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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 28, 2020 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. president trump formally accepts the republican nomination ahead of the presidential vote in november, saying his opponant joe biden will be the destroyer of american greatness. your vote will decide whether we protect law—abiding americans or whether we give free rein to violent anarchists, agitators and criminals who threaten our citizens. in fear of his life — manchester united captain harry maguire gives his first interview about his arrest in greece. i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody.
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an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret? i regret being in the situation. more sports events in the united states are called off, in protest at the shooting of jacob blake. some major league baseball players join the boycott, taking to the field in new york before walking off. good morning. we have more rain in the forecast today and some thunderstorms, especially in the south, but the weather should turn drier if a little cooler through the weekend. it's friday, the 28th of august. our top story. donald trump says his democratic presidential rival, joe biden, would "destroy the american dream" and give "free rein to violent anarchists". in an hour long closing speech on the fourth day of the republican national convention, mr trump promised voters he would rebuild the us economy and claimed that a coronavirus vaccine is on its way. here's our north america correspondent, david willis.
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please welcome, if anchor a billionaire businessman that ivanka trump described as a billionaire, an outsider. the 44th president of the united states, donald trump. and the south lawn for a rousing reception for uninvited and not —— for uninvited and not socially distanced audience. donald trump's appeal coming at a time of renewed racial tension and on the day a hurricane wreaked havoc on america's gulf coast. my fellow
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americans, tonight with a heart full of gratitude and boundless optimism, i profoundly accept this nomination for president of the united states. calling the forthcoming election the most important in the country's history, donald trump called once again for the restoration or law and order in the face of protests against police brutality and racial injustice, some of which have grown violent. like richard nixon in 1968, the message to white suburban voters is clear. safety on their street is at risk and he is backing the police over the protesters. the democrat party wa nts over the protesters. the democrat party wants to stand with anarchists, agitators, rioters, looters and flag burners. that is up to them. but i, as your president, will not be a part of it. the republican party will remain the voice of the page are to carers who keep america safe and salute the ——
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the patriotic hero to keep american safe and salute the american flag. the president vowed to rebuild the economy ravaged by what he called the china virus. perversely, given his criticism of the black lead to massive protests, he made this assessment about a voting group his party is still wanting to woo. he i have done more for the african—american community since abraham lincoln. there was no mention ofjacob abraham lincoln. there was no mention of jacob lake, abraham lincoln. there was no mention ofjacob lake, the black man shotin mention ofjacob lake, the black man shot in the back by a white police officer on sunday, nor of the tramp supporting teenage vigilante charged with murdering two people who were protesting that. our north america correspondent david willis joins us now. david, how has mr trump's speech been received by voters?
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no doubt that president trump was going to be storming out of the blocks? he categorised it as the most important election in america's history, representing it as a choice between two starkly different ideologies and viewpoints, one which would uphold the so—called american dream, the other which would destroy it. and he sought to portray his democratic rivaljoe biden as a trojan horse of the radical left. himself as a protector of law and order. someone who would support white suburban voters against the ravages of looters and anarchists who have hijacked some of the black lives matter protests here. the president vehemently backed the police over the protesters, and he said that many of the police here we re said that many of the police here were noble, courageous and honourable. that of course following some protest in wisconsin over the shooting in the back of a black man,
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jacob blake, by a white police officer. thank you so much, david. the manchester united captain, harry maguire, says he thought he was being kidnapped when he was arrested on the greek island of mykonos last week. the defender was found guilty of assault and attempted bribery, but has since been granted a re—trial. in an exclusive bbc interview, he says he initially didn't believe the men who detained him were police, and feared for his life. yeah, obviously, they hit me a lot on the legs. it wasn't on my mind, i was in that much of a panic. fear, scared for my life. you feared for your life, did you? yeah, for sure, all the way through it, until i got into the prison cell, where, like i say, ifelt relief when i got there, because the guys who were in there already told me where i was. we'll hear more from harry maguire
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in a longer version of that interview in around half an hour's time. a campaign to emphasise the benefits of going back to work will be launched by the government next week. it will urge employers to reassure staff that it is safe to return, by highlighting the measures they're taking to make workplaces covid secure. our political correspondent, leila nathoo joins us now from westminster. leila, what else do we know about this campaign? good morning. ithink good morning. i think we can expect to hear a lot more encouragement next week from the government, particularly in the regional press, about going back to work, stressing the positive side of going into an office environment. it is worth stressing that this is aimed at offices, plenty of people have gone back to other workplaces already and who have been going in throughout. at the beginning of the month, we heard the work from home guidance changed to give employers more discretion in consultation with their employees about how to get
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people back in. there are big implications for the city centre are economies of people not being back in offices. and on transport reve nu es in offices. and on transport revenues as well. we have had a warning from the business group the cbi that the city centres are turning into a ghost towns. the government wants to stress the positive benefits of going back to work but there will be a lot of nervousness and for many offices, getting back to anything like full capacity with social distancing still required will be very difficult. it's unlikely we will see a return to pre—coronavirus levels of office working any time soon. the authors of the largest—ever study to examine children treated in hospitalfor covid—19 have said it is "vanishingly rare" for young people to die from the virus. the report, published in the british medicaljournal, identified which children were more likely to need critical care support, including newborn babies under a month old, young people from a black ethnic background, or children who are obese.
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our science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. this is the world's largest study of patients with covid—19. but it confirms that the overwhelming majority of those aged 19 or under don't get severe symptoms. the study looked at 70,000 patients who were admitted to hospital in the uk. just 651 were children. six of those died and all of them had serious underlying health problems. i think the most important message from this paper is that children make up a tiny proportion of severe covid in the uk and that death with covid in children is vanishingly rare. what i would like to say is that these findings are really reassuring. and, for myself as a parent, as are children's doctor and also as a scientist, i find these numbers are extremely reassuring for parents who are about to send their children back to school. the research has also found that young people with black ethnicity and those medical staff classed as obese are more likely to need extra treatment, such as intensive care.
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the findings were seen in advance by england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty. they were part of the evidence he looked at when he told parents on sunday that it is safe for children to return to school in september. pallab ghosh, bbc news. most schools in england feel ready to reopen fully next week, that's according to the national association of headteachers. around 4,000 head teachers, mainly from primary schools, told the union about their plans to manage the risks around coronavirus, including additional cleaning and staggered starts and break times. the education secretary, gavin williamson, said this should give parents confidence ahead of the new term. an urgent manhunt is under way, for a father who abducted his three sons from their foster home in south london, a week ago. the boys, who are aged six, five and three, were taken by their biological father, imran safi, a 26—year—old from afghanistan. 0ur reporter simonjones is outside new scotland yard. simon, what information have
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dectectives released? there is concern for the safety of the children? yes, the police are describing this as an intense investigation. they have had 100 officers working around the clock over the past week to desperately try and find these three little boys and their father. the abduction happened just over a week ago in south london. it was thursday of last week, around 6pm, the three boys were playing in the garden of their foster boys were playing in the garden of theirfosterfamily when boys were playing in the garden of their foster family when their foster mother said that she had some footsteps. she went to investigate and at that point, she saw the boys' father, she said he was armed with a knife, he threatened her and bundled the boys into the back of a car and they haven't been seen since. the police admit they don't know where the boys are, they fear they may have been smuggled out of the country so they are asking the public for any help.
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noor inayat khan was born into indian royalty and became a british spy during world war two. she died in dachau concentration camp, having given up none of her secrets. now, english heritage will be honouring her memory with a blue plaque, the first dedicated to a woman of indian origin, outside herformerfamily home in bloomsbury. lizo mzimba has more. it's the first time in its 150 year history that a blue plaque is being unveiled in honour of a woman of indian origin. noor inayat khan was born in moscow to an american mother and an indian father. he was a musician and teacher. the family moved first to london and then to france. she was educated in paris and later worked writing children's stories. after the fall of france in 1940, khan escaped to england, where she joined the women's auxiliary air force. two years later, she was recruited to join the special operations
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executive as a radio operator. shortly after, she returned to paris, this time to work as a spy — the first female radio operator to be sent into nazi—occupied france. after months of dangerous work, she was betrayed, arrested by the gestapo, imprisoned and tortured. she died after being shot in a concentration camp in september 19114. her plaque marks the return of the blue plaque scheme after a brief hiatus because of coronavirus. the new plaque will mark the house in bloomsbury in central london that was her family home when she left england for the last time. english heritage, which oversees the blue plaque scheme, believes that the story of her remarkable courage in the service of her adopted country is something that will serve
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to inspire future generations. lizo mzimba, bbc news. donald trump has accepted the us republican nomination to run for a second term as president, during a speech on the final day of the party's national convention. let's get more reaction to this with the former republican senator jeff flake and the former republican candidate for congress randi reed. good morning to all. maybe we can start with you, randi. early hours of the morning here, donald trump's speech a very grand surroundings, what if you think of it?|j speech a very grand surroundings, what if you think of it? i loved every minute of it. it was grand, it was over—the—top, and a little long winded at times, but it was wonderful. it was everything that we wa nted wonderful. it was everything that we wanted and more, and it was everything that the american people needed to hear. it touched on every single subject, it touched on issues that are affecting us today, issues
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that are affecting us today, issues that will affect us in the future painted a broad picture on what is to expect from for years from donald trump, and what to expect from a biden administration. people expected that because he was a more formal speech, and because he was using an auto call, that it was less trumpish, if you know what i mean, than his other speeches. was that good or bad? it depends on who you ask. there were moments where we saw the real honest trump come out, and there were moments where he was poised and read from a teleprompter like pretty much every other person did whether it was republican or democrat. he held steadfast and he was honest. it was a brilliant speech in my opinion, much more energetic and all about the people
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which it should be. he was at the people's house and he was talking for and about the people. when we introduced both of you, both republicans, randi obviously a supporter of mr trump. you, not so much, former republican senator but veering away from the party leader? yes, i'm not going to vote for the president. i frankly thought the republican convention overall was good. it showcased a lot of republicans that i think speak to what the party should be about. i didn't think that the president's speech really fit in that mould, though. it was more of a campaign speech, a little bit, well, shorter than some of his campaign speeches but there wasn't any good rhetoric whatever. it was the old gripes. so not so good. so what do you need to
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hear from not so good. so what do you need to hearfrom president not so good. so what do you need to hear from president trump to bring you back to the party in terms of voting for him? actually, some real conservatism, limited government, free trade, strong american leadership around the globe. those kind of things and themes of conservatism. that would be a departure from really the last four years. i wouldn't expect to hear that. that's why i think you have a numberof that. that's why i think you have a number of republicans who are not very excited about a second term. randl very excited about a second term. randi, pick up on the theme of what he said about the rival for the presidency, joe biden. some people possibly were expecting him to go further in his criticisms and he is very much presenting joe biden as a risk to the us. what did you make of his tone on his presidential rival? i couldn't agree more. i mean, you would have to be blind to not see what is happening in our country right now. the top ten most
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dangerous cities in the united states are democratic run and have been, and the current unrest is not happening in republican rand cities. so i'm pretty sure that the rest of america watched on tonight and still president trump paint a picture of a bleak four years under presidentjoe biden, if we can even imagine that. and i think president trump, i wholly disagree, actually, with former senator lake. i think trump delivered everything we wanted in that speech, he mentioned joe biden‘s name a0 times to point out how wrong he will be b. why is he ready to solve our world issues right now? it hasn't happened before. his track record proves that. president trump has been in
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office a7 months and he was able to prove tonight what he achieved in that timeframe. for anyone, i think, following politics, to have someone across the floor as we would say, to change parties in terms of loyalty, isa change parties in terms of loyalty, is a big thing. and it's a significant decision, especially after 18 years of experience that you have had. what was the moment, what was it that made you turn your back, effectively, on your party and voting for the rival? well, i didn't vote for the president in the last election. i've hoped that voters in arizona would want somebody who was going to be an independent, that they wanted somebody he was all in. that is the polarisation that is happening there which the president has fared far. the moment for me, in the middle of the presidents term,
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when they needed to decide when i would run again, i knewl when they needed to decide when i would run again, i knew i would have to stand on the campaign stage with the president like tonight. and as he demeaned my colleagues, look at my shoes, when he was talking about other americans in ways that just aren't right. i just other americans in ways that just aren't right. ijust couldn't do it. i think aren't right. ijust couldn't do it. ithinka aren't right. ijust couldn't do it. i think a lot of americans feel that way, i know a lot of republicans like me to. there are a number of republicans and certainly independents who are looking for something else. the democrats didn't nominate bernie sanders, a nominated joe biden and tried —— trying to paint joe joe biden and tried —— trying to paintjoe biden joe biden and tried —— trying to paint joe biden as joe biden and tried —— trying to paintjoe biden as its joe biden and tried —— trying to paint joe biden as its far left figure isn't going to work. interesting to talk to you, thank
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you very much. let's take a look at today's front pages. the times reports that health secretary matt hancock "opened a cabinet rift" by saying he cares more about how effective his employees are rather than whether they continue working from home. meanwhile the paper also says the prime ministerfaces pressure to get more people back in the workplace. the express reports that a no—deal brexit has moved a step closer, with trade deal talks on the brink of collapse. chancellor rishi sunak is also pictured at a pret a manger — yesterday the company announced it would cut 3000 jobs. the mirror leads on the manchester united footballer harry maguire who told the bbc in an exclusive interview that he was scared for his life when he was arrested in greece last week. you can catch that interview here on breakfast throughout the morning. and the new york times reports on president trump accepting his nomination to run for a second term in office. the paper also reports how "maskless
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supporters crowded close together", despite coronavirus restrictions. what have you got on the insides? no particular link between them, these couple of things. people may have seen couple of things. people may have seen these images before. in norfolk, seals have been getting very friendly with people who have been on rafts, as you can see, hitching a ride. and paddle boarding, they had been climbing on the paddle boards. has it been because it has been sunny and they wa nt to because it has been sunny and they want to sunbathe? one of the seals swa m want to sunbathe? one of the seals swam 50 miles up the waterway and has now been escorted back out to the open sea. by way of contrast, look at this, a miniature aston martin, a children's toy car, you know how much it is? for that, you will pay a0,000 —— know how much it is? for that, you will pay 40,000 —— £42,000. required, yourjoking!
