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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2020 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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i the ithe weekend. this the second half of the weekend. this weekend, and at times, often windy, often cloudy, and those temperatures similarto often cloudy, and those temperatures similar to what we have had in recent days. it is going to stay pretty unsettled. that's your latest weather. bye for now. this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. sirens blare protests in hong kong over china's new security law as britain offers millions of its citizens, the right to live in the uk. we hearfrom people in hong kong. well, you just asking me do i support hong kong independence, you are almost asking me to be in jail for over ten years. more than 11,000 jobs are cut in britain — in the past 48 hours — with retail and aviation being hit the hardest.
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there needs to be a laser—like focus on protecting jobs. so, how manyjobs does the prime minister think yesterday's announcement will protect? we've supported huge sectors of the uk economy at a cost of £120 billion and i'm not going to give a figure for the number ofjob losses that may or may not take place, but of course the risk is very, very serious. concern as america buys up almost the entire global supply of a drug proven to help the most seriously ill covid patients. what did the president know — and when. continuing pressure on the white house over allegations russia offered the taliban "bounties" to kill us troops. experts warm of an emotional timebomb of delayed grief — following people who have lost loved ones due to covid—19 — and — the man who should have been england's first blacke player.
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we report on the campaign — for a statue of jack leslie. welcome to bbc news. china's new national security law for hong kong has been greeted with protests in the territory — and condemnation from the international community. there was a day of clashes between police and pro—democracy protestors in hong kong — leading to hundreds of arrests. and a handful of people were detained under the new laws, which ban calls for secession and independence. in theory they could face life in prison. the uk prime minister borisjohnson denounced the new legislation as a "clear and serious breach" of the treaty china signed with the uk when it took back control of the former colony in 1997. and he announced that pp to three million people in hong kong are being granted new rights to come to live and work in britain
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after china pressed ahead with the new law that makes it a crime to undermine beijing's authority. 0ur china correspondent john sudworth reports. 23 years after china took control of hong kong, it was an anniversary marked with tear gas... ..and arrests. familiar scenes but the stakes for protesters are now so much higher with the new national security law enforced. music plays for hong kong's pro—beijing leaders, though, this was a day to celebrate with a flag—raising ceremony and a champagne toast with chinese officers. for beijing, this is all about sovereignty — with china denying that the new law breaches its promise to britain to uphold hong kong's freedoms. but the uk government clearly disagrees and it is now pushing ahead with its plan to offer up to 3 million hongkongers eligible for british national
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overseas passports or bnos a route to citizenship. we will grant bnos five years limited leave to remain with the right to work or study. after these five years, they will be able to apply for settled status. and after a further 12 months with settled status, they will be able to apply for citizenship. senior chinese officials, though, had already made it clear they've no time for what they see as foreign meddling. translation: we are making a law concerning a region of china to safeguard its national security. it's none of your business. hong kong's protesters, though, are certain that something fundamental is being lost. i'm angry at the disrespect for human rights that this national security legislation brings. i think, very obviously, the purpose of the law is to change hong kong from rule of law to rule of fear. this photo shows the first man
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arrested for advocating independence from china. and new police banners were on display warning that such slogans could constitute secession or subversion — new offences punishable with up to life in prison. john sudworth, bbc news, beijing. lord patten served as the 28th and final governor of hong kong between 1992 and 1997. he joins me now from south west london. lord patten welcome here to the programme. you have watched and warned over the last few months. your reaction to what has now been imposed? i'm very sad, it is a very dark day for hong kong, it is a very dark day for hong kong, it is a very dark day for its very brave citizens. it is a dark day for the work because this is an example of the behaviour that unfortunately i would expect from under
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the chinese calmness regime since the outbreak of the current virus which in parts of the current virus which in parts of the current virus which in parts of the continent of chinese communist... don't forget that more than half the population of hong kong are refugees from communism and the mainland. they crawled over barbed wire to get to hong kong and because they knew what the law meant in china and now they're having it visited upon them with the destruction of international relationships and rule of law with them running roughshod over political rights which is supposed to pa rt of political rights which is supposed to part of hong kong's constitution. in some extraordinary additions to this are already in law. for example article 38 which means if you or us saying anything critical about china
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and then having to travel through hong kong or china itself, it or they can lock you out. they can market for almost ten years. it is terrible stuff. and it extends even outside of hong kong. it is a difficult line but i think in that first answer you described it as loutish behaviour which of the elements that your foot through in this new law, which are the elements that trouble you the most? the one that trouble you the most? the one that troubles me the most i think is twofold first of all. it is that it bears the extinction —— decision between the executive and judiciary. and it gives the chinese through the medium of the chief executive the ability to choose judges in cases and presumably it is rather like anybody who wants to get a certain verdict choosing the people who will deliver it. secondly what worries me is that the chinese with this
