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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 16, 2021 6:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today: all travellers arriving in the uk from monday will have to quarantine as the government closes all so— called "travel corridors" to prevent new strains of covid entering the country. tougher lockdown restrictions come into force in scotland to tackle what's being described as a "very serious situation" 100 million vaccines in 100 days. the ambitious target set out byjoe biden when he becomes president of the united states. a captains innings from joe root. he scores a double century, as england open up a big lead over sri lanka in the first test.
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it isa it is a messy start to our saturday morning. a combination of rain, sleet and snow sweeping its way steadily east but into the afternoon, sunny spells and scattered showers. all the details from me throughout the morning. morning, it's saturday the 16th of january. our top story: all travel corridors into the uk will be closed from monday, the prime minister has announced. the change means anyone travelling to the uk will need proof of a negative covid test. they'll also need to isolate on arrival for at least five days. charlotte wright reports. another measure to tighten up travel. this week saw passengers from south america and portugal banned from flying into the uk to stop the spread of a new covid strain from brazil. but the government says it may be difficult to predict where new variance might come from and so further action is
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needed. to come from and so further action is needed. ., , ., . , come from and so further action is needed. ., , ., . ., , needed. to protect us against the risk of as yet _ needed. to protect us against the risk of as yet unidentified - needed. to protect us against the risk of as yet unidentified new - risk of as yet unidentified new strains we will also temporarily close all travel corridors from over hundred hours on monday. this latest announcement _ hundred hours on monday. this latest announcement is _ hundred hours on monday. this latest announcement is not _ hundred hours on monday. this latest announcement is not a _ hundred hours on monday. this latest announcement is not a travel - hundred hours on monday. this latest announcement is not a travel ban - announcement is not a travel ban stop it introduces quarantine for passengers no matter where they have flown from in the world. it means from monday anyone travelling to the uk will have to show a negative covid test less than 72 hours before they depart. when they arrive, they must now self isolate for ten days. 0r pay for a covid test on the fifth day. if it is negative, they can leave quarantine early. the policy also applies to the eurostar and seaports, but not to those travelling within the uk or ireland or to somejobs like travelling within the uk or ireland or to some jobs like hauliers. travel cold —— orators were first introduced in the summer, allowing people to come to the uk from some countries with low covid rates without having to quarantine on
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arrival. described as a lifeline for the industry, they kept people going on holiday. now many say they support the suspension so long as it can be lifted later in the year. ida can be lifted later in the year. in? announcement before can be lifted later in the year. i157 announcement before 12 months and people take a few months in the summer last year. if we're going to have an aviation sector coming out of this, we need to open up in the summer and we look forward to having conversations with the government about that, but for the here and now, we are absolutely clear that we will support the government. i now, we are absolutely clear that we will support the government.- will support the government. i think the government _ will support the government. i think the government needs _ will support the government. i think the government needs a _ will support the government. i think the government needs a longer - will support the government. i think| the government needs a longer term plan for— the government needs a longer term plan for the airline industry. they have _ plan for the airline industry. they have been— plan for the airline industry. they have been hit time and time again and they— have been hit time and time again and they have rightly asked the sunport— and they have rightly asked the support from the government. they asked _ support from the government. they asked months ago but the package has been put _ asked months ago but the package has been put into place.— been put into place. government has said they have _ been put into place. government has said they have put _ been put into place. government has said they have put in _ been put into place. government has said they have put in a _ said they have put in a comprehensive set of measures for the travel and aviation sector including extending the fellow scheme, big net —— business rates relief and tax deferral. it says it is committed to bring the sector back to full strength as soon as it
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is safe to do so. charlotte wright, bbc news. scotland's covid restrictions are being tightened from today. takeaway food and drink outlets can only serve customers via a hatch — and only shops selling essential items are allowed to offer click—and—collect. the changes are among six new rules announced by first minister nicola sturgeon earlier this week. police chiefs say that investigations have been compromised after thousands of fingerprint, dna and arrest records were accidentally deleted from the national computer. a letter sent by the national police chiefs council — and seen by bbc news — says the mistake might prevent officers from linking offenders to crime scenes. policing minister kit malthouse said officers are trying to recover the data. a clinical trial involving 10,000 people in the uk has shown that using blood plasma as a treatment for coronavirus doesn't reduce deaths among hospital patients. researchers say they are incredibly grateful to everyone who took part in the research but that they are no longer seeking plasma donations.
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the final results of the study will be published soon. the us president—electjoe biden has set out ambitious plans to vaccinate 100 million americans within his first 100 days in office. he made the pledge as his health chiefs warned that the covid variant first detected in the uk could become the dominant strain in the us by march. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes sent this report. ina in a city where officials believe one in three of its population has been infected with covid—19 since the start of the pandemic, there is a sense of urgency. hospitals in los angeles are overwhelmed. here, someone is dying from the virus every eight minutes. 15 someone is dying from the virus every eight minutes.— someone is dying from the virus every eight minutes. is how disease --eole every eight minutes. is how disease peeple who — every eight minutes. is how disease peeple who are _ every eight minutes. is how disease people who are really _ every eight minutes. is how disease people who are really sick— every eight minutes. is how disease people who are really sick and - every eight minutes. is how disease people who are really sick and we i people who are really sick and we have to tell them that there is not much we can do. we can take you to the hospital to sit on these gurneys, it is not happy. the rate
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is on to get _ gurneys, it is not happy. the rate is on to get as — gurneys, it is not happy. the rate is on to get as many _ gurneys, it is not happy. the rate is on to get as many people - is on to get as many people vaccinated as soon as possible. this is the car park at dodgers stadium. the baseball venue in los angeles that has been transformed into the largest vaccination site in america. the middle of next week, officials say at least 12,000 people a day will receive the covid jab here. but it isn't enough. we will receive the covid 'ab here. but it isn't enough._ it isn't enough. we have got to increase the _ it isn't enough. we have got to increase the pace _ it isn't enough. we have got to increase the pace of— it isn't enough. we have got to l increase the pace of distribution it isn't enough. we have got to - increase the pace of distribution in the administration of these vaccination —— vaccinations. you need to get these vaccines out of the freezer and into people's arms. this is a scene that is playing out across the country, around the world, but america's so—called operation what has failed to live up to its name, at least as far as distribution of the vaccine is concerned —— 0peration warp speed was notjoe biden says when he takes over donald trump, he says it has so far been a dismalfailure. fiur over donald trump, he says it has so far been a dismal failure.— far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear — far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear as _ far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear as it _ far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear as it is _ far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear as it is bold, _ far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear as it is bold, get - far been a dismal failure. our plan is as clear as it is bold, get more i is as clear as it is bold, get more people vaccinated for free, create
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more places to get vaccinated. mobilise more teams to get the shots in people's arms. he mobilise more teams to get the shots in peeple's arms-— in people's arms. he is promising 100 million _ in people's arms. he is promising 100 million jabs _ in people's arms. he is promising 100 million jabs in _ in people's arms. he is promising 100 million jabs in 100 _ in people's arms. he is promising 100 million jabs in 100 days. - in people's arms. he is promising 100 million jabs in 100 days. 100| 100 millionjabs in 100 days. 100 max vaccination centres across the country and mobile units to get into areas that are hard to reach. the president—elect also had a blunt warning for americans, things he said would get worse before they get better. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. india starts its vaccine rollout today. it's aiming to inoculate 300—million people byjuly. 0ur correspondent rajini vaidyanathan is at a hospital in delhi. rajini, that sounds like a very ambitious target. do people there believe it is achievable? i think they do. rachel and charlie, let me give you some numbers to put this into context. i am at one of
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over 3000 vaccination centres which have been set up at hospitals and health centres across the country. the goal is to vaccinate around 100 people every day so that means that by the end of today alone, if everything goes to plan, then more than 300,000 indians will already have received a coronavirus vaccine. front of the queue, like back in the uk, healthcare workers, front—line staff like police officers, then it goes to the over 50s and people with underlying health conditions. there are two vaccines which are being rolled out today. one of them is the oxford astrazeneca vaccine which has 0xford astrazeneca vaccine which has been produced en masse here in india. the other one is an indian developed vaccine by a company which has raised some concerns because it has raised some concerns because it has been given approval for rollout before it has actually received stage three efficacy trial clearance, which basically has caused some concern to health
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experts here because they say that a vaccine's being rolled out when officials don't actually know how effective it will actually be. the government stresses that that vaccine is also safe and that they are administering it under very, very strict supervision. but i think in answer to your original question, this is a country of 1.3 billion people, it is a huge logistical task against various terrains, mountains, deserts, urban and rural, but india does have some track record on this because it already vaccinates millions of people every year against diseases such as polio. thank you very much, rajini. an enormous, enormous logistical effort there was not we will catch up on that later. a night—time curfew of 6pm comes into force across france from this evening. most of the country was already forbidden from leaving home after 8pm — but the government has tightened the restrictions due to high infection rates. from monday, anyone wishing to enter france from outside the eu will need to show a negative covid test result.
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the duke of cambridge has told how seeing people die during his time as an air ambulance pilot left him traumatised for weeks on end. prince william drew on his own experience while speaking to a group of frontline workers during a video conference about the importance of accessing counselling and bereavement support. something that i noticed from my brief spell flying the air ambulance for the team is when you see so much death and so much bereavement, it does impact how you see the world and it is very interesting what you just said then about being able to kind of see things in a different light and realise, like you said, i think you said about everyone around you dying, you thought everyone was going to die because of that is what really worries me about the front—line staff at the moment is that there is that, you are so under, you are so pressurised and seeing such high levels of sadness,
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trauma, death, that it impacts your own life and your own family life. one story to ring to you on a 0ne story to ring to you on a lighter note, really. a dog, called willy, has been rescued after getting stuck in a well. the 7—year—old labrador was stranded around 20 feet underground in eastleigh, hampshire, for two hours. a team of firefighters used ropes and harnesses to "free willy". he was then given a nice bath — to remove any possible contamination — before being handed back to his grateful owner. he wasn't so happy when he was having a bath at the end. if he wasn't so happy when he was having a bath at the end.- having a bath at the end. if you know labradors, _ having a bath at the end. if you know labradors, and _ having a bath at the end. if you know labradors, and i - having a bath at the end. if you know labradors, and i know - having a bath at the end. if you i know labradors, and i know them, having a bath at the end. if you know labradors, and i know them, the first thing that dog will want is food. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. many papers lead on the government's decision
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to close all travel corridors to the uk from monday morning. according to the i newspaper, the country will become "fortress britain". "keep out!" is the message on the front of the sun, which has been taking a further look at each of the new coronavirus variants. the daily mirror leads with a report from the intensive care unit at wolverhampton's new cross hospital, where it says patients fighting for life are now "much younger" than the first peak. it describes the nhs medics as "modern—day miracle workers". and, online, huffington post uk has been looking through some documents revealing recommendations made by the government's scientific advisors. they include vaccinating people in places of worship and door—to—door, plus providing entertainment vouchers to encourage people to stay home when they should be self—isolating. what kind of entertainment vouchers could you get at home? what what kind of entertainment vouchers could you get at home?— could you get at home? what do you
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mean? i could you get at home? what do you mean? i don't _ could you get at home? what do you mean? i don't know. _ could you get at home? what do you mean? i don't know. i— could you get at home? what do you mean? i don't know. i guess- mean? i don't know. i guess streaming — mean? i don't know. i guess streaming services... - mean? i don't know. i guess streaming services... at - mean? i don't know. i guess| streaming services... at that mean? i don't know. i guess- streaming services... at that kind of thing? element probably, that would work, wouldn't it? i mean, there are other forms of at—home detainment you can indulge in but... what, like boardgames? exactly what i was thinking! exactly what i was thinking! can ijust say, first of all, in terms of the travel corridors being closed which we were talking about this morning, it is interesting to see people reacting to that and a lot of people saying on social media overnight this should have happened 9—10 months ago. it is kind of after the horse has bolted but anyway, it has happened or at least it will be in place from monday 4am monday, is when it all comes into action. a couple of bits from the inside pages. did see that, can you tell what that is, charlie? i5 pages. did see that, can you tell what that is, charlie? is it something _ what that is, charlie? is it something to _ what that is, charlie? is it something to do - what that is, charlie? is it something to do with - what that is, charlie? is it something to do with a i what that is, charlie? is it something to do with a very elderly, a pig that they found, an ex— trip —— an inscription on a pig in a
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cave? -- an inscription on a pig in a cave? , . , :: :: :: cave? pretty much exactly. 45,000 ears a . o cave? pretty much exactly. 45,000 years ago this _ cave? pretty much exactly. 45,000 years ago this drawing _ cave? pretty much exactly. 45,000 years ago this drawing was - cave? pretty much exactly. 45,000 years ago this drawing was created. it is extraordinary, isn't it? does the pic have _ it is extraordinary, isn't it? does the pic have a _ it is extraordinary, isn't it? does the pic have a tail _ it is extraordinary, isn't it? does the pic have a tail or— it is extraordinary, isn't it? does the pic have a tail or is - it is extraordinary, isn't it? does the pic have a tail or is that - the pic have a tail or is that something out the back, like a big bushy tail? == something out the back, like a big bush tail? , something out the back, like a big bushy tail?- where - something out the back, like a big bushy tail?- where did - something out the back, like a big| bushy tail?- where did they bushy tail? -- pig. where did they discover that? _ bushy tail? -- pig. where did they discover that? indonesia _ bushy tail? -- pig. where did they discover that? indonesia and - bushy tail? -- pig. where did they| discover that? indonesia and dated to 10,000 discover that? indonesia and dated to 10.000 years — discover that? indonesia and dated to 10,000 years earlier _ discover that? indonesia and dated to 10,000 years earlier than - discover that? indonesia and dated| to 10,000 years earlier than similar european fines so the oldest cave painting of an animal, charlie. br; painting of an animal, charlie. by wa painting of an animal, charlie. el: way of contrast, this is painting of an animal, charlie. by way of contrast, this is something some people might be rather interested in. apparently this chevrolet van comes equipped with its own guns. not quite sure about that part of it. but it was licensed by universal studios to promote the 80s video the 18th. it sounds like it wasn't actually the van that mr t
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drove around —— a team. i think they usedit drove around —— a team. i think they used it as a promotional thing. there is a lot of interest, it is quite cool, isn't it?— there is a lot of interest, it is quite cool, isn't it?- do l there is a lot of interest, it is quite cool, isn't it? yes. do you think, rachel, _ quite cool, isn't it? yes. do you think, rachel, or— quite cool, isn't it? yes. do you think, rachel, or not? - quite cool, isn't it? yes. do you think, rachel, or not? well, - quite cool, isn't it? yes. do you| think, rachel, or not? well, not really that— think, rachel, or not? well, not really that into _ think, rachel, or not? well, not really that into heavy _ think, rachel, or not? well, not really that into heavy machinery| think, rachel, or not? well, not. really that into heavy machinery but anything to do with 80s television... i anything to do with 80s television. . ._ anything to do with 80s television... ~' , ., ., , television... i think they normally cut thins television... i think they normally out things no _ television... i think they normally cut things up and _ television... i think they normally cut things up and adapt _ television... i think they normally cut things up and adapt it - television. .. i think they normally cut things up and adapt it for- cut things up and adapt it for whatever they are going to do. this whatever they are going to do. as well asjumping out of planes. whatever they are going to do. asj well asjumping out of planes. did well as “umping out of planes. did ou well asjumping out of planes. d c you watch it? well asjumping out of planes. did you watch it? all— well asjumping out of planes. did you watch it? all the _ well asjumping out of planes. did you watch it? all the time! - well asjumping out of planes. did you watch it? all the time! can i l you watch it? all the time! can i 'ust you watch it? all the time! can i just finish _ you watch it? all the time! can i just finish by _ you watch it? all the time! can i just finish by showing _ you watch it? all the time! can i just finish by showing you - you watch it? all the time! can i just finish by showing you this . just finish by showing you this gorgeous picture of megan kennedy getting married and her grandmothers were her bridesmaids. this was after her plans, her original plans for a wedding were completely thrown into confusion. in the end, they had a very, very small family wedding and
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they grandmothers stepped in. gorgeous. they grandmothers stepped in. gorueous. ., ., ., they grandmothers stepped in. goneous. ., ., ., ., , . ., they grandmothers stepped in. goneous. ., ., ., . ., , gorgeous. congratulations. what is lovel as gorgeous. congratulations. what is lovely as people — gorgeous. congratulations. what is lovely as people sharing _ gorgeous. congratulations. what is lovely as people sharing those - lovely as people sharing those pictures because, and looking on, you can't ever feel like you have part of the story.— you can't ever feel like you have part of the story. yes, we all need a bit of that _ part of the story. yes, we all need a bit of that at _ part of the story. yes, we all need a bit of that at the _ part of the story. yes, we all need a bit of that at the moment. - there were warnings of ice and snow overnight. let's see where it landed — and what else lies in store. louise has the details. it is happening, but it is messy. i was hoping for pictures like this when i got home from work but i don't think many of us are going to see that, because the snow is turning readily to ice. the only exception is east anglia. i will try to explain this messy, wintry mix we have at the moment. you can clearly see the frontal system that is straddling the country as we speak. ahead of it, that is where the cold air is sitting, across east anglia and south—east england. we have south—westerly winds driving and milder our quite quickly. any snow is then turning to rain. it is an improving picture into the afternoon
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if you don't want further spells of snow. this is the story at the moment. snow across higher ground, once again across scotland and northern ireland, and we got a line of snow moving through northamptonshire over towards the south—east as we speak, and on top of that, this lying snow that we have at the moment, temperatures have at the moment, temperatures have fallen two —7, so ice could be a problem. the amber weather warning sits across east anglia because here we are going to widely see a couple of centimetres. maybe as much as 5-10 of centimetres. maybe as much as 5—10 centimetres through the morning. the amber weather warning isjust for east morning. the amber weather warning is just for east anglia. as we go through the day that warning will expire into the early part of the afternoon stop that is the messy bit. let's get back to the afternoon story. through the morning, you can see that the snow is sitting across east anglia but it clears through quite quickly. many of us will have some sunshine. if you are going to take some exercise through the day, you should wait, because it does improve. wendy and the far
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north—west. that will drive showers in, but temperatures milder, 7—11, only east anglia will those temperatures stay on the low side. as we go from saturday night into sunday, it will be a much quieter story. i'm looking forward to tomorrow morning because i can tell you about the dry, quiet, clean, lots of sunshine coming through. lots of sunshine moving into the far north—west of scotland and northern ireland, a coolerfeeling today north—west of scotland and northern ireland, a cooler feeling today but hopefully dry and the sunshine should compensate for that. you really need to make the most of sunday's weather, because as we move into the early part of next week, low pressure is set to return, that will bring wet and windy weather once again across southern england, though it stays pretty unsettled the beginning part of the week. drier and brighter on thursday and friday. thank you very much. we are warned. they will be quite a bit of snow. it was messy this morning. it
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they will be quite a bit of snow. it was messy this morning.- was messy this morning. it was disgusting. _ was messy this morning. it was disgusting, coming _ was messy this morning. it was disgusting, coming in. - was messy this morning. it was| disgusting, coming in. horrible. better off in bed. now it is time for the travel show. this week on the travel show, what's in store for the year ahead? i think a phrase a lot of us can expect to hear in 2021 is "documents, please. " the world's tallest mountain. i really hope that the people who want to go and climb mount everest really understand the significance of this mountain, the sacredness of this mountain. after a dramatic year, i am here in turkey to start my 2021 after a tumultuous yearfor travel, 2021 has got off to a gloomy start in the uk, with pretty much the entire country being back in lockdown. but with a vaccine just starting to be rolled out, can we begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel, and start to build some idea of what the year ahead might look like for those who are desperate to travel? rajan has been finding out. last year, as we all stayed home and talked to our computers, much of the outside
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world fell eerily quiet. the latest data from the world tourism 0rganisation says that between january and october 2020, global destinations welcomed 900 million fewer international tourists than in the same period the year before. and they believe that last year as a whole will have set tourism levels back to that of three decades ago. and while that means that we have missed out on tourist holidays, for the travel industry, it spells a loss of an estimated us$1 trillion plus. that is cash that could have gone to the costs and wages of airlines, hotels, local taxes, guides — you name it. it all means that 2021 is going to start like no other year. and an awful lot is riding on it. we're going to be looking at a slow and possibly nervous start.
