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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 7, 2020 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. hours to do a deal — post—brexit trade talks resume today but are said to be on a knife edge. it would have been great to have got this nailed down sooner, but ultimately it's not the biggest surprise in the world that it's going right to the last minute. final preparations are being made for the uk's mass vaccination programme against coronavirus, which is due to begin tomorrow. snowy winters could come to an end in the uk because of climate change, according to analysis from the met office. donald trump's personal lawyer, rudy giuliani, is admitted to hospital with coronavirus. he's tweeted that he's feeling good. and he's a man on a marathon mission. rugby league legend kevin sinfield
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sets off on his seventh marathon in seven days in support of former team mate rob burrow. team—mate rob burrow. i actually feel today there's an army of the mnd community that will be running with us, and we're all really, really proud. it's probably been the most special week my life. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world, and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. negotiations on a post—brexit trade deal are resuming in brussels this morning, as the two sides try to secure a trade deal before the brexit transition period ends injust over three weeks‘ time. eu sources said an agreement on fishing rights was close after talks over the weekend. but that has been disputed
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by downing street, which said there had been no breakthrough. the irish prime minister, micheal martin, cautioned against over—optimism, putting the chances of a deal at 50—50. borisjohnson and the european commission president will discuss the state of negotations later today. and mps will vote on legislation that would allow ministers to override parts of the brexit withdrawal agreement. this report from our political correspondent chris mason. last night in brussels, the lights on, the talks ongoing, a huge amount at stake. things are on a knife edge here and it is serious. my gut instinct is that it's 50 50 right now. it's 50—50 right now. and i don't think one can be overly optimistic about a resolution emerging. and my sense is, having spoken to some of the key principals here, that this is a very challenging issue to resolve, and particularly around the level playing field.
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there are three main sticking points — the so—called level playing field, a reference to rules to ensure fair competition, how any deal is enforced, and fishing rights. eu sources suggest a deal on fish is close. british sources say it isn't. it seems the two sides can't even agree on what they disagree on. after today's negotiations in brussels, these two will talk again tonight. the prime minister and the european commission president, ursula von der leyen. the coming hours, the coming days, will be crucial. chris mason, bbc news. our political correspondent helen catt explained more about the divergences that still remain between the uk and the eu. well, we are frankly running out of days, we're on 7th december, and the transition period ends on 31st december. however, both sides are still talking and we know that there are still significant differences remaining on key issues, as they have been throughout the negotiations.
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as we heard from chris, on the playing field, the idea of being able to ensure fair competition, as the eu calls it. also on fishing, the suggestion last night that there had been some progress made, absolutely scotched this morning firstly by the uk government, who said that the eu sources had literally made it up, but then also by michel barnier, who it is reported has told eu ambassadors this morning that no progress has been made there, either. so, the talks are going round, not progressing massively far. however, they are still talking. and while they are still talking, it does imply there is a possibility of a deal. here is what the foreign office ministerjames cleverly had to say earlier. absolutely, a deal can be done. precision of wording matters here, a deal can be done. there is an opportunity to get a deal that works in the uk national interest,
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that also works for the eu. the one thing we have learnt from negotiating with the european union is, they often, these negotiations, often go to the last minute of the last day. and so it would have been great to have got this nailed down sooner, but ultimately, it's not the biggest surprise in the world that it's going right to the last minute. now, of course, there aren't an awful lot more minutes until we reach that last minute, particularly as the government intends to put any deal that is reacjed before parliament, and to get it through parliament. the labour shadow work and pensions secretary jonathan reynolds was asked earlier if labour would support any deal. it's appalling that we haven't got that deal already. we're in the transition zone, we should be preparing for what comes next, and given the government was elected just a year ago on the promise of that oven—ready deal, they should have kept their promises. but to answer your question directly, we would have to see it first. we've always said we would oppose in all circumstances no deal,
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and we are in a position where it is an up—down vote on a deal or no deal, we think, although the government haven't even told the house of commons yet exactly what form that would take. so we would have to look at it but we do want a deal and we do want to move on from this and give the country a chance to recover from the pandemic by not having to focus on brexit for the next few years. before it gets to parliament, of course there needs to be a deal to put in front of it, so those talks continue today in brussels, and later, the prime minister will be speaking to the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen. in the last hour, the uk's chief negotiator, lord frost, chief negotiator, lord frost, left his hotel in brussels ahead of resuming trade talks with his eu counterpart, michel barnier. let's hear what he had to say. can you tell us about any progress? is ideal still possible? we're still working very hard. are you optimistic a deal can be achieved? nick beake is in brussels.
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nick, how are we going to learn of any progress? well, johanna konta can tell you, there are lots of briefings on both sides today, in the absence of an official commentary, you do get lots of behind the scenes assessments of what is going on behind closed doors in the trade talks. notjust the trade negotiators who are talking today, we've had a lot of comings and goings, the day started with michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator, briefing the ambassadors of the 27 eu countries, and i'm told that his assessment, really, was quite downbeat. he scotched the suggestion that progress had been made last night, particularly on fish. and i think that was echoed by the irish foreign minister, who told us the irish foreign minister, who told us that mr barnier was pretty downbeat. i was actually told that in terms of his mood, he was said to describe himself as realistic, neither being optimistic nor
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pessimistic. but clearly, there are on these big three issues we've been talking about, a lot of work to be done if they are going to bridge the 93p- done if they are going to bridge the gap. i say there are comings and goings today. we've just heard that michael gove, the senior government minister, is now in brussels. he'll be having a meeting with his counterpart this joint committee, it is complicated but basically there is complicated but basically there isa is complicated but basically there is a joint committee that was set up to try and resolve some of the issues over northern ireland that they agreed in the divorce deal. so, lots of meetings today. i think we arejust going to lots of meetings today. i think we are just going to have lots of meetings today. i think we arejust going to have information seeping out throughout the day rather than one big moment or announcement, for now. you talk about the big issues, fishing being right at the centre of that, it accou nts right at the centre of that, it accounts for such a small proportion of gdp here and in france, i think in this country it is somewhere between 0.05% and 0.12% of gdp, why
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is it such a tough area to negotiate? i think it is hugely politically sensitive. it represents in so many ways, for so many people, vividly, taking back control. we know that fishing was something that was illustrated during the referendum campaign for .5 years ago as being symbolic of britain taking back control of its waters, its seas, it conjures up images of the past. but if you talk to people on the eu side here, they say it is a smokescreen, really, because as you say it is a very small part of the economies of both the uk, and a key number of eu states. and if you talk to eu diplomats here, they say fishing is one thing but the much bigger thing for them is competition rules, the idea that britain would be signing up to an agreement on how the two sides trade in the future. that is really crucial to the whole eu project, the idea of keeping
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their single market intact, they don't want to be undercut, they say, by the british, in the future. the problem is that at the same time the british are saying, brexit has happened and if we are going to be following eu rules, what is the point of brexit having happened if we are still going to have to sign up we are still going to have to sign up to all of these rules and regulations? the eu is not accepting the fact that we've become a newly independent country. yes, fishing, you can look at quotas, the price of fish, access of boats, that is tangible. but the idea of sovereignty is really difficult to pin down and if there is going to be a deal, both sides need to be confident that they've ticked off what they need to, and crucially i guess for boris johnson what they need to, and crucially i guess for borisjohnson in particular, he can turn round to the british people and say, we've taken back control, look at this deal, it is here, look at it, this isjob done. thank you very much, nick beake, in done. thank you very much, nick bea ke, in brussels.
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the british chambers of commerce have warned that uk businesses still have a large number of unasnwered questions about brexit, and many feel unprepared ahead of the end of the transition period on 31st december. we can speak now to their director—general, adam marshall. thank you very much forjoining us. before we come to the specifics, i just want to know how you're feeling right now as the clock grinds around inexorably to this moment where we leave and everything changes? well, of course, business expected that in a negotiation, we were likely to see a negotiation, we were likely to see a moment like this. for us, however, it is coming back late in the game. businesses across the uk do want to see a deal happen. they do want to see a deal happen. they do want to see the two sides keep talking, but they're running see the two sides keep talking, but they‘ re running out see the two sides keep talking, but they're running out of time to in whatever may be agreed or not agreed in brussels. and that ticking clock, that worry, is at the back of the minds of many businesses today. so, what are the unanswered questions that are at the forefront of your
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mind right now, and concerns around the preparedness of businesses? well, in so many ways, this is a matter of detail. businesses across the uk have been receiving letters like this encouraging them to prepare for departure from the european union. but it's the detail that goes underneath that that they don't yet have. things like the rules of origin that will apply to goods that get exported from the uk, the labels that need to go on food products to northern ireland, so many other things, vat, whether people can go and take business trips into the eu and practice their profession whilst they're there. these are the nuts and bolts things that so many businesses need answers on, and they have been highlighting the problems here forfour years now, so the patience of so many of those companies is wearing thin, as is their ability to do anything, u nless is their ability to do anything, unless that clarity comes out. so,
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what is the solution? because even if there is suddenly clarity right now, is there enough time to implement those things that businesses have been told to prepare for, but as you say they have not specifically know what to prepare for, is there a need for another extension of the transition period, do you think? well, i think there are two things at stake here. the first is getting as precise information as is possible on uk government guidance, and onto government websites, and out to businesses, over the next few weeks, so businesses, over the next few weeks, so that they can do what they are able to do with the time that does remain. and in some areas, we're going to have to look at whether the uk and eu can agree some form of easements, all grace periods, as businesses work to get the new arrangements right, but after the ist of january may need a bit of extra time in order to settle into those new routines. in a number of detailed areas around customs, for
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example, that may be required, and we would hope that the two sides, if they reach a deal, will also sit down and look at how to implement it ina way down and look at how to implement it in a way that keeps trade flowing across borders. from your perspective, do you see any potential upside from brexit? well, of course, a lot of businesses all across the uk have known this has been coming for some time, they've been coming for some time, they've been looking at changes to where they sell their goods or services, asa they sell their goods or services, as a result of changes in market access. every challenge, for some businesses, creates opportunities for others. so undoubtedly around the country today there are firms that are seeing problems and difficulties and costs ahead, but there are also firms see an opportunity and new markets for the future. so, it's a real mixed picture in business communities of. and on the specifics of the points that you were raising about the rules of origin labelling, obviously, there is a lot that has
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been agreed when we look at those final areas, they are the hardest ones for the negotiators to reach agreement on, but this is a massive agreement on, but this is a massive agreement spanning every aspect of the relationship, so, why do you think it has been so hard to get the information which has effectively already been agreed? 0k, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, but actually just putting agreed until everything is agreed, but actuallyjust putting across to businesses what they need to know, do you think that could have been done differently? well, i think in a negotiation, both parties do keep their options open until the last minute and even if 97% or 98% of the content is closed down, they would be very unlikely to share it with businesses in case that last 2% collapsed or fell apart in some way which means that the whole deal. away. but there is a lot of information that businesses require right now that are highlighted in the unanswered questions of the
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chambers of commerce, which are in the gift of the uk government. i think where businesses are understanding is where things are subject to negotiation. where they are incredibly frustrated is where the uk government could tell them right now, tomorrow, what it is that they need to do in order to get ready, but some of that information has not yet been forthcoming. that is where we need to see a remedy immediately. and of course we have to hope that we would also see a deal which would unlock many more of those questions as well. and a final thought on fishing, it is not the only outstanding area, the level playing field obviously covers everything, and that's a really contentious issue, too, but the fishing being right there at the end is one of the most knotty issues, representing somewhere between 0.05% and 0.1% of gdp in the country, how do you feel about that being given such a priority effectively? well, it may be a small part of the economy, it is a big part of the
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political consciousness. i just do hope that an issue of that size and significance doesn't end up becoming a stumbling block to an agreement thatis a stumbling block to an agreement that is in the mutual interest of both countries, because there is much more in the economy besides where a deal would be of great benefit. adam marshall, director—general of the british chambers of commerce, thank you. hospitals across the uk are receiving the pfizer—biontech vaccine ready for the first doses to be administered from tomorrow. priority will be given to vaccinating the over—80s, frontline healthcare workers and care home staff and residents. aru na iyengar reports. a precious delivery from belgium arrives at croydon university hospital in south london, one of 50 vaccination hubs across england which will receive some of the 800,000 doses available in the first batch. the pfizer—biontech vaccines are packed in ice. they have to be kept at —70 degrees. they need handling with care.
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these small vials will kick—start the most crucial mass inoculation programme in history. it's just incredible, actually. obviously, i can't hold them in my hands, because they are —70 degrees, but to know that they are here and we are amongst the first in the country to actually receive the vaccine and therefore the first in the world is just amazing. i'm so proud. st george's hospital in tooting is also getting ready. the uk has ordered a0 million doses. each person needs to have two doses, 21 days apart. so that's enough to vaccinate 20 million people. hospitals like this see many elderly people every day of the week. so they'll be taking the opportunity to make sure those over 80 who will be in the hospital, either in outpatients or perhaps being discharged this week, will get the vaccination first. we'll also be working with local care homes to make sure care home staff,
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who've been doing such a greatjob during the pandemic, also get their vaccine. and of course, high—risk health workers will also be in the queue as well. scotland, wales and northern ireland will also begin their vaccination programme on tuesday. over—80s are told not to be worried if they're not called for a jab this month. the vast majority will have to wait until the new year to receive it. how the roll—out goes will determine the future course of the coronavirus pandemic in the uk. for now, these life—savers will be kept under lock and key until tomorrow, when the vaccination programme starts. aruna iyengar, bbc news. one of the hospitals that's been earmarked as a vaccination hub is st thomas' in central london. tim muffett gave us the latest from there. well, what we know so far is that the vaccinations have been arriving in the uk, and in england specifically, 50 designated hubs have been announced, and this is one of them. so, as to precisely which ones will be in play tomorrow,
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not entirely sure. but what we do know is that from tomorrow, the care home residents who were initially thought to have been amongst the first to receive the vaccine will not be right at the start, that is because this vaccine needs to be stored at —70 celsius. so, the first groups to be vaccinated are going to be those who are 80 and above who are either outpatients or people who are about to be discharged from the hospital, as they are effectively already in the hospital. and then as the weeks and months go on, so the age groups and the different categories will be included in those being vaccinated. now, if you are aged over 80 and you don't get a call in the next couple of weeks, don't panic, because the vast majority of people within that age group will receive the vaccine in the new year. it is a logistical challenge of gargantuan proportions. some 800,000 doses are thought to be ready to go from next week. a0 million doses have been
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ordered of this vaccine. that means 20 million people can receive their two doses 21 days apart. the medical director of nhs england said this is going to be a marathon, not a sprint. thank you, tim. rudy giuliani, president trump's personal lawyer, is being treated for covid—i9. the 76—year—old is understood to be at the georgetown university medical facility in washington. in a tweet he said he was getting great care. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has the details. he's one of the best known public figures in america, a loyal supporter of donald trump, and the latest member of the president's inner circle to contract the virus. known as america's mayor following his widely praised response to the september 11th attacks in 2001, rudy giuliani is every bit as bombastic as his boss, backing mr trump's uncorroborated allegations of election fraud. president trump tweeted that "by far
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the greatest mayor in the history of new york city who has been working tirelessly exposing the most corrupt election (by far) in the history of the usa," had hours later mr giuliani tweeted that he was getting great care and feeling good, recovering quickly and keeping up with everything. the former mayor has been travelling the country, leading mr trump's legal efforts to challenge the election results. he is known, like many in the president's team, for not wearing a mask. at a hearing last week in michigan, mr giuliani had this exchange with a witness as she was about to give evidence. would you be comfortable taking your mask off so that people can hear you more clearly? she turned down the request. 0verwhelmingly, mr trump's claims of election fraud have either been withdrawn or rejected by the courts.
