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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 14, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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involved, making everything as fun as possible. it's not all bad news. today's figures actually saw a rise in girls being fitter. but overall, the pandemic has seen a million fewer children being active in england, with some groups worse hit than others across the whole of the uk. there's been a negative effect on children's physical and mental health, driven by disturbed patterns of sleep, inactivity, that has been exponentially worse for those who are on lower incomes and we are really concerned about the effect on health inequalities. keeping kids active and happy is crucial for their futures. while that may have become more difficult now, it may also have become more important. natalie pirks, bbc news. an original painting of tintin by his belgian creator, herge, has been sold online by a paris auction house for 3.2 million euros. it shows tintin and his dog snowy hiding from a red dragon
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in a large porcelainjar. the sale breaks the record for comic book art. cricket — and any fears that england's form may be suffering after five months away from first class action have been wiped away. the team have made a flying start in the first test against sri lanka, in the southern city of galle. joe wilson's been watching. escape for a moment into a different world called cricket. england's players say they try to retain a social distance when they celebrate. well, celebrate was really all they did. for kusal mendis batting's miserable. got him. that's the fourth in a row. more success for stuart broad in his headband era. parreira improvised...badly. first success for spin bowler dom bess. galle�*s cricket ground famously nestles between sea and fort. spectators aren't allowed near this game. well...
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rob lewis arrived in sri lanka last march for england's suspended tour. he stayed, waited. after ten months he was allowed to sing on the fort before being moved on. now restricted by quarantine, england's players had little preparation but they were sharp. angelo mathews gone. next watch shanaka's shot hit the leaping bairstow and then see the ball loop tojos buttler. england's luck was truly in. sri lanka was soon all out — ouch! — for 135. bess took five wickets in various ways. test match rhythm meant england were now batting. playing it with wonderful control. a bird—scattering sweep from the captain as they thrived. route 66, bairstow a7. england 127—2 and the view getting better. joe wilson, bbc news.
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that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the editor of politicshome, kate proctor and the broadcaster, john stapleton. we john stapleton. are trying to sort out the connection we are trying to sort out the connection to his line. as we do that let's start with some of the print pages that we already have. the metro has a stark warning from nhs doctors, who say that hospital beds are running out and emergency patients are being treated in ambulances, due to the coronavirus crisis.
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the i reports that the number of covid—19 vaccinations will be more than doubled next week to inoculate vulnerable groups by mid—february, according to a leaked government document. the mirror also leads on vaccinations, writing that high street chemists joined the drive to innoculate the population today. the telegraph reports that outbreaks of covid—19 in care homes have more than trebled in a month, with infection levels now similar to the peak of the first wave. the guardian says boris johnson's plans to test millions of schoolchildren for coronavirus every week appear to be in disarray, after failing to be approved by the uk's medicines regulator. the financial times reports that worker protections enshrined in eu law would be ripped up under the government's post—brexit labour plans. the business secretary tonight denied the story, saying workers�* standards would not be lowered. the times writes that more than 150,000 fingerprint, dna and arrest history records have
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been wiped off police databases in a technology blunder. the sun has an interview with former model katie price, who says she is putting her disabled 18—year—old son into a care home. so, let's begin... like i say, we are trying to get john's line up. thejoys like i say, we are trying to get john's line up. the joys of technology and the joys of remote papers while we are in the pandemic. 0f papers while we are in the pandemic. of course are working from our homes. let's start with you. world start with the metro that has that very, very stark warning. it's quoting medics as saying the nhs is reaching a calamitous state. morris surgeons are describing the situation is calamitous. in the headline really says it all, sorry no beds laughed. yes headline really says it all, sorry no beds laughed.— headline really says it all, sorry no beds laughed. yes this story hiuuhlihts no beds laughed. yes this story highlights the _ no beds laughed. yes this story highlights the immense - no beds laughed. yes this story | highlights the immense pressure no beds laughed. yes this story - highlights the immense pressure on