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cities will be busy again after the pandemic. - so it will turn a whole new generation of people into global nomads. we will probably see prices go up. 2021 is going to be - a bumpy year for travel. and now is the time we usually all start making those holiday plans for the year. but the way we choose to book my change. our research finds that people are increasingly turning to travel agents to book their future holidays. i think they really value the professionalism and expertise. the higher end will be promoting a more secure and safe environment, with larger, expensive rooms, and everything has been cleaned immaculately well and really pushing that high end, save as back. then you will have these great offers that are super cheap. and don't forget the availability of vaccine should be a game—changer.
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we are rolling out the biggest vaccination programme in our history. the governments who get together and vaccinate the population are going to see a short—term boost. we are going to find ways to boost the vaccinations. crucially, we don't know if the vaccine prevents you from transmitting the disease. that is going to be really crucial for holidays, because even if you have been vaccinated and you can still transmit the disease, countries are not going to want to let you in. but for travellers it is going to be an important step towards booking with confidence. when the vaccine news for the pfizer vaccine came out in december, we saw a 37% increase in searches and bookings. 0nce travel does open up again, the trips we actually take might also change. people haven't taken all their holiday allowance in 2020, and ultimately people are looking to use that in new and different ways.
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activity holidays, i think, will benefit very much from the collective experience that people have been through. high demand, more passengers seeking to go to fewer places, i because airlines will not have as many aircraft to fly - to traditional places. all these places from barcelona to dubrovnik to venice that are typically swarmed with tourists are going to say "come now, while there is nobody here" and, as the fears start to drop, people swarm back in. we will be encouraged to see other places in those countries, go to other beaches, other national parks, other cities. and when we do travellers year, what will it be like? i think a phrase lots of us can expect to hear in 2021 is "documents, please. " that may be your vaccination certificate, or it may be your proof of a test. of course, there is one man who has been through this with us every step of the way.
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simon, hello. in terms of travel, when it does get going in 2021, what do you foresee? i am braced to pay quite a lot more. while there are certainly some bargains around — i am just looking at early march, a 1—way ticket to athens, £8, it's ridiculous — but generally, for these sorts of flights and holidays you were getting a couple of years ago, i would be prepared to pay 25% or 50% more. and of course, we have now fully left the european union, the brexit transition phase is over, so lots of restrictions, particularly to go with passport validity. are there any reason to be cheerful about 2021, simon? so many reasons to be cheerful. in northern ireland, the game of thrones studio tour is opening up. and perhaps the biggest cultural event of the 20205, the opening of the new egyptian museum outside of cairo, that will be momentous.
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i can't wait to be there. neither can i. let's hope it will happen soon. thank you, simon. next this week, a visit to the world's tallest mountain. mount everest was closed for much of 2020 because of the pandemic. but could the lockdown have been a blessing disguise for this ultimate adventure destination? in the 19505, there were only like four or five western tourists who came into the everest region. by 2019, we have thousands, more than 35,000 tourists, who came to the everest region. to put that in perspective, this is a region with about 7000 people, so it is five times the population that actually lives there. in 2019, nearly 900 people reached the mountain's summit. but bad weather and a short winter to reach the peak made
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it one of the deadliest seasons on record, with at least 11 casualties. some of the slower climbers held up those behind them, so the slowest person dictated the pace. fortunately, because our team's skill level was high enough, we could climb around people who were stuck. so we stayed on schedule, and got to the top, and came back down. i think something was lost there. it became all about who's going to get there, how fast, and what am i going to get out of that experience? and i suspect that it is only going to get worse in the future, unless there is an intervention. although the nepalese government collected £8,000 fee from foreign mountaineers, until now, there has been little regulation on tour operators or climber skill level. in the last 15 years, the peak has become more
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accessible to climbers with a lower skill set, or less experience, because companies are offering trips to everest and not requiring a certain level of mountaineering experience and skill tojoin. and with more mountaineers, another problem has emerged. some have started calling mount everest the world's highest garbage dump. after the crowded 2019 season, officials embarked on a massive cleaning expedition, bringing over 10,000 kilos of garbage down from the mountain. but there's still more to be done.
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but nepal is not a wealthy country, so balancing environmental issues with everest�*s environmental impact can be difficult to for a government who to increase the number of people visiting each year, there are plans to put new rules about who is allowed to some of the world's highest peak.
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up next week, carmen is here with a look back at some of our favourite adventures from southeast asia and henry prospect trip on cambodia's railway. this is great! to rajan's starting journey through myanmar. my explanation of exploration of manila. if you want the driver to stop you tap on the roof. so that is go? that is stop! so make sure not to miss it and remember you can join us on social media by following us on all of the regular social media platforms but from me and the rest of the team, in istanbul it is goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. travel corridors from the uk are being closed from monday the prime minister has announced. the change means anyone flying into the country from overseas will have to show proof of a negative covid test before setting off and they'll also need to isolate for a minimum of five days on arrival. borisjohnson said the new rules will be in place until at least mid—february. scotland's covid restrictions are being tightened from today. takeaway food and drink outlets can only serve customers via a hatch — and only shops selling essential items are allowed to offer click—and—collect. the changes are among six new rules announced by first minister nicola sturgeon
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earlier this week. police chiefs say that investigations have been compromised after thousands of fingerprint, dna and arrest records were accidentally deleted from the national computer. a letter sent by the national police chiefs council — and seen by bbc news — says the mistake might prevent officers from linking offenders to crime scenes. policing minister kit malthouse said officers are trying to recover the data. one of the world's biggest vaccine rollouts has got underway today in india. health authorities are aiming to administer the first 300,000 jabs today — and to inoculate 300 million people byjuly. the government says it's drawing on its experience of organising national elections to help with the rollout. a night—time curfew of 6pm comes into force across france from this evening. most of the country was already forbidden from leaving home after 8pm — but the government has tightened the restrictions due to high infection rates.
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from monday, anyone wishing to enter france from outside the eu will need to show a negative covid test result. he i've even been talking to charlie how you keep a flask free of certain tastes. there is a lack of coffee around, at bbc studios, hence the talk about flask. i don't know this but i imagine sales of masks are up at the moment, do you think? if you haven't gone — at the moment, do you think? if you haven't gone down _ at the moment, do you think? if you haven't gone down the _ at the moment, do you think? if you haven't gone down the flask- at the moment, do you think? if you haven't gone down the flask life, - haven't gone down the flask life, you should. mike, where are you on the flask business? i got you should. mike, where are you on the flask business?— the flask business? i got one but i never use it. _ the flask business? i got one but i never use it, it _ the flask business? i got one but i never use it, it is _ the flask business? i got one but i never use it, it is always - the flask business? i got one but i never use it, it is always in - the flask business? i got one but i never use it, it is always in the - never use it, it is always in the cupboard _ never use it, it is always in the copboard |t— never use it, it is always in the copboard-_ never use it, it is always in the cuboard. ,, , .,, _ cupboard. it is probably a bit musty b now. cupboard. it is probably a bit musty by now- limit _ cupboard. it is probably a bit musty by now. limit never— cupboard. it is probably a bit musty by now. limit never think _ cupboard. it is probably a bit musty by now. limit never think about - by now. limit never think about using it.
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you always get a funny taste in your coffee or tea with the flask. 0r coffee or tea with the flask. or maybe i should wash it out after each use. �* , ,, maybe i should wash it out after each use-- it— maybe i should wash it out after each use.- it is - maybe i should wash it out after each use.- it is one - maybe i should wash it out after each use.- it is one of l maybe i should wash it out after i each use.- it is one of the each use. laughs. it is one of the ha iest each use. laughs. it is one of the happiest places — each use. laughs. it is one of the happiest places to _ each use. laughs. it is one of the happiest places to go, _ each use. laughs. it is one of the happiest places to go, sri - each use. laughs. it is one of the happiest places to go, sri lanka, | happiest places to go, sri lanka, because of the heat and humidity. it will be a very happy england dressing room, as they chomp on their sandwiches, during an early lunchbreak, and they'll be toasting their captainjoe root, after his double century against sri lanka. root�*s score of 228 is the second highest knock, by an english cricketer in asia and his second highest career total, while the england tail end around him didn't offer much resistance on this third morning, it didn't matter as england all out for 421, so a lead of 286
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ronnie 0'sullivan has been knocked out of the masters snooker by another great of the gamejohn higgins. it was a cracking match in milton keynes — both players played unbelieveable snooker. we saw a record—equalling five consecutive centuries, both players showing why they're still going strong, at the age of 45. in the end, higgins, known as the wizard of wishaw, had too many tricks up his sleeve for the rocket and higgins will face dave gilbert in the semi finals this evening. after 18 years as a player, wayne rooney is hanging up his boots and becoming a manager. he's been made the boss of derby county in the championship on a permanent basis, a job he's been doing on a temporary basis recently. he retires from playing, as england and manchester united's record goalscorer — winning five premier league titles at old trafford. he says he's delighted to get the chance to "roll his sleeves up" and get stuck into management. there are five matches in the premier league today,
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and all eyes will be on goal celebrations this weekend. there's been concern that players haven't been following the league's covid protocls during matches, and they've been reminded that "handshakes, high fives and hugs must be avoided". this is forever. —— this isn't forever. this is hopefullyjust the season. and i think we can make those small adjustments, get to the end of the season and hopefully things will return to normal. the rules are there to give everybody safe and i think if we're in the public eye, we should be demonstrating adherence as best as we can under the circumstances so i think it is a justifiable request. let's get a player's perspective on this. some of them have expressed their frustration with the scrutiny they're under, and say that it's very difficult not to break the rules. let's hear from charlie austin, who's on loan at the championship side qpr. premier league players need to behave, what? what do you mean? it's mad, i don't get it.— mad, i don't get it. have you had any guidance _ mad, i don't get it. have you had
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any guidance and _ mad, i don't get it. have you had any guidance and advice - mad, i don't get it. have you had any guidance and advice with - mad, i don't get it. have you had - any guidance and advice with regards to celebrations? no—one said to you, right. _ to celebrations? no—one said to you, right, turn— to celebrations? no—one said to you, right, turn it — to celebrations? no—one said to you, right, turn it down... | to celebrations? no-one said to you, right, turn it down. . ._ right, turn it down... i promise you and i right, turn it down... i promise you and i mean — right, turn it down... i promise you and i mean this, _ right, turn it down... i promise you and i mean this, they _ right, turn it down... i promise you and i mean this, they haven't - right, turn it down... i promise you and i mean this, they haven't but l right, turn it down... i promise you and i mean this, they haven't but if you ask every footballer and honestly, the raw emotionjust you ask every footballer and honestly, the raw emotion just takes over. football clubs that play below the sixth tier of english football are being asked this week how they want the season to end. many expect it will be declared null and void for the second campaign in a row. at the same time, they're waiting to see what money or help they might get. patrick gearey�*s been looking into the challenges facing non—league football. seeing red stars numberfour, might have a while to dwell. it might be the last kick at this level of football for months. now see the victorious united and all clubs below the six level of english football should be looking at a second straight abandon season. the onl second straight abandon season. iie: only outcome second straight abandon season. tie: only outcome would second straight abandon season. ti2 only outcome would be it would be null and void again in the season starts stop this will be lower than they should be and hopefully it will
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be ok but your teetering on the rink folding, notjust us, but many clubs, because of the situation. clubs are nervously waiting on what money they can get from the government's winter survival fund. at marine fc have their money from the cup tie against spurs that it means they are not allowed to play again. all players at their level have been sent a questionnaire this week asking how they think it should end. some feel the football association should have had a plan. there seems to have been no forward planning from the essay. that's two seasons where volunteers have time, effort, commitment, into trying to keep the game going at our level and nothing at all back. the keep the game going at our level and nothing at all back.— nothing at all back. the fa told us the were nothing at all back. the fa told us they were working _ nothing at all back. the fa told us they were working with _ nothing at all back. the fa told us they were working with all - nothing at all back. the fa told us| they were working with all involved to explore various scenarios for this current season. in response to the complex situation presented due to the pandemic was up for all of society, these are turbulent times
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and those clubs that can have discontented water, gas and electric fellow players and locked gates. that leaves those within the game with a pass of their lives shut down —— part of their lives. in with a pass of their lives shut down -- part of their lives.— -- part of their lives. in the past, had issues _ -- part of their lives. in the past, had issues with _ -- part of their lives. in the past, had issues with the _ -- part of their lives. in the past, had issues with the mental- -- part of their lives. in the past, | had issues with the mental health and exciting things that so playing with the football team really does help and with such a serious situation all day every day at the moment, it is then locked down when you finish work. just that 90 minutes, two hours while you are at the football match, you kind of forget about what's going on. you know dimly _ forget about what's going on. you know dimly agree the game had to stop. god is already turning to next season. a chance to make up for lost time and missed penalties. patrick geary, bbc news. and it affects so many people. all the people around them, all the volunteers and we saw we marine when they were allowed to play against
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tottenham in the fa cup, just what it can mean to the whole area and the emotions it brings out. we hope they get it sorted and i bet they can't wait till next season. we will see ou can't wait till next season. we will see you very _ can't wait till next season. we will see you very later _ can't wait till next season. we will see you very later on, _ can't wait till next season. we will see you very later on, thanks. - you've probably seen a lot of pictures this week of the meagre food parcels which have been sent out to some families to replace the free meals their children would normally receive at school. now it seems the row is having a knock—on effect across the catering supply industry, even for firms which have been trying to provide a good service. our business correspondent katy austin has more. providing lunch parcels to children eligible for free school meals while covid restrictions are keeping them at home is helping this hampshire wholesaler keep going while its pubs and restaurant customers are shut. they provide some schools with ingredients and deliver fully packed boxes for others but in the past few days, they've had bad news. we come down from 3000 _ days, they've had bad news. we come down from 3000 to _ days, they've had bad news. we come down from 3000 to just _ days, they've had bad news. we come down from 3000 to just 1400 - days, they've had bad news. we come down from 3000 to just 1400 so 16 i down from 3000 to just 1400 so 16 hundred meals have been cancelled now. the impact for us is we bought
