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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 11, 2020 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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inside to watch a fight live since the start of the pandemic. just 1000 are lucky enough to have tickets, like superfan steve, who's paid £200 for his. very, very privileged and very lucky to get one of the 1000 golden tickets as you could call them. so, yeah, it's great for boxing, and it's obviously great to have fans back at sporting events again. do you feel like charlie bucket, then? yeah, a little bit, i guess, yeah. victory forjoshua would bring the prospect of a mouth—watering all—british affair with tyson fury to be crowned the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. right now, though, there's only one focus. when i look at kubrat pulev, i'm saying that boy can't beat me. that boy can't beat me. i'm too good, i'm too strong, i'm too quick and i've developed too much skills. and that's the mindset i'm going into saturday night with. all eyes on the prize then,
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but the bigger award lies tantalisingly in wait. natalie pirks, bbc news, wembley arena. the duke and duchess of cambridge and their three children made a special appearance tonight at the pantomime — their first royal engagement together as a family. they watched the show, held as a thank you to key workers in the capital for their efforts during the pandemic, from the royal box. prince william also paid tribute to dame barbara windsor, describing her as a "national treasure". that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with us are former conservative adviser mo hussein and harriet line,
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the deputy political editor of pa. thanks for sharing your friday evening with us. let's get start with some of the papers we have. the telegraph says schools have been threatened with legal action by ministers amid growing fears that many will close early to reduce the spread of coronavirus among teenagers before christmas. the i has an intriguing story. it says that gps are concerned that the government has failed to put in place an it system that alerts them to whether any of their patients have already had the first dose of the pfizer/biontech vaccine in a hospital, resulting in them not knowing who to contact first on their priority lists. also going with a coronavirus story, the guardian leads on scientists and government advisers urging families to rethink christmas plans and ignore the easing of covid rules amid fears over rising cases
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and hospitalisations in parts of the uk. 0n the brexit trade deal negotiations, which rumble on, the financial times says that brussels has told eu governments not to entertain the idea of side deals with britain should trade talks fail, urging a firm line in order to force the uk back to the negotiation table "as soon as possible" after january 1. the daily mail says four royal navy vessels will be dispatched to britain's territorial waters if a trade deal is not agreed with the eu. the sun goes with a call from friends of the actress dame barbara windsor, who has died at the age of 83, for her death to mark a turning point in the fight against dementia. they want more funding for research in to the disease. the mirror says the call is being led by barbara windsor‘s heartbroken husband, scott mitchell, who has urged the government "to be true to their previous promises and invest more" into care.
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we are going to start with this, the daily member. last night, we reported the death of dame barbara windsor, it was really sad, as we hear some attributes, harriet, windsor, it was really sad, as we hearsome attributes, harriet, let's start with you, we all grew up with her and she was so formidable, and according to all the tribute we heard, she was so lovely, i know we have for husband urging to continue on with this work she did tirelessly in highlighting the concerns of dementia sufferers. yeah, dame barbara windsor was a real national treasure, in the west and in the 19505, treasure, in the west and in the 1950s, to east enders, but alongside all of that work, she determined his charity work. i actually interviewed her about five years ago, her work with the british legion, and then in
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the latter years after her dementia diagnosis, she did a lot of work to raise awareness of dementia and the campaignfor raise awareness of dementia and the campaign for more funding and research. an unusually with someone suffering from the disease speaking out about her own experience or that comanche has been supported usually at the time, not her husband scott is calling for the prime minister's promise on more funding to be made true. remember last year, in the garden of number 10, barbara windsor met borisjohnson, garden of number 10, barbara windsor met boris johnson, asking garden of number 10, barbara windsor met borisjohnson, asking him for a kiss, a really lovely moment, but that moment did raise the profile of dementia suffering and the need for more funding and in what in many ways is forgotten illness. beside also picking up on this —— of the sun also. ba bs's also picking up on this —— of the sun also. babs's legacy, how they
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are describing this. the friends of the stars, she was such a superstar, an absolute legend, the calling for this to be her legacy. exactly. and calling for things like early diagnosis, more funding for research, and different ways of tackling this horrific disease, and i think it is really nice when somebody of her celebrity uses her position and her public profile and her platform to raise awareness of these issues, and i think be testament to that is seen tributes from not only the people who worked with her and drop with her but also members of the royal family, former prime ministers, so she did have real sway anything she has made for progress on his agenda —— and i think she has. but clearly lots more has to be done. the focus being so much on covid, which is understandable, it shows there are still other big medical challenges
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that we face and that need some attention as well. and of course it is the most vulnerable in the care homes affected by covid, so dreadfully at the beginning of this, so dreadfully at the beginning of this, so it is really important keep the spotlight on them, and barbara windsor, the guardian also showed an image of her as a young woman. we all grew image of her as a young woman. we allgrew up image of her as a young woman. we all grew up with her and it is just desperately sad. like i say, last night, we were all really sad when we had to break this year on bbc news, but let's look at the story that we are going to focus on with the guardian, coronavirus. harriet, we we re the guardian, coronavirus. harriet, we were all looking forward to this period over christmas, this number of days that people were able to travel and see family members. the scientists are now, they are urging people to rethink their plans. talk us people to rethink their plans. talk us through this. yeah, everyone