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will pay 40,000 —— £42,000. required, your joking! —— will pay 40,000 —— £42,000. required, yourjoking! —— be quiet, you arejoking! does it go? does it have a working engine? yes, i think so. have a working engine? yes, i think so. a two thirds scale steering wheel, it has functional dashboard, it is battery run. how about that? 23 minutes per six. back in march, manchester united footballer, marcus rashford, shared with us his experience of relying on free school meals and food banks while growing up. he successfully campaigned for the government to allow children in england to claim free school meal vouchers during the summer holidays. since then £380 million worth of vouchers have been redeemed by schools and families. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to liverpool to see what a difference it's made. let me introduce you to three families. i'm melicia, and this is rubens. my name is mohammed and this is bilal. camilla and natalia. this is isaac, this is noah, this is ethan and i'm martin.
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and let me tell you why they want to talk. weeks before free school meals were due to end in england for the summer, this premiership footballer tweeted. .. marcus rashford made his appeal to government to continue the scheme right through the holidays, right here on breakfast. you know, what families are going through now, i once had to go through that. when i heard about the schools shutting down, that means free meals for some kids that they're not getting at school. the 22—year—old kept up the pressure. a8 hours later, the government agreed to extend the scheme. now with the holidays almost at an end, we've come to liverpool to see what impact those vouchers have had. this is the l6 community centre. this is where these families have been making the most of their summer food vouchers. just before you ring this through, can you show the cam of the voucher?
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this voucher says asda, but it depends on what you have requested, what your local supermarket is. so it could say... iceland, sainsbury‘s. whatever. but the crucial thing is? i can spend this here. it's only a £15 voucher but i get a lot more from £15. £15 worth of goods from here. they will get £30 worth of items for that £15. i am a single parent but i'm struggling a lot lately. but the school vouchers have really helped. thanks, thanks, reuben! and i think that the best thing they've ever done is brought these vouchers out, without them there is going to be a lot of families that are really going to struggle. these families are eligible because they have household income of less than £7,a00 a year, and they say this centre and these vouchers have been a lifeline. i was born in syria, i am an asylum seeker in the uk. i'm not allowed to work.
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but i do fill my time volunteering for the british red cross, the nhs. we have £35 per week per person, and it's very difficult for us. i've been a single parent for five years now. usually towards the end of the month, it's hardest. universal credit is monthly, so making it stretch for the whole month is quite difficult. i've been quite low at times. if it wasn't for places like the l6, i don't know, i'm starting to wonder where i'd be now, or if we'd be here now, together as a family. we're trying to do our best but thanks to the local support that we've been receiving, without it, i wouldn't have been able to do it by myself. it's mainly when the kids ask for things and you have to say no. exchanging the vouchers for food, itjust makes you feel like you're doing a proper shop rather than asking and begging for food. this scheme helped over1 million
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kids over the summer holidays. a campaign that helped lead to change in england, wales, scotland and northern ireland. the marcus rashford campaign... i've got to say, you know, he's a manchester united player. i know this kills you, doesn't it? it does. but i've got to admire him. thank you. you know, you don't realise what help that gives to our kids. if there's something great to come out of this epidemic, all our staff have been there, done it and got the t—shirt. yourself included? myself as well. thank you so much, families, for speaking to me, not easy, appreciate it. it's been a pleasure. thank you very much, bye—bye. you know, it's not been easy but it's not just about as, at about every other family in this situation across the country. it's about trying to give a bit back and help out. glad to do it. £15 per week per
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child for six weeks. that might not sound like much for some people. for others, it's meant the world of difference this summer. as for marcus rashford this week, he tweeted... a hint this young man's work trying to tackle child poverty isn't over yet. in a statement the government says, "we have taken substantial action to make sure no child goes hungry throughout the pandemic period, including by launching a national voucher scheme to support children eligible for free school meals while they were at home. councils are also receiving additional funding to support families who are struggling financially with the impact of covid—19, and to provide help for those who need it." you are watching bbc breakfast, still to come. we'll hear from seven—year—old caeden thompson who has cerebral palsy, and is preparing to climb more than a000 feet up ben nevis this weekend.
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we'll be discussing that shortly and bringing you the latest news. now let's get the weather with sarah. we have been covering this, some areas were flooded yesterday from really heavy rain. horrendous experiences for homeowners. yes, we had some torrential rain. good morning. yesterday, downpours really slow moving, we had flooding in parts of west lothian, hampshire and berkshire, some places so a months worth of rainfall in just a few hours. there was a lot of surface water flooding. we few hours. there was a lot of surface waterflooding. we had low pressure bringing the rain, but we didn't have the stronger winds that we re didn't have the stronger winds that were here earlier own in the week. it didn't play through quickly, it was fairly slow moving. through
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today, we could have a bit more rain. this band of rain will edge its way south. it is going to be brightening up and drying up across northern parts. further south, brightening up and drying up across northern parts. furthersouth, more heavy showers and thunderstorms. it could be quite heavy if you catch one and we will have surface water similarto one and we will have surface water similar to yesterday. the wind coming from a northerly direction and gusting more than a0 mph particularly around the coastline. feeling blustery, especially in scotland, northern ireland and feeling cold when you are exposed to the northerly wind. further south, cloud and rain lingering into this evening and overnight. particularly in the south—east of england and east anglia. low pressure will drift away as we head into the weekend.
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and then it will build in from the west. under clearing skies, cold overnight so temperatures in scotla nd overnight so temperatures in scotland and northern ireland down in single figures and feeling milder where you have breeze and cloud further south. through the day tomorrow, we will start with outbreaks of rain across the south—east of england and east anglia. they should fade. a lot of dry weather but winters gusting up to a0 mph for some. temperatures in the mid to high teens are not as warm as recently and when you add the effect of the breeze it will feel quite cold out there. and saturday night, temperatures dropping quickly. well down into single figures as we head through saturday night and into sunday. sunday, high—pressure moves in from the west. it will squeeze away most of those showers. a largely dry picture. introducing cooler air. the
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wind coming from a northerly direction and feeling fairly cool on sunday. for most looking dry with sunshine, as well. temperatures in the mid—to high teens and feeling cooler than recently. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. as children prepare to return to school in england from next week, new research by the british medicaljournal suggests young people are less likely than adults to develop severe covid—19 or die from the disease. we're joined now from leeds by gp, dramir khan. good morning. are you ok? i am good. i'm very well, thank you. never a bad thing to check in on people and with schools going back next week, there will be attention on this new report published in the british
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medicaljournal. astonishingly rare, they say, for young people to die from the virus. what do you make of it? i read that report. it does not tell us anything we already know. —— don't already know. children get very mild or no symptoms. the study says 1% admitted to hospital during the pandemic in the uk sadly passed away, which is much less than other age groups. of those who died, all of them had underlying health conditions and some of them were very severe. it is a timely publication because we are preparing in england for children to go back to school, so it should provide some reassurance to parents that children, if they get the virus, it will be mild or no symptoms only, but we still have to be vigilant and careful and children in secondary schools should be wearing masks in communal areas in particular. you
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will know from other circumstances and times that statistics may say one thing but it does not stop people worrying. i wonder how much concern you have had from parents and students about what is happening in england when schools go back? there has been a lot of concern. yesterday i spoke to a parent about... who wanted a letter for exemption for going back to school. there has been talk of finding pa rents there has been talk of finding parents if they do not send children back to school. it is all about having a dialogue with parents and children, sometimes, about their fears, getting to know why they are worried, understanding that, trying to reassure them with things like this study, and explaining what precautions have been put in to keep children safe. we want children to go back to school and know how important education is, so we have to have this open dialogue with pa rents to have this open dialogue with parents right now. back to school,
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back to work, as well. the government message about getting people back into the workplace. that presents problems for people in terms of whether they are co mforta ble terms of whether they are comfortable with that, if they think their workplace is, i think the term is covid secure. real concerns. we have to make sure employers are supported in putting policies and procedures in place to help prevent the spread of covid. there is not a mandate yet for wearing masks in workplaces, many workplaces, but general rules apply. if you cannot maintain social distancing for more than 15 minutes with another adult, consider wearing a mask. if you can work from home, that is still the advice, but if you have to go back to work, and many of us have been doing so all the way through the pandemic, but those going back to work now, talk to your employer
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about what has been put in place to keep you safe, to try to reassure you before you go back to work. ideally that is done by negotiation. but, on that theme, have you yet been asked by a patient to write something for them by way of saying my doctor says i should not be in the workplace? are there people for whom it would not be appropriate? several times. it has happened lots over the past couple of months, both for adults and now for children. it puts gps in a difficult position because this is government policy rather than medical policy. we are caught in the middle and often we talk to patients, explaining why perhaps we cannot write that letter, rather than just perhaps we cannot write that letter, rather thanjust doing perhaps we cannot write that letter, rather than just doing it, perhaps we cannot write that letter, rather thanjust doing it, and telling them this is the conversation you should have with your boss rather than with us. presumably there are medical conditions where there would be a
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reason why you should not be in the workplace. there must be circumstances it would be appropriate? there are some very vulnerable people that we would support. but it is about supporting them working from home if they can do that. that goes back to having a conversation with your boss. it is not necessarily the role of the gp to make that decision. we can support it and advised but it is not for us to make the ultimate decision. good to talk to you as always. i know you have a busy time in the next few weeks. thank you. take care. it is nice when someone tells you to take care. jane, good morning. so much interest in what has been happening with harry maguire. this exclusive interview our sports editor got with the manchester united captain has
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just been incredibly revealing. he was found guilty of assaulting police and of bribery on mykonos last week. in this exclusive interview with the bbc, he said he feared for his life when he was arrested by plainclothes officers and thought he was being kidnapped. it was horrible. it's not something i ever want to do again. i don't wish it on anybody. who do you owe an apology to? i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody. an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret? i regret being in the situation. obviously, the situation has made it difficult. i play for one of the biggest clubs in the world, so i regret putting the fans and the club through it. you appealed and you have been granted a retrial. as we've heard, that means your conviction is effectively nullified. you are now an innocent man again in the eyes of the greek law, legal system. how confident are you,
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harry, sitting here now, that you will eventually clear your name? i have great faith in the greek law. the retrial will give us more time to prepare, gather the evidence, allow witnesses into the court, and i'm really confident the truth will be told and come out. i'm strong mentally and i will come over this. how badly hurt were you? yeah, obviously they hit me a lot on the legs. it wasn't on my mind, i was in that much of a panic. fear, scared for my life. you feared for your life, did you? yeah, for sure, all the way through it. until i got into the prison cell, where, like i say, ifelt relief when i got there because the guys who were in there already told me where i was and, obviously, i was with my friend, as well, who was in
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the cell with me. so that's when i calmed down a little bit and the panic and anxiety came away from me. despite everything you've said, the facts remain, sadly, that you were found guilty of abusing and assaulting the police and of attempting to bribe them. given all that, how can you remain captain of one of the biggest clubs in the world? well, yeah, obviously, you see a lot of reports going around. it's such a huge honour to be captain of manchester united. something i'm really proud of. it's a massive privilege to play for the club, never mind to be a captain. obviously, it is not my decision to make. but one thing i will say is how supportive the club have been, from top to bottom. they have been great with me and i thank them for that. 0bviously, we've had a long, hard season, a tough season, and we wanted to get away for a break. obviously, we went out for a couple of drinks that night. i wasn't planning on going out
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every night and drinking. i am sure we would have had some great days and some great times out there in terms of chilling around the villa and going out to the beaches and things, but, like i say, i don't see myself as regretting going out there. i have been to mykonos before, i had a great time. i have been with my family before, i had a great time, so, i can't say i regret going out there. i think i found myself in a bad situation. you didn't need to be there, looking back now, was that a mistake? no, i think us footballers get a bit of stick for trying to stay away from everything, the public eye. it's not how i want to live my life. i've always been really open. 0bviously, i've seen a lot of things about security and things. i was away with my family, in couples. if somebody wanted a picture, they can have a picture. if they wanted something
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signing, i'd sign it. i didn't feel the need for that and, obviously, it has probably changed my mind on that. i was going to ask, will that make you act differently in the future? will you think twice now about being as open as that, or going back to greece in the future? no, like i said, with greece, i have nothing against greece. obviously, the few individuals who were involved on that night, i'm not putting everyone into that category, because i love greece. i grew up in that country in terms of i've been with my family time and time again. 0bviously, with the security, it's probably something i need to look into. i don't want to do it. i don't want security coming away with me. i don't feel like i should need to, but in the current climate, like you said, and things, the situation i found myself in, would it have helped? for sure. do you understand why gareth southgate withdrew you from the england squad, having initially named you,
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after hearing that verdict? yeah, i understand. 0bviously, i'm disappointed. i love playing for my country. i'm physically good, i'm mentally strong. like i said previously, mentally, ifeel like i can get over this. i'm a strong guy. i'm a strong lad. i feel more for the girls who were on the minibus and my little sister. who were suffering the most from this. but, no, i'm physically and mentally... i'm ready to play. i'm disappointed, but, of course, i understand. the appeal could take a year or maybe longer. how hard will it be to have that hanging over you? for me, i move on. i'm mentally strong enough at the moment. like i say, you probably speak to my family and they would say i'm the one best dealing with it. what sort of state are they in, then? yeah, i think my brother is a bit... a lot more of a warrior than me. but he is getting better. my dad has been great, the support that he's shown.
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it's been tough for my mum. it's been really tough for daisy. harry maguire speaking exclusively to our sports editor. sporting boycotts are increasing in the united states, following the shooting of jacob blake. more basketball matches were called off last night, with baseball, ice hockey and football games also cancelled. games also affected. the former manchester city defender, nedum 0nuoha, now plays for real salt lake — and he's expressed his anger at the club's owner for failing to back the player's protests, saying this has been a very difficult spell for him. this is as tough a time as i have seen in my career. it's a shame, because it feels like all we are trying to do is put forward a positive message, but pushback has
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has been so great, that, in some ways, it's kind of highlighting the situation that we are in. and it's very disappointing, given the platform is that we have, i think it would be a crime for us to stay silent, so we are going to do as much as we can to highlight the bigger conversations that need to happen. there have been protests at the tennis in new york too, with former world number one naomi 0sa ka refusing to play her semifinal yesterday — that match will go ahead later, though. and the draw for the us open went ahead as planned, producing an all—british tie in the first round, withjohanna konta facing heather watson in new york. andy murray will take on japan's yoshihito nishioka. and kyle edmund could play novak djokovic in the second round, if they both get through. the tournament starts on monday, behind closed doors at flushing meadows. there's another step in the return of fans to sport this evening, with murrayfield staging the first rugby match to admit supporters since the lockdown. around 700 will be allowed in to watch edinburgh take on glasgow warriors, with strict social distancing measures in place. football fans will be keen to see how it goes — they're hoping the scottish premiership will be next in line for a test event.