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the stock in, and we are faced with potentially having to throw away, although we won't, we will give it a few charities, but it costs us and makes us and cause us to take a loss. .., . ., ., , makes us and cause us to take a loss. . ., ., , ., ., ., ., loss. the cancellations follow a row around pictures _ loss. the cancellations follow a row around pictures shed _ loss. the cancellations follow a row around pictures shed to _ loss. the cancellations follow a row around pictures shed to social- loss. the cancellations follow a rowl around pictures shed to social media with parents who have branded the offer in some areas inadequate. it has prompted more schools and parents to choose vouchers instead of lunch parcels. richard's firms and others they those pictures don't represent what they supply. this greater manchester supplier has laid open at a loss to serve its public sector clients but here, too, cancellations are now coming in thick and fast. it cancellations are now coming in thick and fast.— cancellations are now coming in thick and fast. it would mean us bellowing. _ thick and fast. it would mean us bellowing, having _ thick and fast. it would mean us bellowing, having developed - thick and fast. it would mean usl bellowing, having developed may thick and fast. it would mean us - bellowing, having developed may be 40% of our team if this continues. 0ur 40% of our team if this continues. our team have been moving mountains to make this work for schools and we have sought new lines so what this means is we're sat on more stock when we have already been sitting on stock due to the quick shutdown of schools, the lockdowns last year, having to stop while for the exit negotiations going to the very last
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minute —— brexit negotiations. it just adds to the problem. minute -- brexit negotiations. it just adds to the problem.- minute -- brexit negotiations. it just adds to the problem. there has alwa s just adds to the problem. there has always been — just adds to the problem. there has always been a _ just adds to the problem. there has always been a choice _ just adds to the problem. there has always been a choice between - just adds to the problem. there hasl always been a choice between locally provided vouchers and mill parcels, but from monday, national voucher scheme is due to begin. the trade body says its members should get compensation for the loss of business following the storm storm of public —— publicity in the last week. it of public -- publicity in the last week. . . of public -- publicity in the last week. ., ., ., , ., week. it will have a devastating im act week. it will have a devastating impact on _ week. it will have a devastating impact on the _ week. it will have a devastating impact on the sector— week. it will have a devastating impact on the sector which - week. it will have a devastating impact on the sector which is i impact on the sector which is already on its knees and what we're seeing is that the move to the voucher scheme is essentially the government giving yet more income to the supermarkets. as actors receive no government support whatsoever and this is a body blow. this no government support whatsoever and this is a body blow.— this is a body blow. this small caterer understand _ this is a body blow. this small caterer understand some - this is a body blow. this small. caterer understand some parents this is a body blow. this small- caterer understand some parents are concerned about food boxes but when when dull —— well done, they provide an opportunity. when dull -- well done, they provide an opportunity-— an opportunity. what better way to educate as many _ an opportunity. what better way to educate as many people _ an opportunity. what better way to educate as many people as - an opportunity. what better way to | educate as many people as possible over such as short period of time than to send out food boxes with recipes and really try to engage children and parents to cook. these firms fill they _
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children and parents to cook. these firms fill they are _ children and parents to cook. these firms fill they are taking _ children and parents to cook. these firms fill they are taking yet - firms fill they are taking yet another unfair hit at these toughest times. because of a few bad corporate apples. katy austin, bbc news. i have a feeling is one of those stories we're going to hear much more about in the coming as well. it's been a source of tension between britain and spain for centuries, but the border which separates gibraltar from the spanish mainland could be taken down this year as part of a post—brexit agreement. the deal, which will allow the free movement of people, is prompting some fears about the long—term future of the territory. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee has been to find out more. enduring the rock of your altar, 15,000 workers from spain across the border here every day. —— gibraltar. the fence, as they call it, is all they have ever known. after more than a century, it is set to come down. it than a century, it is set to come down. . . than a century, it is set to come down. , , ., ., , .,, down. it is better for our people. the border _ down. it is better for our people. the border town _ down. it is better for our people. the border town is _ down. it is better for our people. the border town is one _ down. it is better for our people. the border town is one of - down. it is better for our people. the border town is one of the - the border town is one of the poorest parts of spain. a third of people are unemployed. gibraltar
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relies on workers here for catering and cleaning. forthem, it is relies on workers here for catering and cleaning. for them, it is cause for celebration. bell we're going to have a dom perignon! ii it for celebration. bell we're going to have a dom perignon! if it happens, we will be normal _ have a dom perignon! if it happens, we will be normal people _ have a dom perignon! if it happens, we will be normal people again, - have a dom perignon! if it happens, we will be normal people again, as. we will be normal people again, as we will be normal people again, as we have been suffering for so many years, the queues and the delays on the border, the political issues behind it. ., ,, the border, the political issues behind it. ., ., behind it. the uk and spain have aareed behind it. the uk and spain have agreed that _ behind it. the uk and spain have agreed that the _ behind it. the uk and spain have agreed that the border _ behind it. the uk and spain have agreed that the border will - behind it. the uk and spain have agreed that the border will go, i agreed that the border will go, possibly within six months, but it first has to be made into a formal treaty with the eu, and the single road that links both territories will be widened so people in cars can travel freely, and gibraltar will be linked to europe's passport free travel area known as schengen. some areas will remain and a few guards will rent stay on standby. instead, new arrivals will only be checkedif instead, new arrivals will only be checked if they enter by sea, here at the port, and by air. it will mean for the first time they will be
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due altar guides than eu bodyguards checking passports one after the other. . , ., , ., checking passports one after the other. . , ., ., ., other. the decisions as to who enters gibraltar _ other. the decisions as to who enters gibraltar will _ other. the decisions as to who enters gibraltar will only - other. the decisions as to who enters gibraltar will only ever| other. the decisions as to who i enters gibraltar will only ever be made by a gibraltar guard and we will have primacy of control. these are two borders, ultimate control of our borders in our hands and control of the schengen border is in the control of the schengen authorities. we are absolutely 100% clear that we will never see the one grain of sand of gibraltar, one breath of our air, one drop of rc. of gibraltar, one breath of our air, one drop of rc— one drop of rc. spain's europe minister describes _ one drop of rc. spain's europe minister describes it _ one drop of rc. spain's europe minister describes it in - one drop of rc. spain's europe minister describes it in a - one drop of rc. spain's europe i minister describes it in a different way. minister describes it in a different wa . �* ., ., ., minister describes it in a different wa . ., ., , ., minister describes it in a different wa. ., ., , ., ., way. both are equivalent. instead of sovereignty. — way. both are equivalent. instead of sovereignty. i— way. both are equivalent. instead of sovereignty, iwill— way. both are equivalent. instead of sovereignty, iwillcall_ way. both are equivalent. instead of sovereignty, i will call it _ way. both are equivalent. instead of sovereignty, i will call it core - sovereignty, i will call it core responsibility —— pay responsibility, because by this agreement, uk is allowing gibraltar to participate in certain policies and programmes of the european union to which the uk as such is not participating. this has been possible because spain is an eu
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member state wishes it to happen. four gibraltar aryans, there are painful memories of spain contesting, some think this could be a steppingstone —— steppingstone to spanish rule. —— gibraltarians. two ifeel like this could spanish rule. —— gibraltarians. two i feel like this could be part of spain. i i feel like this could be part of sain. ., �* ., , ., , spain. i don't want this to ever be under spanish _ spain. i don't want this to ever be under spanish government, - spain. i don't want this to ever be | under spanish government, never. both sides — under spanish government, never. both sides recognise this as an experiment not without its risks. the hope, though, is that with the border gone, trust between the historically fractious neighbours can begin to grow. gavin lee, bbc news, gibraltar. just makes you think about going somewhere different, doesn't it? when you see pictures like that. one day. it is 6:45 am, _ pictures like that. one day. it is 6:45 a.m., let's— pictures like that. one day. it is 6:45 a.m., let's look— pictures like that. one day. it is 6:45 a.m. , let's look at - pictures like that. one day. it 3 6:45 a.m., let's look at the weekend weather. lots of people are trying to work out how it is going to be, if they can go out for their walk.
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it is snowing, then we go. pretty clear. yes, somebody has done myjob to me this morning. no need to have mine. weather watches are out already. what is impressive about this is that the snow was further south today. this is kent this morning, and we've actually got some wet snow falling across greater london as well as the moment. but pretty much what you've got at the moment, you are not going to keep the most of the day. that is because we have this well—defined pushing in quickly. 0n the leading edge they will be some snow, but will cause issues into east anglia, but behind it, south—westerly winds mean milder hour for all of us. just east anglia and maybe down through essex and kent. we have further snow so far, and that is through scotland as northern england. temperatures down to —7 in northumberland, so ice could be an issue first thing. the met office has issued an amber warning. that is a tier up for east anglia, because we could see
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significant accumulations developing as we go through the day widely a couple of centimetres, but 5—10 centimetres is not unlikely. so it is certainly worth bearing in mind that amber warning remains in force until the early afternoon, and then conditions should start to improve. for most of us, though, today, what we start with, we're not going to keep. because the cloud and the rain and the wintry mix eases east, and sunshine comes through for many. the wind is pushing on a scattering of showers to western scotland and maybe north—west england, it will be quite windy up here, gusty, gale force gusts quite widely. but temperatures generally will be sitting on the milder side is that south—westerly wind kicks in. 8—11, perhapsjust south—westerly wind kicks in. 8—11, perhaps just east anglia on the cool side, with around 3— four at the very best. but france takes a significant snow to europe through the night, but it keeps things quite quiet. a north—westerly flow continues to develop as we go into
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sunday, but sunday will be a much, much quieter day. we will continue to see some rain into the north—west of scotland, but some decent sunshine around for many of us. certainly the second half of the weekend looks better for all. certainly the second half of the weekend looks betterfor all. 5—8 at the very best. and then as we move into monday we will see low pressure returning. that will bring more wet and windy weather. back to you. time for some movie recommendations now, courtesy of mark kermode, on this week's film review. hello and welcome to the film review with me mark kermode. and despite the fact that covid has closed cinemas and put us in lockdown once again, there is still plenty of new movies for you to experience and enjoy in the comfort and safety of your own home. this week's most arresting
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release is dear comrades, the latest from acclaimed russian film—maker andrei konchalovsky. set in 1962 in a provincial town in the southern ussr, this increasingly harrowing drama stars acclaimed stage and screen actor yuliya vysotskaya as lyudmila, a party devotee with a nostalgia for stalinist ideas in the age of khrushchev. "what am i supposed to believe in if not communism", asks lyuda as her beliefs are challenged in the fallout of a factory strike and protest to which the army and kgb respond with deadly force.
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as the authorities rush to cover up a state—sponsored atrocity, lyuda searches for her missing daughter, for whose life she fears after scenes of terrible violence. based on real events, that were not officially acknowledged until 30 years later, dear comrades is a powerfulfilm that draws visual inspiration from soviet classics like the cranes are flying and ballad of a soldier. presenting its bleakly crisp black and white images in a retro four by three frame. the result is an affecting recreation of a terrifying historical event that at times recalls the impact of the infamous 0dessa steps scene from battleship potemkin. conjuring an utterly convincing world in which the stillness of the cameras merely amplifies the sense of growing chaos. yet despite the true grit of its historical setting, it's the personal story of lyuda's journey that gives dear comrades such an emotional punch, with vysotskaya perfectly embodying a character who slips from stoic political stalwart to frantically anguished mother before our very eyes. it's available now on curzon home cinema with plans for a big—screen theatrical release whenever
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that becomes possible. david. i'm sorry, can you repeat the question? who, or what is david bowie? from the sublime to the ridiculous with stardust, a trite, unauthorised reimagining of david bowie's 1971 american tour which opens with the disclaimer: what follows is mostly fiction. it's also mostly rubbish, hobbled by the legally required absence of any original songs by bowie, who died five years ago, and whose estate wanted nothing to do with this movie. i need to be known, i need them to know me! instead, accomplished actor/musician johnny flynn is left to bash out a couple of bowie related cover
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versions like jacques brel�*s my death. while musicjournalists merrily misquote lyrics to the man who sold the world. presumably because the film—makers don't have the rights to use the real ones. now, this in itself would not necessarily be terrible. tom haynes brilliantly inventive velvet goldmine was similarly denied access to bowie's back catalog, but sparkled in the last. there is no authentic to me. it'sjust fear. yet with stardust, a clunky script co—written by director gabriel range makes heavy weather of alleged psychological scars, painting bowie's suppose it fear of family schizophrenia in unsubtle strokes that lack invention, insight or width. the key elements of bowie's ever—changing career. perhaps a different way to talk about me when on the phone.
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comedian podcast or mark maron does his best to hold it all together as stateside publicist ron 0berman, and jenna malone cuts a vaguely sympathetic figure as bowie's wife angie. butjust when you think that maybe they can save this debacle, along comes james cade whose impression of mark bolan is so toe curling that i had to take my shoes off and then throw them at the screen. it all recalls the opportunist silliness of 2003's grand theft parsons, another film which turned a modern rock legend into a bad joke. you can find stardust on a range of home viewing platforms, but bowie fans would be better served just dusting off their old lps and basking in the majesty of a talent to which this shoddy affair cannot hold a candle. oh, and if you want some of the real bowie on screen, then check out next week's secrets of cinema on pop movies. bbc four, tuesday night. i mention it only in passing. now we are getting somewhere.
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now, 1945 saw the release of david lean's acclaimed adaptation of noel coward's blithe spirit. a hit stage play which had taken london and broadway by storm. margaret rutherford and kay hammond, both of whom started in the original stage production, reprised their roles as a medium and a ghost. the letter conjured up by a seance which reintroduces her to former husband rex harrison, now remarried to constance cummings. now these roles have been refilled by respectively damejudy dench, leslie mann, dan stevens and isla fisher in a new version of blithe spirit which add some perfunctory nods to modernity while still retaining a basic skeleton of the original. elvira? hello? i haven't the foggiest idea of how to send her back. directed by downton abbey alumnus edward hall from a script
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by nick moorcroft, meg leonard and piers ashworth, this latest incarnation was due to open in uk theaters last year emma but after covid delays it was acquired for sky cinema. you're in trouble now. but to be honest, i can't imagine this somewhat lackluster production ever setting movie theaters alight, even with a starry cast whose performances range from the kooky to the caricatured come up with a rather irritating lack of panache. i can feel it in my base chakra. probably trapped wind. and while lean's original won oscars for its spectacular poltergeist effects, this looks more like a drab tv movie thatjust happens to be set in some eye—catching art deco surroundings. how dare you! "just photograph it, dear boy," coward apparently told lean. believing his play to be near perfect. i shudder to think what coward would have made of this adaptation, which is, at best, innocuously forgettable. altogether more ambitious, although also derivative, is archive. an eerie science—fiction drama from writer—director gavin rothery. which lifts rifts from everything from moon and ex machina, to blade runner, marjorie prime, ghost in the shell and even robot and frank.
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how are you feeling? theo james is george almore, an isolated scientist attempting to imbue the spirit of his dead wife into a secretively developed artificial intelligence. having previously built two prototypes, george seems to have struck gold with his third attempt, a biomechanical creation that can carry the recorded thoughts and consciousness of his lost love. i know what you're doing in there. but what will happen to the cast—offs that still need to be cared for, and can george really conduct such wild experiments under the radar?
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we received the notifications of your wife's transition. - she's not ready to go yet. of course. it may not be the most original idea, and the final reel twists won't surprise any genre enthusiasts, but an atmospheric score by steven price, who won an oscar for his work on gravity, and typically eye—catching cinematography from the great laurie rose lift this above the realms of mere repetition into something strangely haunting and effecting. it's nice to finally talk to you. supporting players stacy martin and the recently nobled tobyjones 0be add lively half, but it's james who carries the drama following in the footsteps of lonely screen astronauts like bruce dern and sam rockwell. do you need my help? leave me alone. current lockdown restrictions may have nixed the planned cinema release, but viewers can find archive on digital download from monday.