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the nhs at the moment treating covid patients an example here of a patients an example here of a patient that was very low on oxygen and in a very, very poor condition and in a very, very poor condition and essentially having to be treated in the back of an ambulance because there just aren't any beds laughed. this person was wheeled from the hospital to an ambulance where they had to be treated they are instead. we are hearing all the time about the number of intensive care beds running out. things happen to be repurposed. some oxygen being given to patients on non—intensive care wards. since i've heard of surgeries sorry surgeon theaters that are being used in operations. they are being used in operations. they are being repurposed because they have no oxygen supplies so they are being used or have intensive care patients as well force up the whole thing is, many doctors have said they are at breaking point. ithink many doctors have said they are at breaking point. i think this illustrates a very clearly force up the other thing that's happening is that patients being moved around the country where there is capacity. so
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i know patients from london are being moved around up into the midlands. just to try and find some capacity and spine would not find spare beds. the public are being told all the time to take the coronavirus seriously and to stay home. and i think this image on the front of the story highlights the risks to peoples lives very, very well. �* , risks to peoples lives very, very well. �*, ., ., . ~ risks to peoples lives very, very well. �*, ., ., risks to peoples lives very, very well. , , risks to peoples lives very, very well. , well. it's also the lack of beds and also the lack _ well. it's also the lack of beds and also the lack of _ well. it's also the lack of beds and also the lack of people _ well. it's also the lack of beds and also the lack of people to - well. it's also the lack of beds and also the lack of people to look - also the lack of people to look after the patients once they're in those bed. because we know in the intensive care unitjust how one—to—one the care is. how those nurses who are at the front line of all of this are so desperately needed. yet there are certainly not enough of them.— needed. yet there are certainly not enough of them. that's right. people are off sick- — enough of them. that's right. people are off sick. they _ enough of them. that's right. people are off sick. they just _ enough of them. that's right. people are off sick. they just aren't - are off sick. they just aren't enough people to provide the care that's needed. although nhs staff are working extremely hard i've heard some absolutely ridiculous hours being put in by staff at the moment. lots of doctors, people are doing 20 more hours shifts nurses
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working ten hours on their feet without a single break not being able to stop for their lunch. it's really difficult right now. and it's hard to see, and less the numbers go down, unless the infection rate goes down, unless the infection rate goes down it's really hard to see how the nhs can really get a handle on this. i would like to hear more from the government about the nightingale hospitals was up they were supposed to be the places to go so the patient delete that patients could be treated and try and make sure the nhs wasn't overwhelmed. i think the government needs to explain a bit more about that system. are they going to be put into place again in a really big way? or is itjust the fact that the nightingale hospitals are equipped to look after people who need intensive care medicine. i think the government needs to try and make some kind of statement on this tomorrow. because it's notjust the metro it's on the front pages as well that is really highlighting the real crisis in the nhs at the moment. real crisis in the nhs at the moment-— real crisis in the nhs at the moment. ~ , ,., , , moment. absolutely the independent also lookin:
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moment. absolutely the independent also looking at _ moment. absolutely the independent also looking at the _ moment. absolutely the independent also looking at the situation - moment. absolutely the independent also looking at the situation in - moment. absolutely the independent also looking at the situation in the . also looking at the situation in the nhs. notjust people who are suffering from coronavirus but also those who are waiting to get other treatments. fora those who are waiting to get other treatments. for a half million people in england are waiting to start their treatment in hospital. —— it's a really astonishing figure. it's extremely high. and i think this piece by sean linton is an important health story during this coronavirus crisis. the point here is they are saying that four .5 million people are on a waitlist for a routine surgery. 0n million people are on a waitlist for a routine surgery. on a routine surgery may be something as significant as a hip operation. that can mean the difference between being able to walk or not. it determines someone's mobility. we know that health problems that can come further down the line once it is restricted. to say it's a routine operation or a routine procedure.