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what happens next isn't entirely clear. it's not as though the attempts were going that well. i mean, they've just taken a battering. and so, you know, could this be the death knell for the legal efforts? with the number of new coronavirus cases again soaring around the country, americans could know by the end of the week whether emergency use authorisation has been granted for two vaccines, with the first jabs available almost immediately. health care workers and nursing home residents will be the first to receive the inoculations. in the meantime, several major cities, including san francisco and los angeles, are facing the toughest lockdown yet in the us during the pandemic. within days, it's feared some hospitals in california could run out of intensive care beds. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. doctors in turkey say the coming weeks will be critical to see if covid infection rates can be reduced. new restrictions have come
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into effect including weekend lockdowns and nightly curfews. the country is now fourth in the world in terms of new infections according to officialfigures. 0ur international correspondent 0rla guerin in istanbul explains how the official figures may not reveal the true picture on the intensity of spread of the virus in the country. well, the figures here are stark. the number of new daily cases of covid—i9 is around 32,000. now, that's according to official data, and that means turkey is number four in the world for new cases of covid—i9. but the turkish medical association, the doctor's union, is telling us that they believe the real figure is much worse. they say it's around 50,000 new cases of covid—i9 every day, and they are basing that on data they are gathering from their members around the country. the important thing to note about these figures is that they were not being revealed for the last four months.
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turkey started giving figures back in july only for those who were symptomatic with covid—i9 and that meant the figures looked much lower. under pressure from the opposition, they recently started releasing the figures for those who test positive every day, and that brought us up to 32,000, almost overnight. now, we should say that the death toll here, relatively speaking, is still quite low. officially, it's around 14,000. that puts turkey at number 20 in the world. but again, the opposition, the doctors' union, were saying that the actual death toll is higher, the doctors' union believes it is about 50,000. the government has tightened restrictions here, we now have a nightly curfew, we have just finished the first weekend lockdown since may, but doctors are concerned about whether or not those measures will be enough to stop the health system here being overwhelmed.
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south korea is raising its coronavirus alert level to the second highest tier with infections rising to more than 600 a day. the military is being mobilised to help with expanded testing and new restrictions on daily life are imminent. mark lobel reports. up to now, south korea has been dealing with the pressure of the pandemic with flying colours, like these students taking important exams in these even more challenging times — achieving top marks with their tough testing and contact tracing. but the latest assessments don't look good, now that daily cases have risen to a nine—month high. if the medical system reaches its
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limit, it will cause great damage to all of us. like other countries witnessing a resurgence in this crisis, it is introducing new measures. for three weeks from tuesday, in the capital seoul and the surrounding areas, gatherings will be limited to 50 people, restaurants and some shops will close at nine, and gyms and karaoke bars will shut. as the country prepares for empty stadiums and a curtailed nightlife, the prime minister says south korea is facing a critical period in its fight against covid—i9. president moonjae—in is mobilising the military and public servants to help expand testing. he wants more drive—through testing facilities and longer opening hours to help combat this rise in cases. as the country beds down to battle the virus in this third wave, it seems a somewhat more urgent effort than before. mark lobel, bbc news.
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the organisers of a christmas market which closed afterjust one day when concerns were raised about a lack of social distancing say it won't reopen. hundreds of people crowded into the attraction in nottingham on saturday. organisers say plans were in place to manage visitors entering the site but the numbers were far greater than expected. the channel island ofjersey has recorded a daily high of coronavirus cases. the island has seen 96 new cases over the past 2a hours. there are now 516 active cases on the island, with positive tests increasing at an average rate of 60 per day. 17 people are in hospital. the duke and duchess of cambridge have started a tour of britain by train to thank key workers for their work during the pandemic — and they were treated to a festive send—off at london's euston station. # merry christmas, everyone...
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shakin‘ stevens serenaded the couple with his classic hit, merry christmas everyone. the duchess was seen dancing before boarding the royal train last night for the 1,200 mile trip which ends tomorrow. this is what happened when they arrived in edinburgh this morning. the christmas music by bagpipes was playing as the train pulled in. and they are now off to meet some of the workers who have done such a brilliantjob workers who have done such a brilliant job throughout the workers who have done such a brilliantjob throughout the crisis supporting the many people in need. a team of conservationists in kenya is trying to rescue eight giraffes,
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stranded by rising flood water. a specially—adapted barge was used to float the animals to safety one by one after they became trapped on an island in lake baringo in the east of the country. tim allman reports. like a carefully planned military operation, the rescue team began their work. first priority — find a giraffe. wading through the flood waters of longicharo island, soon enough, they did. meet asiwa, said to be the most vulnerable of the animals stranded here. they are known as rothschild giraffes, an endangered species that was only reintroduced to this area ten years ago. there are believed to be only 3,000 of them left in africa and around 800 in kenya. once asiwa was subdued, she was led onto a barge
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so she could be transported to the mainland. this had once been a peninsula, but the rising levels of lake baringo meant it was now an island. these giraffes need space, hence the need for this rather picturesque rescue. one very important passenger who seemed perfectly content to watch the world go by. back on dry land, asiwa was released to her new home. so far, two giraffes have been rescued, another six will be moved in the coming months. a big day for asiwa. a moment of triumph for her rescuers. tim allman, bbc news. hello, this is bbc news withjoanna gosling. the headlines. hours to do a deal — post brexit trade talks resume today — but are said to be ‘on a knife edge'. final preparations are being made for the uk's mass vaccination programme against coronavirus, which is due to begin tomorrow.
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snowy winters could come to an end in the uk because of climate change, according to analysis from the met office. donald trump's personal lawyer — rudy giuliani — is admitted to hospital with coronavirus. he's tweeted that he's "feeling good". and he's a man on a marathon mission — rugby legend kevin sinfield sets off on his seventh marathon in seven days, in support of former team mate rob burrow. just to say, he is about halfway through the last marathon and we hope to speak to him when he gets to the end of it in about an hour and a half's time probably. let's get more now on our top story — the deadlock in the talks over a post—brexit trade deal between the uk and the eu. why are the sticking points in the talks proving so, well, sticky? chris morris explains. the final days of negotiation, and while fishing may be a tiny part of the economy on both sides of the channel, it is of huge
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political importance. it was central to the take back control message in the 2016 referendum. what is at stake now is access to these uk waters, where eu boats currently catch about £600 million worth of fish every year. the uk wants much of that back, so it is about the uk share of fishing quotas, not just where you can fish, but how much you can catch. there is also the timeline for measures coming into full force. the eu wants a status quo period of up to ten years, the uk says it should be much shorter than that. the other main area of disagreement involves billions of pounds of business now and in the future. the level playing field is all about rules on fair competition between businesses in a free—trade agreement. the two sides are trying to agree a common baseline on workers' rights and the environmental regulations that companies have to follow. if you cut regulation, it can be cheaper to make stuff, and the eu is worried the uk could do that in the future.
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and then there's state aid or government subsidies for business. the uk is determined to assert its sovereignty and is refusing to follow eu rules. but the eu says it has to protect companies within its single market. so, the third main area of disagreement — how you enforce a deal and resolve any disputes. the eu is demanding the right to retaliate if the uk breaks the rules in one area by hitting back in another. imposing tariffs or taxes, for example, where it thinks they might hurt the most. then there is the question of who adjudicates any disputes and the potential role of the european court ofjustice. chris morris. fighting continues in yemen, where a five—year conflict between the houthi group in the north, and the internationally recognised government in the south, has led to a humanitarian crisis that's described as the world's worst. children and young people are among those who've suffered the most. 60% of yemen's population is under the age of 25, and bbc my world has been investigating the impact. our correspondent nawal al—maghafi
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explains the crisis through the eyes of three teenagers. i want people in my generation to start using their voices and raise awareness of what is happening in yemen. yemen's been labelled the world's worst humanitarian crisis. but when 60% of its population is under 25, what's it actually like growing up there? we can hear saudi coalition aeroplanes flying overhead. everyone in the house is really nervous.
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i'm nawal al—maghafi, and i've been reporting on my home country of yemen for the bbc for nearly ten years now. yemen's been troubled by civil warfor decades, but violence intensified in late 2014 between yemen's internationally recognised government and the houthi rebel movement. the houthi rebels, backed by iran, took control of the capital city sana'a. the president asked for help from saudi arabia, who with other countries tried to take power from the houthi rebels and reinstate the government which had fled. five years of conflict have forced 3.5 million people to flee their homes. ididn't i didn'tjust i didn't just leave i didn'tjust leave school, i left my family, i left my friends, it really impacted me a lot and it was really impacted me a lot and it was
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really ha rd. as well as the air strikes, two in three yemenis aren't able to buy food. we've now seen what it's like to live through one of the world's worst humanitarian crises, but what do the young people want you to know about their country?
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it's completely unfair for them to be paying the price for something they didn't even, you know, commit. parts of the uk got a dusting of snow over the weekend but that could soon become a thing of the past in britain — as climate change takes hold. that's according to the met office, which has shown the bbc some of the most detailed climate—change projections ever made. here's our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. nothing evokes winter like a thick blanket of snow. and sledging, snowball fights and snowmen too, of course. but, says the met office, scenes like this will become a rarity across most of britain in the decades to come if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase, as they have been. we are saying by the end
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of the century much of the lying snow will have disappeared entirely except over the highest ground. here is how the met office projections suggest our winters could change. this is the average temperature of the coldest day across the uk over the last two decades. everywhere in blue is below zero and the bluer the colour the colder it is. this map shows how things could have changed by the 2040s. as you can see, most of england now rarely gets sub—0 days. now look at this. by the 2060s, only very high ground and some parts of northern scotland are likely to still experience these freezing days. temperature changes will be much less dramatic if the world succeeds in cutting emissions, and there has been good news on that front. just last week the uk government announced ambitious targets for cutting carbon, and more than 100 countries, including the uk, china and the eu,
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have committed to going net zero by mid century. if those promises are not honoured, we can expect more of this, the met office says. its new data gives unprecedented detail, showing how the climate could change in every neighbourhood in the uk. as well as being warmer, our winters will get wetter. all right? how you doing? panorama has followed the wingfield family from doncaster. can we come in and have a look? you can do by all means. thank you very much. i don't give a monkeys no more. the wingfields' home was flooded in november last year when a month worth of rain fell over south yorkshire in a day. look at this, there is just water through the whole house. yeah. this is my father—in—law's room downstairs. this is terrible.
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grandpa ken suffering from dementia had to be carried out of the home safety. are you all right? yeah, i'm fine. our summers will be a dramatic contrast to our wetter winters. they will be hotter and drier if emissions are not curbed. the warning is clear. unless the world succeeds in cutting emissions, intense weather like this could become more common. justin rowlatt, bbc news. for those of you living in the uk — today the bbc is launching a climate change postcode checker on the bbc news website and app. the bbc and the met office have looked at the uk's changing climate in detail, and you can now check how your area will be affected. just put in your postcode to discover how temperatures and rainfall will rise, over the coming years. people with learning disabilities experienced ‘unacceptable health care inequalities and discrimination‘
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during the covid—19 pandemic in england, according to a new report by the charity mencap. as the vaccine is being rolled out across the uk from tomorrow, the charity is calling for people with learning disabilities to be prioritised, as death rates among the group because of the virus are up to six times the rate of that among the general population. joining me now is annie mcdowall, chief executive at the charity share community, which provides training and employment support in areas like independent living, digital skills, horticulture and catering, to disabled people across south london. and i‘m alsojoined by fatima — she is a member of share who has a learning difficulty. welcome, both of you, thank you for joining us. annie, that is a shocking statistic that those with learning difficulties have died as such a high rate compared to others within the community. tell us more about your perspective of the impact
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of covid on those you particularly ca re of covid on those you particularly care for. hi, joanna. ithink everybody has found covid incredibly challenging and we have all had to adapt but for people with learning difficulties the information has not a lwa ys difficulties the information has not always been very understandable. most of us have found the information confusing and if you have a learning disability it is doubly so. a lot of the families we are working for a quite low income so are working for a quite low income so there was a lot of pressure on the families, particularly if work was interrupted. and we had to make a huge number of adaptations in order to try and keep people safe and well. in wandsworth, where we are based, we worked very quickly with the local authority and with other voluntary organisations to put a safety net in place for people with learning difficulties and their families. we think that this has had
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a huge protective effect, and although every death is a tragedy, so although every death is a tragedy, so far as we know, only three adults with learning difficulties in wandsworth have died in this pandemic to date. very close coordinated partnership working has really helped. fatima, thank you for joining us. hi, joanna, nice to meet you. hi. how has life been for you throughout this very difficult time? we can't high five, unfortunately, not sit together, and that makes me feel very sad. we have to social distance and stay apart, which makes us distance and stay apart, which makes us feel very left out. well, it makes me feel very left out. we can't go on trips and socialise, i
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can't go on trips and socialise, i can't go on trips and socialise, i can't go to the parks with my family, two restaurants, two cinemas, obviously because of covid—19 they were closed. the lockdown made me feel very helpless and stressed. i was not sure what i have to do. i had no idea what i need to do. there were some youtube videos which were very helpful indeed. i felt very appreciated, it was part of my family's idea, to do youtube videos and build confidence in myself, speak up and talk about the lockdown, the first lockdown, and talk about the first lockdown and talk about the first lockdown and how to maintain a healthy diet. there is a lot, it sounds like, to navigate for you, fatima, and it
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sounds like your family have been great. how are you feeling now? you have achieved a lot through this so you should pat yourself on the back for that, no doubt. thank you. it's all because of my family's support and one of the staff at share karen also supported me through my family and she also supported me, and annie. yeah, it is a really lovely to be able to talk to you and fatima this morning and to obviously understand what people like fatima have been dealing with and the amount of help you have been able to provide. going forward now, i know that you want people with learning disabilities to be given priority on vaccines because they are vulnerable. what is the current situation regarding vaccination for people with learning disabilities?|j
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do people with learning disabilities?” do not think they are being afforded any special treatment or any special category. we know that people with down syndrome have been designated as being extremely clinically vulnerable, so hopefully they will be closer to the top of the list to get the vaccine. but there has been nothing decisive come out of government yet so we really want government yet so we really want government to make a commitment, we support mencap‘s: there is to prioritise people with learning difficulties. they are vulnerable in so difficulties. they are vulnerable in so many different ways and particularly people from bame backgrounds and in the general population people from bame communities are suffering disproportionately from covid, and the mortality rates are much higher. the same goes for people with learning disabilities. you can imagine the even greater impact there. we think this is a matter of urgency and we really urge the government to take action and protect people like fatima and her
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colleagues. it's been a real pleasure to talk to you both. annie and fatima, thank you very much indeed forjoining us. we wish you all the best. thank you. thank you very much. if you didn‘t feel much like getting out of bed on a freezing cold monday morning, spare a thought for rugby league legend kevin sinfield. the former leeds rhinos captain, who‘s run six marathons in the last six days, set out a couple of hours ago on his seventh. he‘s running to honour his friend and former team—mate rob burrow, who was diagnosed last year with motor neurone disease, or mnd — and to raise money for research into the illness. more than £1 million has been donated. before he set off this morning, he spoke to my bbc breakfast colleagues dan walker and sally nugent — and they showed him this incredibly moving video to help put a spring in his step today. is it recording? yeah! when you decided to do this challenge, i thought it was impossible, how could anyone put their body through this
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for seven straight days? well done, kevin, you‘re doing amazing, you‘ve got really fast running legs. to say it's unbelievable is a bit of an understatement. yeah, absolutely brilliant, kev. you‘re nearly as fast as my dad but not quite. laughter i want to remember the good times, i want to try and get away from those dark moments. in its simplest form, i'm just trying to be a team—mate. i know he'd do it for me.