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free at last, free at last! thank god almighty, we are free at last! i'll leave you with news of mlk/fbi, an engrossing documentary about the us government's surveillance and harassment of martin luther king that seems all the more relevant in these troubled times. after the march on washington, it's clear that martin luther king junior is the most dangerous negro in america. and we have to use every resource at our disposal to destroy him. considering doctor king to be a communist threat, j edgar hoover went to great length to dig into his private life hoping to discredit him with evidence of extramarital infidelities. this represents the darkest part of the bureau's history. tracing the racist tropes of hoover's campaign back to birth of a nation and beyond, sam pollard's film argues
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that the fbi's activities were to some kind of renegade aberration, but a key part of an existing political order. they were running a surveillance state. along the way we hear from former fbi directorjames comey who says that the records of the bureau's action made him feel physically sick when learned of a cache of unreleased surveillance tapes that some believe should never be heard. it's compelling and alarming fair, a warning from history that there are those who will stop at nothing to retain white power. the greatness of america is the right to protest for rights. mlk/fbi is available on vod and through virtual cinema screenings now. that's it for this week, thanks for watching the film review, stay safe and i will see
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you next week. sakes good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: all travellers arriving in the uk from monday will have to quarantine as the government closes all "travel corridors" to prevent new strains of covid entering the country. tougher lockdown restrictions come into force in scotland to tackle what's being described as a "very serious situation". 100 million vaccines in 100 days. the ambitious target set out byjoe biden when he becomes
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president of the united states. england toast their captain marvel. joe root scores a double century as england opened up a big lead over sri lanka. a messy start to our saturday morning. a combination of rain, sleet and snow slipping its way steadily east but into the afternoon, sunny spells and scattered showers. all of the details from me throughout the morning. it's saturday the 16th of january. our top story: all travel corridors into the uk will be closed from monday, the prime minister has announced. the change means anyone travelling to the uk will need proof of a negative covid test. they'll also need to isolate on arrival for at least five days. charlotte wright reports.
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another measure to tighten up travel. this week saw passengers from south america and portugal banned from flying into the uk to stop the spread of a new covid strain from brazil. but the government says it may be difficult to predict where new variants might come from and so further action is needed. to protect us against the risk of as yet unidentified new strains we will also temporarily close all travel corridors from 0400 hours on monday. this latest announcement is not a travel ban. it introduces quarantine for passengers no matter where they have flown from in the world. it means from monday anyone travelling to the uk will have to show a negative covid test less than 72 hours before they depart. when they arrive, they must now self isolate for ten days, or pay for a covid test on the fifth day. if it is negative, they can leave quarantine early. the policy also applies
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to the eurostar and seaports, but not to those travelling within the uk or ireland or to somejobs, like hauliers. travel corridors were first introduced in the summer, allowing people to come to the uk from some countries with low covid rates without having to quarantine on arrival. described as a lifeline for the industry, they kept people going on holiday. now many say they support the suspension so long as it can be lifted later in the year. we've had no revenue now for 12 months and people take a few months in the summer last year. if we're going to have an aviation sector coming out of this, we need to open up in the summer and we look forward to having conversations with the government about that, but for the here and now, we are absolutely clear that we will support the government. i think the government needs a longer term plan for the airline industry. they've been hit time and time again
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and they rightly have asked the support from the government. they were promised support months ago but the package hasn't been put into place. government has said they have put in a comprehensive set of measures for the travel and tourism sector including extending the fellow scheme, business rates relief and tax deferral. it says it is committed to bring the sector back to full strength as soon as it is safe to do so. charlotte wright, bbc news. scotland's covid restrictions are being tightened from today. takeaway food and drink outlets can only serve customers via a hatch — and only shops selling essential items are allowed to offer click—and—collect. the changes are among six new rules announced by first minister nicola sturgeon earlier this week. police chiefs say that investigations have been compromised after thousands of fingerprint, dna and arrest records were accidentally deleted from the national computer. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake can tell us more. jonathan, we understand the bbc has seen a letter in which these concerns are laid out.
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the key question is, has this had an impact on investigations? the lan . ua . e impact on investigations? the language in — impact on investigations? the language in that _ impact on investigations? ti2 language in that letter which was sent by the national police chiefs accountable to chief constables and local police —— local police and crime, uses the phrase," near misses". to talk about impact this has had on the serious crimes. it goes on to say that some records were used to identify offenders by other means, through the use of forensic information but there are huge concerns around this of course. it seems that the problem started backin it seems that the problem started back in november but is only very recently come to light. so the policing minister kip malthouse has said that the problem now is under control. nevertheless, labour is calling for the home secretary priti patel to take full responsibility and leadership for this and answer questions in the house of commons on monday. questions in the house of commons on monda . . , questions in the house of commons on monda . ., , . questions in the house of commons on monda. ., , . ., ., a clinical trial involving 10,000 people in the uk has shown that
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using blood plasma as a treatment for coronavirus doesn't reduce deaths among hospital patients. researchers say they are "incredibly grateful" to everyone who took part in the study but that they are no longer seeking plasma donations. the final results of the research will be published soon. the us president—electjoe biden has set out ambitious plans to vaccinate 100 million americans within his first 100 days in office. he made the pledge as his health chiefs warned that the covid variant first detected in the uk could become the dominant strain in the us by march. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes sent this report. in a city where officials believe one in three of its population has been infected with covid—19 since the start of the pandemic, there's a sense of urgency. hospitals in los angeles are overwhelmed. here, someone is dying from the virus every eight minutes.
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it's rough to see people who are really sick and we have to tell them that there's not much we can do. we can take you to the hospital to sit on these gurneys, it is not comfy. the race is on to get as many people vaccinated as soon as possible. this is the car park at dodgers stadium — the baseball venue in los angeles that's been transformed into the largest vaccination site in america. by the middle of next week, officials say at least 12,000 people a day will receive the covid jab here. but it isn't enough. we've got to increase the pace in distribution in the administration of these vaccines. the reality is we need to get these vaccines out of the freezer and we need to get them into people's arms. this is a scene that's playing out across the country, around the world, but america's so—called 0peration warp speed as failed to live up to its name, at least as far as distribution of the vaccine is concerned. joe biden says when he takes over donald trump on wednesday, he'll launch an ambitious plan to roll it out fast. he said efforts so far had
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been a dismalfailure. our plan is as clear as it is bold, get more people vaccinated for free, create more places for them to get vaccinated. mobilise more medical teams to get the shots in people's arms. he's promising 100 millionjabs in 100 days. 100 mass vaccination centres around the country, and mobile units to get into areas that are hard to reach. the president—elect also had a blunt warning for americans — things, he said, would get worse before they get better. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. that is in america, but one of the biggest vaccine rollout in the world starts today in india. india is aiming to inoculate 300—million people byjuly. 0ur correspondent rajini vaidyanathan is at a hospital in delhi. rajini, that sounds
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like a very ambitious target. tell us how this is going to rollout given the scale of the operation. charlie, as you can see, there is a bit of commotion. some of it is the media but some are people who have actually now come out and had their vaccinations. this is one of 3006 vaccinations. this is one of 3006 vaccination centres that have been set up across india. the goal here and at other centres is to vaccinate around 100 people a day. if you do the maths on that, that means that today alone, if everything goes to plan, more than 300,000 indians will have received a coronavirus vaccine. police officers and frontline workers and then photographs to the over 50s and then people with underlying health conditions. there is a huge logistical task, population of billion people. you live in all kinds of terrain,
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mountains, deserts, urban and rural. 0ne mountains, deserts, urban and rural. one thing to point out, two vaccines are being rolled out today. one of them is the oxford extra rebecca vaccine which is being manufactured here in india. —— astrazeneca. the other one is an indian develop vaccine and they have been some concerns about that because it has been given approval to be rolled out before it has actually passed its phase three clinical trials for efficacy. it basically means that the vaccines being rolled out here and people don't know how effective it will be. and so some health experts have raised concerns but charlie, the government is stressing that they think it is a safe vaccine and it will be administered under very strict supervision. a wonderful bit of detail before i leave you, charlie and rachel, but as people have been streaming out any net vaccines, people have been coming out with a red rose. everyone who has had the vaccine here today is getting a red rose. this hospital in delhi saw some of the worst of the
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pandemic, treating thousands of coronavirus patients. so there is a sense of hope and optimism and a positive mood here today now india is starting to get the vaccine. rajini, thank you very much. a night—time curfew of 6:00pm comes into force across france from this evening. most of the country was already forbidden from leaving home after 8:00pm, but the government has tightened the restrictions due to high infection rates. from monday, anyone wishing to enter france from outside the eu will need to show a negative covid test result. prince william has told how seeing people die during his time as an air ambulance pilot left him traumatised "for weeks on end" and changed how he viewed the world. during a video call with emergency responders and counsellors, he said he could understand the immense pressure frontline staff were under. something that i noticed from my brief spell flying the air ambulance for the team is when you see so much death
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and so much bereavement, it does impact how you see the world you are so there and so drawn into it and it is only natural. that is what a lot of the public don't understand, when you are surrounded by that level of intense trauma, sadness and bereavement, it really does, it stays with you, it stays with you for weeks on end and you see the world in a much more slightly depressed, darker, blacker place. a, slightly depressed, darker, blacker lace. �* . ., ., place. a little change in tone. i don't know _ place. a little change in tone. i don't know how _ place. a little change in tone. i don't know how it _ place. a little change in tone. i don't know how it is _ place. a little change in tone. i don't know how it is where - place. a little change in tone. i don't know how it is where you | place. a little change in tone. i - don't know how it is where you are, it is raining a lot here in manchester and northwest this morning to stop quite a lot of snow elsewhere. people enjoying it, some people not. some animals enjoying it more than others. have a look at this. these four polar bears — nobby, hamish, luka and sisu — have been making the most of the chilly conditions at their home near doncaster. they live at the yorkshire wildlife
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park, which is temporarily closed due to lockdown restrictions. they have completely got the run of the place and making the most of it. fair play to them. make the most of it. we will have the weather details for you injust it. we will have the weather details for you in just a it. we will have the weather details for you injust a moment. there are some weather warnings for people this morning. it is some weather warnings for people this morning-— this morning. it is pretty grotty out there- _ let's return to our main story now, and that closure of all travel corridors into the uk from monday. it's part of the effort to reduce the spread of coronavirus. nick thomas—symonds is the shadow home secretary and hejoins us now from south wales. at what point would you have said no—one is coming into this country without a test? it hasn't just been it hasn'tjust been the slowness around testing, it was the failure to put in border protection, when i
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put it to priti patel raising that. the gap —— the government didn't introduce a comprehensive quarantine regime until the eight ofjune last year and we then had the announcement of the 72 hour testing and even that was not introduced when the government said that it would be and we have had yet another delay. so yes, the measures are necessary. i support them coming into effect. but i do say to the government to get a comprehensive plan and to act in that proper strategic way, not in the short—term chaotic way we've seen over the past 12 months. share chaotic way we've seen over the past 12 months. �* , ' 12 months. are very different icture 12 months. are very different picture to _ 12 months. are very different picture to how _ 12 months. are very different picture to how it _ 12 months. are very different picture to how it was - 12 months. are very different picture to how it was in - 12 months. are very differentj picture to how it was in april. 12 months. are very different - picture to how it was in april. far fewer people travelling at the moment, so in that sense, this will have a bit less of an impact. the other key element of it is if —— is
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enforcement. how would you like to see this being properly patrolled? first of all it is about checking of course before people board aeroplanes and then of course checks on arrival. to make this whole system work, we have to have an effective quarantine system and that's been a real problem. the government has only at this stage published data from june last year when quarantine was introduced up to september and it paints a really poor picture, frankly because it shows that just under poor picture, frankly because it shows thatjust under 2 million people were spot checked by border force, that is not the totality of everyone who came into the country, by the way, but fewer than 67,000 of those was actually successfully contacted to check that they were quarantining. the government has outsourced this to a company that is meant to be doing this, the government itself
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has said it should be checking 20%, it isn't checking anywhere near 20%, thatis it isn't checking anywhere near 20%, that is around about 3% on the figures i have given you, so they really do need to get a grip on the quarantine system to make this work. i'm hearing the criticism but i'm not hearing what you would be doing as an alternative. can you clarify that for me, please? are you seeking for example the police to add this to their list of responsibilities, to their list of responsibilities, to be knocking on the doors and checking on people? is it border force? ~ ., , checking on people? is it border force? ., , force? who is it? well, the isolation — force? who is it? well, the isolation assurance - force? who is it? well, the isolation assurance service | force? who is it? well, the i isolation assurance service can force? who is it? well, the - isolation assurance service can do this effectively with appropriate support. we have already been critical of outsourcing, outsourcing in this case clearly isn't working, and they labour government would take a very different approach to that. but it is also about having processes in place to ensure that this contact is happening —— conduct is happening, and if the conduct is not happening as it should be, clearly the case at the moment,
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additional support needs to be given and a different approach for the isolation assurance service. speaking of enforcement, we talked a lot about what is happening in supermarkets over the last week. i know the welsh government is now introducing stricter measures to make it compulsory for supermarkets to enforce things like social distancing and mask wearing. do you support that? if so, do you think we should see that around the rest of the uk? i should see that around the rest of the uk? .,, , should see that around the rest of theuk? .,, the uk? i do support the approach that was government _ the uk? i do support the approach that was government has - the uk? i do support the approach that was government has taken i the uk? i do support the approach - that was government has taken during the pandemic. the welsh government has taken a careful, studied approach, and has been introducing measures like, for example, the circuit breaker ahead of the position in england. in terms of that specific issue, of course around the uk i would say to look at the welsh model and indeed how it is working, because it is absolutely critical. but whatever measures are in place in any part of the uk, we
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also have to remember that we must follow the guidance, people have made extraordinary sacrifices, those sacrifices are continuing, and the government, by the way, the uk government, by the way, the uk government, now has to put into place inside of the bargain, which is a swift, effective and fair vaccine rollout.— is a swift, effective and fair vaccine rollout. speaking of the vaccine rollout. speaking of the vaccine rollout, _ vaccine rollout. speaking of the vaccine rollout, 3.2 _ vaccine rollout. speaking of the vaccine rollout, 3.2 million - vaccine rollout. speaking of the i vaccine rollout, 3.2 million people have now been vaccinated in this country. will you give the government some credit for that? it is an extraordinary achievement. look, i am is an extraordinary achievement. look, iam pleased is an extraordinary achievement. look, i am pleased to see the 3.2 million people vaccinated, and let's give every credit to those on the frontline who are actually putting that into effect. and our remarkable national health service, which over the past 12 months, not that any of us needed it, but it has given us a powerful reminder of its importance. and we really are seeing that as well now in the vaccine rollout. absolutely i want to vaccine rollout to succeed. that is why the labor
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party has its vaccinate —— vaccinate britain campaign to support that happening, we want to see the vaccine getting out of the nine categories of people who have been identified by the joint committee on immunisation, and vaccination, as soon as is possible, because that is the root out of the situation that we currently find ourselves in. can i also ask we currently find ourselves in. can i also ask you. _ we currently find ourselves in. can i also ask you, as _ we currently find ourselves in. can i also ask you, as part of your brief, of course, about this error that was made that lead to the loss of thousands of records within the police database? something like 200,000 records that were deleted, possibly according to other reports, dna records, finger print records, are you clear analysis to whether this is going to have an impact on police investigations? the position reall is police investigations? the position really is unclear. _ police investigations? the position really is unclear. you _ police investigations? the position really is unclear. you know, - police investigations? the position really is unclear. you know, this i police investigations? the position really is unclear. you know, this isj really is unclear. you know, this is extraordinarily serious. priti patel will be responsible for criminals walking free, because we are not going to be able to link suspects to