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murrayfield holds 67,000 so i reckon it will be all right for social distancing with just 700 inside. that seems fair enough. see you later. good morning. staggered start times, wearing masks and year group bubbles will all become a reality for children in england returning to the classroom from next week. breakfast‘s john maguire has been finding out what measures are in place for students who use public transport, and what you can expect when it comes to social distancing on the school run. the school run is almost back, but, as with everything else in 2020, it will look, feel and be very different. public transport companies have been juggling the demands of social distancing, bubbles and face coverings, all while not really knowing just how many children will turn up. in bristol, first bus will run special services
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just for pupils and, in some cases, for individual schools. we've added buses in which are specifically marked up as school buses and the route number has an s added to it, and they are specifically for those journeys. obviously, the first day is going to be challenging while everyone gets the hang of it. but once the kids have got used to it, i think that will work 0k. unlike the summer term, the majority of parents will now have no choice other than to send their children to school, but will have to decide how they get there. i've been extremely anxious about them using the transport. i know it's a necessity, because i can't physically get them all there myself. but it is concerning to myself, with us being a shielding family and her vulnerability. i'd like to know who's going to be in the transport with my second child — as to how many children she's going to have within that transport bubble —
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but i still don't know that with a week to go. the industry's trade body is working to persuade parents that children will be safe. understandable that parents may be concerned, but there's really no need for them to be. 0perators have been working hard, making sure there is enhanced cleaning in place. 0bviously, there's the face coverings that children can wear to keep themselves safe, and making sure that there are safety measures in place to protect the driver, as well. from the road to the rails, the return of school children would be the biggest step back to pre—virus life. but there are considerable and familiar challenges ahead. as with any environment, these days, whether it's a pub, a cinema, or, indeed, public transport, it's not necessarily when you're sitting down and not moving around that social distancing is challenging. it's the getting on and off, the pinch points of accessing a bus or a train. the physical safeguards are plain to see. the safety of those pupils has got to be at the top of our list. we've been carrying customers now for some time. we know how to do it in the railway industry.
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the wearing of masks, which most of the secondary school pupils will be having to wear, significantly gives that additional reassurance to customers that they can travel safely. and, of course, we've got those enhanced cleaning regimes in place and the social distancing recommendations that we're helping people follow. there are always nerves on the first day of school, but, next week, it won't be just the children who'll be anxious. it will be a major test of public transport and of public confidence. john maguire, bbc news. when 11—year—old austin began a lockdown camping challenge, he had planned to spend the whole of april sleeping in a tent in his back garden. now, more than 150 nights later, he's still going. with the help of his siblings, he's spent almost five months camping out — and even the recent bad weather hasn't stopped him. 0ur reporter suzanne hailey has been to meet him.
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11—year—old austin loves camping with the scouts. the trip was postponed because of the pandemic so he and his siblings decided to take on the camp at home challenge through april. one of my scout leaders, he challenged me to 50 nights and when i got 50 he changed it to 100 and when i got to 100 he changed it to 150. for 50 night's austin was rewarded by his scout group but they continued to camp. his sister is a brownie leader. i never planned on doing it and when i started i thought i would come in a couple of weeks at most. but the challenge is coming to an end. couple of weeks at most. but the challenge is coming to an endlj have done 150 but i will probably come in the next few days because i do not want to be out while at school. his brother is also a scout but 100 nights was enough for him. school. his brother is also a scout but 100 nights was enough for himlj got to 100 nights and i decided to
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come back in because i decided to get back to a comfy bed. it was a bit comfy but not as comfy as inside. and the camping continues whatever the weather. these kids have come through it all. it was quite rainy but otherwise fine. never anything that bad. i was not really cold, so, yeah. you are taking it in your stride. yes. sometimes it's boiling, sometimes it's freezing and rain is very loud on the tent. i have been fine apart from a damp pillow one night. on the tent. i have been fine apart from a damp pillow one nightlj on the tent. i have been fine apart from a damp pillow one night. i hate camping with a passion, which is why i always sent them to brownies and cubs and scouts. they loved camping, so off you go with somebody else sort of thing. they have celebrated every milestone but the proudest achievement is this rare accolade. the award was given but it has only
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ever been given to four or five young people. now austin is planning to go it alone and hoping to reach the six month mark. wow, that is impressive. school start next week, obviously he is going to carry on and going to school. he is good at keeping everything secure and the tent neat and tidy. very neat and tidy. we are talking about schools next week and the government encouraging people to go back into the workplace. we will speak to grant shapps the transport secretary. you saw the report about how buses and trains are coping as it stands. if you have thoughts about that and questions for grant shapps who is in charge of all transport, let us know in the usual way.
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the liberal democrats need to "wake up and smell the coffee", according to the party's newly elected leader, sir ed davey. he has been acting leader sincejo swinson lost her seat at the december 2019 general election — when the party only managed to secure 12 per cent of the vote. sir ed joins us now from westminster. i will say congratulations on winning the competition to be leader of the liberal democrats. what did you bring to the party that your rival layla moran did not? layla moran is a good friend and we fought a good contest, but i think the party liked my experience and vision. i have been in politics a while and given the liberal democrats have a real challenge. we failed in three general elections, poor results, we need to reconnect with voters and hopefully my experience will enable me to fix the problem the party house. we have a clear vision. i want a greener
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economy, fairer society, but before we talk about policies, we need to listen to the british people. that is the message they have sent us in recent elections and i want to make sure we learn those lessons. recent elections and i want to make sure we learn those lessonsm recent elections and i want to make sure we learn those lessons. if you say that is the message you have got and you need to listen, you have had and you need to listen, you have had a lot of time to listen. why do you not have policies now? surely this is the time for liberal democrats to be clear with policies. we have plenty of policies. we have never been criticised for not having policies but the question is, are we getting them over? are people hearing things relevant to them? we have been looking at policies that we feel passionately about but they may not be the ones voters really ca re may not be the ones voters really care about. that is why i talk about reconnecting. i want to make sure we listen to people, their concerns and hopes and dreams, are the ones we are talking about and responding to.
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they know if they vote for the liberal democrats they vote for someone on liberal democrats they vote for someone on their side, who will talk about the future they and their family and communities want. that is what i am talking about today. when i say wake up and smell the coffee, ido i say wake up and smell the coffee, i do not think the party has done that, we have been inward looking. i wa nt to that, we have been inward looking. i want to make sure we connect with the voters. when you say you want to be the party that shows people you have their back. how do you square that with you voting with the tories on the bedroom tax, this isjust some of them from 2010 to 2015, bedroom tax, benefit cuts and increasing tuition fees. who does that tell you have got their back? all governments make mistakes but i would say we took millions of low—paid people out of tax and put money for disadvantaged children in our schools. we almost quadrupled
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power, tackling climate change. making sure offshore wind is working. if you look at our record in local government, we are in control with others all by ourselves in 50 councils across the country and responsible for £5 billion. liberal democrats represent communities. can i stop you before you make... we have not been as strong as we need to be and not been seen strong as we need to be and not been seen by the british people as on their side and i am determined by their side and i am determined by the time of the next election people know we are their voice in standing up know we are their voice in standing upfor ordinary know we are their voice in standing up for ordinary people and we have policies that will help them and theirfamilies, particularly policies that will help them and their families, particularly at this time of covid, a national crisis. i wa nt to time of covid, a national crisis. i want to make sure people realise we have the answers when this government doesn't. when you vote for benefit cuts in trebling of tuition fees, there are two macro groups you have effectively said you have not got their back. you have
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demonstrated other policies that benefit some but these are significant groups, students and those who need help, to claim benefit, that you decided not to support. one reason i am talking about a listing exercise is to make sure we learn those lessons. do you regret those voting choices?” sure we learn those lessons. do you regret those voting choices? i want people to know we are listening to them, hearing their concerns, hearing their hopes. and as we develop our policies we fix the problems of the past and move the party forward. by the time we get to the next election in 202a, people will want to know our plans for the second half of this decade, how we will deal with the economic crisis, make sure everybody is safe in things like covid, and the crisis in ca re things like covid, and the crisis in care homes. if you put forward a positive vision of a greener economy, fairer society, caring country, on the back of engaging and listening to the british people,
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that powerful voice... listening to the british people, that powerful voice. .. you have said you are listening. i will ask you, as you are listening and we all learn through experience, do you regret those voting choices? we were ina regret those voting choices? we were in a coalition with the conservatives and it was difficult andi conservatives and it was difficult and i agree with that. we had some difficult decisions. not everything was got right. but we did a huge amount, stopping the tories cutting welfare benefits by £12 billion. introducing free school meals that the tories are now realising was a good idea. we took millions of low—paid out of tax. there are two sides to the ledger. the current government have made so many mistakes, the fact there are more deaths in our country per capita from covid than any other g7 country and the fact our economy has shrunk faster, with morejob losses and the fact our economy has shrunk faster, with more job losses than any other g7 country, shows this government has got it wrong. i want
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to make sure by reconnecting with voters and fixing problems in the liberal democrats that by the time of the next election people look to us as of the next election people look to us as the party to represent them. quick question. in 202a, currently you have 11 mps in westminster, what is your target? you will guarantee the lib dems how many mps?|j is your target? you will guarantee the lib dems how many mps? i will listen to the british people before making those predictions. look forward to it. thank you. newly appointed leader of the liberal democrats. the headlines are coming up democrats. the headlines are coming up injusta democrats. the headlines are coming up injust a moment.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. in fear of his life — manchester united captain harry maguire gives his first interview about his arrest in greece. i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody. an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret? i regret being in the situation. the manchester united defender describes the moment he thought he was being kidnapped and tried to run away. president trump formally makes his bid for a second term, saying his opponentjoe biden will be the destroyer of american greatness. your vote will decide whether we protect law—abiding americans or whether we give free rein to violent anarchists, agitators and criminals
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who threaten our citizens. more sporting events in the united states are called off, this election will decide whether we defend the american way of life or whether we will allow a radical movement to completely dismantle and destroy it. that won't happen. good morning from which one of the many places expected to be busy this weekend. —— good morning from whitstable. but not everywhere is cashing in on the staycation boom. more sporting events in the united states are called off, in protest at the shooting of jacob blake. some major league baseball players have joined the boycott, taking to the field in new york, before walking off. heavy rain yesterday because flooding to some areas, more rain
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today but it should dry up later on. full forecast in half an hour. it's friday, the 28th of august. our top story. the manchester united captain harry maguire has spoken for the first time about being found guilty of assaulting police and bribery, on the greek island of mykonos. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, the england defender says he feared for his life when he was arrested by plain clothes officers and thought he was being kidnapped. he has been talking to our sports editor, dan roan. since he left a greek courthouse on saturday, harry maguire has not been seen or heard. but finally, the united and england star has broken his silence, telling me what it was like to spend two nights in custody. it was horrible. it's not something i ever want to do again. i don't wish it on anybody. who do you owe an apology to? i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody. an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret?
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i regret being in the situation. obviously, the situation has made it difficult. i play for one of the biggest clubs in the world, so i regret putting the fans and the club through it. maguire says trouble began when he suspected his sister daisy had been attacked by two strangers. these two men approached my little sister. they said, asked her where she was from, she responded, and then my fiance saw my little sister's eyes go into the back of her head. and... she ran over, and she was fainting, she was in and out of consciousness. and... sorry. maguire says he and his friends tried to get to hospital but were instead taken to a police station where they claim outside they were attacked
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by plainclothes officers. my initial thoughts was that we were getting kidnapped. we got down on our knees, we put our hands in the air. and then theyjust started hitting us. they were hitting my legs, saying my career is over, no more football. "you won't play again." despite everything you said, the facts remain, sadly, that you were found guilty. how can you remain captain of one of the biggest clubs in the world? it's a massive privilege to play for the club, never mind to be a captain. obviously, it is not my decision to make. i have great faith in the greek law. the retrial will give us more time to prepare. gather the evidence, allow witnesses into the court. and i'm really confident that the truth will be told. we will run no longer version of
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that interview later on in the programme. “— that interview later on in the programme. —— we will run a longer version of that interview. donald trump has promised voters he will rebuild the us economy if he is elected for a second term in office. in his closing speech on the final day of the republican national convention, mr trump also claimed that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by the end of the year. he said his democratic presidential rival, joe biden, would "destroy the american dream", while addressing a crowd at the white house, who weren't social distancing or wearing face masks. here's our north america correspondent, david willis. please welcome, ivanka trump. it's been a family affair, this convention. and it fell to donald trump's daughter ivanka to introduce him on the final night of the republican gathering. my fellow americans, our first lady and the 45th president of the united states, donald trump. and onto the south lawn to a rousing reception from an invited and un—socially distanced audience stepped donald and melania trump.