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instrumental -- is —— is tremendously looking for to christmas and meeting with family, meeting family they have not met for a year, but the cases do appear to be going up and it is particularly in london, which now has the highest rate of infection in all of england, concern amongst scientists, the guardian is reporting, experts warning ministers they are sending the wrong message that families must not follow the rules, suggesting this could lead to a third wave just weeks before we have mass vaccination roll—out, suggest concerning. lutz of young people will be seeing grandparents over christmas i think scientists are urging element of caution for people to think about whether it is right to think about whether it is right to mingle with relatives who are vulnerable themselves and really not to blow it over the christmas period and plunge us into a much worse
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situation in the new year. is a tricky one, isn't it? we do not want to see more lockdowns and difficulties, and we did it about people's health, but when it comes to clear instructions on what to do, it is all getting a bit hazy again, it is all getting a bit hazy again, it is all getting a bit hazy again, it is all getting a bit fudged. yeah, it really is, and i think on this one, the genie is out of the bottle. it decision was made following some advice by the government around three households meeting over certain period of time, andl meeting over certain period of time, and i think was clearer than that after months of not being up to see people, people getting together again, it will lead to some kind of rising transmission after christmas, but three households is certainly not perfect, there were still many people who may have more than three children or three sets of friends they want to meet. they cannot. it is not a perfect solution. what i think government has to strike a balance between giving people some
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kind of leeway over the christmas period, which is so important as to other “ so —— so many people. otherwise, people are likely to ignore the guidance. i think saying something and then trying to apply a bit more caution, i think that message willjust be lost. yeah, that is an interesting point. let us have a look at some international news, we'll come back to coronavirus shortly, but let's look at what the huffington post is focusing on, a huge story in the united states, harriet. this is ao—year—old brandon bernard, who was executed. there was a massive appeal, with celebrities saying this death does not need to take place, yet it has done, and a lot of questions over the time of this, the fa ct questions over the time of this, the fact the united states is in a transition period in terms of its administration, a lot of concern,
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even thejurors turning administration, a lot of concern, even the jurors turning against this. yeah, brandon bernard was a teenager when he was convicted of murder back in 1999 and he was executed today. it is very interesting timing for president trump because, as you say, it is very unusual for executions to be carried out during this presidential transition period, if you like, and particular because there are formal plans —— four more plan. if president trump has those carried out, he will have conducted the most executions under his residency than any president in over a century, which is very interesting, potentially very concerning and also, when you think that you have gotjoe biden coming in, who takes a very different approach to donald trump on executions, it does send a very interesting signal or interesting clinical message about
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what actually... which is the clear difference between the two presidents. what is your reading of this, mo? i think presidents. what is your reading of this, mo? ithink this is presidents. what is your reading of this, mo? i think this is about legacy, i think this is about president trump trying to use his short amount of time he has left to really ta ke short amount of time he has left to really take his mark on the weather is to appeal to his base for a potential reelection challenge in four years time orjust to be known for something beyond being a loser, for something beyond being a loser, for losing the election, but i think the other striking part of this story, which i found quite disturbing, the prison where this execution happened is now a covid hotspot is the execution teams are not quarantining and not being tested, and they are not from the local area, so it is a grim side bar to an already quite disturbing story. 0k, to an already quite disturbing story. ok, let's go to the uk and we are going to have a look at the mail, very much focusing on... this
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is an interesting aspect in terms of the brexit story, harriet, gunboats in case there is no deal. you talk us in case there is no deal. you talk us through what these gunboats are going to be doing. indeed, four royal navy vessels dispatched to the territorial waters if a trade deal is not reached with the eu. there go to be armed with cannons and machine guns and patrolling the waters to make sure any rogue fishing vessels are sent packing, assuming there is no trade deal will stub that is quite interesting because yesterday, the european commission set out some contingency plans on what it would like to happen in the event of a no—deal brexit, and under those plans, it said they wanted fishing rights to continue for a year, and ursula von der leyen today said that the british government must understand what she said were legitimate expectations of fishing,
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fishermen on the continent, to access fishermen on the continent, to a ccess u k fishermen on the continent, to access uk waters, writes that they have had for decades and in some case don asked cases centuries, so testing the uk government, if this report is correct, are actually taking quite a different approach —— in some cases centuries. sending in gunboats is certainly not allowing access for a year, so very different sides to fishing. incredibly contentious in the brexit negotiations and one of the key selling blocks, of which we have not seen any sign so far there is any way of resolving. let's have a look at the daily telegraph because there is schools face being sued if they close early, in terms of what is happening with coronavirus and the fa ct happening with coronavirus and the fact that schools are being threatened with legal actions by ministers amid growing fears that many will close because they do not wa nt to many will close because they do not want to spread coronavirus among teenage before christmas. we have
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been doing a lot on this over the past few days with what is going on in wales as well and testing in english schools, the lettuce crack on to staying on with brexit, because... what the paper is describing as a snub, the prime minister gets a triple snub, from merkel and macron, and this was his idea he would go around, he was happy to go reach out to different leaders and they are holding tight because, ultimately, the person speaking on behalf of the 27 years ursula von der leyen —— is. speaking on behalf of the 27 years ursula von der leyen -- is. that is a perfectly understandable position for such she is negotiating on behalf of the entire eu and i think the eu will be collectively worried about the idea of doing side deals with us if there is no overall deal. along with the idea that, actually, they

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