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crime scenes without the dna and without the finger print evidence. yesterday the home secretary was hiding, not even giving an explanation to and she still hasn't done that. instead, we had the policing minister, junior minister yesterday, who apparently found out about this on twitter but ben said that this only related to suspects who had subsequently been released without charge. now, that is a serious enough problem. but then we also had a revelation last night but there are 26,000 pieces of dna evidence, and that includes notjust suspects but people who have been convicted of the most serious offences, whose dna should have been kept indefinitely, so frankly the government's explanation so far doesn't add up. we need the home secretary to take responsibility and explain what has happened to him, appear to the public and explain how she is going to fix it.—
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she is going to fix it. thank you very much- _ she is going to fix it. thank you very much. sorry, _ she is going to fix it. thank you very much. sorry, charlie, - she is going to fix it. thank you very much. sorry, charlie, i- she is going to fix it. thank you | very much. sorry, charlie, iwas just going to say, we were talking about flasks earlier, as we were about to go to cold weather. and the very difficult issue of what to do when your flask becomes tainted with the taste of something else. 50 when your flask becomes tainted with the taste of something else.- the taste of something else. so say the taste of something else. so say the flask has _ the taste of something else. so say the flask has had, _ the taste of something else. so say the flask has had, like, _ the taste of something else. so say the flask has had, like, a _ the taste of something else. so say the flask has had, like, a soup - the taste of something else. so say the flask has had, like, a soup in i the flask has had, like, a soup in it, a strong tasting soup, and the next day you want to have a hot chocolate or something. the residue smell or taste that lies within. these are the things that are really exercising us this morning. lucy tweed is to say "we love a flask, usually coffee over christmas and new year's we had flasks of soup on picnics and long walks, and then on boxing day we had a gmt. in picnics and long walks, and then on boxing day we had a gmt.- boxing day we had a gmt. in the flask? yes, _ boxing day we had a gmt. in the flask? yes, from _ boxing day we had a gmt. in the flask? yes, from soup _ boxing day we had a gmt. in the flask? yes, from soup to - boxing day we had a gmt. in the flask? yes, from soup to g - boxing day we had a gmt. in the flask? yes, from soup to g and l boxing day we had a gmt. in thel flask? yes, from soup to g and t, that is crazy- _ flask? yes, from soup to g and t, that is crazy. louise, _ flask? yes, from soup to g and t, that is crazy. louise, where - flask? yes, from soup to g and t, that is crazy. louise, where are i flask? yes, from soup to g and t, l that is crazy. louise, where are you with the flask— that is crazy. louise, where are you with the flask thing? _ that is crazy. louise, where are you with the flask thing? are _ that is crazy. louise, where are you with the flask thing? are you - that is crazy. louise, where are you with the flask thing? are you on - with the flask thing? are you on board? i with the flask thing? are you on board? ., , ., , _ board? i would be quite happy if the g and t flavour— board? i would be quite happy if the g and t flavour lingered. _
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board? i would be quite happy if the g and t flavour lingered. you - board? i would be quite happy if the g and t flavour lingered. you are . g and t flavour lingered. you are always. — g and t flavour lingered. you are always. you _ g and t flavour lingered. you are always, you know, washing it pmperly. _ always, you know, washing it properly. it is my opinion. in terms of flask— properly. it is my opinion. in terms of flask carrying, you might need it in the _ of flask carrying, you might need it in the next — of flask carrying, you might need it in the next few days, it is cold out there _ in the next few days, it is cold out there there — in the next few days, it is cold out there. there is a wet snow across there. there is a wet snow across the capital— there. there is a wet snow across the capital at the moment. more significant snow starting to develop across— significant snow starting to develop across east anglia. this is important because this is where we will see _ important because this is where we will see the worst of the weather today _ will see the worst of the weather today. let's take a look at what has happened _ today. let's take a look at what has happened over the past few hours. 0n the leading edge we had snow out of scotland and northern ireland, 'ust of scotland and northern ireland, just pushing north of our venture into east— just pushing north of our venture into east anglia, but behind it, turning — into east anglia, but behind it, turning readily to rain. that is going — turning readily to rain. that is going to — turning readily to rain. that is going to be the story as we go through— going to be the story as we go through the day. the exception to this will— through the day. the exception to this will be — through the day. the exception to this will be east anglia, where here we have _ this will be east anglia, where here we have an — this will be east anglia, where here we have an amber weather wanting out until the _ we have an amber weather wanting out until the early part of this afternoon for some significant snow. -- amber— afternoon for some significant snow. —— amberweather afternoon for some significant snow. —— amber weather warning. that may well cause _ —— amber weather warning. that may well cause some disruption. but we are going _ well cause some disruption. but we are going to see, most of us, some wet weather~ — are going to see, most of us, some wet weather. it will be rained today because _ wet weather. it will be rained today because the wind is coming around to a south—westerly direction, so the yellow— a south—westerly direction, so the yellow colours, they are returning
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because _ yellow colours, they are returning because the wind is swinging around to southerly. now, just anglia and maybe _ to southerly. now, just anglia and maybe kent will cling onto some snow first thing _ maybe kent will cling onto some snow first thing this morning, then the rain will— first thing this morning, then the rain will ease away and actually come _ rain will ease away and actually come into— rain will ease away and actually come into the afternoon, it is an improving — come into the afternoon, it is an improving picture. it really is quite — improving picture. it really is quite a — improving picture. it really is quite a messy story to try to pinpoint— quite a messy story to try to pinpoint today. we will see your showers — pinpoint today. we will see your showers into the far north—west, gusty— showers into the far north—west, gusty winds in scotland as well, but many— gusty winds in scotland as well, but many of— gusty winds in scotland as well, but many of us — gusty winds in scotland as well, but many of us will be bright and breezy into the _ many of us will be bright and breezy into the afternoon and it will be milder— into the afternoon and it will be milder than it has been, 9—11 the high _ milder than it has been, 9—11 the high the — milder than it has been, 9—11 the high. the only exception is east anglia. — high. the only exception is east anglia. 4- — high. the only exception is east anglia, 4— five at the best. through tonight— anglia, 4— five at the best. through tonight we — anglia, 4— five at the best. through tonight we will see significant snow moving _ tonight we will see significant snow moving over to europe, for us it stays— moving over to europe, for us it stays quiet _ moving over to europe, for us it stays quiet. north—westerly wind very much— stays quiet. north—westerly wind very much in charge. those temperatures will perhaps descend into low _ temperatures will perhaps descend into low single figures first thing on sunday morning but sunday is going _ on sunday morning but sunday is going to — on sunday morning but sunday is going to be a better day. much more straightforward for me to try to paint— straightforward for me to try to paint that — straightforward for me to try to paint that picture tomorrow morning. driel’i _ paint that picture tomorrow morning. drier. some — paint that picture tomorrow morning. drier, some sunshine coming through, scattered _ drier, some sunshine coming through, scattered showers driving into the far north — scattered showers driving into the far north -- — scattered showers driving into the far north —— north—west of scotland and northern ireland, temperatures
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sitting _ and northern ireland, temperatures sitting around 6— eight, but are dry and sunny— sitting around 6— eight, but are dry and sunny story. it could be a case of making — and sunny story. it could be a case of making the most of it because as we move _ of making the most of it because as we move into monday and then into tuesday. _ we move into monday and then into tuesday, low pressure returns, bringing — tuesday, low pressure returns, bringing some wet and windy weather, and i bringing some wet and windy weather, and i don't _ bringing some wet and windy weather, and i don't want to and too much on and i don't want to and too much on a dismal— and i don't want to and too much on a dismal note. i am not trying to put you — a dismal note. i am not trying to put you off— a dismal note. i am not trying to put you off your breakfast. but unfortunately i think next week could _ unfortunately i think next week could be — unfortunately i think next week could be starting to see localised flooding. — could be starting to see localised flooding, and flood warnings are pretty— flooding, and flood warnings are pretty high at the moment. i will have _ pretty high at the moment. i will have more — pretty high at the moment. i will have more details through the morning _ louise, thank you. the nhs needs all hands on deck right now, so final—year nursing students are once again being invited to start working on the wards while they finish their degrees. one of those who has answered the call is jaimie thompson. she's a third—year nursing student in hull. jamie, good morning to you. good mornina! jamie, good morning to you. good morning! how _ jamie, good morning to you. good morning! how are _ jamie, good morning to you. good morning! how are you _ jamie, good morning to you. good morning! how are you doing? - jamie, good morning to you. good morning! how are you doing? i - jamie, good morning to you. goodj morning! how are you doing? i am jamie, good morning to you. good i morning! how are you doing? i am all riuht. you morning! how are you doing? i am all right- you are — morning! how are you doing? i am all right. you are all— morning! how are you doing? i am all right. you are all right? _ morning! how are you doing? i am all right. you are all right? we _ morning! how are you doing? i am all right. you are all right? we are - right. you are all right? we are auoin to
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right. you are all right? we are going to investigate _ right. you are all right? we are going to investigate that - right. you are all right? we are going to investigate that in - right. you are all right? we are going to investigate that in a i going to investigate that in a moment. just so that people can get to know you, can you tell us, you were in the middle of your training, before you are brought into the wards and were working out, what were your circumstances? how old are you, how long have you been studying? i you, how long have you been studying?— you, how long have you been stud inc? . ., , ., , studying? i am a third-year student to my second _ studying? i am a third-year student to my second placement _ studying? i am a third-year student to my second placement in - studying? i am a third-year student to my second placement in my - studying? i am a third-year student i to my second placement in my daddy. so i qualified in september. —— in my third year. i have worked very nhs persisting is so far, i was a physio assistant beforehand and i went to my training eight years ago. at home i've got a three—year—old little girl and my husband, who is working all the time to help me get through my course. 50 working all the time to help me get through my course.— working all the time to help me get through my course. so now we know to set u - , through my course. so now we know to set up. they — through my course. so now we know to set up. they must _ through my course. so now we know to set up, they must be _ through my course. so now we know to set up, they must be very _ through my course. so now we know to set up, they must be very proud - through my course. so now we know to set up, they must be very proud of - set up, they must be very proud of you, i will say that straight up, i am sure. so you get the call, as have quite a lot of student nurses, saying that we want you to come into the wards. as i understand it, you are now in the deep end, working on are now in the deep end, working on a covid ward. can you tell us about
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that? ~ ., , .,. , a covid ward. can you tell us about that? ~ ., , , ., that? well, our placements now, some are startin: that? well, our placements now, some are starting this — that? well, our placements now, some are starting this week— that? well, our placements now, some are starting this week and _ that? well, our placements now, some are starting this week and some - that? well, our placements now, some are starting this week and some are - are starting this week and some are starting next week, i was in the first wave of the actual virus, we got to public so we could make up our hours, and through sickness, because of the virus itself and many other families have been because of the virus itself and many otherfamilies have been ill, the wards at moment are very busy, very shortstaffed, so we are kinda filling in the gaps to help help, really, at the moment, anyway. i am sure the teams _ really, at the moment, anyway. lam sure the teams alongside you are of course thinking absolutely about your safety and your colleagues split�* safety. you have gone from being in a training situation to a hospital, i know you have had experience before, but then you are told that you are working on a covid ward. now, you have a job to do and we know that nurses and doctors do what they need to do. what about yourself personally? what did i feel like? what was your thought at that
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point? fist like? what was your thought at that oint? �* . . . point? at first it was quite worrying- _ point? at first it was quite worrying. because - point? at first it was quite worrying. because the - point? at first it was quite l worrying. because the ward point? at first it was quite i worrying. because the ward i point? at first it was quite - worrying. because the ward i was going on, the orthopaedic ward, and i was told it wasn�*t clear, because it had been a previous covid ward, but within a week it had gone back to being a covid ward. 0bviously but within a week it had gone back to being a covid ward. obviously i am really worried about my family, because obviously my little only quite young still. but i�*ve got a job to do, and that�*s how i see it. i am enrolled into this course to help patients, and that is what i�*m doing, that is how i look at it. so i am trying to do what i can, look after my family as well as my extended family, and i am now shielding myself from my parents while i am on placement, so obviously i�*m not putting them at risk, but i go through little routines of, you know, changing my clothes at work and then coming home, changing in the back of our house, we�*vejust
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home, changing in the back of our house, we�*ve just got that layer of protection, just going through that, trying to be as safe as possible, really. trying to be as safe as possible, reall . g ., ., ., ., trying to be as safe as possible, reall . . ., ., ., ., _ trying to be as safe as possible, reall .�*., ., ., ., ,, ,., really. jamie, i am amazed by your ”ramatic really. jamie, i am amazed by your pragmatic attitude. _ really. jamie, i am amazed by your pragmatic attitude. i _ really. jamie, i am amazed by your pragmatic attitude. i shouldn't - really. jamie, i am amazed by your pragmatic attitude. i shouldn't be, | pragmatic attitude. i shouldn�*t be, because we speak to a lot of medics, and you are very practical, you deal with things. among your colleagues and the people you are working with, inevitably, what is vtol? because we are talking quite a bit about the mental toll on the people. among this comment should be said, there are other stories. you are looking after people who are getting better, so they must be moments when you have those times as well?— have those times as well? yeah, i mean, have those times as well? yeah, i mean. there _ have those times as well? yeah, i mean, there are _ have those times as well? yeah, i mean, there are a _ have those times as well? yeah, i mean, there are a lot _ have those times as well? yeah, i mean, there are a lot of— have those times as well? yeah, i mean, there are a lot of student l mean, there are a lot of student nurses who are struggling. a lot of the experiences i have had in the past, i have learned to deal with, but they haven�*t. 0ne situation that i had when i was working on icu is a patient�*s family asking me to listen to voicemails of, basically,
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goodbyes. and also read out messages from the family. that was quite difficult, because obviously, having a small child myself, to say goodbye to somebody, that is quite a big thing. i took it as a positive, because at the end of the day, i am helping that family speak to that individual that they love, but for a lot of individuals, it has taken a toll, and it is very hard for a lot of the student nurses, definitely. that story you just told us, that brings it home in such a real way. how do you, jamie, what is your way of kind of getting over the day? even in normal times, people who work in medicine, there are times when it is very challenging. at the moment, more than ever. what is your way of dealing with it? how are you coping? for way of dealing with it? how are you coin: ? ., . way of dealing with it? how are you coin: ? ., , , way of dealing with it? how are you coinu? ., , , ., , coping? for me, it is my family. i come home. _ coping? for me, it is my family. i come home. if— coping? for me, it is my family. i come home, if i _ coping? for me, it is my family. i come home, if! have _ coping? for me, it is my family. i come home, if! have had - coping? for me, it is my family. i come home, if! have had a - coping? for me, it is my family. i come home, if! have had a really come home, if i have had a really stressful day, i will sit and cuddle
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my little girl or we will play a lot of pj mask at the moment, but it is just to take your mind off what you�*ve been through. i do talk to my family and tell them what has happened, but obviously not wanting to tell too much detail, i think sometimes it is better to talk about it than not. i sometimes it is better to talk about it than not. .. . . sometimes it is better to talk about it than not. ~ ., , ., , it than not. i think that is a very aood it than not. i think that is a very good message- _ it than not. i think that is a very good message. what _ it than not. i think that is a very good message. what is - it than not. i think that is a very good message. what is your - it than not. i think that is a very l good message. what is your little girl called? good message. what is your little airl called? ., , good message. what is your little girl called?- robin, - good message. what is your little girl called?- robin, well, l good message. what is your little girl called?- robin, well, i| girl called? robyn. robin, well, i am sure all— girl called? robyn. robin, well, i am sure all your _ girl called? robyn. robin, well, i am sure all your family _ girl called? robyn. robin, well, i am sure all your family is - girl called? robyn. robin, well, i am sure all your family is very i am sure all your family is very proud of you, and in the years to come, your little robin will be very, very proud of her mum. i thank you so much for talking to us this morning, taking us through the realities of what is going on your world. . .. realities of what is going on your world. ., ~' ,, realities of what is going on your world. ., ,, i. ., realities of what is going on your world. ., ~' i., ., .., realities of what is going on your world. ., ,, i. ., _, ., ,, world. thank you. you welcome. thank ou. pj mask i don't imagine, is massive in your— pj mask i don't imagine, is massive in your household, charlie? it is top quality— in your household, charlie? it is top quality television.— top quality television. painting, thou~h! top quality television. painting, though! painting. _ top quality television. painting, though! painting. stay- top quality television. painting, though! painting. stay with - top quality television. painting, though! painting. stay with us. | top quality television. painting, i though! painting. stay with us. we will be speaking _ though! painting. stay with us. we will be speaking to _ though! painting. stay with us. we will be speaking to the _ though! painting. stay with us. we will be speaking to the gp - though! painting. stay with us. we will be speaking to the gp sajid - will be speaking to the gp sajid javid _ will be speaking to the gp sajid javid in— will be speaking to the gp sajid javid injust a moment. —— sarah
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jarvis _ hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. here are the main news stories this morning. we�*ve just been hearing about the immense pressure on hospitals at the moment — but gps are also facing a very challenging winter. let�*s catch up with one of them now. doctor sarahjarvis is one of our regulars on breakfast and she joins us from west london. what do you make of these young men and women all over the country that are stepping up before their time to assist their colleagues in the nhs? it is an incredibly difficult situation stop there are medical students when i was a girl, we used to have to go onto the wards and step up and i genuinely thought that the time had come where people were