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the white house, a federal building, a controversial, some say unconstitutional backdrop for a pitch of this kind. donald trump's appeal to remain here coming at a time of renewed racial tension and on the day a hurricane wreaked havoc i profoundly accept this nomination for president of the united states. calling the forthcoming election the most important in the country's history, donald trump called once again for the restoration or law and order in the face of protests against police brutality and racial injustice, some of which have grown violent. like richard nixon in 1968, the message to white suburban voters is clear. safety on their streets is at risk and he is backing the police over the protesters. the democrat party wants to stand with anarchists, agitators, rioters, looters and flag burners. that is up to them. but i, as your president,
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will not be a part of it. touting his achievements in trade negotiations, criminal justice reform and the middle east, the president vowed to rebuild an economy ravaged by what he calls the china virus. perversely, perhaps, given his criticism of the black lives matter protests, he made this assertion about a voting group his party is nonetheless still hoping to woo. i have done more for the african—american community than any president since abraham lincoln, our first republican president. there was no mention ofjacob blake, the black man shot in the back by a white police officer in wisconsin on sunday, nor of the trump supporting teenage vigilante charged with murdering two people who were protesting that shooting. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. a campaign to emphasise the benefits of going back to work, will be launched by the government next week. it will urge employers to reassure
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staff that it is safe to return, by highlighting the measures they're taking to make workplaces covid secure. 0ur political correspondent, leila nathoo joins us now from westminster. for quite a while, the government theme has been, if you can work from home, can work from home, is this a significant change? home, can work from home, is this a significant change ?|j home, can work from home, is this a significant change? i think we have already heard various messages from the prime minister trying to gently nudge people back into offices. we will hear more encouragement in the form of this campaign, positive m essa g es form of this campaign, positive messages stressing the benefit of being back at work. the official guidance of work from home changed at the start of the month to get back to work if you can. employers we re back to work if you can. employers were encouraged to have conversations about security and protection and how they can get more people in. clearly what is on the mind of ministers is the economic implications of people working from
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home, the implications on city centre businesses and on transport revenue. i think we will see a renewed push from the government, with schools getting back, they hope, in full. that might give pa rents hope, in full. that might give parents more options to go back into the office if they have childcare in terms of children being at school. clearly we have not yet seen a stampede to get back to offices. employers will have put various security protections in place. a social distancing is still required, many will not be able to operate at full capacity and for some businesses, home working has worked very well. so we are unlikely to pre—coronavirus levels anytime soon but the government clearly hopes they give a bit of a push to get more people back into offices. thank you very much, we will be speaking to grant shapps, transport secretary, and about 20 minutes. japanese prime minister shinzo abe is set to resign due to a worsening of his health, national broadcaster
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nhk is reporting. speculation about mr abe's health and tenure had risen after he made two visits to hospital recently. he has been diagnosed with the digestive disease, ulcerative colitis. the authors of the largest—ever study to examine children treated in hospitalfor covid—19 have said it is "vanishingly rare" for young people to die from the virus. the report, published in the british medicaljournal, identified which children were more likely to need critical care support, including newborn babies under a month old, young people from a black ethnic background, or children who are obese. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. this is the world's largest study of patients with covid—19. but it confirms that the overwhelming majority of those aged 19 or under don't get severe symptoms. the study looked at 70,000 patients who were admitted to hospital in the uk. just 651 were children.
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six of those died and all of them had serious underlying health problems. i think the most important message from this paper is that children make up a tiny proportion of severe covid in the uk and that death with covid in children is vanishingly rare. what i would like to say is that these findings are really reassuring. and, for myself as a parent, as are children's doctor and also as a scientist, i find these numbers are extremely reassuring for parents who are about to send their children back to school. the research has also found that young people with black ethnicity and those medical staff classed as obese are more likely to need extra treatment, such as intensive care. the findings were seen in advance by england's chief medical officer, professor chris whitty. they were part of the evidence he looked at when he told parents on sunday that it is safe for children to return to school in september. pallab ghosh, bbc news. most schools in england feel ready to reopen fully next week.
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that's according to the national association of headteachers. around a,000 head teachers, mainly from primary schools, told the union about their plans to manage the risks around coronavirus, including additional cleaning and staggered starts and break times. the education secretary, gavin williamson, said this should give parents confidence ahead of the new term. a video of two passengers being escorted off a flight at stansted airport, by officials in protective suits, has been shared on social media. the man had just boarded a ryanair plane to pisa in italy, when he received a text saying he had tested positive for coronavirus. after alerting cabin crew, the man and his travel partner were taken to an isolation area at the terminal. rya nair said both passengers were seated for only ten minutes, but the flight on wednesday was delayed by one hour and 20 minutes while seats and overhead cabins were disinfected.
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the august bank holiday weekend is upon us and it is a crucial one for britain's tourism industry. ben is at the seaside in whitstable for us. now that is looking so lovely behind you. is it habitually? —— is it a bit cold? good morning! maybe you can't see the rain! we have got rather mixed weather across the country for the bank holiday. good morning, welcome to whitstable. the pretty glorious view you might be able to see from our drone along the coast today. a busy weekend, the summer is a bit ofa a busy weekend, the summer is a bit of a wash out as far as travel and tourism is concerned as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. there is a hope this weekend could be one which helps safeguard the future for some travel and tourism businesses, certainly in the uk. a.8 million of
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us certainly in the uk. a.8 million of us planning an overnight trip this weekend. that might sound like a lot but that is down from 8 million that did so in the same time last year. so where are the winners and losers in all of this? patricia is with me, from visit britain. somewhere like this is expected to do pretty well, but the cities will lose out. yes, you can see the nervousness about using public transport and going to indoor attraction. so coast and countryside will do well, the trick is to extend the season so it doesn't end after the bank holiday but it is much quieter in the cities and the indoor attractions, which already have to limit numbers because a social distancing. how important will this weekend be for the future of the uk travel and tourism market? we know it is important to make the money to get them through winter, but this year more than ever? it is the last weekend before the schools go back so weekend before the schools go back so this is a big family weekend. if
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you think, tourism loss to the two bank holidays in may, it really crucial to get people out and supporting local businesses and spending money. thinking about another holiday in september and 0ctober, another holiday in september and october, and keep coming, to the seaside resort and going to the cities and seeing some of the jewels in the tourism crown which are actually pretty empty at the moment. give me your best guess on where we will be very busy, where one might we go to visit this weekend and where to avoid? as always, wonderfully weather dependent! you would expect the beaches will be busy and some of the national parks. so people getting out and enjoying the outdoors. thank you very much for now. stay dry. the great british weather really turning it on for us this morning. it is supposed to improve and sarah will tell us about
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that later. worth bearing in mind that later. worth bearing in mind that all of the businesses here have been contending with lockdown, with social distancing measures, and a lot of the restaurants along here are very lot of the restaurants along here are very happy to get people back this weekend. but that brings its own set of challenges. mark is the head chef at one of the oyster restau ra nt head chef at one of the oyster restaurant is just down the coast. give mea restaurant is just down the coast. give me a sense of how it has been for you. i know it's a pretty small restau ra nt for you. i know it's a pretty small restaurant and shop you have so you have been trying to adapt the business to get as many people through your doors as you can? yes, we have been unfortunate, we cannot open the restaurant because of the size of our rooms so we have had to completely diversify and adapt our business. we do take away, delivery, anything that has saved us this year, these last few months, is the hot and cold picnic boxes that we produce. again, weather dependent. you want the sun out so people can sit on the beach and eat them. so talk to me about when people are coming. a really big weekend,
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friday, saturday, sunday, monday, hopefully you will get people spending in the restaurant and shop but what happens after that? what we're finding is trend is people are not doing the week or two weeks vacation, they do three to four days so vacation, they do three to four days so monday to wednesday is quite quiet when they turn around houses but they come from thursday to sunday. the other side is we have got a lot of people travelling for the day and prepared to do a long journey back home just to get out for the day and not have to spend the money on the b&b and the kind of thing. it is different, a different model. and how difficult will this year be? when you get to december, how will you look at this year in terms of finances, how many staff you have, whether you can continue? that's the frightening part. what is going to be the projection for the year. and i think our industry could be in fora huge year. and i think our industry could be in for a huge culling, because the restaurant is not be able to do
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the restaurant is not be able to do the numbers if those two social distancing. it may not affect them now but it is what comes in february and march, they are tough months especially in a tourist town. to talk to you, good luck this weekend, particularly crucial. getting people through the doors, spending money and spending time in some of our staycation hotspot is really important this weekend. we might not be able to travel overseas but the industry trying to get out the message that there are some wonderful places in this country, weather permitting, that you might wa nt to weather permitting, that you might want to consider visiting this weekend. we will talk more about that little later. i tell you what, even if it is cloudy, it's beautiful down there, there's something rather magnificent about that skyline. we are looking at the drone shots above you right now. it is rather beautiful. he is being rained on. but still! there is a m being rained on. but still! there is a joy that sometimes as well. travellers returning
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to the uk from switzerland, jamaica and czech republic must self—isolate for two weeks from aam tomorrow morning. the government says there has been a "consistent increase" in the number of coronavirus cases in these countries. we're joined now by the travel editor of the independent, simon calder. a slight sense of deja vu here, another week and we have got some more countries that have been added to the list, tell us more. yes, as from aam tomorrow morning. switzerland, the closest you will get in the next few weeks is probably here at the swiss court in central london, the famous clock behind me. the czech republic and jamaica, also because of an accident of geography, election style is of the agenda because the only way you can the agenda because the only way you ca n a ccess the agenda because the only way you can access it —— lichtenstien because the only way you can access it unless you have your own helicopter, is through switzerland and austria both of which are on the
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list. people were given 35 hours to get where they needed to be after the gun was fired last night and the race immediately got under way. any idea of the numbers we are talking about in relation to the countries most recently announced ? about in relation to the countries most recently announced? it's not the same scale as spain or france, even as croatia. i think around 5000 british holiday—makers in switzerland, probably roughly the same number in the czech republic, mainly in the capital prague, may be a handful in lichtenstien, and in jamaica, very few actual holiday—makers but of course, it is an island with lots of connections with the uk and there will be many british citizens who are perhaps on long—stay visits to see family there. so a mixed picture, and i'm afraid, if you are injamaica and we re afraid, if you are injamaica and were hoping to get back before aam, you really haven't got any hope. the journey can only be possible via the us which brings its own problems, and you're not going to get to any
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of the us airport in time to get an overnight flight which gets you back in time. it is a sad situation for them. meanwhile, i hearstories of people racing across europe from the czech republic and switzerland. as you well know, the government has said they will make these decisions as and when this is required according to the information they have and it is a straightforward decision for them. but what about the watchlist of other countries that are possibly next in line, what we know about that? if you look at the scores, and i'm looking everyday at the european centre for disease and control, at about 11am they come out with their numbers and i have a look and see who is up and down and who is worrying. gibraltar is the obvious country which has sky—high rates, but the chief minister yesterday told the bbc, of course we do, we are pretty much testing the entire population. they have escaped again, although spain isjust across
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the border and very much on the no—go list. there is a lot of concern about portugal, which was only allowed visits from last weekend after five months. only allowed visits from last weekend afterfive months. those numbers have been increasing that they are now tailing off. people are also contacting me about greece and italy, and about turkey, and although we are seeing higher numbers than you would like, i would very happily travel to any of those tomorrow and i would be comfortable that i could stay for a fortnight without ending up having to either race back or spend two weeks in self isolation when i returned. i'm assuming in normal times there would be fewer people travelling with school starting next week, but if you are planning a trip, to any destination at the moment, what are the rules around your insurance? how can people be secure in the money they spend, given that things can change very quickly? the best bet is
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to book a proper package holiday, because we have seen the big tour operators, tui and jet2, generally when there is a no—go warning, they will not send holiday—makers and they will give you a full refund. moving into city breaks, if you go toa moving into city breaks, if you go to a travel agent, and speak to face—to—face with them, they will able to give you a good trip and give you the assurance that if anything goes awry, you will be ok to get your money back or return home swiftly. it is a really tricky picture with insurance because it wasn't designed for the possibility that you might suddenly get a thursday evening call and be told, right, you have 35 hours to get back. a messy situation, like a lot of people, i'm just picking late. i'm very hungry to travel where i can, but i'm not going to be committing more than a week or two in advance in these very uncertain times. always good to talk to you,
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thank you very much. 23 minutes past seven. housing charities, landlords, and campaigners are calling on the government to provide emergency financial help to people in england who are struggling to pay their rent due to coronavirus. more than 300,000 people have fallen into arrears since the start of the pandemic, according to the housing charity shelter. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. susan and her family have struggled during lockdown. illness early on meant isolation and time off work. sick pay wasn't enough. they couldn't afford to pay the rent and have since been threatened with eviction. it's rent. yeah, you have to pay your rent, but if you are put into a situation where you can't afford to pay it and you can't get help, what are you supposed to do? there are signs that many, many more are facing similar difficulty. research for the housing charity shelter suggests 322,000 private renters in england have fallen into arrears since the start of the pandemic in march. now, housing charities and groups
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representing landlords, letting agents and tenants are calling on the government to act. this is an unprecedented emergency and that's why we've got what i think is an unprecedented coalition of organisations, all coming together to say we have got a debt crisis here, a rent debt crisis, as a result of the pandemic that means that, unless the government act, unless the government provides this emergency funding, we are going to see a severe increase in homelessness. the group say those claiming benefits should get grants to help pay their rent. others could take out interest—free loans, similar to a scheme in wales. an estimated total cost of £270 million. the majority of landlords in this country own only one or two properties and they aren't big companies who are able to manage the risk of severe rent arrears building up over a number of months.
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so these are the kinds of people who really can't afford to continue sustaining the lack of income that they have. the government says it has taken unprecedented action to support renters during the pandemic by banning evictions, preventing people getting into financial hardship and helping businesses to pay salaries. campaigners hope they'll go further. for susan and others struggling to pay, the risk of losing their home remains. jonathan blake, bbc news. you are watching bbc breakfast, still to come... this is verity conroy and her miniature dachshund elvis. they started marathon running during lockdown after verity was diagnoised with a rare form of breast cancer. they'lljoin us later to explain why, for them, exercise is one of the best medicines.