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0rwellian law can define himself exactly what these consuls like sedition and secession mean. and thenif sedition and secession mean. and then if they like, they can take you off to china where i don't think anybody expects a fair trial to sentencing for up to ten years. one of the complete mendacity is, the real lies about all of this is that it has to be done because there is no secrete on hong kong. there is! there is laws against secession and treason. there are laws about that and terrorism come part of the crimes ordinance which is why so many thousands of people had been locked up or arrested over the last yea rs locked up or arrested over the last years because they protest against the exhibition treaty and other things. the point is that china hasn't got the sort of charred that it wants to defy what it means.|j will come to at the british government announced today in a moment or two but you have seen beijing responses over the last two months every time britain has raised
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concerns telling us citizen of our business. in term of the international routes, is there a way of applying pressure do you think or is it now too late? no, we do have to apply rush or whether it is too late or not i cannot tell you. —— apply pressure. you can lock up people but you cannot walk up the idea of freedom. but all around the world china had been behaving like this. they picked a fight with india and killed 20 indian soldiers. they picked fights in the south china sea which they have been militarising and ramming boats and trying to deal with vietnamese and malaysian fishermen. they picked fights with australia, canada. what we need to do both the liberal democracies, our friends, and i were friends in the region is worked together not in order to start a new cold war but to contain bad behaviour by china and to make them understand that we'll
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work with them when they are behaving properly and when we need international agreements like the one on climate change or one in the future about micro biological resistance, we will work with them and those things. what we want to do is push over and bullied by them. and we will stand up to them and try to deter that sort of behaviour. we do have to work with others, our allies. i will come back to that point but in terms of the british government response to the past to citizenship, is that the right response was over i citizenship, is that the right response was over i think it is the honourable thing to do. i am not in the business... i'm not in the business of praising ministers but dominic raab got things absolutely right today to spell it in detail the way in which this national security but is a breach of an international treaty, the hong kong constitution, the international cove na nt o n constitution, the international covenant on civil and portico rights, he was right to spell that
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out into detail and then to repeat actually more generously than i expected an assurance that if people who have the right to come here want to come here and turn their stay here into citizenship, we would be welcoming to them. and we would do very well frankly and anybody who has been hong kong to know to have some of those hong kong people with us. some of those hong kong people with us. i don't want to see that in the future. what china is doing is threatening not only the freedoms of hong kong, they are also threatening the stability and the possibility of a great asian financial hub. is there a prospect do you think of an exodus of people and in terms of what you fear, how long do you think it would be before hong kong ends up looking and being governed exactly like mainland china? if it is, then it ceases to be the very special city which attracted so much investment and has been the main way in which china has attracted foreign
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direct investment and the main way in which china has got money out. a lot of the prince links weapons are corrupt have got their money out of china by doing it through hong kong. hong kong is very important to them. don't forget they raised a lot of money when they flip companies are when they have fluctuations in the stock market, they do it through hong kong like ally bobbitt did recently. you destroyed that basin hong kong, you destroy the bases in hong kong, you destroy the bases in hong kong, you destroy the bases in hong kong that helps to assure the free movement of capital has been successful in hong kong, you destroy those things and you knock hong kong down. —— like what ali baba did. those things and you knock hong kong down. -- like what ali baba did. we see the ongoing struggle and tension between beijing and washington. i was talking to our correspondent —— to the chair of the commons foreign selectivity that it was time for
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the week are muslims —— with the uighur muslims and everything else that it was henry kasser relationship with china. do you share that assessment? it is one i entirely share. he has done well and mobilising right across parliament, labour, liberal democrats, snp and certainly conservative and understanding that we have to stand up for ourselves, set up for we have to stand up for ourselves, set upfor our we have to stand up for ourselves, set up for our values in the stand up set up for our values in the stand upfor set up for our values in the stand up for others against the way china is behaving. this is a moment in global history not entirely right just before the first world war or the second world war but that sort of moment where unless we stand up to an aggressive noticed bullying power, we are all going to be rolled over so we have to work together. and i hope, i do not have too many hopes for president trump, but i hopes for president trump, but i hope an american administration will play its customary role in the future and actually working with allies to make sure that we can
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sustain liberal democracy and the rule of law internationally over the next few years. lord patten we have to leave it there but think is much for your time speaking to us here in bbc news and this evening. think you in sucha bbc news and this evening. think you in such a sad day. now two other news. more than 11,000 job losses have been announced in the uk in the past 2a hours. they're being blamed on devastating impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the british economy. unions have accused the uk government of "sitting on the sidelines". but the prime minister borisjohnson said although the risk to jobs is "very very serious" the government had taken action to protect the jobs of 11 million people. among the 11,000 job cuts in the uk, the world's largest aircraft manufacturer airbus says it plans to cut 1700 from its uk workforce — and thousands more will also go, in germany, spain, and elsewhere. and the department store harrods has said it will cut 700 jobs — more than a seventh of its workforce. our business editor simonjack has this report.