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going to be eased into it more gently, and when i again became ajp as a trainee, we were working 110 hour a week shifts and it was completely untenable —— gp. we worked with the government to ensure that stopped happening overall, but now we�*re seeing that unfortunately, especially for instance with intensive care nurses, where there is one intensive care nurse notjust a one patient but up to four or even six in parts of london, the pressure isjust immense. and six in parts of london, the pressure is just immense. and for those juniors to be brought in and witnessing what�*s essentially a war zone, it�*s really tough. just witnessing what's essentially a war zone, it's really tough.— zone, it's really tough. just at the time, we zone, it's really tough. just at the time. we have — zone, it's really tough. just at the time, we have been _ zone, it's really tough. just at the time, we have been hearing - zone, it's really tough. just at the | time, we have been hearing about zone, it's really tough. just at the - time, we have been hearing about the long—term mental health impact and working through the impact —— working through the impact —— working through the impact —— working through their pandemic on other front—line services, too. working through their pandemic on otherfront—line services, too. this is one of the reasons we are so focused on vaccines at the moment to get us through this very bleak period. how is it going at your surgery right now? in period. how is it going at your surgery right now?— period. how is it going at your surgery right now? in our practice ou work surgery right now? in our practice you work as _ surgery right now? in our practice you work as a _ surgery right now? in our practice you work as a primary _ surgery right now? in our practice
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you work as a primary care - surgery right now? in our practice i you work as a primary care network so practice act as hubs. in the practice i worked at, we have now done to lots of the pfizer vaccine which is to lots of 975 doses and are starting to roll out with the astrazeneca doses. the astrazeneca doses have been a little bit more patchy in coming through and we are undoubtedly aware that many of our colleagues in south london and north london and other parts of the country have had problems with delivery. i�*ve got a colleague in a practice in north london who had booked 300 patients in yesterday afternoon for vaccines and was advised halfway through the morning that the vaccines were not going to be arriving. that the vaccines were not going to be arrivinu. that the vaccines were not going to be arriving-— be arriving. there are clearly differences _ be arriving. there are clearly differences all _ be arriving. there are clearly differences all around - be arriving. there are clearly differences all around the . be arriving. there are clearly - differences all around the country in terms of supply. we�*ve heard of places where they haven�*t even started vaccinating that over 80s at the moment. can you explain, how do you decide who gets these vaccines? do you as a practice have to apply and say look, we�*re set up and ready
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go? give us the jabs? how does it work? go? give us the 'abs? how does it work? ~ ., ., , , go? give us the 'abs? how does it work? ~ ., ., ,, , go? give us the 'abs? how does it work? 2 ., ., ,, , ., go? give us the 'abs? how does it work? 2 ., ., , , , ., ., work? what will happen is that a rima work? what will happen is that a primary care _ work? what will happen is that a primary care network _ work? what will happen is that a primary care network which - work? what will happen is that a primary care network which is i work? what will happen is that a primary care network which is a l primary care network which is a group of a few practices will come together and the vast majority of primary care networks in the country have come together and said at least one of our practices is going to act as a hub. but once you�*ve done that and once he�*s got all the logistics started and certainly with the pfizer vaccine, that was a real challenge because at the very last moment we were told we then had to observe everybody for 15 minutes afterwards which suddenly meant you had to have a whole heap more space if you are going to get the throughput to get 975 patients vaccinated in 3.5 days, so that did cause a few practices to pull out and if you practise primary care networks not to have anybody but the majority of primary care networks have now got them. with the astrazeneca vaccine, it is a little bit easier because you have a little bit easier because you have a little bit more time but very often, we are
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sitting there waiting for the vaccines. another colleague of mine in south london, which makes me very aware how lucky west london has been, a colleague in south london has had five dates for delivery of the vaccine and they�*ve been ready to really ramp up, inviting people, inviting 975 people over 3.5 days was a bit is a huge logistical challenge for a practice, but they may often have to invite people that maybe two days lupus notice which means cancelling all the other work thatis means cancelling all the other work that is on and not allowing patients to begin for other things. that must be very frustrating _ to begin for other things. that must be very frustrating if _ to begin for other things. that must be very frustrating if you _ to begin for other things. that must be very frustrating if you have - to begin for other things. that must be very frustrating if you have been | be very frustrating if you have been held up like that. the age of the —— the other issue that has emerged like that is other people within minority communities being much more reluctant in some cases to take this vaccine. if you look over role, around 57% of people from black, asian and minority ethnic communities were taken vaccine, that compares to 79% of white people. is a lot of misinformation and cultural
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misunderstandings in some communities. how do you compact that and have you seen it firsthand, sarah? . and have you seen it firsthand, sarah? , ., , , ., , sarah? yes, absolutely, and it is ve , sarah? yes, absolutely, and it is very. very _ sarah? yes, absolutely, and it is very. very worrying- _ sarah? yes, absolutely, and it is very, very worrying. social- sarah? yes, absolutely, and it is| very, very worrying. social media has quite a lot to do that but i think i�*m really reassured that are so many now community leaders and religious leaders are stepping up and giving sermons, engaging with their congregations to try and explain to people the importance, because the irony is that people of b ame origin have been disproportionately affect the by the pandemic was that they are much more likely to seriously be ill or die from the pandemic of and equivalently people from white ethnic backgrounds so that is why it is such a concern. but what it does mean of course is when the receptionist rings up to offer the patient and appointment, it can take 10-15 patient and appointment, it can take 10—15 minutes to make a single appointment. multiply that if you�*ve
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got 40% of your population from ethnic minorities by 400 and suddenly it�*s taking an awfully long time and then sometimes, and this i think is the really sad thing, is that people will say yes, i have the appointment and later you realise is it —— it is to get you off the phone and then that vaccine has to be thrown away because the five —— pfizer ones, in particular, have such a thought —— have such a short life. but make those vulnerabilities in those communities offer all sorts of reasons. in those communities offer all sorts of reasons-— of reasons. structural inequalities. but that of reasons. structural inequalities. ibut that does _ of reasons. structural inequalities. but that does need _ of reasons. structural inequalities. but that does need to _ of reasons. structural inequalities. but that does need to be - of reasons. structural inequalities. l but that does need to be addressed. thank you very much, sarahjarvis, gp working in west london. what is going on with the cricket? sri lanka have been batting. i have wicket alert on vibrate in my phone in my pocket and it could happen any
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time! england may be massive favourites, to win this first test in sri lanka now, thanks tojoe root�*s double century, but they still have to take ten wickets, as the hosts try and save the match, with the help of some expected thundery showers. so england ——but there are still two days to go after today, so england can be patient. root�*s score of 228 is the second highest knock, by an english cricketer in asia and his second highest career total. while the england tail end around him didn�*t offer much resistance on this third morning, it didn�*t matter as england all out for 421. they�*re now having a bowl at sri lanka, who are 13 without loss. problems for organisers of the australian open tennis, after two positive coronavirus tests on one of the charter flights bringing players to melbourne for the tournament. 24 players have been identified as close contacts on the flight which came in from los angeles. so that means that they�*ll quarantine for two weeks like everyone else, but they�*ll miss
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out on the opportunity to leave their rooms for 5 hours a day to train like the rest of the players who are already there. bear in mind the tournament starts on 8th february, so that leaves them very little time to properly prepare. the wizard of wishaw, had us all spell bound. that�*s how the commentators described john higgins masterclass, as he knocked ronnie 0�*sullivan out of the masters. both players played unbelieveable snooker in milton keynes. we saw a record—equalling five consecutive centuries. both players showing why they�*re still going strong, at the age of 45. in the end higgins, known as the wizard of wishaw, had too many tricks up his sleeve for the rocket. and higgins will face dave gilbert in the semi finals this evening. wayne rooney�*s first match, in his new full time manager career, is a home game against rotherham today. he�*s been made the boss of derby in the championship
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on a permanent basis, now, officially ending an 18 year career as a player — and what a time he enjoyed — england and manchester united�*s record goalscorer — winning 5 premier league titles at old trafford. he says he�*s delighted to get the chance, now to inspire the next generation of players as the gaffer. my my whole life, it would i know, playing football. so i�*m very fortunate i�*m staying around football, i�*m still going into the dressing room, not with the players but obviously with the staff. yellow, it is a new chapter for me. i�*ve —— of course i will miss playing. everybody who stops playing it misses it, but obviously time suffers no man so i have had my time and it is time for obviously the younger generation to have des and for me to try and guide the young players to be better players. —— to have affairs. —— to have theirs. anyone who�*s scored a goal at whatever level will know what an amazing feeling
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it is and sometimes its a blur as your emotions take over. but the instinct for the profesional players to celebrate together must be restrained. there�*s been concern that players haven�*t been following the league�*s strengthened covid protocols during this week�*s matches, and they�*ve been reminded that "handshakes, high fives and hugs must be avoided." this isn�*t forever. this is hopefully until the end of this season. and i think under the circumstances we can make those small adjustments, get to the end of the season and hopefully things will return to normal. the rules are there to give everybody safe, and i think if we�*re in the public eye, we should be demonstrating adherence to those rules as best we can under the circumstances, so i think it�*s a justifiable request. let�*s get a player�*s perspective on this. some of them have expressed their frustration with the scrutiny they�*re under, and say that it�*s very difficult not to break the rules. let�*s hear from charlie austin, who�*s on loan at the championship side qpr. premier league players need to behave, what? what do you mean? it�*s mad, i don�*t get it. have you had any, like,
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guidance and advice with regards to celebrations? no—one said to you, right, guys, just tone it down a bit... i promise you and i mean this, they haven�*t, but i mean, if you ask every footballer, and honestly, the raw emotion just takes over. the opening premier league match of the weekend, is a huge one for wolves and west brom fans. they face each other in the black country derby, for the first time in nine years. sam allardyce is a month into the west brom manager�*s job, but he says the spread of the new variant of coronavirus has affected his enjoyment of it. my my enjoyment of trying to does that help the club out of their problem because of my fear catching covid. worse still actually passing it on to my wife. that would be the greatest fear of awfully stop i still got my enthusiasm at the back of my mind. i have to make sure i stay ultra
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safe stop like they were saying, people outside the football bubble. i was quite looking forward to seeing your vibration face. i�*m disappointed we haven�*t... can you take a picture of your vibration face? a paper round has long been seen as a great way for young people to learn about responsibility and discipline, about really sticking at something, come rain or shine. in george bailey�*s case, it definitely worked. he started his paper round when he was 11, and he�*s still doing it at 79. peter whittlesea went to meet him. picking up his paper around, george bailey isn�*t scared of early start, cold mornings or covid, for that matter. as he approaches his 80th birthday, he highlights the benefits of providing the people of head call with their daily papers.— with their daily papers. basically to t with their daily papers. basically
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tot and with their daily papers. basically to try and keep _ with their daily papers. basically to try and keep fit, _ with their daily papers. basically to try and keep fit, otherwise i with their daily papers. basically to try and keep fit, otherwise it| to try and keep fit, otherwise it would be a little bit of gardening and i�*m not one to gojogging at my age so the bicycle keeps me fit. apart from the punches. george is ve well apart from the punches. george is very well known — apart from the punches. george is very well known for _ apart from the punches. george is very well known for his _ apart from the punches. george is very well known for his jokes i apart from the punches. george is very well known for his jokes and i very well known for his jokes and says he gives the doors of his elderly customers a gentle tap because they only get up once their paper has arrived. adult fields, the newspaper heated institution, a role model for us all in these difficult times. bill model for us all in these difficult times. �* . model for us all in these difficult times. �* , ., , ., times. all these covid started, we saw maybe _ times. all these covid started, we saw maybe he _ times. all these covid started, we saw maybe he shouldn't _ times. all these covid started, we saw maybe he shouldn't come i times. all these covid started, we saw maybe he shouldn't come outj saw maybe he shouldn�*t come out and do it but you know, he keeps himself safe, as you�*ve seen this morning, he�*s got his mask and that on and comes in and gets his papers and that, he goes. comes in and gets his papers and that. he goes-— comes in and gets his papers and that, he goes. george has hindered about retirement _ that, he goes. george has hindered about retirement will. _ that, he goes. george has hindered about retirement will. this - that, he goes. george has hindered about retirement will. this is i that, he goes. george has hindered about retirement will. this is a i about retirement will. this is a question his have put to him in recent weeks. i question his have put to him in recent weeks.— recent weeks. i heard you are retirin: , recent weeks. i heard you are retiring. i— recent weeks. i heard you are retiring, i said _ recent weeks. i heard you are retiring, i said i _ recent weeks. i heard you are retiring, i said i might - recent weeks. i heard you are retiring, i said i might be i recent weeks. i heard you are retiring, i said i might be on i recent weeks. i heard you are i retiring, i said i might be on my 80th birthday. she said you�*re a youngster! she said i�*m 92. and i said and you look at and she hit me
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over the head with the telegraph. but it was a joke, it was part of the fund. but it was a 'oke, it was part of the fund. . ., but it was a 'oke, it was part of the fund. , ., ., �* but it was a 'oke, it was part of the fund. . ., ., �* ., the fund. george said he won't leave an one in the fund. george said he won't leave anyone in the — the fund. george said he won't leave anyone in the lurch _ the fund. george said he won't leave anyone in the lurch so _ the fund. george said he won't leave anyone in the lurch so he _ the fund. george said he won't leave anyone in the lurch so he will- the fund. george said he won't leave anyone in the lurch so he will only i anyone in the lurch so he will only hang up when a replacement is found. and there is george cycling off into the distance was obvious just going to keep going, isn�*t he? fasten; to keep going, isn't he? very impressive- _ it would be nippy if you are going out there today for your paper around. and slippery, too! yes, i wouldn�*t fancy it. most of the snow today is going to be across east anglia. this is norfolk at the moment. as you can see. the snow has arrived, but for most of us it is actually rain. this is the story over the last few hours. 0n the leading edge, as you can see quite clearly, moving into parts of east anglia, behind it, much milderair. so it will be chiefly rain. that will start to clear away. however, the met office has issued an amber
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weather warning for east anglia, because we could potentially see up to 5-10 because we could potentially see up to 5—10 centimetres of snow. the snow should begin to ease in the early afternoon. so, this is the story. this weather front sweeps steadily east. it will begin to clear away. steadily east. it will begin to clearaway. behind steadily east. it will begin to clear away. behind it, we have the wind direction changing to a southerly, and that is the reason for this milder air beginning to push in. east anglia and may be kent staying with the wintry weather for a time this morning. rain following behind. quite a clearance, and for many in the afternoon it will be a different story. if you are thinking of getting undertaking some much—needed fresh out at the moment, wait until the afternoon. blustery winds in the far north—west of scotland and a rush of showers continuing. look at the feel of the weather. 9—11 is the high out in the west, but still rather call into east anglia, four or five celsius. through the night tonight, the front ease away. we see those isobars swinging around to a north—westerly
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direction. that means temperatures will be hovering around freezing in one or two spots first thing in the morning. it is a relatively quiet start to a relatively quiet day for most of us. dry with some sunshine coming through, scattering of showers coming through to the of the great glen, primarily here, strengthening wind as well, with temperatures on sunday afternoon around 6—8. but we see a return to more unsettled weather monday into tuesday, it will return to heavy rain and gale force gusts of wind is that low pressure move steadily north. i suspect that could cause some issues with localised flooding before the week is three. back to you tonight. before the week is three. back to you tonight-— before the week is three. back to ou toniaht. . ,. ,, , . time now for clicks, which has been taking a virtual look at the world�*s this technology show. —— are biggest.
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every january, the tech world descends on las vegas for the consumer electronics show. it�*s a massive affair where companies launch their products for the year and fight to be seen and heard over the din. and this year... wind howls. ..not so much. not a casino or convention centre in sight! it�*s weird, really! after going to vegas every january for 15 years, i was so over it. and then, this year, it turns out i really miss it. i know. 0urjanuaryjaunt may not be happening but that doesn�*t mean that technology is standing still. of course it�*s not. yeah. ces is still happening — it�*s online—only — and we�*re gonna try and bring you a sense of what the show is like. and yes, there will be weird gadgets, there will be big announcements, but there
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won�*t bejet lag! and i�*m still in for a bit of a treat. i�*m being spoiled this week by having someone film me remotely using something being shown at ces this year. so you may have heard us mention by now that we�*re both self—shooting our bits of the show, and that can mean a bit of stopping and starting as we�*re trying to respond to changes in lighting, or tweaking focus if we move a bit — all the bits that you never need to know about that can be rather fiddly for us. ratherfiddly? it drives me up the wall! well, i did not need to worry about any of that this week — sorry, spencer — as i unwrapped crew in a box. ok, it�*s not literally a crew inside a box, but it is a high—end plug—and—play studio kit in a box, to be operated remotely. lift the lid and you�*ll find a 6k camera, a teleprompter, a triple led light panel, two microphones and a whole load of leads.