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and a cuddle! that is lovely. we'll be discussing that shortly and bringing you the latest news. now let's get the weather with sarah. lovely to see you. we saw in whitstable, a little bit of cloudy and raining, but still looked gorgeous. yeah, not too bad. we should see some sunshine around, but still a fairly unsettled story. yesterday we had a lot of heavy rain. this was taken by one of our weather watchers in bournemouth, and there were similar pictures across other parts of southern england and central and southern scotland. some people were rescued from their homes in parts of west lothian. the really heavy downpours there, they were slow—moving. today some will see further outbreaks of rain, and some of us will see scenes like this. this is devon, some blue sky there. the radar picture shows where you are going to wake up with a soggy
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start, particularly the far south of scotland, northern england, northern ireland, fairly persistent rain. that will sink through the day so it will dry that will sink through the day so it willdry up that will sink through the day so it will dry up from the north. further south, some sunshine but also some heavy and potentially thundery showers cropping up. torrential downpours, hit and miss, showers cropping up. torrential downpours, hitand miss, if showers cropping up. torrential downpours, hit and miss, if you catch one, could be some hail mixed in. the other feature of the weather today will be the northerly wind starting to develop, so strong gusty winds especially around exposed coasts, after a0 miles an hour. that will make things feel quite chilly. despite the sunshine, temperatures in the mid teens, feeling cool in the breeze. further south, in the mid teens, feeling cool in the breeze. furthersouth, outbreaks of rain into the evening hours. 0vernight, that will ease for most places as this area of low pressure pushes towards the east and we see higher pressure building in from the atlantic. first thing saturday morning, under clearer skies, a chilly start to the day, across
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northern part of the uk. enough of a breeze and showers to keep things frost free. the showers could linger in east anglia but they will clear away to the east. for most of us, not a bad day, some sunshine but you will notice these fairly strong gusty northerly winds. they will make things feel rather chilly on saturday. cooler than it has been, temperatures mainly in the mid—teens, possibly 18 degrees in the warmest spots. saturday night, if you are out camping, you might wa nt to ta ke if you are out camping, you might want to take an extra blanket because it will be quite chilly. low single figures for scotland, northern ireland, northern england. an area of high pressure is building through sunday so that means things will turn a little bit less windy through the day. we still have a keen northerly breeze blowing through eastern coast of england, one or two showers, most places looking dry so a decent day with one or two sunny spells. quite a bit colder than recently with temperatures for all of us in the mid—teens on sunday. mainly dry,
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fairly breezy, the wind slowly easing through the course of the weekend and for many of us, things are set to remain dry into monday. more than half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. schools in england reopen fully next week and the government is also encouraging workers to return to their offices, but is the transport network prepared for it and how can pupils and commuters all stay safe? we're joined by transport secretary, grant shapps. good morning. it is an important question and in theory there could bea question and in theory there could be a major jump question and in theory there could be a majorjump in the amount of young people and people going to work next week. is the transport system safe, secure and capable? work next week. is the transport system safe, secure and capable7m is obviously not without its challenges but we are ramping it up so challenges but we are ramping it up so that the transport system will be
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back and in particular putting on additional coaches bespoke for school children in many cases. it is worth mentioning when schoolchildren come back every year, there are usually two or three days when the new routes children are taking, often changing schools, take their time to work out and that will be no different but we will be prepared for it this year. from tuesday onwards till the middle of the month, various school start coming back. have you been on a train lately? yes, i have. when was that? igoon lately? yes, i have. when was that? i go on then all the time. in my job, as you can imagine, i go on them a lot. what i tend to find, in london they are busier, up to a0%, 50% of where they were. 0ut london they are busier, up to a0%, 50% of where they were. out of town, they tend to be less busy. i live by a station where trains are still pretty empty. my children will take
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a train to school on tuesday. the key thing is to ensure there is sufficient social distancing with the one metre plus which there will be, certainly online is outside of london. we are encouraging children in particular to go back, active transport, walking and cycling as well. you will know if you have been on trains recently that on longer journeys, train managers check numbers on the train and try to stick to a certain number relative to the full capacity of the train, about the number they are advised should be on the train. are you issuing official guidance to the train network about what percentage of the train can be full? the guidance makes clear to the operators, train companies, about the measures they should take as you described and also to passengers
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about how to best be safe on the journey. is that guidance changing? all we are hearing is you are encouraging more people to use the transport system and say it is safe and you can be safe on the system, but if you are saying the numbers of people, how full the train will be, if you are not putting guidance around that, the one metre distancing is purely notional because it cannot happen in practice. at the moment the trains, all public transport is very much underused, probably about one third the usual level. we think with the guidance that was updated just before the summer that there is capacity for more people on public transport. in addition, what we have done with schools is to ensure there is new guidance which was recently published for school specific transport which has slightly
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different rules to ensure for example bubbles and year groups, that sort of thing can happen, so stu d e nts that sort of thing can happen, so students can travel together. between all of those different measures, we think we have the right balance. i will not pretend it is straightforward. everyone knows the restrictions this virus is brought to bear. we will be watching it carefully next week. 0ften, to bear. we will be watching it carefully next week. often, the first few days of school when more people are using public transport, partly because parents tend to go back to work when children are in school, that does tend to create pressure and we will watch that carefully a nd pressure and we will watch that carefully and look to in some cases run additional services where we see those problems bubble up. run additional services where we see those problems bubble upm run additional services where we see those problems bubble up. it is confusing. you seem to be saying a train service, they need as an operator to have the one metre distance in place, but you want the train to be what, 50% full? those
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two things cannot exist at the same time. it is not quite as straightforward as that because there are lots of types of public transport. trains, buses and different types have different capacity constraints and we realise common sense tells you there will be occasions when people need to walk past each other closer and mitigating factors like wearing a face covering which is compulsory on public transport. and also ensuring things like if you are not face—to—face, be back to back, side by side. and the main thing like making sure your hands stay away from your face and you maintain as much space as possible, carry hand gel, those types of things are important. as so often through this crisis, we look to people to use common sense. we are putting additional help in place, for example, people to help guide when
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you get to public transport, about how full the platform is in those types of things. and again, i repeat, the ask that if people can ta ke repeat, the ask that if people can take alternative forms of transport, politically active transport, walking the last mile, cycling a couple of miles, those things really help. most journeys in couple of miles, those things really help. mostjourneys in this country outside london are less than three miles. matthew got in touch under question for you, he says on a recent journey that people question for you, he says on a recentjourney that people gradually took off theirface recentjourney that people gradually took off their face coverings as the journey went on until most were not wearing them. he asked what is the point in rules if they are not in force ? point in rules if they are not in force? which leads to the question, how many people have been fined for not wearing face coverings on public transport? over100,000 people have been stopped and reminded. aa00
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people have been prevented from boarding public transport. and hundreds have received fixed penalty notices. hundreds. do you know the number? i have a number from the 16th of august that was 356 with fixed penalty notices but that is a couple of weeks out of date. the numbers come in in retrospect from the police etc. but since that time, we have put in place a scheme where fines have doubled and they can go up fines have doubled and they can go up to £3200. although they start at £100, repeat offenders... they would be in difficulty. not everybody is required to wear a mask. there can be medical reasons so when you look around, there may be people who cannot wear a mask and that is quite proper. by and large, i'm interested in your viewer's comments because by and large, both from surveys carried
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out and also from studies of footage on public transport, the rate of compliance is very high, upwards of 90%. some people do not have to wear them so that percentage could be higher. where people have concerns, they should get in touch particularly with the operating company and by all means contact me. we will make sure there is additional enforcement on those lines and try to send people to the right place to check it out. most people are complying. i stood outside manchester piccadilly a cup of of weeks ago and every single person who walked —— a couple of weeks ago and every person walking into the station was wearing a face mask. we understand a new government message is coming out the beginning of next week. maybe you can clarify if it is official policy, saying people should go back into their workplace if they can. is that a
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clear and defined change of position for the government, who have been saying work from home if you can.“ this a complete change? broadly speaking. we are in a situation where thanks to the unbelievable ha rd where thanks to the unbelievable hard work of everyone in this country, we have the rate of infection down, we are about 11 cases per 100,000. clearly we have seen cases per 100,000. clearly we have seen hospital admissions and fatalities fall dramatically. we have to keep a lid on that. we absolutely believe we have to keep working, but we have data to be able to do that through local lockdowns if required. yes, by and large, where it is possible, people can now return to work, it is safe to do so and the employer should have put in covid friendly, or unfriendly i suppose you could say, measures to make sure people can work safely from their office. because there are things impossible to do from home
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over zoom videos, as we are doing now. gradually now people will start to return to the office but i suspect we will see more flexible working than in the past and it will be for employers and employees to work out the right balance in their particular cases. do you back someone particular cases. do you back someone whose employer says, i want you back, ithink someone whose employer says, i want you back, i think we have a covid secure workplace, and that employers says, i do not feel comfortable doing that. people might be fearful they could lose theirjob as a result. what would you say in a circumstance like that? the easy a nswer circumstance like that? the easy answer is to negotiate, but what if it goes beyond that point, they say you need to be here, and you say i'm not happy. if someone has a legitimate concern, that would clearly be sparked by feeling their employer has not done the correct things to make the employment place covid secure. in which case, the
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employee has options with the health and safety executive, and we have funded them additionally in order to look after these cases. the local authority would be another place to turn. by and large, we typically find employers have worked hard, a bit like schools over the summer, putting in measures to make them covid secure. usually it will be ok to return, unless someone is in a vulnerable state, there is no reason not to return. i think! am vulnerable state, there is no reason not to return. i think i am talking to you from your home and we have done that quite a bit. what is your department looking like in whitehall? how many people are there? described the workplace and is the message being sent to them to get back in? we are encouraging people back now and we have done a lot of work on the workplace at the department to make it covid secure.
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is there anyone there? is it open plan, if! is there anyone there? is it open plan, if i look at your workplace, what percentage is working in the department currently? my department happens to be having renovation work done so parts of it are closed off, nothing to do with coronavirus, but we encourage people back. at the height of the disease there were four, five people in the building, when everybody was asked to stay—at—home and the department complied with it. now you will find each floor has a buzz about it. and from next week as well in common with the rest of the country, more people will be coming back. it does look quite different and it does create changes and limitations, but talking to colleagues at the department, a lot of people enjoy being able to see each other again and have conversations in covid secure but face—to—face way. i think
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there are advantages to the working environment but it is a gradual process and i recognise that. thank you. we have an exclusive interview with the england defender harry maguire. it is something jane is looking at and comes after his arrest and charges in mykonos last weekend. yes and incredibly eventful week for harry maguire. maguire says he's thankful for the suppport of his club, manchester united, after the traumatic events in an exclusive interview with the bbc, he told sports editor dan roan that he feared for his life when he was arrested by greek police, and he thought he was being kidnapped. united have said he's likely to remain as their captain this season. it's such a huge honour to be captain of manchester united. it's something i'm really proud of. it's a massive privilege to play for the club, never mind to be the captain. but one thing i will say is how supportive the club have been,
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from top to bottom. they have been great with me. and, obviously, it has been such a difficult time. my main focus is obviously family. but the next best thing to my family is football. so, playing for manchester united, like i said, is something i love. the shooting ofjacob blake has sparked more sporting protests in the united states, with basketball, football, ice hockey and baseball matches called off. american football is in full practice mode, with the season starting in two weeks — but the tennessee titans cancelled their latest session in solidarity. we had a lot of powerful discussions. guys spilled out their emotions, guys teared up, and we had a lot of constructive conversation. but as we went to our team meeting, with the entire team, we felt, as players, and as an entire organisation, that it was right to not practise today. we feel that with all the recent events that's happened
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in our country, not onlyjust this year, not only the past year, but the past hundreds of years, we decided that it's time to take a stand. more on that story on the bbc website. around 700 rugby supporters are being allowed into murrayfield stadium for the pro1a meeting of edinburgh and glasgow warriors this evening. it's part of a pilot looking into how best to allow fans to safely return to watching live sport. injuly, a test event held at the oval cricket ground hosted 1,000 spectators as part of a friendly between county championship sides surrey and middlesex. while earlier this month in sheffield, around 300 fans attended the crucible theatre to see ronnie 0'sullivan claim victory in the final of the world snooker championship. we're joined now by dominic mckay from scottish rugby and by edinburgh fans darren coutts and anna healy, who'll be heading
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to the match later . if we can start with you, dominic, can you explain what the experience will be like for fans going to the match? what measures are in place to ensure safety? we are pleased to be working with the government closely to put this event on this evening for scottish rugby fans and the events industry in scotland. it will bea events industry in scotland. it will be a different experience for supporters. we pride ourselves on a special match day experience but tonight is about a safe environment for supporters. we are working with them in advance, sharing messaging, making sure they have the information to be safe and secure and when they come to the stadium we will make sure they have an experience without contact throughout. we are selling tickets to people in household groups. when they come in they will use hand sanitiser, go to their seat and sit
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infamily groups. sanitiser, go to their seat and sit in family groups. unfortunately, the seats around them, two metres distance, will be tied back so they cannot move around. but the focus is on the game and the match itself. anna and darren are from the same household but this is your first live rugby match. you have picked quite a match to go to for your first time. do you have any concerns about going? not at all, i feel totally safe about it. there are good measures in place and i am looking forward to it. darren, you area looking forward to it. darren, you are a season ticket holder. how pleased are you to be going back to watching live sport? absolutely delighted, it has been a long time coming. february was the last time i was in murrayfield. so excited for the game against our old rivals glasgow. really looking forward to
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it. dominic, this is a test event. all eyes will be on you. it is a responsibility on your shoulders if, for example, hopefully not, there we re for example, hopefully not, there were a spike and it was traced back to murrayfield. have you worked with the scottish government to ensure that doesn't happen? yes we have been proud to work closely with the scottish government from the first minister to the sports minister and all the way through. we have a detailed plan we worked up with them. we have shared it with public health scotland. the key thing tonight, is making sure it is safe for all supporters to come along and have a great experience and then to reflect on that and see if there is anything to learn so we can improve for the next event. and we hope to have a new event with gradually larger crowds. will you be using track and trace? absolutely. everyone coming this evening, we
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will have contact details to make sure if there are issues, we will share the details with the government so share the details with the government so we can share the details with the government so we can trace in line with government policy. darren, how are you feeling about the fact there will not be many fans there when you are used to a big atmosphere like at this derby? it is a test event and notjust for this derby? it is a test event and not just for rugby, it this derby? it is a test event and notjust for rugby, it is this derby? it is a test event and not just for rugby, it is for all stadium sport. i suppose there is some form of responsibility for everyone who goes tonight. i am in the rugby fans group we started up a few years back and is going strong. everybody has a sense of, we will make this work, not just for rugby but sport in general. there is a sense of responsibility. we understand covid has racked sport across the land and we just want to
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make it work and hopefully a great event tonight leads to another great event tonight leads to another great event and we can get back to watching rugby live. darren and anna, thank you, and also dominic mckay from scottish rugby. enjoy the match. that kicks off later this evening at 7:30pm at murrayfield, capacity 67,000, but only 700 fans go again so it will be socially distance. 0n distance. on some sports they have been doing sound effect crowd noises. do you think they will use the real sound of the 700? 0r blending the normal sound? for anyone watching that, there has a lwa ys for anyone watching that, there has always been an option to go to a different channel where you do not have the fake crowd sound and personally i have chosen that because it does sound a bit piped in. it is more interesting to hear what the players are saying on the pitch to each other.