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airlines, manufacturers, retail, the damage is deep and wide and seems to be getting worse by the day or even by the hour. the announcements ofjob losses are coming thick and fast. at the airbus factory in broughton there was a sombre mood as people digested the announcement that 1700 uk jobs will be going. it's a great shame to a lot of people. i have a lot of family members who live here so everybody will be impacted. it's a big part of the community. it's obviously one of the main sources ofjobs around here so obviously if it goes, it makes a big impact on the community. the chairman of airbus uk said its customers were facing a crisis that would leave lasting damage, and airbus have to ensure its own survival. look into the sky. the tourism industry, our bloodline are airlines, those are our customers. if they catch a cold, we are obviously in the same situation.
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so this is unprecedented and we want to be there for the recovery, so we have to cut our cloth according to our means, and it is tough but we have got to do it. it is the right thing to do. today in parliament the leader of the opposition confronted the prime minister with a grim roll call that hours later is already out of date. airbus announced 1700 job losses, tm lewin 800 job losses, easyj et, easyjet, 1300 job losses. that's just yesterday... the prime minister pointed to a job retention scheme unprecedented in its scope and cost, but conceded some tough times lay ahead. we have supported huge sectors of the uk economy at a cost of £120 billion, and i'm not going to give a figure for the number ofjob losses that may or may not take place but the risk is very serious as he rightly says. a month from today, employers will have to start paying
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an increasing portion of that cost until the scheme is withdrawn at the end of october. one reason perhaps whyjob losses are picking up pace. there has been a seismic economic shock to the global economy and these job losses are like waves crashing on uk shores with alarming severity and frequency. the government spent tens of billions of pounds trying to delay this inevitability but with the flood of new announcements, it's clear they are struggling to hold back the tide. with fewer people getting on planes and trains, those stalwarts airports and stations upper crust and caffe ritazza cut 5000 posts. the government has already spent tens of billions keeping dying businesses alive. the chancellor's focus will now shift to trying to create newjobs. simon jack, bbc news. we can speak now to the retail analyst, natalie berg. she joins us from south east london. we saw the prime minister would not put a number of jobs
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we saw the prime minister would not put a number ofjobs potentially. how alarming is this? it is very sad but unfortunately not unexpected. we have to remember that when looking specifically at the retail sector, the retail sector has been facing profound structural changes. so, last year the retail sector faced its worst year on record. sales were actually in decline. we saw unprecedented levels of job actually in decline. we saw unprecedented levels ofjob losses, retailers going into administration, andi retailers going into administration, and i think we did even before the pandemic hit we were bracing ourselves for more doom and gloom this year because the consumer has changed drastically over the past 5-10 changed drastically over the past 5—10 years. we are spending more online. more recently we have been confirmed by brexit which has led to economic and political uncertainty because i think consumers were tightening their belts a bit there and a broader shift away from spending on stuff and material goods as consumers look to spend on experiences which is going out to
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eat or go into the pub there is a lot of shifts happening, it really was the perfect storm and i think u nfortu nately was the perfect storm and i think unfortunately that pandemic has exacerbated what is already quite a difficult situation. exacerbated at how much though? what is your best guess though was irb just at the very start of this process? we look at the end of the furlough scheme so so many businesses up and down the country will have to make an assessment. have they got the business to go forward after all of this? i think things are going to get a lot worse before they get better. we have artie heard today from john lewis who said they want to be reopening all their stores for site —— already heard from. we heard from harrods that is reliant on international visitors that they are looking to cut jobs international visitors that they are looking to cutjobs from their main store in central london. just yesterday we heard from tm lewin that they're causing all their shops and training online i think a lot of retailers are looking to hit it
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and focus on online operations was at the big challenge though is with social distancing measures in place, it is very, very difficult that they we re it is very, very difficult that they were not trained at full capacity and they are looking at anywhere from trading between 30—70% capacity. but the structure hasn't changed for cost. unfortunately we are going to continue to see more retailers looking to close stores and cut costs where possible. of very gloomy assessment and of course under assessment not just specific here to the uk but absolutely globally as we were hearing there in our introduction. natalie berg think is so much for that analysis. pubs, restaurants and hairdressers are all preparing to open their doors again in england this weekend. the uk government says, it is safe to do so, as long as the clear guidelines are followed. but a member of sage — the government's senior scientific advisory body — says the moves are too widespread and it's a "highly irresponsible" decision. it comes as the number of people reported to have died after testing positive in the last 2a hours, increased by 176, bringing that