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if we can make their life a little bit better and a little bit more comfortable, it's a really good thing to do. ijust want to salute everybody because, like i said, i know it's been a tough year. cheering he's incredible, so, i think for him to be here today, i had to carry on running then, i'd gone past but i won't let him see me cry again! can i update you just a tiny bit? 457,000, ijust checked a few seconds ago, so, yeah, the total is ticking up. i'm told we are expecting snow on thursday morning, so, carol, please do your thing and be kind to us. that bit's the hard bit.
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that‘s why you‘re doing it. yeah. i have a few pieces of sporting memorabilia that mean a lot to me, and this is one of them. this is a shirt signed by the leeds rhinos team of 2012 that won the grand final. that team included kevin sinfield and rob burrow. and i just want to say a massive good luck to kevin and congratulations for everything you have done this week. all the money you‘ve raised. i‘ve always thought you were a hero but even more so now. nobody knows how you've done it and how you're doing it. so if you know, sell it and make another million. thanks very much, kevin. you're just a wonderful person, and we thank you so much. you are an inspiration. so too is rob. you‘re doing this for him, and to me, that is what love is. hi, kevin, ijust wanted to wish
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you all the very best for doing the seven marathons in seven days. i know you're getting to the close now, and it's an extraordinary achievement. rob will be proud of you, of course, we all are. keep going. you can do it. thank you so much. that was lovely. some really special moments.
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rob is with us every step of the way today and absolutely for our team he has been our inspiration. we will get it done today because we have to get it done. kev, i know one of the things that‘s been keeping you going, it‘s notjust rob, it‘s the messages from people you‘ve never met before, a people who are donating, ordinary people and families who have been affected by motor neurone disease, and they are as important to you as everything else. yeah, very much so. i think when we started this it was all about rob because rob was the only person i know who is living with mnd at this moment in time but that‘s changed, that‘s changed for all of us, for ourteam. you hear about all the different stories and there are some horror stories out there, it‘s such a cruel disease. and what it does to people and their families is so heartbreaking. we‘ve got to help. we‘ve got to find a cure, we‘ve got to raise awareness. notjust for rob and his family, for everybody. and like i said, ifeel
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like there is an army, the mnd community are with us today, and they will get us through, i know they will. we‘re all really excited to start today but this has become more than just seven runs. today is the culmination of some wonderful support, some wonderful work by yourselves, and we feel incredibly proud to be part of this. there have been some beautiful messages. we saw earlier, kev, when we had a camera on you, you‘ve got two father christmases running with you today hopefully to raise your spirits on the way around. give us an idea, because you have had to do interviews every day and on top of all of that you‘ve got the sort of physical challenge of doing what you are doing, you are running a marathon every day in under four hours. how is the body holding up? look, i‘m not going to moan while i‘m wearing this vest. i‘m all right. if you‘d said to me on tuesday you‘d be waking up on day seven and this
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is the shape you‘d be in and this is how you‘d feel i‘d have snapped your hand off for sure. the father christmases that we have got with us today, darryl and phil, have been outstanding all week. darryl has been alongside me on most of the solo stuff i‘ve done and been a great friend. i‘m delighted to say today that the three runners have combined, david, who‘s walked a marathon every day for the last six days, will run today and chris who at 50 has been absolutely amazing. so we‘ve got a wonderful team, we are going to enjoy it today. we‘re going to make sure we get it done and make sure that actually in the run—up to christmas people are thinking about rob, people are thinking about the mnd association, people are sparing a thought for everybody out there who is affected by this cruel disease. ican i can tell you he is almost done it, he has has about 15 minutes of running left. let‘s look at some of the pictures that have been put on the pictures that have been put on the leeds rhinos twitter feed of him just running those final moments of
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that marathon. seven marathons in seven days. he set out to raise just over 77 million. he‘s raised over1 million. we will talk to him once he has finished. you‘re watching bbc news. and as i mentioned, we will be talking to him when he‘s finished. we will maybe give him a bit of time to catch his breath. i said he‘s gone over1 million in terms of the amount he has raised. 1,065,679, and you can see the plan was to raise £77,777 by running seven marathons in seven days, it has been a formidable effort and i‘m really looking forward to speaking to him once he has finished it in a little while. it hasjust once he has finished it in a little while. it has just gone up catch up with the weather with carol.
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hello again. we have had some dense fog around, lifting into low cloud, but some of it will stick around for much of the day and if it happens where you are it will peg back the temperatures. for most to day will be a cold day and also a grey one, the best chance of seeing an assumption will be out towards the west. we are sandwiched between two areas of low pressure, quite gusty winds coming around the western flank off the low pressure in the north sea. so, windy across the far north—east of scotland. and here through the afternoon we will also see some showers move out towards the west and we have a better chance of seeing some sunshine. but across parts of south—east scotland and northern ireland we will hang on to some of that fog. but equally, where we don‘t have it, there will be some sunny skies and a few showers in northern ireland. a few showers coming in from the north sea down this north sea coastline of england. and a few showers in wales. but again, west is best in terms of sunshine. some showers affecting the channel islands and the far south—east corner of england as we go through the day.
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but you can quite clearly see, where we have got the low cloud, and also some of that fog sticking, particularly so in the south—east, and particularly east anglia. if you are stuck under that, temperatures in norwich, for example, may not get higher than three degrees. but as we push further west and also north, we are looking at a range 6—8, only 3 in glasgow, though, you have freezing fog this morning so temperatures are not going to lift that much. through this evening and overnight, the low pressure drifts further west taking some persistent rain with it, there will be some snow on the mountains, gusty winds around it, and this rain is falling on already saturated ground so there is a risk of localised flooding. come south, we will see some of the mist and fog reform tonight, some of it will still be there from the daytime, and it‘s going to be cold with a touch of frost. tomorrow, low pressure is centred across scotland, so we have bands of rain and showers circulating around it, gusty winds around it as well. come south, for parts of the midlands and southern england, we will see some brighter skies
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and some sunshine. but again, if you are stuck under an area that hangs on to any fog it will feel cold. we have the dregs of that low pressure across us on wednesday producing some cloud and spots of rain. this weather front bringing some rain into western areas and top temperatures 6—9.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: hours to do a deal — post—brexit trade talks resume today, but are said to be "on a knife edge". it "on a knife edge". would have been great to get it nailed it would have been great to get it nailed down sooner, but it is no surprise it is going to the last minute. final preparations are being made for the uk‘s mass vaccination programme against coronavirus, which is due to begin tomorrow. people who get the jab will be given vaccine cards, reminding them to get the second dose. ministers have said there are no plans to introduce a "vaccine passport". snowy winters could come to an end in the uk because of climate change, according to analysis from the met office. donald trump‘s personal lawyer — rudy giuliani — is admitted to hospital with coronavirus. he‘s tweeted that
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he‘s "feeling good". and he‘s a man on a marathon mission — in the next hour or so rugby league legend kevin sinfield should finish his seventh marathon in seven days, in support of former team mate rob burrow. i actually feel today there‘s an army of the mnd community that will be running with us, and we‘re all really, really proud. it‘s probably being the most special week my life. negotiations on a post—brexit trade deal are resuming in brussels this morning, as the two sides try to secure a trade deal before the brexit transition period ends injust over three weeks‘ time.
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eu sources say an agreement on fishing rights was close after talks over the weekend. but that has been disputed by downing street, which said there had been no breakthrough. the irish prime minister, micheal martin, cautioned against over—optimism, putting the chances of a deal at "50/50". borisjohnson and the european commission president will discuss the state of negotations later today. and mps will vote on legislation that would allow ministers to override parts of the brexit withdrawal agreement. this report from our political correspondent, chris mason. last night in brussels, the lights on, the talks ongoing, a huge amount at stake. things are on a knife edge here and it is serious. my gut instinct is that it‘s 50 50 right now. and i don‘t think one can be overly optimistic about a resolution emerging. and my sense is, having spoken to some of the key principles here,
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to some of the key principals here, that this is a very challenging issue to resolve, and particularly around the level playing field. there are three main sticking points — the so—called level playing field, a reference to rules to ensure fair competition, how any deal is enforced, and fishing rights. eu sources suggest a deal on fish is close. british sources say it isn‘t. it seems the two sides can‘t even agree on what they disagree on. after today‘s negotiations in brussels, these two will talk again tonight. the prime minister and the european commission president, ursula von der leyen. the coming hours, the coming days will be crucial. chris mason, bbc news. let‘s speak to our political correspondent helen catt at westminster. the negotiations go right up to the wire? yes, and the noises from both sides not sounding any more positive. the uk government seem much less optimistic than it was
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last week. we heard from the irish foreign minister, who said that michel barnier, the eu‘s chief negotiator, had delivered a gloomy assessment this morning. that idea that there had been any movement on fishing has been scotched today by both sides. the uk source saying that eu sources had literally made it up and it is said michel barnier told a meeting this morning that no progress has been made on fishing. there is still, as you heard, differences on other areas too. like those shared rules that both sides will follow. and how to enforce them. of course, if those issues go for the eu right to the heart of protecting the single market and for the uk government to the heart of what brexit means. it is a tricky circle to square. the uk‘s chief negotiator today, lord frost, circle to square. the uk‘s chief negotiatortoday, lord frost, not giving much away. reporter: can you tell us about any progress. is a
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deal still possible? we are still working very hard. are you optimistic a deal can be achieved? the fact they‘re still talking, all the time they are still talking, it does imply there is a deal there. but the talks are going on and nothing seems to have moved significantly in the last 24 hours. the big moment will be later today when borisjohnson the prime minister has that phone call with the eu president, of the commission sorry, ursula von der leyen to see if any progress has been made. thank you very much. catherine barnard is a professor of eu law at the cambridge university. thank you forjoining us. the actual deadline for leaving is 31st december. how close to that can we get? because we keep hearing different thing it is about when the actualfinal different thing it is about when the actual final date is for
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different thing it is about when the actualfinal date is for a deal? well, to be frank the final date is 3ist well, to be frank the final date is 31st december. but in reality it has to go through the european parliament, it has got to go through the uk parliament and be agreed by the uk parliament and be agreed by the council of ministers of the eu. so it looks like in reality this week or next week, of course then we have christmas, and i don‘t think anyone will have the appetite to be doing negotiations on christmas day. but remember there has been an emergency session of the european parliament scheduled for 28th december. the level playing field is a fundamental issue about competition, observing the same standards, to be trying to hammer out an agreement on that at the last minute, it is something they have been talking about for a long time, you wonder what would lead to a break through now. remember there is
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a quitea break through now. remember there is a quite a lot of posturing on either side. neither side wants to be seen to making concessions easily. the bottom line is it is a major issue for both sides and if you look at from it the eu‘s point of view, they‘re saying if the uk is going to have significant access to eu markets, what they don‘t want is the uk undercutting the eu by giving significant subsidies to british business. what would you say are the chances of a deal now?” business. what would you say are the chances of a deal now? i think still on balance i have always been a 52/48 person, i thoughtjust about we will do it, because the bottom line is it is both sides‘ interests to have a trade deal of some sort. because both sides will lose, the losses on the eu side will be spread across a number of countrieser to the uk -- across a number of countrieser to the uk —— countries, for the uk it
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will be serious in red wall seats where car manufacturer is likely to move and serious for northern ireland if there is no deal. we are just getting word from the eu financial services commissioner saying it is not looking good, the ukfailing to saying it is not looking good, the uk failing to understand the need for compromise. both sides have said it is the other one. inevitably in a negotiation it is the other one being difficult. politics is important and we see right up to the end the fishing rights in uk waters are sbilly big. the political totem is enormous. explain why it is that it has come down to fishing on that front? if you remember, they voted to leave the eu, because they feel they have been restricted for a long period of time and it is probably
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the case that in 73 when we joined the case that in 73 when we joined the eu, that the uk got a very poor deal over fisheries. the eu, that the uk got a very poor deal overfisheries. so, yes, i think there is quite a lot of sense that from the fishermen‘s point of view that justice that from the fishermen‘s point of view thatjustice needs to be done. however, it is worth bearing in mind that the fish that british fir esh men “— that the fish that british fir esh men —— fishermen catch are not eaten widely in the uk and they are sold in the eu. and what this means is that if there is no deal, tariffs will be imposed, which will make those fish much more expensive for european consumers to buy. so in fa ct european consumers to buy. so in fact it is in the british fishermen‘s interests to have a deal. and a deal which will be phased in ore a numb —— over a number of years, because it will require changes for the uk and the eu fishing fleet. i spoke to one of the big business groups earlier, saying, spelling out their concerns
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around the fact that businesses actually are unable to prepare even at this late stage, because they don‘t know what they‘re preparing in terms of what the labelling needs to be on packaging, a number of issues for them. there have been some suggestions in ireland in particular in northern ireland, there are call for a further extension to the transition period so these things can be ironed out. do you think that that would, that is a possibility? we have not heard any official word on that. i think the answer is no to the extension of the transition period. the transition period runs out on 31st december. but if there isa out on 31st december. but if there is a deal, what you might find is something like an implementation period and that would give a phased implementation to the new way of working between the uk and the eu. now, if there is a deal as well, it
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may be that there won‘t be such draconian enforcement of eu rules by eu customs officials for the first six months. if there is no require, the eu may require strict enforcement and there will be problems at the border. particularly at the dover/calais border. thank you. hospitals across the uk are receiving the pfizer—biontech vaccine, ready for the first doses to be administered from tomorrow. priority will be given to vaccinating the over—80s, front line health care workers and care home staff and residents. aru na iyengar reports. a precious delivery from belgium arrives at croydon university hospital in south london, one of 50 vaccination hubs across england which will receive some of the 800,000 doses available in the first batch.