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you do hear a lot of individual voices. yes, which has led to apologies for not particularly nice language, at times. shocking that happens in a competitive environment! thank you. when seven—year—old caeden was born 12 weeks premature and diagnosed with cerebral palsy, his family were told it was unlikely he'd ever be able to walk. this weekend, he is preparing to climb ben nevis, the tallest mountain in britain, as he tries to raise funds for the charities who have helped him along the way. caeden and his mum lisa join us now. good morning to you both, how are you? we are good, thank you. morning. tell us where you are. you are getting ready and in preparation made for climbing ben nevis. we are at ben nevis, this is what is behind us now. such a lovely thing to wake
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up us now. such a lovely thing to wake up beside. caeden, how are you feeling about it? are you looking forward to? i am looking forward to it. but i don't think i can do it. why, you have done so much, so far. why, you have done so much, so far. why do you not think you can do it? it is hard work, isn't it? we have done lots and lots of training lots of big walking, lots of muscle building, and we are going to smash it. two things, climbing ben nevis are not easy, doing an interview is not easy, either. caeden, iwant are not easy, doing an interview is not easy, either. caeden, i want to know some basic stuff, 0k? not easy, either. caeden, i want to know some basic stuff, ok? i want to know some basic stuff, ok? i want to know what you have been eating to
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make sure you have enough energy. have you had breakfast yet? no? mum, what is going on? have you been eating more food to make sure you have plenty of energy? talk me through what you have been eating, caeden. we are going to have chocolate cereal for breakfast. that isa chocolate cereal for breakfast. that is a special treat because chocolate cereal is a good treat. we have porridge with us. all things that will give us energy to walk up. we have protein bars to carry and fruit to have along the way. take it from me, porridge is very good. do not pull that phase about borage! porridge is good. when you are doing your training porridge is good. when you are doing yourtraining and porridge is good. when you are doing your training and you are going for the big climb tomorrow, what is the thing that keeps you going? what do you think about that helps you? what do you think about? you have a think
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about that. lisa, what keeps caeden going? support and encouragement. and actually donations coming through have been so amazing, every single one, caeden is reading the comments people leave and the encouragement and support, and it is overwhelming. if you can imagine, being seven, going through this and have the support he is getting, is a massive deal. hence being closed in this morning. this is not his natural state! lisa, there is no harm at all, it is not unusual for anyone to be slightly uncomfortable in front of the camera. it is lovely seeing caeden, anyway. talk to us about the local nhs you are raising money for, and the relationship you and yourfamily money for, and the relationship you and your family have money for, and the relationship you and yourfamily have had money for, and the relationship you
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and your family have had with that and your family have had with that and also raising money for the charity scope. since birth it has been a rough ride. we have had so much help and support, it is indescribable. for caeden to be as he is today, and he is super enthusiastic, to constantly keep going, doing an event like this might seem like a massive push, but when i spoke to his physiotherapist, she said it was good because it will encourage him and help his muscles, so encourage him and help his muscles, so this might not be the first. there might be more to come, because it will help him. lisa, you are an example of a mother i assume is as determine. caeden has to get it from someone determine. caeden has to get it from someone to be able to do something like this, determined to do everything and give caeden every opportunity to do what he wants, despite being told he would not
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walk. what has driven you, what drives you and caeden? he drives me andi drives you and caeden? he drives me and i think actually he drives the family, as well, because he has so much positivity. he is usually very bubbly. it is early. ithink much positivity. he is usually very bubbly. it is early. i think we are passionate, as a family, the skies the limit. there is never an end. you can always be better and push yourself further. what a good note to finish on. how was the night under canvas? did you sleep all right? it was a good sleep, wasn't it? we wish you the best. tomorrow is the big day. eat well, prepare, and we have faith you will do it. good luck. thank you so much. give usa good luck. thank you so much. give us a big way. goodbye, good luck. goodbye. i am usually perky while
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doing this programme, but i saw caeden leaning into his mum, that tired cuddle, that is a lovely thing. he is saving his energy. that isa thing. he is saving his energy. that is a significant achievement. good luck. they have scenes at ben nevis, this is whitstable this morning. ben is there. he is talking about tourism and travel. he is enjoying the views. we thought we would share them before we talk to sarah, who will bring you a car going through very deep water on the road. why are you bringing us that? good morning. this picture was taken yesterday and many parts of the country had heavy rain yesterday. this was bournemouth, big puddles, lots of surface water and flash flooding around. not only in southern england but in northern ireland we had a lot of surface
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water and scotland, west lothian had significant flooding yesterday. today, we have more of the same with heavy downpours, but not for everyone. and there will be sunshine. for many it is a bank holiday weekend and the weather should improve over the next days. a bit of blue sky this morning but also outbreaks of rain. this from the past few hours shows where it has been raining. across southern scotland, northern england, northern ireland, a persistent band of rain. it will shift south, so drying up from the north. to the south of the raina mixture from the north. to the south of the rain a mixture of sunshine and heavy showers. this afternoon, they could be thunder and hail mixed in with the showers. we have these gusty, northerly winds. up to a0 mph along the coast. we could see 18—19 in the
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south—east. but watch out for heavy showers and thunderstorms. rain lingers across east anglia and the southeast overnight with most other places seeing clearing skies because we have high pressure building in and that is squeezing away rain of the past couple of days. saturday morning, most places looking largely dry, a chilly start in some northern areas. rain in east anglia and the south—east hanging around, which should slowly clear. most places, not a bad day with sunshine around. a keen northerly breeze will take the edge of the temperatures. feeling cooler than recently so most in the mid teens on saturday and when you add the effect of the northerly wind, it will feel a little colder than that. but sunshine to compensate. clear skies, so sunshine to compensate. clear skies, so if you are camping, an extra
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blanket, because temperatures will be in the low single figures in parts on sunday morning. high pressure building from the west should keep things dry and settle through the day. less breezy on sunday compared to the next couple of days. sunshine around, but temperatures feeling cooler than recently. the headlines coming up next. good morning and welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... in fear of his life — manchester united captain harry maguire gives his first interview about his arrest in greece. i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody. an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret? i regret being in the situation. the manchester united defender says he thought he was being kidnapped and tried to run away.
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president trump formally makes his bid for a second term, saying his opponantjoe biden will be the destroyer the manchester united defender says he thought he was being kidnapped your vote will decide whether we protect law—abiding americans, or whether we give free rein to violent anarchists and agitators and criminals who threaten our citizens. good morning from whitstable, which is expected to be pretty busy this weekend with the bank holiday, but not everywhere is cashing in on the staycation boom. i will explain why a little later. more sporting events in the united states are called off, in protest at the shooting of jacob blake. some major league baseball players join the boycott, walking off the field in new york, leaving behind a black lives matter t—shirt. it's friday, the 28th of august, our top story... the manchester united captain
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harry maguire has spoken for the first time about being found guilty of assaulting police and bribery on the greek island of mykonos. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, the england defender says he feared for his life when he was arrested by plain clothes officers and thought he was being kidnapped. he has been talking to our sports editor, dan roan. since he left a greek courthouse on saturday, harry maguire's not been seen or heard. but finally, the united and england star has broken his silence, telling me what it was like to spend two nights in custody. it was horrible. it's not something i ever want to do again. i don't wish it on anybody. who do you owe an apology to? i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody. an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret? i regret being in the situation. obviously, the situation has made it difficult. i play for one of the biggest clubs in the world, so i regret putting the fans and the club through this.
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maguire says trouble began when he suspected his sister, daisy, had been attacked by two strangers. these two men approached my little sister. they asked her where she was from, she responded, and then my fiancee fern seen my little sister's eyes go into the back of her head, and, she ran over and she was fainting, she was in and out of consciousness, and, sorry... maguire says he and his friends tried to get to hospital, but were instead taken to a police station, where they claim outside they were attacked by plainclothed officers. my initial thoughts was that we were getting kidnapped. we got down on our knees, we put our hands in the air.
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and then theyjust started hitting us. they were hitting my legs, saying my career is over, no more football. "you won't play again." despite everything you've said, the facts remain, sadly, that you were found guilty. how can you remain captain of one of the biggest clubs in the world? it's a massive privilege to play for the club, never mind to be the captain. obviously, it's not my decision to make. i have great faith in the greek law. the retrial will give us more time to prepare. gather the evidence, allow witnesses into the court. and i'm really confident that the truth will be told. we'll be speaking to our sports editor, dan roan, in around half an hour, who has more detail on what harry maguire had to say during that exclusive interview. transport secretary grant shapps has admitted that more people using buses and trains as they return to work from next week isn't without its challenges.
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the government is urging all employers to reassure staff that it is safe to return, by highlighting the measures they're taking to make workplaces covid—secure. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo joins us now from westminster. leila, what else did mr shapps have to say? he did have quite a bit to say, i think what we are hearing from government is really another push to try and reassure people that it is safe to try and go back to offices, that there are protective measures in place. clearly, ministers are mindful of the economic impact of not having people, by and large, backin not having people, by and large, back in offices in city centres. of course, many other workplaces are fully operational and there have been people going into other workplaces throughout, so this is clearly aimed at office workers, primarily. what we are going to see from the government next week is a bit more of a campaign in the
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regional press mostly, trying to stress the positive aspects of going into the office. this is what the transport secretary, grant shapps, had to say. by and large, where it's possible, people can now return to work, it is safe to do so, employers should be putting in covid friendly, or covid unfriendly, i suppose we should say, measures which can make sure that people can work in their offices. people can work from home with zuma videos as we are doing now, but gradually, people will now start to return to the office but i will expect to see more flexible working and we have seen in the past and it will be for employers and employees to work out the right balance in their particular cases. interesting to hear that acknowledgement that ultimately, the decision is one for employers, despite all the encouragement from the government. because of course, with social distancing measures still required in most workplaces, it will be very difficult for
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offices to return to full capacity full—time, and many businesses will have found that homeworking might have found that homeworking might have worked very well and they might have worked very well and they might have rethought their entire operation. so i think we are unlikely to see a complete return to normality anytime soon. but clearly ministers are mindful of the economic impact, with schools now going back, they think this is the right time to give another push. leila nathoo, thank you very much. donald trump has promised voters he will rebuild the us economy if he is elected for a second term in office. in his closing speech on the final day of the republican national convention, mr trump also claimed that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by the end of the year. he said his democratic presidential rival, joe biden, would "destroy the american dream", as he addressed a crowd at the white house. critics have raised concerns about social distancing at the rally. here's our north america correspondent david willis. please welcome, ivanka trump. it's been a family affair, this convention. and it fell to donald trump's
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daughter ivanka to introduce him on the final night of the republican gathering. my fellow americans, our first lady and the 45th president of the united states, donald trump. and onto the south lawn to a rousing reception from an invited and un—socially distanced audience stepped donald and melania trump. the white house, a federal building, a controversial, some say unconstitutional backdrop for a political pitch of this kind. donald trump's appeal to remain here coming at a time of renewed racial tension... i profoundly accept this nomination for president of the united states. calling the forthcoming election the most important in the country's history, donald trump called once again for the restoration or law and order in the face of protests against police brutality and racial injustice,
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some of which have grown violent. like richard nixon in 1968, the message to white suburban voters is clear. safety on their streets is at risk and he is backing the police over the protesters. the democrat party wants to stand with anarchists, agitators, rioters, looters and flag burners. that is up to them. but i, as your president, will not be a part of it. touting his achievements in trade negotiations, criminal justice reform and the middle east, the president vowed to rebuild an economy ravaged by what he calls the china virus. perversely, perhaps, given his criticism of the black lives matter protests, he made this assertion about a voting group his party is nonetheless still hoping to woo. i have done more for the african—american community than any president since abraham lincoln, our first republican president. there was no mention ofjacob blake, the black man shot in the back
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by a white police officer in wisconsin on sunday, nor of the trump—supporting teenage vigilante charged with murdering two people who were protesting that shooting. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. japanese prime minister shinzo abe is set to resign due to a worsening of his health, according to reports by the national broadcaster nhk. speculation about mr abe's health and tenure had risen after he made two visits to hospital recently. the authors of the largest ever study to examine children treated in hospitalfor covid—19 have said it is "vanishingly rare" for young people to die from the virus. the report, published in the british medicaljournal, identified which children were more likely to need critical care support, including newborn babies under a month old, young people from a black ethnic background, or children who are obese. back in march, manchester united footballer, marcus rashford,
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footballer marcus rashford shared with us his experience of relying on free school meals and food banks while growing up. he successfully campaigned for the government to allow children in england to claim free school meal vouchers during the summer holidays. since then, £380 million worth of vouchers have been redeemed by schools and families. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to liverpool to see what a difference it has made. let me introduce you to three families. i'm melicia, and this is reuben. my name is mohammed and this is bilal. camilla and natalia. this is isaac, this is noah, this is ethan and i'm martin. and let me tell you why they want to talk. weeks before free school meals were due to end in england for the summer, this premiership footballer tweeted. .. marcus rashford made his appeal to government to continue the scheme
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right through the holidays, right here on breakfast. you know what families are going through now, i once had to go through that. when i heard about the schools shutting down, that means free meals for some kids that they're not getting at school. the 22—year—old kept up the pressure. a8 hours later, the government agreed to extend the scheme. now, with the holidays almost at an end, we've come to liverpool to see what impact those vouchers have had. this is the l6 community centre. this is where these families have been making the most of their summer food vouchers. just before you ring this through, can you show the camera the voucher? this voucher says asda, but it depends on what you have requested, what your local supermarket is. so it could say... iceland, sainsbury‘s. whatever. but the crucial thing is? i can spend this here. it's only a £15 voucher but i get a lot more from £15. £15 worth of goods from here. they will get £30 worth
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of items for that £15. i am a single parent and i'm struggling a lot lately. but these school vouchers have really helped. thanks, thanks, reuben! and i think that the best thing they've ever done is brought these vouchers out, without them there is going to be a lot of families that are really going to struggle. these families are eligible because they have household income of less than £7,a00 a year, and they say this centre and these vouchers have been a lifeline. i was born in syria, i am an asylum seeker in the uk. i'm not allowed to work. but i do fill my time volunteering for the british red cross, the nhs. we have £35 per week per person, and it's very difficult for us. i've been a single parent for five years now. usually towards the end of the month, it's hardest.
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universal credit is monthly, so making it stretch for the whole month is quite difficult. i've been quite low at times. if it wasn't for places like the l6, i don't know, i'm starting to wonder where i'd be now, or if we'd be here now, together as a family. we're trying to do our best but thanks to the local support that we've been receiving, without it, i wouldn't have been able to do it by myself. it's mainly when the kids ask for things and you have to say no. exchanging the vouchers for food, itjust makes you feel like you're doing a proper shop rather than asking and begging for food. this scheme helped over1 million kids over the summer holidays. a campaign that helped lead to change in england, wales, scotland and northern ireland. the marcus rashford campaign... i've got to say, you know, he's a manchester united player. i know this kills you, doesn't it? it does. but i've got to admire him. thank you.