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total number of deaths to 43,906. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, reports. preparing for opening time on saturday in england for restaurants, cafes, hairdressers and many other businesses, and on friday for some of those traders in northern ireland. amongst these traders, there is a keen sense of anticipation. can't wait to make everyone look good again. everybody is walking around with a helmet on their head, so i can't wait to get back to my craft. been hard not cutting hair. pubs too will reopen on saturday in england after three months of lockdown but there is a warning from a member of the committeee sage that it's too risky and shouldn't be allowed. what will happen is the government will blame the people for behaving irresponsibly, when actually i would say it's
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highly irresponsible to be having so many restrictions lifted on a saturday, especially opening pubs and restaurants indoors, where there is likely to be a high rate of transmission. a government spokesperson said clear guidelines had been set out for pubs and other venues in england to keep safe and all measures would be kept under constant review. —— to keep customers safe. dawn is a critical care nurse and was one of the faces of the early stages of the crisis, with a plea for people to stop panic buying in supermarkets. people like me will be looking after you at your lowest, please just stop it! please. with lockdown measures about to ease, she had this message. psychologically people need more of a normal life, and i understand that, it is quite worrying when you see these pictures, these scenes of people up close with each other. it is a concern, and i'm hoping that peoplejust remember
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what we are all doing, what we are fighting against. expanding virus testing and the tracing of contacts of people who are infected is seen as essential if future outbreaks are to be spotted and curbed. a former health secretary told me he believes a major increase in testing capacity is required. for the next big step, we need to introduce mass testing, starting with health care workers, people in the care system and nhs, so we can make sure that hospitals and care homes really are safe and nip in the bud any infections which start there. testing after the lockdown easing this weekend will be especially important. today people were drinking outdoors. nhs leaders and ministers will watch anxiously to see how they use their new freedom to go into pubs and bars across most of england. hugh pym, bbc news.
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the us has struck a deal to buy almost the entire global supply of a drug known to help people recover faster from coronavirus. in trials, remdesivir has been shown to shorten hospital stays for the most seriously ill by about four days. here's our medical correspondent, fergus walsh. geraldine from north london is one of more than 1,000 covid patients who took part in a global trial of remdesivir. this is her receiving the drug in april. she made a rapid recovery and is shocked that the drug has been bought up by the us. i wanted to be part of something that could potentially help everyone, and i feel that now only a small percentage of the world's population really are going to receive any benefit from it in the near future. it's really disappointing. remdesivir takes months to manufacture, so there was already a shortage. this deal means the american pharma company gilead will reserve nearly all production in the coming three months for us patients.
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covid is a global problem with millions of patients affected worldwide. those patients need access to proven treatments. for one country to dominate the access to a single treatment is beyond unfortunate. there are now two drugs which have proven to be effective against covid—19, remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone. remdesivir costs £1,900 per course of treatment, whereas dexamethasone costs just £5. remdesivir cuts the duration of symptoms from 15 to 11 days, but is not proven to reduce the risk of dying, whereas dexamethasone cuts the risk of dying by a third in the most seriously ill patients. the nhs says it has enough remdesivirfor patients who currently need it, but how long that will last is unclear. but there are ample supplies of dexamethasone, which is now the standard treatment for seriously
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ill covid patients. fergus walsh, bbc news. injusta injust a moment in just a moment we will have more on that story that russia offered bounties to the title band to kill us troops. we will speak to one mother injust a us troops. we will speak to one mother in just a minute. us troops. we will speak to one mother injust a minute. —— offering a...to mother injust a minute. —— offering a... to the taliban. mother injust a minute. —— offering hello there. for a good chunk of the uk, june was a wetter than normaljune, and that unsettled theme's continued into the first part ofjuly with no real change in the forecast. now, we've seen plenty of showers across england and wales today. you see those here on the satellite and radar picture combined, but there were some lengthier outbreaks of rain for southern counties of northern ireland, for northern england and also central and southern parts of scotland, where it turned out to be quite a wet day. now, overnight, that rain will continue to affect southern scotland, northern england, working southwards over time into north wales and the north midlands as well by the end of the night.