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the pfizer biontech vaccines are packed in ice. they have to be kept at —70 degrees. they need handling with care. these small vials will kick—start the most crucial mass inoculation programme in history. it‘s just incredible, actually. obviously, i can‘t hold them in my hands, because they are —70 degrees, but to know that they are here and we are amongst the first in the country to actually receive the vaccine and therefore the first in the world is just amazing. i‘m so proud. st george‘s hospital in tooting is also getting ready. the uk has ordered 40 million doses. each person needs to have two doses, 21 days apart. so that‘s enough to vaccinate 20 million people. hospitals like this see many elderly people every day of the week. so they'll be taking the opportunity to make sure those over 80 who will be in the hospital, either in outpatients or perhaps being discharged this week, will get the vaccination first. we'll also be working
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with local care homes to make sure care home staff, who have been doing such a greatjob during the pandemic, also get their vaccine. and of course, high—risk health workers will also be in the queue as well. scotland, wales and northern ireland will also begin their vaccination programme on tuesday. over 80s are told not to be worried if they‘re not called for a jab this month. the vast majority will have to wait until the new year to receive it. how the roll—out goes will determine the future course of the coronavirus pandemic in the uk. for now, these life—savers will be kept under lock and key until tomorrow when the vaccination programme starts. aruna iyengar, bbc news. let‘s speak to professor david salisbury, former director of immunisation at the department of health, presently with the programme for global health at chatham house. welcome, thank you forjoining us. the roll out begins, there are lots
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of questions from people, saying they‘re not right at the top... perhaps not high enough up the priority to where they should be. what do you think about the way that the priority list has been drawn up? well, the priority list has been drawn up according to the risk of dying or having serious complications from the virus. that is fine. what you have to do though is fine. what you have to do though is match the priority groups against the vaccines‘ supply, you may have a priority listing that looks sensible and you know you can justify it... sorry i‘m going to interrupt you. we will come back. we want to go to kevin sinfield. he isjust about will come back. we want to go to kevin sinfield. he is just about to cross the finish line for that incredible seventh marathon in seven days. accompanied by father christmas of course! this has been an incredible achievement by him and
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it is something he decided to do to support his friend and former team mate rob borrow who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. let‘s see if we can hear him speak. applause well done, kev, lad! well done you as well.
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the adrenaline will be coursing. he has done it. he has raised so much money for the motor neurone disease charity. he set to raise money for research and we are hearing the donations hit £1.1 million as he crossed the finish line. that is his wife. it was their wedding anniversary i think on the second marathon. so much support for him. the team that have obviously made this happen, the logisticsjust in practical terms of running those seven marathons, leeds rhinos incredibly proud of their former captain and they have been keeping us captain and they have been keeping us all updated with their twitter
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feed. and i don‘t want to miss him saying something, so i‘m going to be quiet for a moment and see if he speaks. well done. love you, man. well done, mate. he is going to be some time before he will speak, because everybody wants to hug him and congratulate him on that, that incredible achievement. i said it was... to raise money. he started out wanting to raise £77 , 777. started out wanting to raise £77,777. it was all about the 7s, the former number on his jersey. £77,777. it was all about the 7s, the former number on hisjersey. but he has gone way beyond that and done
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the seven marathons and raised 1.1 million. a lot of emotion there. as you would expect. rob borrow was there along the route as he was running some of the marathons and he has been incredibly moved by what his former team mate has done. we we re his former team mate has done. we were hoping to perhaps get a word with him. he might be going to speak. let‘s have a listen. with him. he might be going to speak. let's have a listen. live on the bbc news channel, how are you feeling? overwhelmed. just... it's unbelievable. just... so happy that we got it done. after the first day we got it done. after the first day we we re we got it done. after the first day we were all worried, we bit off a bit more than we could chew, the donations, the support fumed that and it is overwhelming. at the start we we re
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and it is overwhelming. at the start we were worried we may not make seven grand, let alone what we have done. we have all been so proud of wearing this vest, just... for our good mate rob and his family and also for the mnd community, the mnd association do so many good things. the sooner we can get advances the better. what are you going to do now? i want to say i'm going to get some sleep, but i don‘t reckon i will sleep tonight. just massively overwhelmed. it has notjust been seven runs, it is the hours you spend to get yourself ready. the tea m spend to get yourself ready. the team have been brilliant. i have a special group of friends who have been so selfless this week and they have wa nted been so selfless this week and they have wanted to be part of it and share in it. they have a gone above and beyond. they have been brilliant. we wouldn‘t have done it,
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without them and rob an inspiration for us. the texts i woke up to this morning were brilliant. we are delighted. a big long think and finish off with the snake in my boots. 183 miles that is the equivalent of leeds to glasgow. my wife said if they would double it, would you do it again, i said absolutely. busted and broken now. i would do it, because that is what mates do, they look out for each other. i would, mates do, they look out for each other. iwould, our group, ourteam have been so supportive, the amount of texts we have had, we had such a special team at the club and the clu b special team at the club and the club have been fantastic. but we would never knew it would turn into something like this. it were just six mates trying to raise money.
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none of us could go on holiday, because of covid, so we said we would do this instead. it has been our holiday. i don‘t think we will forget this one. it is probably the best week of my life. when i look across what we have been through, the challenges and the camaraderie has been unreal and... we will miss waking up tomorrow and getting ready to go again. i think that will be the case for the next weeks and months and a couple of years we will look back hopefully with pride at being able to help people. thank you. thanks very much. kevin sinfield, he said he told his wife he would do it again if somebody offered to double the donations. it is exceptional what he has done. here is the latest tally, it is 11.
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1.1 million. we can‘t keep track of it, because it is going to keep going up, as people see what he has done and he‘s done it for such a good cause. his friend and former tea m good cause. his friend and former team mate, rob burrow. congratulations to him. let‘s go back to talking about the vaccine and the roll out starts tomorrow, i was talking to professor david salisbury. sorry we had to interrupt you, but we couldn‘t miss that moment. you were talking about the way the programme has been set out is to focus on the most vulnerable initially. but there are those who say that actually there are, you know there are good reasons to bring others into the picture, what is your view. i understand the prioritisation and it is based on
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the risk of dying or having serious disease. that is fine. however, there has to be flexibility, because there has to be flexibility, because the whole thing will be driven by the whole thing will be driven by the availability of vaccine and we know what ever is already in the country, we will vaccinate people for that are first dose, but in three weeks time, they‘re going to be coming back for their second dose. that means there has got to be double the amount of vaccine to give them all second doses and start to bring some more people into the programme. so... sorry to interrupt, i assumed they would only vaccinate half the number, the people that could get basically half the number of doses there to avoid any potential issue of what might happen in three weeks? well that depends on when you‘re going to get your next if the batch of vaccine. if you work on the basis what we have now is what we use, that means you have a run out of six weeks before you
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bring anyone else in. so knowing how much have been aing signs coming in o‘— much have been aing signs coming in o‘ — vaccine is coming in, that is critically important, because that drive it is programme. as soon as you start bringing more cohorts of people in, then you double the number of vaccines that you‘re going to be giving, you need double the number of people to do it and double the number of people to turn up. so knowing about the through put of vaccine is so important. and i know from long experience that you never can trust the numbers that you‘re given. it is terribly rare to get more vaccine than you thought you we re more vaccine than you thought you were going to get. it is rare to get exactly the amount you thought you would get and it is frequent you don‘t get as much as you thought you we re don‘t get as much as you thought you were going to get when you told you you would get it. there are many, many opportunities for things to
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slow down in vaccine arrival and we should be ready to be flexible. that means being nimble in bringing in new people to be vaccinated, against maybe the priority list, but get them through the process according to the number of doses that we have got. on how it will actually work in practice, people will get, i call up, that means being nimble in bringing in new people to be vaccinated, against maybe the priority list, but get them through the process according to the number of doses that we have got. on how it will actually work in practice, people will get, i call up, will it bea people will get, i call up, will it be a phone call or a letter, they will know they have been invited to 90, will know they have been invited to go, but what if people don‘t show, in the same way people don‘t show forgp in the same way people don‘t show for gp appointments? would the slots, should they be taken by others who may step in on the day. what is the most practical to deal with how it actually gets put out in that way? well, i think the closer it can be matched to the seasonal flu vaccine programme, the more certainty there will be about who
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turns up. we know that there is very high concordance with the seasonal flu programme for people 65 and over. in my case, i get a text message saying what time on which saturday to turn up at my local practice and there are long... lines of grey—haired people standing two metres apart currently waiting to go in. ithink metres apart currently waiting to go in. i think you can have considerable confidence that people in the 65 and over group will come when they‘re asked. i‘m not as persuaded we will do as well with the under 65s in medical risk groups, because they‘re not as good as coming for their season flu and what becomes really challenging is later on when we have got vaccine to try to give to people under 635 not in risk -- try to give to people under 635 not in risk —— 65 not in risk groups, it will be unpredictable about how many of them will turn up on any
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particular day, even in these centres. so there are difficult issues ahead. but all of this is driven by how much vaccine is in every place on each day. thank you for joining every place on each day. thank you forjoining us professor david salisbury. now some breaking news, we are hearing that... hashim abedi has admitted his involvement in the conspiracy. during his trial, he denied helping his suicide bomber proer. brother —— brother. but the public ink rip has heard —— inquiry has heard he accepted his role in it. paul greeny qc said in an interview in prison with lawyers on 22nd october, hashim abedi admitted
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he had played a full and a knowing pa rt he had played a full and a knowing part in the planning and preparation for the arena attack in manchester. that revelation has just emerged today in that public inquiry. it came during the evidence of detective chief superinden dent —— of the police officer who led the inquiry. hashim abedi was jailed for life with a minimum term of 55 yea rs. life with a minimum term of 55 years. now more on the knife enbrecht negotiations. our europe correspondent kevin connoly is in brussels. feel the attempt for us. what —— feel the temperature for us. how febrile is it? we are told the mood is down beat, michel barnier has been briefing ambassadors from european member states, he was said to be not making be optimistic
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noises. he described himself as neither optimistic nor pessimistic, but realistic, which when he said it felt like an interesting and useful briefing, but on further reflection it is mean beingless. it is not —— meaningless. it is not clear what he this is going to happen. he thinks it could go either way. what i would say, you can hear a lot of noise around this, the number of people who really know what is going on in those talks is extremely small. clearly, there is no deal yet. although most of the issues of the free trade agreement are solved, the ha rd free trade agreement are solved, the hard ones are not solved yet. and what is impossible to judge and the reason we have to wait is we don‘t know if this is the difficulty of two sides sticking to their guns until the last possible moment before compromising. or whether they‘re difficulties so great
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they‘re difficulties so great they‘re not going to be surmounted before the time for talking the runs out, probably some time later this week. there is a sense of things not going very well. but the talks do continue. lord frost and michel barnier are now together in a room ina european barnier are now together in a room in a european commission building here in brussels. the talks go on andi here in brussels. the talks go on and i would say as long as the talks go on, then there remains a chance ofa go on, then there remains a chance of a deal, but very hard to assess how good the chance of a deal is. and on that point, you say the time for talking up would probably run out sometime this week,, how is the decision made, what will the fact behind that? who decides? i suppose that a two ways in which that might be resolved, both sides agreeing they will not agree this week, and thatis they will not agree this week, and that is one possible way in which they may come to an end. the other
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is that there is a summit of european union leaders on the thursday and friday of this week. now, clearly on the european side, there would be pressure to get something agreed, if it is going to be agreed, so that it can be discussed by those leaders. clearly, they have been kept in touch all the way along, they would want a chance to discuss it in the round, i think, as part of that process. that gives you another two and a half days of talks, i guess, you another two and a half days of talks, iguess, if you another two and a half days of talks, i guess, if the two sites feel there is another life in the process and enough possibility of last—minute compromises to make talking worthwhile. borisjohnson is going to have another one of these stock taking phone calls with the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, later today, probably around tea—time, we think. we may get a better sense then of what the direction of travel is. as i say, as long as they are still talking, there is still a chance of a deal, but the general mood here this
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morning is more downbeat than upbeat. thank you, kevin. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. it‘s been a fairly foggy start to the day. most of that fog will lift into low cloud, but some of it will linger. if it lingers where you are, for example in parts of east anglia, southern scotland, and northern ireland, that will hold back the temperature. also a few showers dotted around our coastline through today. the best chance of brightest weather will be in the west, but it is going to be a cold day whichever way you look at it. this evening and overnight, an area of low pressure currently in the north sea drifts west, taking some heavy rain with it, across parts of scotland with some snow on the mountains and gusty winds around it. further south, we will see mist and fog patches re—form, and it is going to be a cold night with some frost. tomorrow, we start off with that mist and fog which should lift more readily than today. around the low pressure, we will have areas of rain and showers and spiralling and again gusty winds, some brightness as we come further south, where we don‘t have the fog, we are looking at temperatures of 3—9.
