find out the answer to that question. watford have their third manager of the season and it's nigel pearson. the former leicester city and hull mananger will take charge after saturday's premier league game against crystal palace. pearson takes over from quique sanchez flores, who was sacked after only three months in charge. watford are bottom of the table, 7 points from safety. chelsea are free to sign new players again after their transfer ban was reduced on appeal by the court of arbitration for sport.
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they haven't been able to buy anyone since last season for breaching rules on signing young over—seas players. i think we have to give credit to the group that are working now to get to where we got to. i still want more. i think we could have more points and be higher up the table. that is my feeling. as we go forward , that is my feeling. as we go forward, of course, if i feel or we feel is a club there are positions we can strengthen, and we would obviously look at that, as all big clu bs obviously look at that, as all big clubs do. that is why people expected less of us this season because there are lots of clubs around us spending £100 million or £150 million, and we didn't have that chance, and we lost eden hazard and we lost two number nines. but was obviously in everybody‘s mindset. now the picture slightly changed and is important we it right moving forward. the only game in the championship tonight ended in a draw between mid—table millwall and nottingham forest. forest thought they'd won it after coming from behind to lead 2—1 in the 88th minute, substitute lewis grabban scoring both goals. but millwall equalized in injury time, aidan 0'brien to take a point.
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it's the third round in rugby union's european champions cup. bath remain rooted to the bottom of pool 3 after being thrashed 34—17 by clemont auvergne at the rec. clermont ran in four tries to secure a bonus point, with samuel ezeala twice crossing the line. the win puts clermont back on top of the pool. the former world number one tennis player — caroline wozniacki — has announced she's retiring after next month's australian open. the 29—year—old says it is nothing to do with her health, butjust the right time for her to stop playing competitively. wozniaki was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 2018, the same year she won her only grand slam title. she's currently ranked number 37 in the world. that's all the sport for now. hello there. the weather is looking
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decidedly unsettled now for the foreseeable future, because we have a series of low pressure system is pushing off the atlantic to bring us spells of wet and windy weather. this weekend will be more unsettled with gales and heavy rain, whereas we are starting off on a fairly settled note thanks to this ridge of high pressure. you can see low pressure looming behind it and moving in through the course of saturday afternoon. we start off largely dry in england and wales, with good sunny spells. more cloud further north and west, and that will continue to thicken up, along with the strengthening south—westerly breeze. then the rain arrives, becoming heavy and widespread across scotland later in the day. this temperature is not too bad for this time of year. highs of around nine or ten. saturday night, the wet and windy weather in the north and west sweeping its way eastwards right across the country, some heavy rain in places followed by blustery showers in the north and west. wintry over the higher ground. because of the strength of the winds, temperature shouldn't fall below six or seven for most of us.
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here is the pressure chart for sunday. you can see how many isobars are on the chart. it will be windy, and a real squeeze approaching islands late in the day. more on that in just islands late in the day. more on that injust a islands late in the day. more on that in just a moment. islands late in the day. more on that injust a moment. sunday, a windy day, bright, some sunshine around, best across eastern areas, lots of showers in the north and west, heavy and may be hungry and they will produce longer spells of rain as they merge together in the north and the west. a little bit wintry over the higher ground in the north. temperatures in single figures, 10—13 further south. the irishman of service have named this storm atiyah, because it is going to bring a swathe of strong winds to the republic of ireland, but also northern ireland, wales and the south—west could see severe gales, gusts of 70—90 miles an hour. a severe spell of weather across the british isles from sunday into monday. disruption could be possible. stay tuned to bbc local radio and subsequent weather forecasts. continues to move through on monday. a windy start today. you will notice another ridge of high pressure trying to notice in from
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the west as the day wears on. it sta rts the west as the day wears on. it starts windy stop some sunshine, the best of it in the west. very windy down the east coast, with further showers here. as that ridge of high pressure starts to move in, comedy winds will tend to ease a little bit, but a call today across the 00:29:15,152 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 board. —— cooler day.
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