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all the while, it stays cloudy. it's mild, temperatures 10—14 degrees. a little bit cooler across northern scotland, where there will be occasional clear spells working in. looking at the weather charts on thursday, no pressure still with us, a couple of weather fronts working south eastwards with time, it is another unsettled looking day there is start off with the rain across southern scotland, northern england, north wales, the north midlands with that rain putting south eastwards with time. the rain will turn showery into the afternoon so big showers for the midlands, east anglia, southeast england, and the showers will be slow—moving as well. a few sunny spells across southern scotland. where those tempers are, 12 in aberdeen and for the south this temperature is a little disappointing for earlierjuly. to the end of the week we're looking at the end of the week we're looking at the next area of low pressure moving in off the atlantic. this being the heaviest rain across the north—west of the country but it is notjust
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wet, it will be pretty windy. there may be some rain across eastern england for a time but should clear for the morning. a greater chance in the afternoon for breaks in the cloud and some sunny spells across at the seaman, the prospect of that for the north and west with the rain continuing to pour down. the week and with the prospects still dominated by low pressure. weather fronts scooting across the uk bringing rain at times, showers merging together to give lengthier spells of rain during the second half of the weekend as well. it doesn't state unsettled, this we can rain at times, often windy, often cloudy, and thus temperatures somewhere to what we have had in recent days. generally run into the mid to high teens and go 20s and warm response but it is going to stay pretty unsettled. that is your latest weather. —— low 20s.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. protests in hong kong over china's new security law, as britain offers millions of its citizens the right to live in the uk. we hearfrom people in hong kong. you just asked me, do i support hong kong independence? you are almost asking me to be in jail for over ten years. more than 11,000 jobs are cut in britain in the past 48 hours — with retail and aviation being hardest hit. there needs to be a laser—like focus on protecting jobs. so how manyjobs does
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the prime minister think yesterday's announcement will protect? we've supported huge sectors of the uk economy at a cost of £120 billion, and i'm not going to give a figure for the number of job losses that may or may not take place, but, of course, the risk is very, very serious. concern as america buys up almost the entire global supply of a drug proven to help the most seriously ill covid patients. what did the president know and when? continuing pressure on the white house over allegations russia offered the taliban "bounties" to kill us troops. experts warn of an "emotional time bomb" of delayed grief following people who have lost loved ones due to covid—19. and the man who should have been england's first black player. we report on the campaign for a statue of footballerjack leslie.
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welcome to bbc news. let's get more on that story getting real traction in the us — allegations by us officials that russia offered the taliban "bounties" to kill american troops in afghanistan. the white house insists donald trump was not briefed on the matter — despite claims it was included in the president's daily briefing in february. parents of us soldiers killed in combat are coming forward and demanding answers. becky whetstone tweeted this earlier today... beckyjoins me from little rock in arkansas. becky, welcome here to the programme. this story broke in the
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united states over the weekend. tell me first of all about your first reaction, your gut reaction, when you read it. when i read that there'd been a bounty on american lives, of course that may be feel nauseated, because that's going to motivate people to kill our soldiers and having been through that experience, i know what that means for the person who loses their lives and know it means for their families, so i medially got disgusted. you will have seen the various revelations since the weekend. we have had denials from the president that he was actually briefed, claims too, counter claims it was in his daily briefing right backin it was in his daily briefing right back in february. what do you make of the president's role here, commander—in—chief‘s role? of the president's role here, commander—in—chief's role ?|j of the president's role here, commander-in-chief's role? i would like to think that he is on top of every situation that threatens the lives of our loved ones. we need him to ta ke lives of our loved ones. we need him to take care of important
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threads immediately, so i'm thinking this man's like the captain of our ship, of america's ship, supposed to be keeping us safe and then when he says he didn't know about a bounty on american soldiers lives, i'm thinking, you're the captain of ship, that's like you taking us out on your boat and yet you're not could check the weather, look at maps or do anything to keep us out of harm's way. it's extremist —— extremely scary. -- extremely scary. does it make you angry as well? i saw that you told our producer it made you mad. 0h, yes. the thing is, anybody that loses a child, whether it's in a war oran loses a child, whether it's in a war or an accident or a murder or something like that, one of the things that rings us peace is getting justice, you know? and so if this is going on and we are not doing anything about it, there is
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good to be nojustice doing anything about it, there is good to be no justice for those people and the families are probably going to tell themselves that my child died in vain, my child's death was needless, and there was no reason for it, and so that causes us to feel rage, that it's wrong. and whatever the rights and wrongs around the intelligence briefings, in terms of the basic story now that's out there, would you like to see a more robust set of actions from this administration against russia? back in march, the president was inviting putin to the g7. russia? back in march, the president was inviting putin to the 67m russia? back in march, the president was inviting putin to the g7. it is outrageous. absolutely, it's got to be decisive, it's got to be announced that this is what it's for, and in my view, it's got to... whatever he would choose to do, it's gotta be something that would harm russia and then the next time they