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once you figure what goes where, you just power it up and you can meet your remote production team. award—winning director ira was one of a trio of hollywood professionals who co—founded the company back in march after realising that production could be disrupted for a while. so i think it was march 17 — i think that was the day that we found out that there would be a lockdown in la and i imagine, like a lot of other people in the business, i panicked, thinking when would production ever come back? my first call was actually to dallas. dallas sterling is a really innovative cinematographer that i have worked with and he is also really great with building things, so i brought him on board and i think within two months, dallas had built a prototype in his garage. as soon as talent receives crew in a box and they plug it in, it immediately connects over bonded cellular, over the internet, to a remote operator. and at that time, the remote operator controls all of main
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integrated components the box. outside of the us, it does need a wi—fi connection, though. but once set up, i had nothing to think about, other than to sit down and talk. let�*s talk through what you�*re doing to this image of me. so that�*s off and that�*s on. watch your eyes — i�*m going to go full—blown. there you go, that is full up. and then i have the ability to control the warmth of it, so that is max cool and this is max warmth. it makes me want to move around and cause more bother to give you more work to do. it�*s challenging. the box comes with a serious price tag of $55,000, but it is mostly intended for rental use. and this is a high production value set—up, so you have to think about what it�*s actually replacing. and right now, it maybe just keeping things going.
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phone rings. patrick! currently, it does only offer a static locked—off shot, though, which does limit its uses — but i guess that is not that dissimilar to my at—home click studio anyway. still, it�*s got to help though, hasn�*t it? honestly, i am so jealous of you right now. someone, just someone to come and pull focus for me! i�*d kill for that! yes! it really did make things easier! now, as we said, ces has moved online this year, and for the organisers, that has been a massive undertaking, a big risk and a huge unknown. since 1967, people have been flocking to ces to see the latest innovations in technology. last year, it attracted more than 170,000 people. these big tech shows can be overwhelming but many, many companies feel that they are essential
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to attend, whether to network, to make deals orjust to get a taste of what is going on in other tech areas. so how do you recreate all of that noise, the excitement and the buzz of being in las vegas when you are forced to go online—only? ces is organised by the consumer technology association, and i caught up with its president gary shapiro. so we�*ve adjusted in just about every way you can adjust at this point. and it�*as not been easy, i�*m not going to lie! and, you know, we had concerns about the speed and the pace and the offering. to be honest, i was expecting ces online to be this 3d world of virtual conference halls, but it�*s not — it�*s a directory of exhibitors. the larger of which will have their own flashy micro sites, but the smaller start—ups, who usually only have a small booth anyway, well, theyjust get a page to upload their presentations to. we get around i would say 20,000 contacts there, so that�*s a big fallout if you�*re not there. we are not so impressed currently, because itjust looks like a big phone book of companies in alphabetical order. so i�*m thinking it�*s really hard to be noticed there, unless someone is specifically
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looking for you. a lot of people assumed we would go ar, vr, 3d as you mentioned. and we said we're not going to do that, we're not even going to encourage that because it's too high of a reach, frankly. given the current unknowns, next year�*s ces will be an as yet unspecified mix of real—world and online events. the pandemic has shown us that we don�*t really all need to fly to one city to do business. but i can�*t help thinking that the need to touch and feel the tech and to look each other in the eye will mean that these big, physical events will be back. 0nline or offline, ces remains popular for major tech unveils. lg teased a smartphone with a roll—out screen. it�*s pegged for release this year, but no specs and no price means no promises.
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in a world where no—one wants to touch anything at the moment, it is no surprise that contactless payments are now the preferred way to pay. you just tap your card on a terminal to make a transaction. it�*s done using nfc chips — nfc is nearfield communication — and you get them in your credit cards, on your phone or in smart watches. but these chips, well, they can be put into anything. which explains why i have been sent some headphones, a lipstick, and a chicken. wearables company tappy has partnered with mastercard is to put payment chips into practical accessories like rings, watch clasps and watch straps, and non—practical accessories just designed to get media coverage. hmm. which works, apparently. but why might you want a payment chip in something other than a nice, small, thin credit card? let�*s say if you are shopping in a grocery shop and you are already checking out with a lot of things in your bag. at the same time, you want to take your wallet out all your phone out and pay,
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you just feel that sometimes, it won�*t be as efficient. so if it is already on your wrist, it isjust much more convenient, it�*s quicker for the checkout. first, you associate a chipped item to a particular credit card using this cradle and going through a security set up on the accompanying app. and from then on, your whatever it is acts just like a contactless payment card, but with the added advantage that you can activate and deactivate items at will using the app. so there are a few devices featuring at ces that can actually help you avoid touching stuff, and i�*m talking work computers, touchscreens, phones, all of that. first up, this wristband by corso. it houses a biosensor that reads muscle movements, so by making gestures, you can control the laptop, the phone, the tablet that you are connected
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to via bluetooth. it is kind of like using the force. look. click on spencer kelly. and we�*ve got spencer. argh! no, i did not mean to do that! let — let go of the window! for general use, for gaming, controlling robots, prosthetics and rehabilitation for amputees. right, that is corso done. next up... poof! ..is this ring created by a company arcx. it�*s for your workout, so that instead of getting your phone out, you can control it using this little joystick here. so what that means that i�*ll put this on and then i can control what song i�*m listening to, the volume, i can also take calls and take split times of my exercises. i can then continue my workout and if i�*m saying "0h, i want listen to the next track", boom!
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music plays. i can listen to it as i do my press—ups. ooh! 0h, 0k — that�*s enough. honestly, though, it doesn�*t work for every exercise. i mean, if i am using the dumbbells, sometimes the joystick will hit the side and do something that i don�*t want it to do. another drawback is that it is connected via bluetooth, so if you put your phone in a locker and it�*s quite a big gym, you walk quite far away to do your exercises, this will eventually stop working. but while it is connected, it does work really well. right, that�*s for your private devices though. what about for public ones like touchscreens? well, that�*s where ultraleap comes into play. their touch—free app allows touchscreens to become touchless. a camera and motion controller are retrofitted to detect and track hand movements, but in set—ups with ultraleap built in, they include ultrasonic speakers to enable haptic feedback. i will get on the strip and kiss it! i am going to give
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everyone a big high five! good plan. but is it from us for this week. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, facebook, instagram, and twitter — @bbcclick. thank you for watching, and we will see you soon. goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today... all travellers arriving in the uk from monday will have to quarantine as the government closes all "travel corridors" to prevent new strains of covid entering the country. tougher lockdown restrictions come into force in scotland to tackle what�*s being described as a "very serious situation". fears that police investigations may have been compromised after thousands of arrest records were deleted from from the police national computer. a captain�*s innings from joe root. he scores a double century, as england take a big first innings lead over sri lanka in the first test. the hosts now batting again.
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morning, it is a messy start to our saturday morning. a combination of rain, sleet and snow sweeping its way east but into the afternoon, sunny spells and scattered showers. all the details from me throughout the morning. it�*s saturday the 16th of january. our top story. all travel corridors into the uk will be closed from monday in an attempt to stop new strains of coronavirus entering the country. the change means anyone travelling to the uk will need proof of a negative covid test. they�*ll also need to isolate on arrival for up to ten days. charlotte wright reports. another measure to tighten up travel. this week�*s passengers from south america and portugal banned from flying into the uk to stop the spread of a new covid strain from brazil. the government says it may be difficult to predict where new
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variants may come from and still further action is needed. to protect us from the — further action is needed. to protect us from the risk _ further action is needed. to protect us from the risk of, _ further action is needed. to protect us from the risk of, as _ further action is needed. to protect us from the risk of, as yet, - further action is needed. to protect us from the risk of, as yet, and i us from the risk of, as yet, and identified new strains, we will also temporarily close all travel corridors from over 400 hours on monday. corridors from over 400 hours on monda . . corridors from over 400 hours on monda . , ., , corridors from over 400 hours on monda. ,., _, ., . , monday. this latest announcement is not a travel — monday. this latest announcement is not a travel ban. _ monday. this latest announcement is not a travel ban. it _ monday. this latest announcement is not a travel ban. it introduces - not a travel ban. it introduces quarantine for passengers no matter where they have flowed from in the world. it means reminding anyone travelling from the uk will have to show a negative test lesser than 72 hours before they depart. when they arrive they must now self—isolate for ten days. 0r pay for a test on the fifth day. it is negative, they can leave quarantine early. the policy also applies to the eurostar and seaports, but not to those travelling within the uk or ireland, what are some jobs like colliers. travel corridors were first introduced in the summer, allowing people to come to the uk from some countries with low covid rate
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without having to quarantine on arrival. described as a lifeline for the industry, they kept people going on holiday. now many say they support the suspension so long as it can be lifted later in the year. give or take a few months in some elastic, if you�*re going to have an aviation sector coming out of this we need to open up in the summer. we look forward to having conversations with the government about that. for this year and now, we are clear that we will support the government. the government needs a longer term plan for the _ government needs a longer term plan for the airline industry. they have been _ for the airline industry. they have been hit _ for the airline industry. they have been hit time and time again and they rightfully have asked the government for support. they were promised _ government for support. they were promised to support months ago but that package hasn't been put in place — that package hasn't been put in lace. ,., that package hasn't been put in lace. , that package hasn't been put in lace, , .,, place. the government says it has rovided place. the government says it has provided a — place. the government says it has provided a competitive _ place. the government says it has provided a competitive package i place. the government says it has provided a competitive package of| provided a competitive package of measures for the travellers —— travel and tourism sector. including extending this for a furlough scheme. it says it is committed to
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bringing the sector back to strength as soon as it is safe to do so. scotland�*s covid restrictions are being tightened from today. takeaway food and drink outlets can only serve customers via a hatch — and only shops selling essential items are allowed to offer click—and—collect. the changes are among six new rules announced by first minister nicola sturgeon earlier this week. police chiefs say that investigations have been compromised after thousands of fingerprint, dna and arrest records were accidentally deleted from the national computer. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake can tell us more. we learnt about this 24—hour cycle or maybe a little more. we are learning about some of the implications now. abs, learning about some of the implications now.— learning about some of the implications now. learning about some of the imlications now. �* ., , implications now. a new detail this mornin: , implications now. a new detail this morning, according _ implications now. a new detail this morning, according to _ implications now. a new detail this morning, according to a _ implications now. a new detail this morning, according to a letter- implications now. a new detail this| morning, according to a letter from morning, according to a letterfrom the national police chiefs council, seen by the bbc, sent to voices across the uk, which indicates the problem is worse than first thought. it says 213,000 records have gone missing, more than hundred 50,000 or
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so than my first thought to be involved. we are talking about things like fingerprint records, dna records, records of people being arrested and this first started happening back in november. it has come to light in the last week or so. as for the impact it has had on investigations or convictions, the national police chiefs council talks about a couple of near misses and crimes were a biometric match wasn�*t found, but defenders were identified using other means. the government says it has this problem under control. the policing minister has said we have already put a stop to the problem so it cannot be occur and they are working to assess the full impact. labour are calling for more answers. you have had the shadow home secretary on the programme this morning saying the home secretary priti patel has been hiding and used to come to the house of commons to address mps and answer some questions on this herself. thank you very much.
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the us president—electjoe biden has set out ambitious plans to vaccinate 100 million americans within his first 100 days in office. just over 12—million vaccine doses have been administered in the us so far — a figure mr biden has criticised as insufficient. he set out the plans as his health chiefs warned that the covid variant first detected in the uk could become the dominant strain in america by march. one of the biggest vaccine rollouts in the world starts today. india is aiming to inoculate 300—million people byjuly. earlier we spoke to our correspondent rajini vaidyanathan at a hospital in delhi — and asked her how such a huge operation will unfold. this is one of 3006 vaccination centres which are being set up across india. the goal here and in other centres is to vaccinate around hundred people a day. if you did the maths on that, that means today alone, if everything goes to plan,
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more than 300,000 indians could receive a coronavirus vaccine. front of the queue, a bit like back in the uk, will be health care workers, front line workers like police officers, then the priority goes to the over 50s and people with underlying health conditions. there is a huge logistical task, a population of 1.3 billion people who live in all kinds of terrains, mountains, deserts, urban and rural. 0ne mountains, deserts, urban and rural. one thing to point out is to vaccines are actually being rolled out today. one is the oxford astrazeneca vaccine which is being manufactured here in india. the other one is an indian developed vaccine from a company called biotech. there have been some concerns about that because it has been given approval to be ruled out before it is actually past its phase three clinical trials were efficacy. it means the vaccine is being rolled out here and people don�*t know how effective it will be, so some health
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experts have raised concerns but the government is stressing they think it is a safe vaccine and it will be administered under very strict supervision. wonderful bit of detail before i leave you, as people have been streaming out here getting their vaccines, they have been coming out with a red rose. everyone who has had the vaccine today is getting a red rose. this hospital in delhi so some of the worst of the pandemic, treating thousands of coronavirus patients, so there is a sense of and optimism, and a positive mood here today. india starting to get the vaccine. that is unfolding in india this morning as they start the biggest vaccine role that in the world. one of the biggest vaccine roberts in the world. here is something really quite different. a dog — called willy — has been rescued after getting stuck in a well. the seven—year—old labrador was stranded around 20 feet underground in eastleigh,
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hampshire, for two hours. that must have been terrifying! a team of firefighters used ropes and harnesses to "free willy". he was then given a nice bath — to remove any possible contamination — before being handed back to his grateful owner. safe and sound. parts of the uk saw snow yesterday — and some very talented people took the opportunity to release their inner sculptor. these are very impressive. that is a decent looking snowman. tall, thin. we had a glimpse of this snow bikini lady yesterday and the dalek which is immaculate. look at the snowball sheet, —— sheep, i love it. it is gorgeous. people have been busy but is at the
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right kind of snow for building stuff? not much, i suspect. right kind of snow for building stuff? not much, isuspect. how disappointing compared to those photos but i love the weather watchers because they help the state the story. here it is 10 degrees in devon. but take a look at what is happening in norfolk, temperatures around freezing. it is pretty cold and there is some snow. i don�*t know if you would be able to make a dalek with this amount of snow but you might do a little bit later on because we are going to see snow levels topping up a touch here. it is going to be primarily rain for most of us. the snow is going to ease on the northern edge pushing into lincolnshire, east anglia and some wet snow into the south—east as well. rain following on behind. the met office has issued a weather warning, and amber warm across east anglia. they are concerned about the snow level. we could see as much as 5-10 snow level. we could see as much as 5—10 centimetres before that warning eases. this frontal system is
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bringing the problem but a southerly wind behind is driving in the mild air, hence the 10 degrees across parts of devon. you will be a little bit confused if you are stepping out, in comparison to yesterday because for most of us it is going to be a milder story. cloud in rainbow ease away from the south—east and then behind it is a bright and breezy affair with some scattered showers just continue into the far north of scotland. some gusty winds. but generally a quieter afternoon with some sunny spells coming in. for many of us, that will come as welcome news if you are going to get out and about for an hour and get fresh air. temperatures are nine, ten, 11 degrees. the only exception is east anglia where it was difficult. through the night we keep that quiet a story and that bodes well for sunday as a ridge of high pressure continues to build. it will be a chilly start, low single figures so could be a lot worse. we start off with some sunshine from the word go tomorrow. a quiet day,
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some scattered showers from northern ireland, west of scotland, maybe one or two pushing across the lake district but generally it is dry and fine with some sunshine. not quite as warm. 0nce fine with some sunshine. not quite as warm. once again, we never see todayis as warm. once again, we never see today is the same at the moment. another area of low pressure really drives in through monday and tuesday and that is going to bring more wet and that is going to bring more wet and windy weather to come. if you are out this afternoon and into tomorrow, make the most of the dry and sunny weather. thank you, see you later on. "fortress britain". that�*s how one newspaper describes the uk after the prime minister announced plans to close all travel corridors from monday until at least the middle of february. it�*s an attempt to stop new strains of coronavirus entering the country. we�*rejoined now from geneva by dr margaret harris, from the world health organization. good morning. iwonder, we mentioned one of the headlines in one of the papers here. fortress britain.