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hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: talks between the uk and eu resume in a final bid to agree a post—brexit trade deal. final preparations are being made for the uk‘s mass vaccination programme against coronavirus, which is due to begin tomorrow. people who get the jab will be given vaccine cards, reminding them to get the second dose. ministers have said there are no plans to introduce a "vaccine passport". snowy winters could come to an end in the uk because of climate change, according to analysis from the met office. donald trump‘s personal lawyer, rudy giuliani, is admitted to hospital with coronavirus. he‘s tweeted that he‘s "feeling good". a man on a marathon mission — rugby league legend kevin sinfield finishes his seventh marathon in seven days in support of former
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team—mate rob burrow. sport, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here‘s olly foster. good morning, joanna. jose mourinho has hailed harry kane and son heung—min as world class. they both scored in their 2—0 win over arsenal to send tottenham back to the top of the premier league. 2000 fans were inside the tottenham hotpsur stadium to see the pair combine for a 12th time this season, kane releasing son for a brilliant opener. and the south korean then returned the favour, kane‘s goaljust before half—time, making him the all—time leading scorer in north london derbies with 11. the spurs manager could barely contain his delight. we go match after match. we are enjoying the situation, of course, very much. i believe that the public and the ones at home in front of the screen, the tottenham fans,
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they are also enjoying the moment. for one more week, we‘re going to be top of the league. spurs are only top on goal difference from liverpool after the champions beat wolves 4—0. gini wijnaldum with the pick of their goals. there were fans at anfield as well, giving jurgen klopp the opportunity to roll out his post—match celebrations for the first time in nine months. we came here and we had goose bumps. and we thought, oh, my god. i had no idea. it‘s too long ago that i had 2,000 people in a stadium, to be honest, so we don‘t know it any more. but 2,000 people, when they‘re the right people, they can obviously make a proper atmosphere. it was not only the kop. they were here on the main stand, and they started you‘ll never walk alone, and so it was really nice. i had no idea that it could feel that good. not much to shout about at celtic at the moment. the club backed the manager neil lennon after they were knocked out of the league cup last week. a 1—1 draw at home to stjohnstone
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leaves them 13 points behind leaders rangers. they do have two games in hand, but they have won just two of their past 12 games, and not once at home since mid—september. lennon says he will turn things around. the american double world cup winner alex morgan scored her first goal for tottenham as they beat brighton 3—1 in the women‘s super league. that was their first win of the season. and australian star sam kerr scored a hat—trick to give chelsea a 3—2 win over west ham. that also set a record of 12 successive home wins in the league. england‘s cricketers should have been playing their second one—dayer against south africa today, but they are self—isolating in their cape town hotel with two positive covid results. the first one—dayer was abandoned because of coronovirus cases. one of the england squad, tom curran, was due to head to australia after the series, to join up with the sydney sixers for the big bash, but after spending the best part of the last six months in biosecu re bubbles he has opted to return home
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to be with his family. the sixers say, "the varying conditions we are asking our players to play cricket in worldwide is taking its toll, and we understand tom‘s need for a break." george russell says he hopes he‘s given mercedes a selection headache. filling in for lewis hamilton, who has covid—19, he came very close to winning on his f1 debut for the team. the chequered flag looked to be his for the taking, but a pit—lane mix up saw him given the wrong tyres, and he then suffered a puncture in the closing laps. he finished ninth, with racing point‘s sergio perez getting the win. russell could deputise again in the last race of the season if hamilton doesn‘t recover in time. we had the win in the bag today, everything was under control. i was just managing my tyres, i felt great in the car, and obviously it went away from us once, came back through, then it went away from us again. so, yeah, i don‘t know. there was a late finish at the snooker,
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as the uk championship final went to a deciding frame, the australian neil robertson beating the world number one, judd trump, just before one o‘clock this morning. robertson‘s play in the final frame was painfully slow, he took over four minutes for one shot, but came out on top for his first triple crown title in five years. and also a cheque for £200,000. hgppy and also a cheque for £200,000. happy christmas! that‘s all the sport for now. with less than a month to go until the end of the brexit transition period, british businesses have many unanswered questions about what happens next, regardless of if the uk agrees a trade deal with the eu. a report from the british chamber of commerce says the government have failed to answer more than three quarters of its members concerns, which they say is preventing businesses from planning their future plans post—brexit. with me is our reality check
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correspondent chris morris. so businesses are getting increasingly exasperated. yeah, and the fact that these negotiations are going on so late in the day has a real impact on real—world issues for businesses. i mean, they‘ve got 35 detailed questions, the british chambers of commerce, which they have had for some time, and so far they say only 11 are green on a traffic light system. the other 24 are either orange flashing red, in other words they have virtually no information about them at all. for many of them it is too late to get those answers to be prepared for the 1st of january. a couple of examples, the first is rules of origin, which means that companies need to prove where all the components in their products come from if they are to take advantage of tariff free trade under a free trade agreement, you can see the car industry is a good example. the uk had hoped that it would be able to
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include components not just had hoped that it would be able to include components notjust from the eu as british, but also from other countries that both the eu and the uk have agreements with, like components from japan could be counted as british under the rule of origin scheme. it looks like that probably isn‘t going to happen, but at the moment businesses simply don‘t know, so car manufacturers don‘t know, so car manufacturers don‘t know, so car manufacturers don‘t know which components they can still use under a free trade agreement and for them to count as british in this complex behind the scenes scheme. another one is the labelling of food, which you may think sounds like a pretty simple thing to do, but still, at the moment, with a few weeks ago, companies don‘t know what they‘re supposed to put on food labels, and thatis supposed to put on food labels, and that is the trade between britain and the eu, but also between britain and the eu, but also between britain and northern ireland. you may think it is easy to put a food label on, but we are talking about millions and millions of labels every day, and millions of labels every day, and things which companies would
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therefore have to change their manufacturing processes to do. i spoke to a supermarket representative a week or so ago we said it is too light on food labelling already. that is why businesses are concerned, and i think you spoke earlier to the british chambers of commerce, let‘s hear what he had to say. the first i think there are two things at stake here. the first is getting as precise information as possible onto uk government guidance and onto government websites and out to businesses over the next few weeks so that they can do what they are able to do with the time that does remain. and, in some areas, we are going to have to look at whether the uk and eu can agree some form of easements or grace periods, as businesses work to get the new arrangements right, but after the 1st ofjanuary may need a little bit of extra time in order to settle into those new routines.
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northern ireland specifically, what are the concerns? this is notjust about trade with the european union for businesses. because of the way that northern ireland is being treated this complex arrangement to avoid any kind of checks down the irish land border, northern ireland is essentially staying within the rules of the single market when it comes to all these goods that businesses trade. that means at the moment they still don‘t know what the rules of business are going to be injusta the rules of business are going to be in just a few weeks‘ time within the united kingdom between great britain and northern ireland, and thatis britain and northern ireland, and that is a massive issue, because so much trade goes across that border. things like food labelling, because huge amounts of sandwiches, food for supermarkets is shipped from great britain to northern ireland every day. we know michael gove is in brussels today, a separate but linked part of the negotiation, david frost and michel barnier negotiation, michael gove is there as part of talks on the joint committee, which is supposed to be looking at how, in practice, you
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implement what was agreed on northern ireland. it is a separate negotiation, but of course it is all linked, and until you know if there is going to be a basic free trade deal or not, all these other things, the questions on northern ireland, all the other questions that businesses have, cannot really be resolved. some are probably known behind the scenes, some of these questions that businesses want to know the answer to, have probably been resolved and the trade negotiations, because they have not been published because of the old maxim that nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. almost eve ryo ne everything is agreed. almost everyone i have spoken to who is affected by the say there would like there to be an implementation period for this to be in doubt — is that clear? it is awkward, isn't it, because the uk government decided they did not want an extension of they did not want an extension of the current transition period, and if you were to have a further
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implementation, grace period, whatever, it is not entirely clear whatever, it is not entirely clear what the legal basis for that would be, and on trade between great britain and northern ireland, it would have to be something of an informal understanding that the rules would not be applied as strictly as they could be, certainly up strictly as they could be, certainly up to the first year to our businesses to prepare properly for a com pletely businesses to prepare properly for a completely new way of doing business. polite thank you, chris. it's business. polite thank you, chris. it‘s going to be an interesting week. it is. parts of the uk got a dusting of snow over the weekend, but that could soon become a thing of the past in britain — as climate change takes hold. that‘s according to the met office, which has shown the bbc some of the most detailed climate—change projections ever made. here‘s our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. nothing evokes winter like a thick blanket of snow. and sledging, snowball fights and snowmen too, of course. but, says the met office, scenes like this will become a rarity across most of britain in the decades to come if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase, as they have been.
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we are saying by the end of the century much of the lying snow will have disappeared entirely except over the highest ground. here is how the met office projections suggest our winters could change. this is the average temperature of the coldest day across the uk over the last two decades. everywhere in blue is below zero, and the bluer the colour the colder it is. this map shows how things could have changed by the 2040s. as you can see, most of england now rarely gets sub—zero days. now look at this. by the 2060s, only very high ground and some parts of northern scotland are likely to still experience these freezing days. temperature changes will be much less dramatic if the world succeeds in cutting emissions, and there has been good news on that front. just last week, the uk government announced ambitious targets for cutting carbon, and more than 100 countries,
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including the uk, china and the eu, have committed to going net zero by mid century. if those promises are not honoured, we can expect more of this, the met office says. its new data gives unprecedented detail, showing how the climate could change in every neighbourhood in the uk. as well as being warmer, our winters will get wetter. all right? how you doing? panorama has followed the wingfield family from doncaster. can we come in and have a look? you can do, by all means. thank you very much. i don't give a monkeys no more. the wingfields‘ home was flooded in november last year when a month‘s worth of rain fell over south yorkshire in a day. look at this, there is just water through the whole house. yeah. this is my father—in—law's room downstairs. this is terrible.
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grandpa ken, suffering from dementia, had to be carried out of the home safety. are you all right? yeah, i'm fine. our summers will be a dramatic contrast to our wetter winters. they will be hotter and drier if emissions are not curbed. the warning is clear. unless the world succeeds in cutting emissions, intense weather like this could become more common. justin rowlatt, bbc news. farhana yamin is an internationally recognised environmental lawyer, who‘s been advising leaders and countries for 20 years. thank you forjoining us. what is your response to this new analysis? well, it just confirms your response to this new analysis? well, itjust confirms and gives greater detail about what the scientists, including in the uk, have been predicting, which is much warmer summers, a lot more rain at the wrong time, you know, heavy
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downpours both in the summer and the winter, and yes, sadly, you know, a com plete winter, and yes, sadly, you know, a complete cherry in the way our landscape looks and around which a lot of tourism, for example, is built, including skiing in scotland and many other places. so it is also the impact, really, on famine, floods that need to be looked at, on buildings and infrastructure, people‘s homes, so therejust buildings and infrastructure, people‘s homes, so there just paints a more detailed, devastating picture of the uk‘s climate impacts. a more detailed, devastating picture of the uk's climate impacts. we are obviously signed up to various targets, the most recent being a new targets, the most recent being a new target to reduce the uk‘s emissions by at least 68% by 2030 compared to 1998 levels. do you believe the uk is getting it right in terms of what it is signing up to? well, that is a very welcome rise in ambition. it should be about 75%, really, to
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align with 1.5 should be about 75%, really, to align with1.5 and should be about 75%, really, to align with 1.5 and for the uk to do its global share, but it is a welcome step up, and if other countries follow suit and they implement enough policies to meet their targets, we would be reducing emissions in line with some chance of getting towards the paris goals. but at the moment, in the uk, we are already well above 1 degrees, and another 0.5 is locked in, so we are already close, by the end of this decade, by 2030, to some pretty devastating impacts, and the uk climate change adaptation experts, i will just read you climate change adaptation experts, i willjust read you this very short line which i have read from their october 2020 report from a major conference of hundreds of adaptation experts — the uk is not yet resilient to the minimum level of climate change we are experiencing, the delay in acting now will result in higher costs and much harder choices, and i feel that in higher costs and much harder choices, and ifeel that it in higher costs and much harder choices, and i feel that it is important for viewers to understand that these impacts are locked in,
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and we also have to focus on not just cutting emissions, but also enhancing our resilience. and how does that get done? what needs to be done? well, you know, we need to re—examine choices about where homes are built, who has provided insurance, who is vulnerable to climate impacts, coastal defence areas, we need to look at buildings and infrastructure, we need to look at our water systems completely, because they will not be able to cope with the heavy downpours in the winter, and the hotter period that we have. we also have to look at the health system, we have 900 deaths from the heat wave in 2019, 900 deaths, and that willjust go up and up deaths, and that willjust go up and up and up. we need to look at who is vulnerable and what we can do to make sure those do not rise. thank you very much. today, the bbc are launching a climate change postcode checker
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on the bbc news website and app. the bbc and the met office have looked at the uk‘s changing climate in detail, and you can now check how how your area will be affected. just put in your postcode to discover how temperatures and rainfall will rise over the coming years. the authorities in the indian state of andhra pradesh are struggling to identify a mysterious illness which has affected several hundred people in the last two days. one man has died and dozens are in hospital. the authorities in eluru seem baffled as the number of people being rushed to local hospitals has continued to rise. some report fits, similar to epilepsy, even a loss of consciousness. others report vomiting or frothing at the mouth. nearly 50 children are affected, although most patients are aged between 20 and 40. all the patients tested negative for coronavirus. the organisers of a christmas market which closed afterjust one day, when concerns were raised about a lack of social distancing, say it won‘t reopen. hundreds of people crowded into the attraction in nottingham on saturday. organisers say plans
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were in place to manage visitors entering the site but the numbers were far greater than expected. jersey has recorded a daily high of coronavirus cases. the channel island has seen 96 new cases over the past 24 hours. there are now 516 active cases on the island, with positive tests increasing at an average rate of 60 per day. 17 people are in hospital. south korea is raising its covid—19 alert levels, as it battles a rise in infections. the country was widely praised for its virus response earlier this year, with aggressive testing and contact tracing. but the authorities have struggled in recent weeks. the number of active cases in south korea now stands at 7,873, and there are concerns about rising numbers in hospitals. rudy giuliani, president trump‘s personal lawyer, is being treated for covid 19. the 76 year old is understood to be at the georgetown university
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medical facility in washington. in a tweet he said he was getting "great care". our north america correspondent peter bowes has the details. he‘s one of the best known public figures in america, a loyal supporter of donald trump, and the latest member of the president‘s inner circle to contract the virus. known as america‘s mayor following his widely praised response to the september 11th attacks in 2001, rudy giuliani is every bit as bombastic as his boss, backing mr trump‘s uncorroborated allegations of election fraud. president trump tweeted that... hours later, mr giuliani tweeted...