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will wait it out and say, is this worth it? is it worth the retribution that's going to come afterwards ? retribution that's going to come afterwards? and so in this case, he has not done anything about it, so what would keep them from just keeping doing this and motivating people who might not be thinking, i wa nt to people who might not be thinking, i want to go kill an american today. now you've got this bounty out there that somebody needs to go make some money, so they will kill kill somebody and there's knocking to be any consequences, so i'm sure it's creating fear. not only people in the military but their loved ones who are, you know, feeling helpless. becky whetstone, thank you for taking time to speak to us. thank you, thank you! plans by israel's leadership to annex parts of the occupied west bank appear to have stalled. july 1st had been set as the date from which it could begin the legislative process. but prime minister benjamin netanyahu is still trying to build a consensus. and palestinians have warned
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it would be the absolute end of the two—state solution. the west bank has been occupied by israel since the middle east war in 1967, but after decades of talks, its final status remains unresolved. both israel and the palestinians assert rights there. israel still has civil and military control over much of the area, which you can see here in blue. 430,000 israelis live in a number of settlements and outposts built under israel's occupation. but they are regarded as illegal under international law. and in orange are the areas under varying degrees of palestinian control. the result? a complex patchwork in one of the most disputed regions in the world. diana buttu is a former legal adviser to mahmoud abbas. i asked her how dangerous a moment this was if israel goes ahead. i think it is important to keep in mind that israel has been doing this now for 53 years. the only difference between what it plans to do and what it has been doing all along
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is that they plan to make this formal. what i mean by that is that, for 53 years, we have seen israel has put into place a system of apartheid, with the construction of israeli settlements. with now 600,000 israeli settlers living in the west bank, making up about 25% of the population. these settlers have superior rights than palestinians do, and so the only difference between what is happening before annexation and now is that now, the israeli government intends to make this actually formal. but given what you just said, how much of a difference would that make for palestinians? 0n the ground, it's the exact same. the difference is not what is happening to us, the difference is what is happening worldwide. it is important to keep in mind that it is illegal to annex territory, and by agreeing to this, or by sanctioning it or allowing it to happen, the world is saying to israel
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and to other countries around the world that it is ok to take land by force. thereby undoing the international legal system. that being said, by having this plan of annexation, the other thing israel is doing is saying to palestinians, "you will never be free. you will continue to live under israel military role." in the past, israel has simply lowered the international community. what should the international community do if this time, if this goes ahead? they should be applying sanctions and enforcing israel's hands and applying economic sanctions against israel and treating israel as the pariah state that it is. the same way the world has placed sanctions when it comes to the issue of crimea, so too they should be placing sanctions when it comes to israel annexation. yet you know that will be blocked to the un route, but will you hope for a unilateral decision from the eu and from other individual countries?
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most definitely. i think that process is already taking shape. we already see many foreign ministers are talking about holding israel account and the fact we have broken the taboo and countries are starting to talk about holding israel accountable means that it is just a question of time and a matter of time before this actually happens. we mentioned that there is a stalled process, in terms of benjamin netanyahu as he tries to get consensus, but did you get the feeling that he will want to do this before the presidential election and any set a potential change in the white house come november, so there is quite a limited timeframe here where he may do this? absolutely. november 3, and saying, "i have a very limited period of time." this is a golden opportunity. they have a president in place who is not only lockstep with benjamin netanyahu but is also egging him on and i think this is where he is now saying this is the gold opportunity. he said as much.
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a final thought, because joe biden is opposed to any annexation. if there was to happen, how difficult in your assessment would it be to unpick...? once it happens, if it happens, how tricky to roll it in? i think if they went forward and place pressure on israel and start putting sanctions on them, even if annexation does not take place or if it does take place, israel will finally get the message that it cannot continue to act above the law, and so if that is a biden presidency, i'm not looking so much towards a joe biden presidency to undo things. i'm looking at the rest of the world. diana buttu speaking to me earlier. in britain, there's political controversy over the reimposition of coronavirus lockdown regulations in leicester.
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the city's the first area in the country to experience a local lockdown, following a rise in coronavirus cases. let's get a feel for how the news of that re—imposition of a lockdown is going down in leicester itself. we can speak now to billy allingham, director of the steamin' billy brewing and pub company based in and around leicester. welcome to the programme. give me an idea on the impact on your business of the reading position of these lockdown restrictions. good evening, matthew. it's a huge impact. we have had to order beer, order food matthew. it's a huge impact. we have had to order beer, orderfood in, it's a big wheel to turn, and to be told to her three days ago by the government that they knew a fortnight ago that apparently, we have got a spike in cases and we cannot open. you've got pubs inside and outside of the zone. as you were saying, so many establishments like that around the country are preparing forjuly four, presumably you were getting ready for all of that just as establishments you were getting ready for all of thatjust as establishments ever elsewhere was —— everywhere else were? -- everywhere else were? yes. we
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we re -- everywhere else were? yes. we were inside the map, some of the pubs, so we knew we were knuckle to reopen those. 0ne outside the map, in the borough... i was talking to the local authority, we are not in the local authority, we are not in the map, can we open this? they said no. we have not had guidance and it is friday it is going be published. some of your staff have been furloughed. emirate you said you brought them back, so now if you cannot reopen, but ashley happens —— mi rate you said i am i right that you said? they go back on furloughed... they got to go home again. we've got to mothball everything. all the stock, it's taken ten days to get that out, so complete u—turn.