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you know, you don't realise what help that gives to our kids. if there's something great to come out of this epidemic, all our staff have been there, done it and got the t—shirt. yourself included? myself as well. thank you so much, families, for speaking to me, not easy, appreciate it. it's been a pleasure. thank you very much, bye—bye. you know, it's not been easy but it's notjust about us, it's about every other family in this situation across the country. it's about trying to give a bit back and help out. glad to do it. £15 per week per child for six weeks. that might not sound like much for some people. to others, it's meant the world of difference this summer. as for marcus rashford this week, he tweeted... a hint this young man's work trying to tackle child
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poverty isn't over yet. that shows you what a practical difference it has made. and really interesting how passionate marcus rashford is about this as well. in a statement, the government says, "we have taken substantial action to make sure no child goes hungry throughout the pandemic period, including by launching a national voucher scheme to support children eligible for free school meals while they were at home. it continues... "councils are also receiving additional funding to support families who are struggling financially with the impact of covid—19, and to provide help for those who need it." staggered start times, wearing masks and year group bubbles will all become a reality for children in england returning to the classroom from next week. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been finding out what measures are in place for students who use
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public transport, and what you can expect when it comes to social distancing on the school run. the school run is almost back, but, as with everything else in 2020, it will look, feel and be very different. public transport companies have been juggling the demands of social distancing, bubbles and face coverings, all while not really knowing just how many children will turn up. in bristol, first bus will run special services just for pupils and, in some cases, for individual schools. we've added buses in which are specifically marked up as school buses and the route number has an s added to it, and they are specifically for those journeys. obviously, the first day is going to be challenging while everyone gets the hang of it. but once the kids have got used to it, i think that will work 0k. unlike the summer term, the majority of parents will now
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have no choice other than to send their children to school, but will have to decide how they get there. i've been extremely anxious about them using the transport. i know it's a necessity, because i can't physically get them all there myself. but it is concerning to myself, with us being a shielding family and have vulnerability. i'd like to know who's going to be in the transport with my second child — as to how many children she's going to have within that transport bubble — but i still don't know that with a week to go. the industry's trade body is working to persuade parents that children will be safe. understandable that parents may be concerned, but there's really no need for them to be. 0perators have been working hard, making sure there is enhanced cleaning in place. 0bviously, there's the face coverings that children can wear to keep themselves safe, and making sure that there are safety measures in place to protect the driver, as well. from the road to the rails, the return of school children would be the biggest step back to pre—virus life. but there are considerable
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and familiar challenges ahead. as with any environment, these days, whether it's a pub, a cinema, or, indeed, public transport, it's not necessarily when you're sitting down and not moving around that social distancing is challenging. it's the getting on and off, the pinch points of accessing a bus or a train. the physical safeguards are plain to see. the safety of those pupils has got to be at the top of our list. we've been carrying customers now for some time. we know how to do it in the railway industry. the wearing of masks, which most of the secondary school pupils will be having to wear, significantly gives that additional reassurance to customers that they can travel safely. and, of course, we've got those enhanced cleaning regimes in place and the social distancing recommendations that we're helping people follow. there are always nerves on the first day of school, but, next week, it won't be just the children who'll be anxious. it will be a major test of public transport and of public confidence. john maguire, bbc news.
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we'rejoined now by leon hady, a former head teacher who now runs online school courses. good morning to you, thank you very much for talking to us this morning. i know you've been talking to pa rents i know you've been talking to parents and you've been taking a look at what schools can do — what is the plan at the moment? the plan in general is for schools to continue the good work that they have been doing towards the end of last term. we have got a lot of different measures in place which will allow the safe movement of children around. with regard to the transport concerns, schools are putting information out on their website and councils are doing the same so website and councils are doing the same so that parents can be assured that there will be a strong set of routines in place to help their child on top of what parents themselves can do. what are parents concerned about? they are really looking to protect themselves and their children. they are wondering what the schedules will be, what will they do in the event of an outbreak, what is going to happen in terms of if my child is ill? lots of
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questions. the ones which are pinpointed towards transport are really about the logistics. how do we know what time we will get the transport? councils and schools are working together to put on more buses. some councils are encouraging walking buses so that parents can have more control. there is also stu d e nts have more control. there is also students with special educational needs, some councils are now offering an incentive to take children to school. so there are lots of different solutions and a lots of different solutions and a lot of parents are being reassured by that. there are also a lot of pa rents by that. there are also a lot of parents who are concerned, so how is that reassurance being communicated? up that reassurance being communicated? up until now it feels as if schools are, frantically is the wrong word, but really intensely putting in new adaptations? well, schools have been doing this for quite a few months now and over the summer break would have been the best time for them to put in more measures so i can
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have been the best time for them to put in more measures so i can assure pa rents put in more measures so i can assure parents that virtually every school in the country is going to have some really strong measures when they get back. also, the government has put £a0 million into a campaign to assure people that kids will be safe on transport, but people have different ways of accessing media and it is a lot harder to reach people with an advert than it used to be. what would you say to a pa rent to be. what would you say to a parent whose child might be going to secondary school for the first time and is now facing different travel arrangements, having to wear masks in corridors, and added to all of that, and i remember it well, entering secondary school and it being huge and petrifying, just in normal times, what would you say to reassure that parent? normal times, what would you say to reassure that pare nt?|j normal times, what would you say to reassure that parent? i think the first thing that any parent will wa nt to first thing that any parent will want to do is, before any of that happens, to have the conversation with their child to know that this is not going to be something which is not going to be something which is going to recede on the first day. this is going to be more than any other year when the well—being of
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the child, tracking their movement over the first weeks and months, is going to be really important. so it is important for the parent to have some exercises, routines, conversations, with their child over the coming week to make sure that they know things are going to be different. i take your point that it is very intimidating on the first day. but if they have been anywhere recently, they will be used to the idea that it is reduced numbers, more selective spacing, people wearing masks a... so in a strange way there is going to be something a little more familiar because everywhere in the country that we go into is going to be handling the coronavirus in the same way. so, there will be some familiarity which ironically will be somewhat of a bridge. leon hady, former head teacher, now running online school courses, thank you very much for taking us through that. inspiring story now... a woman who took up running marathon distances while having
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treatment for cancer, has put her motivation down to her miniature dachshund, elvis. verity conroy, from leicester, was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer in may, but decided to run with her dog during her treatment, saying "exercise is one of the best medicines". elvis was also diagnosed with a disease during lockdown, which affected his ability to walk, but he's slowly recovering after an operation. he now accompanies verity on her challenge in a pushchair. together they've raised more than £11,000 for cancer research uk. they both join us now. good morning, verity. i have been dying to say this all morning — elvis is in the building! you kept him under cover therefore a moment, he is with you now. usually, when we talk to someone who is going through what you are going through, the first question would be about you, but i am going to ask about elvis
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first, because he is a bit of an inspiration for you, how is he doing? he's doing really well, thank you. he's recovering fantastically. he is fighting fit, he's getting better by the day. what has been the problem? it is quite common in the miniature dachshunds, a condition which affects their spine. after my first round of chemo, we noticed he had some paralysis in his back legs, and we tried rest and medication but after a couple of weeks he woke up one morning and his back legs could not really function out also he had to have emergency surgery on his spine to correct it. but he's on the road to recovery now. he is delightful, absolutely lovely. and the treats, exactly! verity, i will ask about you, how are you? i'm
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doing well, thank you. i'm feeling good today. and treatment is going well, so, yes, all good. tell us, what has driven you to challenge yourself like this? running marathons is difficult enough at the best of times, when you are in full health, so to speak, how have you managed to motivate yourself and decide that this is something that is good for you? i think perhaps like a lot of people who are diagnosed with something like this, it can feel unnecessarily cruel and pointless, and for me, it was really important to find a sense of control and purpose whilst i was going through this. i needed to do something for myself, to keep myself motivated. and one of the things i had read was that exercise is something that can definitely help in the long term. so, i look for something that i felt i would be capable of doing but could potentially be achievable for me.
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and i also really had a desire to give back to the work that i am currently benefiting from as well. so, when i stumbled across, i think i found it on so, when i stumbled across, i think ifound it on facebook, cancer research uk where advertising this marathon run and i thought, it sounds like something myself and elvis can do. let's put this into context, where you quite fit and a regular exercise before you were diagnosed? er, last year! did regular exercise before you were diagnosed? er, last year i did the couch to 5k. so by august last year i think it was about a.8 kilometres was the longest that i had run. but other than that, not so much! so, running a marathon over the course of the month, i actually did it twice, running and walking, it was still a challenge on certain days. verity, a lot of pet owners say even in normal circumstances, they get loads from their pets when they are
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feeling low or feeling down or whatever. tell me about you and elvis and what the relationship is. clearly, you must have had some low moments during the time you've been through, how has elvis helped?” think on the days when i've really struggled with the treatment or perhaps struggled a little bit more mentally, just having him there, knowing that he needs to get out and about, albeit in his buggy, that has really motivated me just to get dressed, get up and get out there and do something, knowing that it is not just and do something, knowing that it is notjust me that needs it but him as well. we have a very close relationship, as pet owners, especially dog owners, tend to do. and he has lived around the world with me. so i wanted to make sure i was taking the best care of him as well as myself. can he read your mood, does he know instinctively
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when to be around and make himself scarce, all that kind of thing? well, when he got ill, i very much thought that that is what he was doing. however, ithen thought that that is what he was doing. however, i then obviously realised he was being particularly sensitive and snugly with me because he actually wasn't very well. i think outside of that, he knows how to lick a salty tear! but i am not sure how emotionally intuitive is, at the best of times! that is quite honest, you know, verity. so many dog owners say that their dog knows them inside out, i quite like your honesty about elvis there, i think it is quite refreshing! i was just reading, you are through your second type of chemotherapy at the moment, and you've been doing the running and you've been doing the running and walking, how has that affected you, have you found it some days more difficult than others, having the therapy affecting that? up until a couple of weeks ago, i was still
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getting out and running, i carried on with the couch to 5k app, i think i got on with the couch to 5k app, i think igot up on with the couch to 5k app, i think i got up to week six. but the chemo in the past couple of weeks has taken its toll in the past couple of weeks has ta ken its toll and in the past couple of weeks has taken its toll and i have not been as well. so, you try and balance it out a bit. i obviously take elvis out a bit. i obviously take elvis out for walks, i walk to the hospital to get my blood checked, i walked to and from chemo yesterday. so, for the time being, walking, at pace, is where i am at in terms of fitness and capabilities. but i'm really keen, as soon as i can, to carry on running and to get my fitness up to where i wanted to be. it's one of the best medicines we have both for us physically and mentally, and i know that once i'm through treatment, it is shown to prevent recurrence, it is scientifically shown to prevent recurrence. so, it is going to continue to be something that is really important in my life. verity, it has been lovely chatting to you.
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lift elvis up... at there we go, we can say goodbye properly! really nice chatting to you today, and good luck with all the fundraising you are doing as well. and the treatment, good luck, verity. thank you very much. later on we will be joined by dorothy and catherine to congratulate them on their big day. sarah has the weather for us today. a lot of people were experiencing flooding yesterday. today it is a bit more mixed and it is getting colder at the weekend? it is. we had heavy downpours yesterday and we did not have the wind that we had during the week, so if you got stuck under the
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downpours, they did not move. yesterday a big puddles and a lot of lying surface water. it was in southern england, northern england, wales, northern ireland and scotland. some of us got something yesterday. today a bit of blue sky. this is the picture this morning in winchelsea beach. a few rainbows to be spotted out there today. fairly persistent rain in the far south of scotland, northern england and northern ireland. this is sinking south, so it will improve in scotla nd south, so it will improve in scotland and northern ireland and later on in northern england. further south, sunny spells and heavy showers with the odd thunderstorm mixed in. further heavy downpours, a chance of flash flooding in one or two areas. the wind is also a feature, coming from a northerly direction, so that is
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bringing us that colder air. temperatures typically in the mid teens. 18 or 19 in the south. but you will have to dodge those torrential downpours. this evening and overnight tonight we will keep those downpours of rain, but as the area of low pressure clears away, we will see high—pressure moving in from the atlantic and that will squeeze away the showers. to start off on saturday, a brisk northerly wind with a few showers across east anglia the south—east. they slowly fade away later on in the day, but for much of the uk saturday looks like a pretty decent day. many of us are voiding the showers altogether. sunny spells and gusts of wind, especially along the east coast. that would take the edge of the temperatures. 0nly that would take the edge of the temperatures. only 13 in aberdeen. 19 in cardiff. 0vernight on saturday night a lot of people are still camping this weekend and it will be
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quite a chilly night. temperatures fall down into the low single figures for some of us. the wind is a bit lighter, cold airfirst thing in the morning. but high pressure is moving its way in. through sunday it is less windy compared to today. a few isolated showers and most of us should have a largely dry day with sunshine around. temperatures typically in the mid—teens on sunday. it looks like it will be mostly dry and those winds will ease as we head throughout the course of the weekend. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the manchester united captain harry maguire has spoken for the first time about being found guilty of assaulting police and bribery, on the greek island of mykonos. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, the england defender says he feared for his life when he was arrested by plain clothes officers and thought
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he was being kidnapped. he has been talking to our sports editor, dan roan. it was horrible. it's not something i ever want to do again. i don't wish it on anybody. who do you owe an apology to? i don't feel like i owe an apology to anybody. an apology is something when you have done something wrong. do i regret? i regret being in the situation. obviously, the situation has made it difficult. i play for one of the biggest clubs in the world, so i regret putting the fans and the club through it. maguire says trouble began when he suspected his sister, daisy, had been attacked by two strangers. these two men approached my little sister. they asked her where she was from, she responded, and then my fiancee fern seen my little sister's eyes go into the back of her head, and...
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she ran over and she was fainting, she was in and out of consciousness. . .and, um... sorry. he and his friends tried to get to hospital, but were instead taken to a police station, where they claim outside they were attacked by plainclothed officers. my initial thought was that we were getting kidnapped. we got down on our knees, we put our hands in the air. and then theyjust started hitting us. they were hitting my legs, saying my career is over, no more football. "you won't play again." at this point, i thought there was no chance. these are police, or i don't know who they are. so i tried to run away. i was in that much of a panic. um, fear, scared for my life. um... you actually feared for your life, did you? yeah, for sure. all the way through it.