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the former mayor has been travelling the country, leading mr trump‘s legal efforts to challenge the election results. he is known, like many in the president‘s team, for not wearing a mask. at a hearing last week in michigan, mr giuliani had this exchange with a witness as she was about to give evidence. would you be comfortable taking your mask off so that people can hear you more clearly? she turned down the request. overwhelmingly, mr trump‘s claims of election fraud have either been withdrawn or rejected by the courts. what happens next isn‘t entirely clear. it‘s not as though the attempts were going that well. i mean, they‘ve just taken a battering. and so, you know, could this be the death knell for the legal efforts? with the number of new coronavirus cases again soaring around the country, americans could know by the end of the week whether emergency use authorisation has been granted for two vaccines, with the first jabs available
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almost immediately. health care workers and nursing home residents will be the first to receive the inoculations. in the meantime, several major cities, including san francisco and los angeles, are facing the toughest lockdown yet in the us during the pandemic. within days, it‘s feared some hospitals in california could run out of intensive care beds. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the duke and duchess of cambridge have started a tour of britain by train to thank key workers for their work during the pandemic, and they were treated to a festive send—off at london‘s euston station. before departure, shakin‘ stevens serenaded the couple with his classic hit merry christmas everyone. the duchess was seen dancing before boarding the royal train last night
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forthe1,200—mile trip, which ends tomorrow. and this morning they were treated to similarly—themed music, though in a slightly different style, as they arrived in edinburgh. the royal train pulled into waverley station to the sounds of a piper playing christmas songs including jingle bells and santa claus is coming to town. wearing face masks, william and kate thanked the piper before leaving the station. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. we‘ve had some dense fog around, lifting into low cloud, but some of it will stick around for much of the day, and if it happens where you are, it will peg back the temperatures. for most, today will be a cold day and also a grey one, the best chance of seeing any sunshine will be out towards the west. we are sandwiched between two areas of low pressure, quite gusty winds coming around the western flank off the low pressure in the north sea. so windy across the far north—east of scotland. and here through the afternoon
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we will also see some showers move out towards the west, and we have a better chance of seeing some sunshine. but across parts of south—east scotland and northern ireland, we will hang on to some of that fog. but equally, where we don‘t have it, there will be some sunny skies and a few showers in northern ireland. a few showers coming in from the north sea down this north sea coastline of england. and a few showers in wales. but again, west is best in terms of sunshine. some showers affecting the channel islands and the far south—east corner of england as we go through the day. but you can quite clearly see, where we have got the low cloud, and also some of that fog sticking, particularly so in the south—east, and particularly east anglia. if you are stuck under that, temperatures in norwich, for example, may not get higher than three degrees. but as we push further west and also north, we are looking at a range 6—8 degrees, only three in glasgow, though you have freezing fog this morning, so temperatures are not going to lift that much. through this evening and overnight, the low pressure drifts further west taking some persistent rain with it, there will be some snow on the mountains, gusty winds around it, and this rain is falling
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on already saturated ground, so there is a risk of localised flooding. come south, we will see some of the mist and fog re—form tonight, some of it will still be there from the daytime, and it‘s going to be cold with a touch of frost. tomorrow, low pressure is centred across scotland, so we have bands of rain and showers circulating around it, gusty winds around it as well. come south, for parts of the midlands and southern england, we will see some brighter skies and some sunshine. but again, if you are stuck under an area that hangs on to any fog, it will feel cold. we have the dregs of that low pressure across us on wednesday producing some cloud and spots of rain. this weather front bringing some rain into western areas and top temperatures 6—9.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: talks between the uk and eu resume in a final bid to agree a post—brexit trade deal. it would have been great to get it nailed down sooner, but it is no surprise it is going to the last minute. final preparations are being made for the uk‘s mass vaccination programme against coronavirus, which is due to begin tomorrow. people who get the jab will be given vaccine cards, reminding them to get the second dose. ministers have said there are no plans to introduce a "vaccine passport". hashem abedi, who was jailed for murdering the 22 victims of the manchester arena attack, has admitted his involvement in the conspiracy. up until now — he has always denied helping plan the attack. snowy winters could come to an end in the uk because of climate change, according to analysis from the met office.
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a man on a marathon mission — rugby league legend kevin sinfield finishes his seventh marathon in seven days, in support of former team mate rob burrow. the donations, the support, just fuelled that last run, just completely overwhelming the whole thing, like. negotiations on a post—brexit trade deal are resuming in brussels, as the two sides try to secure a trade deal before the brexit transition period ends injust over three weeks‘ time. eu sources say an agreement on fishing rights was close after talks over the weekend. but that has been disputed by downing street, which said there had been no breakthrough.
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the irish prime minister, micheal martin, cautioned against over—optimism — putting the chances of a deal at "50/50". borisjohnson and the european commission president will discuss the state of negotations later today. and mps will vote on legislation that would allow ministers to override parts of the brexit withdrawal agreement. this report from our political correspondent, chris mason. last night in brussels, the lights on, the talks ongoing, a huge amount at stake. things are on a knife edge here and it is serious. my gut instinct is that it‘s 50/50 right now. and i don‘t think one can be overly optimistic about a resolution emerging. and my sense is, having spoken to some of the key principals here, that this is a very challenging issue to resolve, and particularly around the level playing field. there are three main sticking points — the so—called level playing field, a reference to rules to ensure fair competition, how any deal is enforced, and fishing rights.
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eu sources suggest a deal on fish is close. british sources say it isn‘t. it seems the two sides can‘t even agree on what they disagree on. after today‘s negotiations in brussels, these two will talk again tonight. the prime minister and the european commission president, ursula von der leyen. the coming hours, the coming days will be crucial. chris mason, bbc news. our political correspondent, helen catt is at westminster. really important week, helen, and a busy day, talk us through what will be unfolding? no, you'vejust chucked me off the channel as they we re chucked me off the channel as they were about to throw to me.” chucked me off the channel as they were about to throw to me. i don't know if you can hear me? a technical failure. it is a critical week and a
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busy day today, talk us through what we can expect. a busy day in brussels, talks have resumed, but not a huge amount of optimism around. you heard in chris‘s piece from the irish foreign minister talking about the down beat mood. but the talks continue and the there is the possibility of a deal. however, there are still quite substantial sticking points. certainly on fish, the mood has worsened on that. when it was put out last night, uk sources were quick to squash it, today absolutely scotched, uk source social 5 saying the eu made it up. we know there is issues with the shared rules, the common standards that both sides will agree and that has been quite a
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sticking point. that goes to the heart of what both sides want. for te the eu it‘s protecting the single market. for the uk the point of brexit is the uk being able to make its own rules. that is why that is such a sticking point. the talks will continue and the big heart of what both sides want. for the eu it‘s protecting the single market. for the uk the point of brexit is the uk being able to make its own rules. that is why that is such a sticking point. the talks will continue and the big moment today is that phone call between boris johnson and ursula von der leyen lar. getting a couple of lines coming through, we hear the eu commission head and the british prime minister are to hold that call... oh, ithought prime minister are to hold that call... oh, i thought it was it said they were to hold it, as in not having it, no, they‘re going to hold it at 4pm. that will be an important conversation. the eu‘s chief negotiator told meps that negotiations could continue until wednesday, but no further. we have
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spoken many times about how elastic this deadline is, because the period, the transition period ends on 31st december. but it sounds like this wednesday then is actually going to be the final moment? well there is a practical deadline. we have seen deadlines come and go, but the transition period does end on 3ist the transition period does end on 31st december. the government wants, still needs to get any deal that is a greed through parliament. there are ratification processes that need to be done. there is a practical elements and businesses will have to get ready for what is coming down the track. there is a practical point where the negotiations can‘t just run on and on and there will have to be a point where a deal is reached or it isn‘t. have to be a point where a deal is reached or it isn't. thank you. to recap that conversation that... that borisjohnson is recap that conversation that... that boris johnson is going recap that conversation that... that borisjohnson is going to be having
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later today with the head of eu commission will be happening at 4 o‘clock. it is a busy day, because there that debate and vote in the house of commons and the negotiations go on in brussels. we are hearing weapons looks like —— wednesday looks like the final deadline. lord frost has resumed talks with michel barnier. he spoke briefly earlier. reporter: can you tell us is a deal possible? we are still work hard. are you optimistic a deal can be achieved. and the irish foreign minister said this. the news is down beat. i would say he was gloomy, michel barnier, and cautious about the ability to make progress today. there was news
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last night on some media sources that there was a break through on fishing, that is absolutely not the case from what we are hearing today. so i‘m not sure where that came from. and so the two difficult issues of the level playing field or fair competition and the governance around that and fishing, still seem to be very, very problematic. there was no progress made yesterday. that is our understanding. and so we have got to try to make a break through today, before the two principals if you like, the commission president and the prime minister speak later this evening. but unfortunately i would like to be giving more positive news, but at the moment, these negotiations seem stalled. and these negotiations seem stalled. and the barriers to progress are still very much in place. very down beat
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there. let‘s discuss this further with elvire fabry, senior research fellow on brexit and trade policy at european think tank, the jacques delors institute. and also i‘m joined by anand menon, director of uk in a changing europe. i‘m not sure if you could hear what simon coveney was saying, but he said negotiations seem stalled and the barriers to progress are still very much there. what is your view on where we are now? well i think that at this point the feeling that we have is that... the evolution in negotiation depends on boris johnson‘s political intention and willingness to get a deal. progress are still very much there. what is your view on where we are now? well i think that at this point the feeling that we have is that... the evolution in negotiation depends on boris johnson‘s evolution in negotiation depends on borisjohnson‘s political intention and willingness to get a deal. rather than the phone call that we will have this afternoon, boris johnson and ursula von der leyen, i‘m tempted to pay attention to the reintroduction of the internal market bill in the house of commons
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today. because depending on the fact that, if it will rerepresent the provision social security threatening the commitment to the withdrawal agreement or not, it does reintroduce in this time. it will be a very determinant element for the uk inside, because it will signal the willingness to... at least provide... a new... a new element of fairness and confidence in this negotiation. or the reverse, fairness and confidence in this negotiation. orthe reverse, it fairness and confidence in this negotiation. or the reverse, it will bea negotiation. or the reverse, it will be a provocation, because on the european side they have clearly, they have been very vocal on the fa ct they have been very vocal on the fact that those provisions were introduced in the text, the european parliament itself already said that it wouldn‘t, it wouldn‘t be in a position to ratify any deal, because it was a threat not only with the
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withdrawal agreement to the implementation of any future potential deal. what do you think of the prospects of a deal with where we are now? to be honest, i think we have learned in the past few weeks is that the only people who know what is happening is the people in the room its. it seems to me from the room its. it seems to me from the outside, i have no privileged information, that the sticking points remain the same, level playing field, governance and fish there is a kind ofa playing field, governance and fish there is a kind of a chicken and egg, each side want it is other to blink first and the danger is neither does. if there is no deal, what would you view be of that?m will increase the economic cost of brexit and the levels of disruption that business and consumers face and perhaps more worrying still the
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danger of no deal is it will put the uk and europe at loggerheads and make it more difficult to work on anyissues make it more difficult to work on any issues and next year we have the cop conference in glasgow. we will need to work with the europeans to make that work. diplomatically there isa danger make that work. diplomatically there is a danger no deal could be a danger to both sides. do you think in the end those sorts of considerations will actually result ina deal considerations will actually result in a dealfinally being considerations will actually result in a deal finally being struck? hopefully, because i think that on theure poon side they real —— european side they stick to the idea to get a deal, because beyond the economic cost what we could fear is really to have a very acrimonious situation, a loss of confidence on all the different issues on which we have to co—operate from migration issues to security and defence.
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because i‘m afraid it might even get to damage co—operation on such serious issues like security and defence. i think that at this moment, well the priority is really the pandemic management and the economic recovery, it is really adding, it would be let it say, would be yeah, adding a lot of confusion and added cost that could impede the quick economic recovery. thank you. as the clock ticks down before the time runs out for there to be a brexit deal. we have heard just in the past few moments that there is a suggestion that the clock will run
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out on wednesday, the eu‘s chief negotiator telling meps the negotiations could continue but no further. you‘re watching bbc news. hospitals across the uk are receiving the pfizer—biontech vaccine, ready for the first doses to be administered from tomorrow. priority will be given to vaccinating the over—80s, frontline healthcare workers and care home staff and residents. aru na iyengar reports. a precious delivery from belgium arrives at croydon university hospital in south london, one of 50 vaccination hubs across england which will receive some of the 800,000 doses available in the first batch. the pfizer biontech vaccines are packed in ice. they have to be kept at —70 degrees. they need handling with care. these small vials will kick—start the most crucial mass inoculation programme in history.