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it's taken ten days to get that out, so complete u-turn. i get that it is frustrating navigating all of that, but given what we are seeing and dealing with, it doesn't make a difference, lockdown for a couple of weeks? does it make a difference? every day that goes by, it's another nail in the coffin of the hospitality industry, i'm afraid. 5000 hospitality industry, i'm afraid. 50 0 0 losses hospitality industry, i'm afraid. 5000 losses in train stations and airports. people's lives are changing massively. we better get back to work. it's having a huge impact. thanks for talking to us and best of luck in the coming weeks. more than 180,000 people have died in england and wales since lockdown began in march. some have died from covid, many others have lost their lives for other reasons. but restrictions have meant that very few people have been able to attend funerals and grieve. now, experts are warning there could be an emotional time
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bomb of delayed grief and, in some cases, trauma. jeremy cooke reports. the rituals and customs of death. different in every culture, refined down countless generations. but in this time, the time of covid—19, dealing with death is very different. everything's on hold. there's no closure. you're not allowed to grieve. it's been mind—blowing. it's tested my abilities. covid has kept families apart, separated the dying from the grieving. you try and sort of make the most of every minute, second that you've got with them. when we went into lockdown, obviously that was taken away from us, and we lost that precious time, didn't we? not being able to see him, that was heartbreaking.
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heartbreaking because family visits had meant everything to norman, who was in a care home, suffering with parkinson's. his five daughters remember their dad's hands as strong, his five daughters remember their dad's hands — the strong, weathered hands of a working farmer. from behind the alien barrier of ppe, paula held those hands one last time. were you able to be with your dad at the end? yeah. still hard. but he wasn't alone and... many families must‘ve found that hard because i know they've not had that opportunity, so we are grateful that they did allow us to go in and sort of hold his hand to the end. covid restrictions at a time of loss and grief run against the natural order of things, the damage described as an emotional time
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bomb. any death causes a great amount of sadness. when there are added factors involved, like absences of not being able to be with the person when they've died, not being able to view that person, then not even being able to attend the funeral, does increase that level of sadness. and for some, it will actually cause trauma. paula and her husband, mike, know all about that trauma. in the lockdown, they've both lost their dads, their sons have lost their grandads, and now mike's mum gone too. you've not grieved one and you're trying to grieve two, and then just last week... my mother—in—law‘s died. so we're now grieving three. it's all so hard. mike's mum's last journey. we are here today for virginia...
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paula and allison grieving again, another loved one gone, and reliving the pain of their dad's funeral. get there, in, out, and then that was it. you all go home afterwards. there's no sitting down, having a drink and reminiscing... having a hug off somebody. there's just nothing. is that what his life meant? is that what it come to, 20 minutes? you really want to help these families through this difficult time. it's something i'll never forget in my career, in my lifetime. i don't ever want to ever experience anything like this again. as lockdown eases, memorial services and life celebrations may help. but many are still left struggling, living with a sense that their pain and grief is unfinished business. i mean, just thinking about your kids losing three grandparents. what's it done to
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them? it's now affecting them quite badly. what effect it'll have on them further down the line, i don't know. eventually, this global pandemic will pass into history, but finding peace and acceptance could take years, even decades. the memories of loss and lockdown will never be forgotten. jeremy cooke, bbc news, 0ldham. joining me now is linda magistris, ceo and founder of the good grief trust — which represents more than 700 grief services in the uk. linda, welcome here to the programme. an incredibly powerful report there from jeremy. how would you describe the scale of what we are actually facing here? we are talking about a scene on me and we should not underestimate that term, really, because as
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you say, we've have actually got 200,000 people grieving in lockdown. that's not just those covid deaths, and it's going to have a huge impact, not only number decades down the line, so we really need to make sure that have early intervention. it's proven, we get to those people early enough, we can hopefully mitigate the impact further down the line.|j will come back to that in a moment. lockdown has will come back to that in a moment. lockd own has clearly will come back to that in a moment. lockdown has clearly completed grieving. has it magnified it as well? how was he manifesting? yes, it has — the pain, the trauma, the burden, the shock. as your report showed, not many people have been able to say goodbye properly and thatis able to say goodbye properly and that is just so unnatural. we would
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normally to a hospice and say goodbye or go to a hospital, or even in the sudden death, they may be time to say goodbye, and that has not happened and that has caused a huge impact. in terms of navigating a way through it, then, what is the advice you are giving people? as you say, the good grief trust, we have services, and tailored support is key. we need to reckon as all this people grieving at home in isolation, because many services to the acute trusts who have been absolutely desperately try to keep people alive, the community services, it's all been disrupted, so those normal logistics of getting brief into some it is not actually happening, so that's why the good grief trust is working with the department of health and government. just a brief final point, do
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you except the advice is a best guess? but we need to do is ask the briefs just to get in touch with the good grief trust. we are the umbrella charity. there are so many services, help lines, tailored for you. please do have a look. there is help today. you do not have to wait a long time. we can hope you today.|j you do not have to wait a long time. we can hope you today. i suppose flowing out of that, lots of questions about funding for those organisations as well, but linda, thanks forjoining us here on the programme. thank you. jack leslie is a football player who should have gone down in history as a hero and pioneer — but sadly, many have never heard of him. leslie was selected to play for england in 1925 but was taken out of the squad, some say because he was black. he would have been england's first black international player. fans of plymouth argyle, his main club, are starting