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despite everything you've said, the facts remain, sadly, that you were found guilty. of of abusing and assaulting the police, and attempting to bribe them. given all that, given all how can you remain captain of one of the biggest clubs in the world? well, yeah, obviously, you see a lot of reports going round and it is such a huge honour to be captain of manchester united. it is something i am really proud of. it's a massive privilege to play for the club, never mind to be the captain. obviously, it is not my decision to make. but one thing i will say is how supportive the club have been, from top to bottom. they have been great with me. and i thank them for that. obviously, we have had a long, hard season. a tough season. we wanted to get away. obviously, we went out for a couple of drinks that night. i wasn't planning on going out every night and drinking. i am sure we would have had some great days and some great times out there in terms of chilling around
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the villa and going out to the beaches and things, but, like i say, i don't see myself as regretting going out there. i have been to mykonos before, i had a great time. i have been with my family before, i had a great time, so, i can't say i regret going out there. i think i found myself in a bad situation. do you understand why gareth southgate withdrew you from the england squad, having initially named you, after hearing that verdict? yeah, i understand. 0bviously, i'm disappointed. i love playing for my country. i'm physically good, i'm mentally strong. like i said previously, mentally, ifeel like i can get over this. i'm a strong lad. i feel more for the girls who were on the minibus and my little sister, who are suffering the most from this. but, no, i'm physically and mentally, i'm ready to play. i'm disappointed, but, of course, i understand. you've appealed and you have
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been granted a retrial. as we've heard, that means your conviction is effectively nullified. you are now an innocent man again in the eyes of the greek law, legal system. how confident are you, harry, sitting here now, that you will eventually clear your name? i have great faith in the greek law. the retrial will give us more time to prepare, gather the evidence, allow witnesses into the court, and i'm really confident the truth will be told and come out. the appeal could take a year or maybe longer. how hard will it be to have that hanging over you? for me, i move on. i'm mentally strong enough at the moment. like i say, you probably speak to my family and they would say i'm the one the best at dealing with it. what sort of state are they in, then? yeah, i think my brother is a bit...
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a lot more of a worrier than me. but he is getting better. my dad has been great, the support that he's shown. it's been tough for my mum. it's been really tough for daisy. we're joined now by our sports editor dan roan. looking at harry maguire, this has affected him emotionally and it is great you had the opportunity to be able to show how he feels about the incident over the last six or seven days. yes, i think it is pretty clear that he is shaken up, he is emotional, but that is not a huge surprise. anyone who spends a couple of nights in greek police cells will not enjoy the experience, certainly not enjoy the experience, certainly not if you are a premier league footballer and as high—profile as harry maguire. this is the most expensive defender in football history, the most expensive english player the game has ever seen. he is
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a man who has enjoyed a good and fine reputation on and off the pitch, a central component for both clu b pitch, a central component for both club and country. and then there is, a big fall from grace. it must have been a chastening experience. for the first time we heard him give his version of events. it is just that. you have to be remembering the great court did not agree with the defence case and they found him guilty of all charges. yes, he has appealed and he will have another day in court when that retrial happens, perhaps another year from now. court when that retrial happens, perhaps another yearfrom now. but the reality is that conviction will hang over him and it will be fascinating to see how he handles that as the new season begins and whether he can get himself together before the campaign and his status. he is the manchester united captain and right now looking at him and seeing him in the eye yesterday you would think he would struggle, but he claims he is ready to go again. that is why he wanted to try and get that done and enable him to move on.
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those moments in your interview when he talked about his family members, his sister, those clearly were the moments in which he was most emotional and possibly ones that a lot of people may be would empathise with, not knowing the full circumstances. as you say, the greek court came to a different decision, but there were moments there where you could really sense the emotion of what happened in that moment in time. that is right. many will listen to his version of events and believe him, others will not. but that did seem authentic, certainly, that did seem authentic, certainly, that emotion. clearly something went on in the early hours of friday morning in mykonos, none of us know. 0nly morning in mykonos, none of us know. only those who were there really know the reality. this is not over, as we said. he has appealed and been granted a full retrial. according to his legal team that conviction has now been lifted and he is regarded
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as an innocent man. he needs to get to that stage and when that appeal for this to be lifted completely away. he has kept a really low profile. the last time we saw him was when he stepped out of the courthouse in serous, the island next to mykonos. two hours later he was found guilty, but he has kept his head down since then and he has asked us not to describe where we are in europe, and he wants a few more days to come to terms with what has happened, get his head together. that yesterday was for him, he hopes, the beginning of that rehabilitation, but it will take time. thank you very much. our sports editor who conducted the exclusive interview with harry maguire. the august bank holiday weekend is upon us and it is a crucial one for britain's tourism industry. thank you so discombobulated for me, idid not thank you so discombobulated for me, i did not realise it was a bank holiday. ben is at the seaside, why
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wouldn't he be? he is doubt in which the full, he says eight has been raining, but there is also some sun peeking through. good morning. sun is out and they will be hoping it stays out for the entire weekend because they have had a pretty dreadful time of it lately. the tourism business is up and down, the country really struggling because they have missed all sorts during lockdown. they missed the easter bank holiday, the half term, two other bank holidays. for them it is really important to get the visitors in, a third of all domestic tourism spending in the uk is done over the july and august months and these will be crucial for them to make sure that they get the visitors back. but new figures are suggesting that we are planning just about a.8 million visits, overnight visits, this weekend. it might sound like a lot but this time last year there we re lot but this time last year there were 8 million overnight stays,
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suggesting maybe we are going on day trips and not stay overnight. let me introduce you to patricia who is from visit to britain, and sarah who ru ns from visit to britain, and sarah who runs a local hotel and restaurant. good morning. patricia, talk me through the importers this weekend for the business is here and for places like this in whitstable. as you said, this is the last hurray for the summer season before schools go back, so businesses are open and operating at a reduced capacity but they want to see people in and spending their money and we are encouraging people to come back through the traditionally quieter months of september and october and extend the season this year. sarah, from your point of view that is important. talk me through how it has been for the last few months. you have been trying to adapt the business. certainly at the beginning of lockdown we had to be flexible and versatile and secure and
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thinking on our feet to look after our customers. with the first few months of coming out of lockdown at the three mariners at we benefited from our outdoor space, but this great weather will not last. 0ur hotel has been on lockdown and has onlyjust reopened hotel has been on lockdown and has only just reopened about hotel has been on lockdown and has onlyjust reopened about four weeks ago and we have got weddings this weekend. weddings have been rescheduled as well. during lockdown you are able to adapt the business a little bit and do things differently, but that will not make up differently, but that will not make upfor differently, but that will not make up for all the business that you have lost from may, june, july and august onwards. the campaign has been great, not only to get back to our customers, but to get the food supply going again. we are very nervous about what holes for the future. we have got october, novemberand december future. we have got october, november and december with the weather changing. we have to be on our toes, we have to diversify and be bespoke and just encourage people to come out and have reassurance that we will look after them and
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they will be safe. patricia, when you hear that, the worry is the end of the year. this is the last hurray for people travelling and getting around the country. how do you persuade people to get around the country and spent from november to february. we have to make people confident that they can. businesses can apply for a badge to reassure customers that they are operating over19 customers that they are operating over 19 compliantly. escape every day is a campaign that we are launching this month to really encourage that travel through september, october, and to get people confident on our public transport and into our cities, as well as enjoying the beaches and the countryside. it is fascinating. when you see it looking so glorious this morning, it makes yourjob easier. nice to see you both. sarah was telling me earlier that as well as running her restaurant and hotel she
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also runs a furniture business and during lockdown that furniture business website was repurposed to sell fruit and veg and you can still buy fruit and veg on her furniture website as such is the demand, but also the way businesses have changed and adapted. let's hope this weekend isa and adapted. let's hope this weekend is a good one for the businesses up and down the country that rely on tourist. before i go, i am going to leave you with a glorious view of whitstable from our drone up here and to show you how gorgeous it looks along the coastline. whatever you are doing on the long weekend, have a wonderful time. as we look at that picture, we have watched it improved during the morning. it was cloudy and rainy earlier on and now it is lovely. it was cloudy and rainy earlier on and now it is lovely. if you live in kent, you may struggle to buy any birthday candles this morning as identical twins kathleen and doris both celebrate their 100th birthday.
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200 candles if they get a cake each. to keep each other company during the pandemic, the pair have moved in together and are living in the house where they grew up in rochester. iam very i am very pleased to say that we can say good morning now to kathleen and dorothy. good morning, how lovely to see you. and happy birthday. thank you. thank you very much. kathleen, can i ask you very much. kathleen, can i ask you first, can you give us an outline of what the day holds in store for you, a 100—year—old joint birthday, what will be doing? we are not together all the time these days and there is a tent going up in the garden, so i guess something will be going on. i don't really know what is planned. i know it is something
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to make as happy and enjoy it, so, i don't know, i am looking forward to it. it sounds like you are in for a wonderful day. dorothy, iam it. it sounds like you are in for a wonderful day. dorothy, i am seeing a lot of cards behind you. clearly a lot of people have been in touch already. yes, we have had a lot of ca rs already. yes, we have had a lot of cars already, yes. you have been living together during lockdown. what is your relationship like sisters? how close are you? very. very. we are twins and we have always been close. who is the chatty one, the bossy one, the most organised one? dorothy is the most organised, i am the chatty is. that is right. it is so lovely seeing two of you. i get that impression, there
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are some twins who do this, do you finish each other‘s sentences and that kind of thing? sometimes. sometimes, not very often. you dress very similarly. is that deliberate or is that instinctive? i don't know, itjust or is that instinctive? i don't know, it just happened. or is that instinctive? i don't know, itjust happened. we like blue, it is our favourite colour. you wear it well. you alluded to the idea that there is something being planned. who is in charge of the surprise birthday today? planned. who is in charge of the surprise birthday today7m planned. who is in charge of the surprise birthday today? it will be our niece margaret. my daughter, yes. and rosie. rosie being? the other daughter. with the restrictions now, everything will be socially distant. i am assuming if it is outside the weather will be good and there will be a few friends over. you are you hoping to see? all
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ourfriends. over. you are you hoping to see? all our friends. two yes, over. you are you hoping to see? all ourfriends. two yes, i hope so. when we have the privilege of talking to someone, on this case it is two people who have reached 100 yea rs, is two people who have reached 100 yea rs , we is two people who have reached 100 yea rs, we often is two people who have reached 100 years, we often ask for some words of wisdom of what you have learned from your time on this earth. kathleen, what would you say to people? what have you learned about life and how to live it? enjoy it. i mean... you only have that one day and the next day is something different, enjoy it while you can. dorothy, would you go along with that? what else would you add to that? what else would you add to that? if you like to be together do
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things together. we always have been. when my husband was alive and kathleen was not married, we often took her out with us. listen, it has been an absolute joy talking to you both today. can you give us a very big birthday wave and we will wave from the studio to you. give as a big birthday wave and we wish you a very, very happy 100th birthday. thank you. thank you very much. very many happy returns. thank you very much. i feel like i slightly want to eavesdrop strictly afterwards. i think their relationship looks so delightful. it is that moment, when you ask them if they dressed the same and they
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just went... brilliant, an amazing ca re of just went... brilliant, an amazing care of women. an amazing pair of women. an amazing pair of women. noor inayat khan may not be a household name, but perhaps she should be. born into indian royalty, she became a british spy during world war two and died in dachau concentration camp in 19aa, having given up none of her secrets. now english heritage will be honouring her memory with a blue plaque, the first dedicated to a woman of indian origin, we're nowjoined by noor inayat khan's biographer, shrabani basu, and anna eavis from english heritage. why is it so important that this woman is recognised ? why is it so important that this woman is recognised? because of her bravery first of all and also because of what she stood for. noor inyat khan was a secret agent in the second world war who, unhesitatingly, gave up her live in the fight against fascism. it is really important to remember that in
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19aa there was a young, muslim women of indian origin who went out there and who unhesitatingly went into the front line. she stood for certain principles and these were nonviolence, peace, so she is an unlikely spy in many ways. but when it came to the crunch she was there and she was on the front line. she believed in tolerance and religious tolerance, which are all such important messages for now. absolutely. how did she become a spy? that is interesting. when they lived in paris and as the german army was on the border they decided to move to england. they took this decision that they were going to come here and sign up for the war effort. both brother and sister were determined to do their bit. they came to england in the blitz, two south london in 19a0 and there were signs up for the women's auxiliary
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air force. suddenly from a gentle background she has a number and a uniform and she loves it. she goes into radio operators, the first batch of women trained in this field. then she is being watched by a special, secret organisation called the special operations executive and they are looking after people with language skills so she fits the bill. she speaks fluent french, she speaks like a native, she knows paris inside out and she has been brought up there and she is a radio operator. they were losing radio operators like flies. the life expectancy was six weeks, so she was crucial to this and they flew her in undercover. she is transformed into madeline, the secret agent, and she will work from paris. when you hear that story it seems like a travesty that story it seems like a travesty that it has not been more recognised so that it has not been more recognised so far, but i suppose that is the point of putting a blue plaque on a
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building. it is a statement, isn't it? it is a statement, the best, simplest kind of public history. in london, which is a very ethnically diverse city, english heritage is very keen to celebrate that diverse history through the blue plaque scheme. the blue plaque scheme in london marks the connection between a historical figure and a building. in hercase, a historical figure and a building. in her case, although we first considered her for a plaque in her case, although we first considered herfora plaque in in her case, although we first considered her for a plaque in 2006, and, as you have heard, she is a very worthy candidate, at that point it was not possible to tie her down toa it was not possible to tie her down to a particular building in london. since then a lot of research has been done and we have been able to identify a number of buildings in london but particularly the flat in bloomsbury where she was living with her mother and bloomsbury where she was living with her motherand her bloomsbury where she was living with her mother and her brother in 1943. that was her last london home. it is
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from a player that she left to go to france. it seems like a very fitting location. absolutely and we show people the plaque there. and as soon as you see the word on there, people will be drawn the story. they might just be walking past and maybe they will go, who was that person? and ask more questions. that is the great thing about the scheme. sometimes you look up and see a plaque to somebody that you have heard of, likejimi hendrix, and you have a jolt of recognition and you think, wow, he lived there. oryou might see a name like nnoor's, which might see a name like nnoor's, which might be less familiar, and a prompts you to have a look. on the english heritage website we have a profile about nnoor and you can find out more about her. . we have not been able to put up any plaques in the last few months because of
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covid-19 and the last few months because of covid—19 and we are exciting to be putting up plaques and london streets today and starting with noor as well. it is lovely commemoration. curatorial director at the english heritage and biographer of noor inyat khan. thank you very much. we are going to leave you with beautiful images of above the kent coastline.
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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines. donald trump accepts the republican party's nomination to run for president, accusing the democrats of having a far—left agenda, and being weak on law and order. no—one will be safe in biden's america. my administration will always stand
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