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it‘s just incredible, actually. obviously, i can‘t hold them in my hands, because they are —70 degrees, but to know that they are here and we are amongst the first in the country to actually receive the vaccine and therefore the first in the world is just amazing. i‘m so proud. st george‘s hospital in tooting is also getting ready. the uk has ordered 40 million doses. each person needs to have two doses, 21 days apart. so that‘s enough to vaccinate 20 million people. hospitals like this see many elderly people every day of the week. so they'll be taking the opportunity to make sure those over 80 who will be in the hospital, either in outpatients or perhaps being discharged this week, will get the vaccination first. we'll also be working with local care homes to make sure care home staff, who have been doing such a greatjob during the pandemic, also get their vaccine. and of course, high—risk health workers will also be in the queue as well. scotland, wales and northern ireland will also begin their vaccination
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programme on tuesday. over 80s are told not to be worried if they‘re not called for a jab this month. the vast majority will have to wait until the new year to receive it. how the roll—out goes will determine the future course of the coronavirus pandemic in the uk. for now, these life—savers will be kept under lock and key until tomorrow when the vaccination programme starts. aruna iyengar, bbc news. let‘s go to edinburgh where scotland‘s first minister nicola sturgeon is holding a coronavirus briefing. the remaining cases are spread across the other eight mainland health board areas. 974 people are in hospital, which is an increase of 23 from yesterday and 59 are in fencive care —— fencive care —— intensive care. one additional death has been registered in the past 24
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hours of a patient who first tested positive over the past 28 days. registration offices tend to be closed at weekend and the figures we report for people dying on sundays and mondays can be artificially low asa and mondays can be artificially low as a result of that. in total since friday, 28 deaths have been registered and that mean it is total number of deaths is now 3,917. that figure reminds us again this virus is still causing grief and heartbreak every day to families and i want to send my condolences all those who have lost a loved one to it. i'm those who have lost a loved one to it. i‘m joined by the health secretary and the chief medical officer. the health secretary will talk about the testing of designated visitors to care home and the use of lateral flow test it s
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visitors to care home and the use of lateral flow test its is being trialled from today in care home. before then i have two points that i wa nt to before then i have two points that i want to briefly update on. the first is to confirm that over the weekend scotla nd is to confirm that over the weekend scotland received our first is to confirm that over the weekend scotland received ourfirst supplies of vaccine against covid, which has been developed by pfizer/biontech and which of course was authorised for use last week and supplies have been delivered to centres in different locations across the country. today i visited the western general hospital in edinburgh to meet the staff there, co—orde nighting the delivery —— co—ordinating the delivery of the vaccine and these will be people who get the vaccine tomorrow. as you know, we set this out last week, vaccinators, those carrying out
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vaccinations will be vaccinated first. after that we will focus on residents in care homes and front line health workers and we then prioritise people over the age of 80. this is obviously extremely positive news. as we have said before, the use of vaccination in time should enable all of us to return to conditions which are much more like normal life. but vaccination is of course a major logistical exercise and will take time to work our through the programme. starting as i have set out with those most at risk of becoming seriously ill and losing their lives. the news therefore while positive and welcome, doesn‘t remove the need for caution during this winter period. instead, the fa ct this winter period. instead, the fact that we are so close to being able to vaccinate the population as able to vaccinate the population as a whole should i hope encourage all of us to be that little bit more
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careful and to pay even more attention to the rules to try to keep ourselves and those with love as safe as possible over the course of the winter. that is linked to the second point i want to touch on briefly, tomorrow as we always now do on briefly, tomorrow as we always now doona briefly, tomorrow as we always now do on a tuesday, we will announce the weekly review of the levels of protection that apply in each local authority area. now i‘m not going to pre—empt that review, but i will just briefly some of the issues that we weigh up the first is that current levels have undoubtly helped to reduce prevalence of the virus in scotla nd to reduce prevalence of the virus in scotland and that is a positive. if we look at the national picture, although this fluctuates, the percentage of tests coming back positive has come closer to the 5%
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that the world health organization said is important to assess whether the virus is under control. the picture varies from region to region, but the national picture is clear and positive. the number of new cases has been falling for the last few weeks. that includes reductions in the eleven local authority areas in level 4 and we have said and said when we applied level 4, that those authorities would move out of the level on friday and i can confirm that remain its friday and i can confirm that remain it s the case. friday and i can confirm that remain its the case. we will consider what level should apply to those areas from friday. we will consider what changes should be made to the levels in other areas. as ever, our decisi s in other areas. as ever, our decisi s will be based on the trajectory of the virus and we will consider the
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social and economic harms from the restrictions. we look at the hard indicators in each area, but also consider the wider context at the context. that means taking account of the christmas period. in we will continue to take a cautious and careful approach and i will set out the conclusions in parliament tomorrow afternoon. for the moment, cani tomorrow afternoon. for the moment, can i ask all of you to stick to the current rules and guidance. it is important that we don‘t drop our guard. now with can see the prospect ofa guard. now with can see the prospect of a return to a more normal way of life, that should give us more incentive to stay safe and keep each other safe. if you‘re in any doubt
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about the rules in your local authority area, you can use the post code checker, but just authority area, you can use the post code checker, butjust to recap, please don‘t visit each other‘s homes at the moment, except for essential purposes, like child care or looking after a vulnerable adult. if you do meet people outdoors or indoors, stick to the limit of six people, avoid car sharing, work from home if possible, down load the app and remember facts, the home if possible, down load the app and rememberfacts, the key rules that help to keep us safe. face coverings, clean your hands, keep safe distances and self—isolated and get tested if you have any symptoms of covid. if we continue as we have been doing to stick to these rules we can continue to see the levels of the virus go in the right direction as the vaccination programme kicks in in the weeks and months to come,
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which hopefully all adds up to a brighter new year than the one we have lived through so far this year. thank you for listen hg. i‘m going to hand over to the hand over the the health secretary and then we will take questions from journalists. thank you. studio: nicola sturgeon looking ahead to that roll out of vaccine, starting tomorrow. now a public inquiry has heard that the jailed terrorist hashem abedi has admitted for the first time that he was involved in planning the manchester arena bombing, which killed 22 people. abedi had previously claimed to not hold any extremist views and said he was shocked by the attack that was carried out by his brother in may 2017. but in an interview this year as part of the inquiry, hashem abedi admitted to playing "a full and knowing part" in the attack. he was handed 24 life sentences in august with a minimum term of 55 years before he can be considered for parole. let‘s get more from our
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correspondent damian grammaticas. so he is in prison anyway, but i wonder what impact this might have on the survivors, the fact he has admitted his part? i think a significant impact, as you can imagine. he was extradited from libya, he is the brother of the suicide bomber who killed 22 people and the police have counted about a thousand victims, over 250 people injured, hundreds more who suffered trauma. he was extradited and denied his involvement. throughout his trial. he did not give evidence. he just gave a written statement. he wasn‘t there for the sentencing. but now in this surprise move, yes, he‘s admitted that he was involved and this was the paul greeny the counsel to the inquiry who told the inquiry on october 22nd in an interview in
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prison, hashem abedi, he says, admitted he had played a full part, admitted he had played a full part, a knowing part in the planning and preparation for the arena attack. many will feel, why did he not do this earlier in he was prepared to do it now. the inquiry is why the interview happened. yes the inquiry is ongoing into events. we learned a lot obviously through the course of the trial as well and in that we learned that hashem abedi had, he was 20 years old at the time of the trial. he had been in the uk, he had been living with his brother. the evidence presented at the trial was that he had helped in the preparation of the attack, the preparation of the attack, the preparation of the explosive, they had fled to libya and he had remained in libya while his brother returned before the attack to carry
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it out and possibly had been the last person to be in contact with him before he carried out the attack. a lot of details came out through the course of the inquiry. and the trial. but of course the police inquiry that is, but of course more now coming out through this inquiry as well. going on after the events. how much longer does this inquiry have to run? not clear on the timeline. but it is a huge effort obviously, because of the sheer scale of this event, of what happened. the trial was described as the biggest murder trial in british legal history. because of the number of victims involved. so of course the inquiry itself has a huge amount of evidence to work through. and a very difficult process for the families. thank you very much. leeds‘ rugby league legend kevin sinfield has this morning completed the extraordinary feat of running run seven marathons in seven days for charity.
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the leeds rhinos director of rugby has been raising funds for his friend and former teammate — rob burrow — who‘s suffering from motor neurone disease. sinfield‘s awareness and fundraising efforts for the motor neurone disease association have now passed a million pounds, easily surpassing the initial target of £77,777. after he crossed the finishing line, he said he was exhausted, but relieved. how are you feeling. overwhelmed. just... it's unbelievable. just so happy that we got it done. after the first day, we were all worried we had bit off more than we could chew, but then the donations, the support just fuelled that lost run and completely overwhelming the whole thing. at the start we were worry we might not get 7 grand, let alone what we have done. we have been so proud of wearing this vest for our
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good mate rob burrow and his family and the mnd community and the mnd association do so many things and the sooner we get advances the better. what are you going to do now. i want to say i want to sleep, but i reckon i won't sleep tonight. it has notjust been seven runs, it is the 20 hours you spend trying to get yourself ready to run the following day. the team have been brilliant. i have got a special group of friends, you know they have been so self——less this week and they have wanted to be part of it and share in it and they have gone above and beyond all of them. they have been brilliant. we wouldn't have been brilliant. we wouldn't have done without them and rob, absolute inspiration for us, his texts every night. they were
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brilliant. so we are delighted. a big long think and finish off with a snake in my boots it was the same distance as leeds to glasgow. my wife said if somebody said they would double it would i do it again. isaid would double it would i do it again. i said absolutely. busted as broken asim,! i said absolutely. busted as broken as i m, iwould i said absolutely. busted as broken as i m, i would do it because that is what mates do, they look after each other, the group have been so special at the club and the club have been fantastic and thrown everything behind it and we never knew it would turn into anything like this it were just six mates trying to raise money for rob and none of us could go on holiday because of covid, so we said we could do this instead and this is our holiday. i don't think we will forget this one. it is probably the
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best week of my life when alook at what we have been through and the camaraderie has been unreal and... we'll miss waking up tomorrow and getting ready to go again. i think that will be the case for the next the weeks and months and then in a couple of years we will look back hopefully with pride at being able to help people. thank you. look at that, now up to £1.2 million, he has exceeded his target by 1576%, and it just million, he has exceeded his target by 1576%, and itjust keeps on ticking up, that is a really brilliant feat by him, and he has done an amazing job, notjust of raising money, but also raising awareness of motor neurone disease. now time for a look at the weather
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with carol kirkwood. hello again. it‘s been a fairly foggy start to the day. most of that fog will lift into low cloud, but some of it will linger. if it lingers where you are, for example in parts of east anglia, southern scotland, and northern ireland, that will hold back the temperature. also a few showers dotted around our coastline through today. the best chance of brightest weather will be in the west, but it is going to be a cold day whichever way you look at it. this evening and overnight, an area of low pressure currently in the north sea drifts west, taking some heavy rain with it, across parts of scotland with some snow on the mountains and gusty winds around it. come south, we will see mist and fog patches re—form, and it is going to be a cold night with some frost. tomorrow, we start off with that mist and fog which should lift more readily than today. around the low pressure, we will have areas of rain and showers and spiralling and again gusty winds, some brightness as we come further south, where we don‘t have the fog, we are looking at temperatures of three to nine.
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hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: talks between the uk and eu resume in a final bid to agree a post—brexit trade deal. final preparations are being made for the uk‘s mass vaccination programme against coronavirus, which is due to begin tomorrow. people who get the jab will be given vaccine cards, reminding them to get the second dose. ministers have said there are no plans to introduce a "vaccine passport". hashem abedi, who was jailed for murdering the 22 victims of the manchester arena attack, has admitted his involvement in the conspiracy. up until now, he has always denied helping plan the attack. snowy winters could come to an end in the uk because of climate change, according to analysis from the met office. a man on a marathon mission — rugby league legend kevin sinfield finishes his seventh marathon in seven days, in support of former team mate rob burrow.
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parts of the uk got a dusting of snow over the weekend, but that could soon become a thing of the past in britain, as climate change takes hold. a thing of the past in britain, that‘s according to the met office, which has shown the bbc some of the most detailed climate—change projections ever made. here‘s our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt. nothing evokes winter like a thick blanket of snow. and sledging, snowball fights and snowmen too, of course. but, says the met office, scenes like this will become a rarity across most of britain in the decades to come if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase, as they have been. we are saying by the end of the century much of the lying snow will have disappeared entirely except over the highest ground. here is how the met office projections suggest our winters could change. this is the average temperature
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of the coldest day across the uk over the last two decades. everywhere in blue is below zero, and the bluer the colour, the colder it is. this map shows how things could have changed by the 2040s. as you can see, most of england now rarely gets sub—zero days. now look at this. by the 2060s, only very high ground and some parts of northern scotland are likely to still experience these freezing days. temperature changes will be much less dramatic if the world succeeds in cutting emissions, and there has been good news on that front. just last week, the uk government announced ambitious targets for cutting carbon, and more than 100 countries, including the uk, china and the eu, have committed to going net zero by mid century. if those promises are not honoured, we can expect more of this, the met office says. its new data gives unprecedented
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detail, showing how the climate could change in every neighbourhood in the uk. as well as being warmer, our winters will get wetter. all right? how you doing? panorama has followed the wingfield family from doncaster. can we come in and have a look? you can do, by all means. thank you very much. i don't give a monkeys no more. the wingfields‘ home was flooded in november last year when a month‘s worth of rain fell over south yorkshire in a day. look at this, there is just water through the whole house. yeah. this is my father—in—law's room downstairs. this is terrible! grandpa ken, suffering from dementia, had to be carried out of the home safety. are you all right? yeah, i'm fine. our summers will be a dramatic contrast to our wetter winters. they will be hotter and drier if emissions are not curbed. the warning is clear.
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unless the world succeeds in cutting emissions, intense weather like this could become more common. justin rowlatt, bbc news. britain‘s first all—electric car charging forecourt has opened in braintree, essex, to charge electric vehicles with 100% renewable energy. amanda stretton is the sustainable transport editor at centrica. this site can charge cars in up to 20 minutes, and after about 200 miles of driving range. amanda stratton is sustainable transport editor at centrica, so this is the first of more than 100 electric forecou rts first of more than 100 electric forecourts that the clean energy
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company will be rolling out. this is the future, how much of a difference will this make? i think it is going to make a tremendous difference for two reasons. first of all, range anxiety has been one of the biggest inhibitors to mass av take up, our research shows around 70% of people are put off by the concern of not being able to charge their vehicle. now, most vehicles will be charged at home, but if you know that on longer journeys you have at home, but if you know that on longerjourneys you have got this type of facility available to you where you can get an 80% charge in around 20 minutes, it is going to alleviate that concern tremendously. the other thing is just education. many people are really concerned about it, what gridserve are doing is opening their facilities up to people who still drive conventional internal combustion engine vehicles so they can see how it works and really some of the horror stories that we have had in the past from
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the very new adopters of electric vehicles can be put to rest once and for all. so this could get new people joining for all. so this could get new peoplejoining in, for all. so this could get new people joining in, and for all. so this could get new peoplejoining in, and there are other imperatives, actually, to do it, which is if you want to buy a new car, remind us of the targets by which things really will change by force as well. exactly, so the government recently announced that by2030, government recently announced that by 2030, the sale of internal combustion engine vehicles will cease. that means if you currently have a vehicle, you can carry on using it. and there is some confusion about what hybrids will still be available to buy, but essentially we know we are going to have to move electric in the near future. now, ithink have to move electric in the near future. now, i think as well, when we look at the pictures of this forecourt, and we actually compare it to service stations or petrol stations that we are familiar with, this looks beautiful, it is newly
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designed, it is light, it is airy, it has got all the facilities we need. if you think about what a motorway service station is light, most of them were designed when the motorway first opened, and really they are no longer fit for purpose. so as well as bay, if you like, the sta ke so as well as bay, if you like, the stake that the government are levying by putting his firm date and place when there will be a ban, we are seeing the incentive from companies like gridserve putting these service centres in place, incentivising people to make the change. polite thank you forjoining us, amanda stratton. for those of you living in the uk... in fact, we are not on bbc world, i didn‘t need to say that! today the bbc
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are launching a climate change postcode checker on the bbc news website and app. just put in your postcode to discover how temperatures and rainfall will rise, over the coming years. president trump‘s personal lawyer, rudy giuliani, is in hospital after testing positive for coronavirus. mr giuliani, who has been leading the trump campaign‘s legal challenges to the presidential election result, is the latest member of the president‘s team to fal ill with covid. in a tweet the 76—year—old said he was "getting great care and feeling good". the shadow faith minister, labour‘s janet da by, has quit this morning after saying marriage registrars should be allowed to refuse to certify same—sex partnerships. ms daby had called for a conscience clause to protect religious objection to same—sex marriages. it currently constitutes unlawful discrimination if registrars refuse to perform same—sex weddings. ms daby tweeted this morning that she was proud to support same—sex marriages, and sincerely apologised for her misjudged comments on friday.