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a campaign to have his statue erected in the city. clive coleman has the story. jack leslie, a phenomenalfootballer. but was he denied his place in sporting history because of the colour of his skin? afine team... jack played for plymouth argyle, then in the third division in the 1920s. he's believed to be the first black player to captain a league side. here at plymouth, jack leslie scored 137 goals, at times suffering racial abuse from both crowds and opponents. but in 1925, the club manager called him into his office and gave him some thrilling news. jack leslie had been picked to play for england. it was the talk of the town. but when the papers came out some days later, billy walker of aston villa was in the team. jack was named as a travelling reserve. he never travelled. england struggled to a 0—0 draw in belfast, while jack scored twice
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in plymouth's 7—2 victory at home to bournemouth. what happened to jack has passed into family history. and then you've got the wedding picture there, which isjust lovely, isn't it? they looked so happy, didn't they? they certainly did. lovely picture. well, in those days, you didn't have the television. someone came down to watch him. they weren't watching his football. they were looking at the colour of his skin. and because of that, he was denied the chance of playing for his country. plymouth argyle has already honoured one of its greatest players in this mural and has renamed its boardroom after him. but fans want a statue of jack and a campaign is underway. we think that at a time when some statues are coming down, we want to campaign to put a statue up to celebrate jack leslie, his incredible achievements, but also to remember that historic injustice where he was denied his england cap. the last thing on my mind was me
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being the first black player to play for england. 53 years afterjack leslie's selection for the national side, viv anderson became the first black player to win a full england cap. it's incredible to get the euphoria of getting the call from the manager and saying you'd been picked for england, and then within a few days the letdown of being dismissed from the squad for the colour of his skin. it's abhorrent, really. you know, i'd never heard ofjack leslie till up to two weeks ago. and that's a crying shame, because what he achieved and what he did should be paramount in every black person's mind, you know. but hopefully the statue that we're trying to get erected will carry on his legacy. after his playing days, jack returned to his trade as a boilermaker before ending his working life in the boot room at west ham, where he cleaned mud from the boots of england stars bobby moore and geoff hurst. hardly fitting for a man who should have been remembered alongside them and now,
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perhaps, will be. clive coleman, bbc news. just time to tell you donald trump has said he would wear a mask if you we re has said he would wear a mask if you were ina has said he would wear a mask if you were in a tight situation with people. of course he's resisted so far. that, of course, after that evidence yesterday america faces 100,000 cases a date unless they get this under control. thanks for watching. 0utside source is next. —— u nless watching. 0utside source is next. —— unless they get this under hello there. for a good chunk of the uk, june was a wetter than normaljune, and that unsettled theme's continued into the first part ofjuly with no real change in the forecast. now, we've seen plenty of showers across england and wales today. you see those here on the satellite and radar picture combined, but there were some lengthier outbreaks of rain for southern counties of northern ireland, for northern england and also central and southern parts of scotland, where it turned out to be quite a wet day. now, overnight, that rain will continue to affect southern scotland, northern england, working southwards over time into north wales
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and the north midlands as well by the end of the night. all the while, it stays cloudy. it's mild, temperatures 10—14 degrees. a little bit cooler across northern scotland, where there will be occasional clear spells working in. looking at the weather charts on thursday, low pressure still with us, a couple of weather fronts working southeastwards with time. it is another unsettled looking day. thursday, we start off with rain across southern scotland, northern england, north wales, the north midlands with that rain pushing southeastwards with time. the rain will turn showery into the afternoon so some big showers for the midlands, east anglia, south east england, a bit of thunder, and the showers will be slow—moving as well given that the winds are going to be light. a few sunny spells across northern scotland. this is where the lowest temperatures are, just 12 in aberdeen and stornoway. even further south, those temperatures a little disappointing for earlyjuly. now beyond that, we're looking at the forecast for the end of the week, and we're looking at the next area of low pressure moving in off the atlantic. this one bringing the heaviest rain — and persistent rain at that — across the north—west of the country but it's notjust wet. it's also going to be pretty windy.
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there may well be some rain for a time across eastern england but that should clear through the morning. the afternoon, probably a rather greater chance of seeing some breaks in the cloud and a few sunny spells across east anglia and south east england. little prospect of that, though, futrher north and west with the rain continuing to pour down. the weekend weather prospects still dominated by low pressure. weather fronts scooting across the uk, bringing rain at times, showers merging together to give some lengthier spells of rain during the second half of the weekend as well. so, it does stay unsettled. this weekend, rain at times, often windy, often cloudy, and those temperatures similar to what we have had in recent days. generally running to the mid to high teens, maybe low 20s in the warmest spots but it is going to stay pretty unsettled. that's your latest weather. bye for now.
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hello. welcome to outside source. hundreds of people have been arrested in hong kong following protest against a new security law imposed by china. polls close in russia
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after a week—long referendum expected to submit president putin's hold

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