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these are not minor things. these are things people are waiting for and it's really significant life—changing operations, life—changing operations, life—changing procedures. i really feel for all of those people that are waiting. at the other end of the scale we are having operations canceled. according to the report cancer operations and also really severely, significant transplants are being halted as well. that is obviously something that is a life—and—death procedure for many people. not only have we got the crisis in intensive care, front line care about everything that's backing up. the figure of these 200,000 people have been on a waiting list for more than a year. just a year ago that was only 1000 people. it just shows how much coronavirus has completely put the health services in this country into a real span. it's going to take a very long time for people to get through the system and to eventually get the procedures
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that they need. it’s and to eventually get the procedures that they need-— that they need. it's certainly something _ that they need. it's certainly something that _ that they need. it's certainly something that all _ that they need. it's certainly something that all the - that they need. it's certainly. something that all the papers that they need. it's certainly - something that all the papers are picking up on foot up the eye as well has not. is not the main headline but it has got the pandemic creating this crisis up for the nhs. 4 million on a waiting list. such a staggering figure. some of the headline points that it picks up on foot up the main headline is the half million vaccinations a day in the uk. that's the plan anyway. that's the aim. talk us through when we can expect that. of course the most vulnerable as always will be the 1st, at the top of that priority list. idi the 1st, at the top of that priority list. , , , the 1st, at the top of that priority list. , ,, . ., list. di paper is predicting that there be the _ list. di paper is predicting that there be the vaccination - list. di paper is predicting that l there be the vaccination doubled next week to 500,000. which would be a significant uplift on what we had this week. although i'd say progress has been relatively good so far. all of these numbers all contribute to
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this overall figure that the government have. it wants to inoculate the top four vulnerable groups. by the 15th of february. so that's 14.6 groups. by the 15th of february. so that's 111.6 million people. to get to that place you have to increase the number of people that's given vaccinations everyday. this 500,000 figure would be significant in reaching that. there's a little story behind all this, the numbers behind the vaccines has been really difficult. the government has been accused of not actually saying how many vaccine doses are in the uk. the committee yesterday, the vaccination minister wouldn't discuss that. nor would someone that they had there from astrazeneca talk about it. the i paper has a very good explanation and it's apparently to do with national security. and the fact that we don't want other countries to know exactly how many doses the uk has. because if other countries do know that they may very well lean on astrazeneca, on these
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company to actually give of delete that over some uk supplies to other countries. just shows how difficult vaccine procurement is foot up in the uk is being very protective. it wants you vaccinate its own citizens. that's why we are having such reticence in the numbers from the government. than such reticence in the numbers from the government.— such reticence in the numbers from the government. an issue of national securi . the government. an issue of national security. staggering, _ the government. an issue of national security. staggering, is— the government. an issue of national security. staggering, is in— the government. an issue of national security. staggering, is in a? - the government. an issue of national security. staggering, is in a? that. security. staggering, is in a? that shows logistically and everything else that comes with it buys even things like that. that the people in charge have to think about. that is certainly open my eyes. another thing that the financial times is looking at is this idea of digital covid passports. which potentially could open the way for travelers who have proof that they've had a vaccination. this could potentially encourage people and enable people to travel again. because travel has been so stopped throughout this whole time. it could also lead to
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other problems as well. talk us through how the ft is covering theirs. , , ., ., through how the ft is covering theirs. , , . ., ., �*, , theirs. this is an idea that's very much in its _ theirs. this is an idea that's very much in its infancy. _ theirs. this is an idea that's very much in its infancy. you've - theirs. this is an idea that's very much in its infancy. you've got. theirs. this is an idea that's very much in its infancy. you've got aj much in its infancy. you've got a group of health and technology companies that are coming together to try and work on a digital vaccination passport. so companies involved microsoft, 0racle vaccination passport. so companies involved microsoft, oracle and the us health care group the mayo clinic. and this is all part of the vaccination credential initiative. this would give people some kind of passport to show that they've been vaccinated in it would free up their ability to travel around the world. i imagine these passports essentially business class essential travelers. people whose businesses are global. people that need to travel around the world a lot to try and keep things going. the idea is in its infancy at the moment. and exactly how a travel would be given an additional certificate needs to be worked out in a bit more detail. it says that the uk is actually not
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considering a vaccine passport of any sort at the moment. so this is any sort at the moment. so this is an idea that's being driven by companies elsewhere in the world with a bit of a lead from the us at the moment. it's an interesting idea and i think it's obviously something that has to be considered. 0therwise how are people going to get to travel again, how are people going to get to travelagain, really? how are people going to get to travel again, really?— how are people going to get to travel again, really? there is an awful lot of _ travel again, really? there is an awful lot of issues _ travel again, really? there is an awful lot of issues around - travel again, really? there is an - awful lot of issues around something like that. in its infancy. something to look out for because ultimately people will want to start traveling again. and how do you prove that you have had a vaccination? it again. and how do you prove that you have had a vaccination?— have had a vaccination? it may involve peoples _ have had a vaccination? it may involve peoples medical- have had a vaccination? it may| involve peoples medical records have had a vaccination? it may - involve peoples medical records and that will start to become a little bit difficult for people to get on board with the idea.— bit difficult for people to get on board with the idea. exactly. the issues of privacy. _ board with the idea. exactly. the issues of privacy. there's - board with the idea. exactly. the issues of privacy. there's a - board with the idea. exactly. the issues of privacy. there's a lot i board with the idea. exactly. the j issues of privacy. there's a lot to look into that. that's our could happen overnight. setting with the financial times away from coronavirus was up the story that the ft has got in terms of worker protections which have been enshrined in eu law. potentially and

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