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simon mccoy will be here at the top of the hour with the one o‘clock news, but first as people in the uk prepare to be vaccinated this week, we‘ve been putting your questions to the experts, and a little earlier i spoke to gp and former head of the royal college of general practitioners dame clare gerada and professorjonathan ball from the university of nottingham in your questions answered. last week, we heard that the first delivery of vaccines had arrived in the uk. as people start being vaccinated this week, we‘re answering all your questions about the coronavirus vaccine. with me is dame clare gerada, who‘s a gp and the former head of the royal college of general practitioners. and jonathan ball, professor of molecular virology at the university of nottingham. welcome and thank you both forjoining us. claire, starting with you, a question from abigail. she says, my mother is 76 years old and has stage four lung cancer and is no longer undergoing treatment, therefore i would like to know
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when she will receive the vaccine. i would also like to know when i will get the vaccine as her sole carer. it seems to me like carers like myself have been the forgotten ones and this is not good enough. it is worth saying lots of people are getting in touch with those who are caring for vulnerable people asking very similar things. ok, her mother is clearly in a high—risk group. she will not be one of the first to get it, because it is the over 80s and then it is decreasing from there, but she will certainly get it. when, i don‘t know. i suspect sometime in the new year, certainly not in the first batch. with respect to carers, the evidence shows that because there is still a limited amount of this vaccine, there is 800,000 doses, so that‘s 400,000 people, the evidence says the best people to give it to are those that are most at risk. now carers are not most at risk. if we can immunise those most at risk first, then we will start to reduce the death rate in this country and whatever else
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the vaccine is given. i am sure that carers in their own right will form part of this vaccination programme. but most of them, if they are in a risk group themselves, will get it, but otherwise they will have to wait until the highest risk people get it and that will reduce the risk for all of us. so what would a carer do if the person they are caring for has been vaccinated and they haven‘t? would they have to continue to take exactly the same precautions on social distancing and ppe around them? again, that is a good question, strictly speaking, no. once the person they are caring for has been fully vaccinated, we are hoping, otherwise what is the point in the vaccine, that they will be immune to covid. it doesn‘t mean the carer themselves will be immune, so they will have to keep social distancing outside the home for themselves if they want to reduce their risk of getting the virus. so, jonathan, to that point, our next question asks about the effectiveness of the vaccine.
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john christie asks, if the covid—19 vaccine is 95% effective, does this mean that those who get the vaccine are not fully protected, or does it mean that 5% of those who are vaccinated are not protected at all? it's a great question about effectiveness and what it means. if we think about the clinical trials, the way they have been set up is to determine, or monitor people who have been vaccinated with either the placebo, the dummy vaccine, or the sars corona vaccine, monitoring them for the appearance of symptoms. and when they get so many covid cases that have been confirmed, they then look at the data and work out how many of the cases were in people who received the vaccine and how many of the cases were in the people who didn't receive the vaccine. and pretty much what those numbers mean if we had 100 cases, they saw coronavirus, 95 of those cases were in somebody who received the dummy vaccine,
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so the placebo, and only five cases were in those who received the sars coronavirus, and that is how we get 95%. the proportion of people who we think are protected. sojust going back to ourfirst point, claire, i know you were saying about not needing to wear ppe around somebody who has been vaccinated, but it might be inevitable that some might have a residual fear that what if their loved one is in that 5%? are you asking me? yes, that is always the fear. that is always the fear with any vaccination. vaccination against measles... what i would say is stage four cancer of the lung is a very serious condition, and it may be that the daughter has to actually use precautions, not just for covid but for the flu, the common cold, because her mother is at risk. irrespective of the infection the daughter might transmit. i would say in those cases
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where you do have somebody you are looking after who is very unwell, take precautions, whether that means wearing full ppe is another matter, but i would certainly make sure that i wash my hands, that if i have a cold, i don‘t go near my loved one, all sorts of things like that. patricia rhodes has another very good question asking claire, what is the risk of the new vaccines triggering autoimmune diseases years after having one? that is an excellent question. just so we understand what an autoimmune disease is, this is where the body essentially doesn‘t recognise its own cells as itself and starts to attack them, and it can sometimes happen in response to a normal infection, so for example a sore throat, a streptococcal sore throat, the body fights that off, but also it can think that its other cells are the bacteria and it starts to fight itself so you end up with this autoimmune antibodies
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fighting come in a sense, attacking its own body, and a common one is rheumatoid arthritis, coeliac disease and many others. the answer to this is vaccines very rarely, i don‘t think they ever have, and maybe we can discuss that, maybejonathan could say, i don‘t think they do create autoimmune responses, the vaccines that we know and love. the only way we will know about this vaccine, of course, is time, and as we are going to be immunising i imagine about 4.5 billion people, i think we will probably start to get a good idea whether it does trigger an autoimmune response. but i suspect it won‘t because none of the other ones have. so that would leave patricia in the position of wondering whether it is best for her to have it or not. i certainly would have it, because if she has an autoimmune disease already, so for example if she has rheumatoid arthritis, or she is a coeliac or she has one of the other autoimmune disease,
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that would put her at increased risk of becoming very unwell following covid, so i would get the vaccine. what i thought the question was, could it, in somebody who doesn‘t have a history of autoimmune disease, it could trigger an autoimmune disease and as my knowledge as a gp, i do not think so butjonathan may have a better answer to that. briefly, jonathan. we have loads of questions, but i saw you shaking your head. i was nodding my head, in terms of what claire said, it is all absolutely spot on. in terms of vaccines causing some kind of autoimmune disease, there was a tiny risk or concern about one of the pandemic flu vaccines come of the swine flu vaccine used in the united states that might have been associated with a syndrome called guillain—barre syndrome, where the immune system starts to destroy the peripheral nerves, but the evidence wasn't that strong and we have not seen
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anything like it since, and that vaccine is used routinely, so i think, you know, the risk of having an autoimmune disease as you may well suffer a more serious disease and therefore you should get vaccinated. we have to crack through the next questions because we have plenty to get through. jonathan, andrew says we know that the covid vaccines, though promising, i‘m not100% effective and some people will be infected after having them, will people be advised to get a test after having the vaccine to see if they are protected? is it possible? it's possible for some vaccinations, and for the hepatitis b vaccine when you have had that, you are often able to see the level of immunity that you have. the reality is that with the covid vaccine we don't know at the moment what protective immunity actually looks like, and we know that the vaccine is around 95% effective, so that means the vast majority of people will have some protection, particularly from disease, therefore i'd be very surprised if there is monitoring.
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what will happen is we will continue to monitor cases of covid as they come up, particularly in hospitals, and see whether or not those people have had vaccination or not, when they have had it, and that will give us an idea of how well they work and also how long the immunity lasts. claire, john newcombe is 82, and he asks, what are the risks for people on blood thinners taking the vaccine? again, lovely question. the questions from listeners are fabulous. first of all, vaccines rarely interact with any of the medicines that we give patients, and blood thinners such as warfarin, there is no interaction with other vaccines, and from what i have seen from this vaccine there is no drug interaction, so you can quite safely have the covid vaccine if you are on blood thinners. jonathan, nick hughes asks, given the speed at which the vaccines have had to be developed and produced, there has been no possibility to study any long—term adverse
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effects of the drugs. given the experience of other drugs in the past that had negative and catastrophic side—effects, such as thalidomide, what steps can and have been taken as a precaution against long—term adverse effects of the drug? clearly long—term testing has not been possible in this case, but what other measures have been taken to address this, or is it simply a case of this is our best option and we have to suck it up and see? if this is the case, then i believe the public should be aware of that, so they can make an informed decision. in terms of safety, one of the biggest measures, and this is true for any new drug or any new vaccine, is the data that you get from phase three trials. these are the large trials that have just been partially completed. they are still under way — most of the phase three trials will continue for another year or so. but what we have is interim data which shows that all of the vaccines that are in these final stages, these phase three trials, have been shown to be safe in literally thousands, tens of thousands of people,
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and therefore, any adverse effects, or serious adverse effect, would be very, very rare. and so what happens once a vaccine has got licensed and any treatment, the regulators and gp surgeries and hospitals and everybody else involved, and indeed people themselves can continue to report on any adverse effects that they might feel were triggered by having the vaccine, and they are monitored routinely scrutinised carefully by the regulator. so that any very rare adverse effects are picked up after licensing. so in a way we call that a kind of phase four period for the vaccine. at the moment, all of the safety data for the pfizer, astrazeneca, moderna vaccine indicate that, yes, there are some very minor adverse effects, but in terms of serious ones there are not any evidence. claire, could the vaccine affect fertility? emily in north london
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wants to know. i see that pregnant women are being advised not to take the vaccine, but what about women in their 20s and 30s who want to get pregnant? if they haven‘t been enough tests done on pregnant women to show it is safe how do we know it is ok for fertility? apologies that somebody is drilling upstairs, this is the problem with covid! we are not picking it up. the reason they are not advised in pregnant women is it has not been tested in pregnant women, and the chances are it is as safe as for anybody, whether pregnant or otherwise, but it‘s the clinical trials that have not been done, so it will not be licensed. with respect to fertility, it will not affect fertility at all. the advice we are currently being told is not to get pregnant within three months of having the vaccine. now, of course, if you are having fertility treatment, you don‘t know when you are going to get pregnant so i would suggest, and as you fall into a very high risk group, it is unlikely, that you postpone the vaccine until you have had your fertility treatment, gone through pregnancy
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and come out the other side. so there are two questions tied up in that, and hopefully those are the two answers that your listener will take. last question from the viewers. jack in leicester asks jonathan, how will we know if the vaccine has been correctly stored when we receive it? is it possible they could be mistakes in storage that would not show up at the point of having the injection that would render it pointless? it is a great question, and correct storage to maintain the effectiveness of the vaccine is a great consideration. the manufacturer of the pfizer vaccine has gone to great lengths to ensure that all the way through the manufacture and transport, the cold chain, the cold storage is maintained, to the point that they have gps trackers on the vaccine lots which also measure and continually report the temperature of the vaccine. so rest assured that from the time it leaves the factory to the time it turns up in a hospital to go into a safety freezer,
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at all points that vaccine and the temperature it is being kept at are being closely monitored. a quick final question from me. i don‘t know which of you is best placed to answer it, but if you have had covid, would you need the vaccine? should you get the vaccine? yes. the evidence is saying we will not pre—test people, so we will assume nobody is not going to have it if they are in one of those groups. and i‘m in that position, because i‘ve had covid, proven covid, but i will still be on the list to get the vaccine and that is the current advice that is being given. jonathan, is that right? it will give your immune system a nice little boost, hopefully. thank you, good to know. thank you so much, as you said claire, they were great questions from viewers. fantastic questions. thank you for answering them so well. thank you. bye.
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hello there! it‘s another cold day, particularly where the fog and low cloud lingers across parts of the midlands, south—east england and east anglia, some freezing fog as well, and in many areas where it has stayed grey, temperatures have struggled to get above freezing all day. patchy fog into this evening, further north wet weather is starting to arrive, and the weather is starting to change here. this area of low pressure coming in from the north sea bringing light to weather for northern areas. further south, still hardly any breeze, is a mist and fog will re—form, thickening up in the same sort of areas. a few showers into west wales, the far south of england, a few into the far south—east of england, but most of that wetter weather coming into scotland, later northern ireland and the far north of england, keeping temperatures up here. further south, a patchy frost and the risk of icy patches too. the rain overnight and into tomorrow
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could be a concern across northern and eastern parts of scotland, not expecting huge amounts of rain, but given that the ground is saturated, it brings the risk of some flooding and travel disruption too. that wetter weather continues to affect scotland, northern ireland, northern england, pushing down to northern wales as well. one or two showers further south, some sunshine coming through, not as much mist and fog and low cloud because we have got more of a breeze to stir things up, and we could be touching gale force in the western isles of scotland, the north coast of northern ireland. temperatures getting up to 8—9 , the lowest temperatures are going to be across east anglia, where the mist and fog and low cloud cuddling into the afternoon. things quieten in down we have that area of low pressure, rain on it tending to peter out overnight, and as we move into rented out, the small cloud across northern and eastern parts of scotland, and by this stage northern and eastern parts of england with showers and not as much fog. then
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dry weather and sunshine before we see an atlantic weather front bringing rain towards wales on the south—west, and northern ireland by the time we get to the evening. ahead of that, temperatures of 5—7 degrees with light winds. not a great deal of rain heading our way on thursday, most of it diving down into france. the next weather system has a bit more about it, and that is probably arriving on friday.
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more talks, but less and less time. the brexit trade negotiations enter the end game. uk and eu representatives are back around the table in brussels ahead of a crucial phone call between the prime minister and the european council president this afternoon. he was very downbeat, i would say he was very gloomy. a deal can be done. we‘ll be getting the latest, live, from brussels and westminster. also this lunchtime... final preparations for the first covid vaccine jabs to be administered in the uk tomorrow. the key thing that we know from other vaccine programs is actually making sure that people come back for that second dose. hashem abedi, brother of the manchester arena bomber, admits his involvement in the conspiracy for the first time. the days of snowball fights and snowmen could be over for much

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