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another one is saying, keep out. uk shuts borders over at mutant bugs with the big red sign with a dash across it. when you hear and see that kind of messaging, what does it mean to you in terms of the wider picture? mean to you in terms of the wider icture? ,., ., ., ., ., ., ., picture? good morning and a good mornin: picture? good morning and a good morning to — picture? good morning and a good morning to you — picture? good morning and a good morning to you and _ picture? good morning and a good morning to you and your _ picture? good morning and a good morning to you and your viewers. l picture? good morning and a good i morning to you and your viewers. we certainly are seeing this as one of the critical areas to look at. our emergency committee, which is convened under the international health regulations, and we are first convened almost a year ago when we were aware that we had this threat that was proving a threat to the global community, the chairman yesterday said exactly this, that looking at travel approaches, and different countries are a very different countries are a very different things, is a critical part of their work. that is what they spend most of their time doing in the latest meeting on thursday. it
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is highly variable. 0ur guidance, which has changed a lot during the year, is that each state should look at their risk and the risk of who is coming in and make their decisions accordingly. i�*d coming in and make their decisions accordingly-— accordingly. i'd look again at the wider picture. — accordingly. i'd look again at the wider picture, and _ accordingly. i'd look again at the wider picture, and i _ accordingly. i'd look again at the wider picture, and i note - accordingly. i'd look again at the wider picture, and i note that i accordingly. i'd look again at the wider picture, and i note that is | wider picture, and i note that is what the world health organization does, people will be familiar with the brazilian strain now. the immediate response to the uk government is in relation to that, but there are some other strains as well. a south africa strain. what are you seeing about how the different strains are moving around the world? and specifically in relation to the uk? the the world? and specifically in relation to the uk?— the world? and specifically in relation to the uk? . relation to the uk? the thing we are seeinr with relation to the uk? the thing we are seeing with quite — relation to the uk? the thing we are seeing with quite a _ relation to the uk? the thing we are seeing with quite a view— relation to the uk? the thing we are seeing with quite a view of— relation to the uk? the thing we are seeing with quite a view of the i seeing with quite a view of the different strains that have been identified in different countries is that they are not proving more dangerous, not proving more dangerous, not proving more dangerous in terms of they are not making it sicker but they are more efficient at transmitting. that is telling us that the public health
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measures that we know work, the distancing, not gathering in large numbers, understanding who has the virus and who has not, keeping the two apart, all those measures do work. they worked over and over again in quite a number of countries, so we have to do them better. and some of the actions at the borders, testing people, quarantine people, understanding where they are coming from, these are all parts of ensuring who has the virus, who has not keeping them apart. the virus, who has not keeping them a art. . the virus, who has not keeping them aart. , , ., ., the virus, who has not keeping them aart. . , ., ., ., apart. given the situation we have in the uk at _ apart. given the situation we have in the uk at moment. _ apart. given the situation we have in the uk at moment. it _ apart. given the situation we have in the uk at moment. it is - apart. given the situation we have in the uk at moment. it is around | in the uk at moment. it is around 50,000 cases a day testing positive. yesterday, the latest figures were 1200 deaths. given the scale of the problem, what is the relevance of the closing down of the borders? i know you often say there are a number of ways you can acted to try
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and help people, but what about, given the situation we have now and severity, and the potential impact of the disclosure of borders. this is another _ of the disclosure of borders. this is another measure, _ of the disclosure of borders. ti 3 is another measure, it is a whole range of measures and increasingly the main aim when you have got to the main aim when you have got to the stage, when you really are overwhelmed as to put a pause on transmission. we have never been keen on lockdowns and never really been keen on travel and trade measures, because these things have enormous impacts on people�*s social economic... 0n the economy and people mentally, but when you have got to a point where your health systems are no longer able to function and you are asking a health workers to make terrible choices every day, then you have to go for it all. i would also emphasise, it is not somebody imposing it on you, it is all of us. everyone of us has to take this very seriously. what we
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are seeing still, and it is some people, their own enough people not taking it seriously for the spires to take advantage. abs, taking it seriously for the spires to take advantage.— taking it seriously for the spires to take advantage. a lot of people are talkin: to take advantage. a lot of people are talking about _ to take advantage. a lot of people are talking about the _ to take advantage. a lot of people are talking about the notion i to take advantage. a lot of people are talking about the notion that l are talking about the notion that whether these border controls are being brought in uk now should have been done a long time ago, maybe nine months ago. they look at places like new zealand, and we know there are differences between this places, and say that was a place that brought in a complete ban on people coming in orare brought in a complete ban on people coming in or are leaving into the country very early on. has the world health organization worked around which was a more effective approach? 0n the face of it, when you look at where new zealand was no escapade of parts of europe, there is a clear difference. parts of europe, there is a clear difference-— parts of europe, there is a clear difference. , ,., difference. indeed. remember, both countries did — difference. indeed. remember, both countries did a _ difference. indeed. remember, both countries did a lot _ difference. indeed. remember, both countries did a lot more _ difference. indeed. remember, both countries did a lot more innocently i countries did a lot more innocently close borders. 0nce
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countries did a lot more innocently close borders. once again, we see do it all and look at what works with your communities. in the countries where things have really worked, they have enlisted their people and they have enlisted their people and they have enlisted their people and they have ensured that everybody understands what is going on and they have really upped their tracking and tracing and upped their genomic sequencing. they have kept a laser eye on where the transmission is that they have been able to keep it down. if you keep your numbers down, you have a much better chance of controlling it. the critical thing is find every spot fire and jump thing is find every spot fire and jump on it. at the moment you have a conflagration so you have to do everything to bring that down, so you can benefit from the tracking and tracing and the genomic sequencing etc. but again, there is notjust sequencing etc. but again, there is not just one sequencing etc. but again, there is notjust one thing you do. you do it all. not 'ust one thing you do. you do it all. . .. not 'ust one thing you do. you do it all. ., ,, , ., not 'ust one thing you do. you do it all. ., ~' i., ., not 'ust one thing you do. you do it all. ., ,, i. ., i. , all. thank you for your time this morning- _ emma brennan is from the travel agent association abta.
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there seems to be consensus that this is the right thing to do amongst a range of other measures, to effectively close the borders at this stage. some people will still be able to come through but with all the necessary tests. do you and your members to it as well?— members to it as well? absolutely. we know the _ members to it as well? absolutely. we know the government - members to it as well? absolutely. we know the government needs i members to it as well? absolutely. we know the government needs to | members to it as well? absolutely. i we know the government needs to take the steps it feels necessary to prevent further spread of the coronavirus and new strains entering into the country as well. and the travel card to change that is coming in on monday is another layer of a number of restrictions that have beenin number of restrictions that have been in place and had been in place for quite some time now. share been in place and had been in place for quite some time now.— for quite some time now. are you clear on how _ for quite some time now. are you clear on how this _ for quite some time now. are you clear on how this testing - for quite some time now. are you clear on how this testing system i clear on how this testing system will work because you will need to be tested before you travel, you need to be tested again five days after you arrive. 0ur travellers clear on the quality of the test they need to get? what documentation they need to get? what documentation they will need to show? how they get they will need to show? how they get the test when they arrive in this country? i the test when they arrive in this count ? .. . the test when they arrive in this
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count ? ~ , ., , country? i think it is worth staying ve few country? i think it is worth staying very few people — country? i think it is worth staying very few people are _ country? i think it is worth staying very few people are travelling i country? i think it is worth staying very few people are travelling at l very few people are travelling at the moment and for a number of reasons and due to a number of restrictions. the message is very clear from the government that you shouldn�*t be travelling unless it is for essential reasons. but other countries have closed their borders to the uk and the government has had travel advice against all but essential travelling for the majority of countries since the start of pandemic, but for those who are travelling, they need to get a test before they leave the country that they are in. they well on arrival need to quarantine. if you want to reduce that quarantine in england, you can take a test after five days. it england, you can take a test after five da s. . england, you can take a test after five da s. , , ., ., five days. it is understanding that there isn't one _ five days. it is understanding that there isn't one standardised i five days. it is understanding that there isn't one standardised test | there isn�*t one standardised test but tests do have different levels of efficacy and it is making sure that whatever tests you are getting in the country you are travelling from meets the standards as well. there are a range of tests and it
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will vary from country to country so it will present a challenge for travellers. this is why we are saying to the government that the need to look at all that the measures they have got in place for it travel at the moment and all of those restrictions and actually come up those restrictions and actually come up with a plan to move forward so that when restrictions start to left and coronavirus cases, the number and coronavirus cases, the number and rate starts to improve, and people start moving around a little bit more, that there is a clear plan in place. all of these measures will be difficult for a lot of people when they start to travel again and will be costly also. the other thing thatis will be costly also. the other thing that is really important that we haven�*t seen from the government since the start of the pandemic when the travel industry is any tailored financial support. there has not been any cash injection to the travel industry which is a little short—sighted given the fact that jobs and businesses are currently at risk, but also the travel industry will play a massive part in the uk�*s economic recovery and the government�*s vision for a global
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britain. government's vision for a global britain. ., , ., ., britain. people are yearning for holida s, britain. people are yearning for holidays. no — britain. people are yearning for holidays, no doubt. _ britain. people are yearning for holidays, no doubt. have i britain. people are yearning for holidays, no doubt. have you i britain. people are yearning for i holidays, no doubt. have you got britain. people are yearning for - holidays, no doubt. have you got any estimate of what proportion of the travel industry may not survive this period? travel industry may not survive this eriod? , ., ., ., , travel industry may not survive this eriod? , ., ., ., i, period? sadly, we have already seen some well-known _ period? sadly, we have already seen some well-known companies - period? sadly, we have already seen some well-known companies go - period? sadly, we have already seen some well-known companies go out| period? sadly, we have already seen l some well-known companies go out of some well—known companies go out of business, but quite a few businesses are remaining resilient but they are running on empty. the chickens are about 90% done. ons figures safe from october last year travel and tour operators were the worst affected businesses during the entire epidemic and they were 90% down on the earnings they made in the previous february. the thing we need to recognise the travel as it has been ten months now and the businesses have been unable to generate any income really. there has been travel card is introduced, there have been some restrictions lifted but only for very short periods of time. you could only travel to spain during 21 days last year during the pandemic period. that is the biggest tourist
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destination for the uk travel industry. it is having a real serious effect on the jobs and businesses, but also on the uk's economic prospects going forward. we economic prospects going forward. no doubt. thank you very much indeed. you refer to fortress britain and keep out, but to be honest, nobby wants us at the moment anyway. it works both ways. —— nobody wants us. the advice is stay—at—home and don't travel. we have been doing a lot on the story. front line workers have been rightly hailed as the heroes of the pandemic — but the pressure of keeping people safe has left them facing their own struggles. this week the duke and duchess of cambridge held a video conference to hearfrom emergency responders and counsellors who've had to deal with trauma and bereavement during the crisis. take a look. from the eeoc have been working on the front line, have you seen anything like this before? 1 the front line, have you seen anything like this before? i thought eve bod anything like this before? i thought everybody was _ anything like this before? i thought
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everybody was going _ anything like this before? i thought everybody was going to _ anything like this before? i thought everybody was going to die - anything like this before? i thought everybody was going to die and - anything like this before? i thought l everybody was going to die and there was nothing i could to protect those people _ was nothing i could to protect those people and our patients. in whatever the ost people and our patients. in whatever the post covid _ people and our patients. in whatever the post covid era _ people and our patients. in whatever the post covid era looks _ people and our patients. in whatever the post covid era looks like, - people and our patients. in whatever the post covid era looks like, that i the post covid era looks like, that is the _ the post covid era looks like, that is the time — the post covid era looks like, that is the time when _ the post covid era looks like, that is the time when people - the post covid era looks like, that is the time when people will- the post covid era looks like, that is the time when people will stop| is the time when people will stop and realise — is the time when people will stop and realise and _ is the time when people will stop and realise and start— is the time when people will stop and realise and start to _ is the time when people will stop and realise and start to reflect i is the time when people will stop. and realise and start to reflect and process _ and realise and start to reflect and process some _ and realise and start to reflect and process some of— and realise and start to reflect and process some of that _ and realise and start to reflect and process some of that trauma - and realise and start to reflect and process some of that trauma and i process some of that trauma and distressing — process some of that trauma and distressing experiences- process some of that trauma and distressing experiences they - process some of that trauma and | distressing experiences they have been _ distressing experiences they have been through— distressing experiences they have been through and _ distressing experiences they have been through and deal— distressing experiences they have been through and deal with - distressing experiences they have been through and deal with theirl been through and deal with their exhaustion _ been through and deal with their exhaustion-— exhaustion. what is it about the service that _ exhaustion. what is it about the service that is _ exhaustion. what is it about the service that is really _ exhaustion. what is it about the service that is really helping - exhaustion. what is it about the 1 service that is really helping you at the moment? just service that is really helping you at the moment?— service that is really helping you at the moment? , , ., , ., , at the moment? just before christmas i suddenly lost — at the moment? just before christmas i suddenly lost my _ at the moment? just before christmas i suddenly lost my uncle _ at the moment? just before christmas i suddenly lost my uncle and _ at the moment? just before christmas i suddenly lost my uncle and i - at the moment? just before christmas i suddenly lost my uncle and i spoke i i suddenly lost my uncle and i spoke to a loveiy— i suddenly lost my uncle and i spoke to a lovely lady, i cried to a lovety— to a lovely lady, i cried to a lovely lady, and it has helped. i am still not _ lovely lady, and it has helped. i am still not ok— lovely lady, and it has helped. i am still not ok but i know i have the support— still not ok but i know i have the support networks to help. this is like nothing _ support networks to help. this is like nothing before _ support networks to help. this is like nothing before that - support networks to help. this is like nothing before that anyone l support networks to help. this is i like nothing before that anyone has ever seen. — like nothing before that anyone has ever seen, particularly— like nothing before that anyone has ever seen, particularly this - like nothing before that anyone has ever seen, particularly this third . ever seen, particularly this third wave _ ever seen, particularly this third wave i— ever seen, particularly this third wave ithink— ever seen, particularly this third wave. i think people _ ever seen, particularly this third wave. i think people need - ever seen, particularly this third wave. i think people need to- wave. i think people need to understand _ wave. i think people need to understand how— wave. i think people need to understand how you - wave. i think people need to understand how you are - wave. i think people need to. understand how you are normal wave. i think people need to— understand how you are normal human bein- understand how you are normal human being is— understand how you are normal human being is doing — understand how you are normal human being is doing a — understand how you are normal human being is doing a brilliant _ understand how you are normal human being is doing a brilliantjob_ understand how you are normal human being is doing a brilliantjob in- understand how you are normal human being is doing a brilliantjob in a - being is doing a brilliantjob in a very— being is doing a brilliantjob in a very difficult _ being is doing a brilliantjob in a very difficult time. _ we can speak to two people who were on that call. tony collins is the chief executive of north yorkshire hospice care
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and a volunteer at the 'just b�* helpline, which offers mental health support to front line workers. and phil spencer is the wellbeing inspector for cleveland police. good morning. tony, i know you have been involved with this from the start. it was set up in march of last year. what is the specific aim of this service?— of this service? need to put it in lot of services. _ of this service? need to put it in lot of services. one _ of this service? need to put it in lot of services. one of— of this service? need to put it in lot of services. one of the - of this service? need to put it in lot of services. one of the aims| of this service? need to put it in l lot of services. one of the aims is to just respond to the emotional well—being needs of our community is that we serve. and we set up a number of helplines to support that, both locally and regionally, and then ultimately, this national helpline commencing with the staff in nhs and then expanded to offer a nice car. the aim really was to help build the layers of resilience and allow people to deal with their emotional well—being and the trauma of the extraordinary experiences they were going through.- of the extraordinary experiences they were going through. there was a aood film
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they were going through. there was a good film on — they were going through. there was a good film on newsnight _ they were going through. there was a good film on newsnight last - they were going through. there was a good film on newsnight last night - they were going through. there was a good film on newsnight last night on| good film on newsnight last night on a hospital in london. the staff described the things they had to deal with over the course of the year, to ring a relatively say somebody has died or to deal with an emergency situation in an intensive care unit, maybe happen handful of times over a year but these are being compressed over and over again, and illustrated the intensity of the pressure and trauma that the staff are experiencing at the moment. i guess you have heard all those stories.— those stories. yes. on the helpline we are getting. _ those stories. yes. on the helpline we are getting, time _ those stories. yes. on the helpline we are getting, time after - those stories. yes. on the helpline we are getting, time after time, i those stories. yes. on the helpline| we are getting, time after time, the same words. it is relentless, exhausting, there are so much death and anxiety, when is it all going to end? those are the stories that are coming through every day. i am end? those are the stories that are coming through every day. i am 'ust checkin: coming through every day. i am 'ust checking your i
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coming through every day. i am 'ust checking your title i coming through every day. i am 'ust checking your title here i coming through every day. i am just checking your title here because i coming through every day. i am just| checking your title here because you are a police inspector, but your unofficial title is well—being inspector. is that right? unofficial title is well-being inspector. is that right? yes, a bit of a unique _ inspector. is that right? yes, a bit of a unique position _ inspector. is that right? yes, a bit of a unique position in _ inspector. is that right? yes, a bit of a unique position in the - inspector. is that right? yes, a bit| of a unique position in the country. my full— of a unique position in the country. my full title — of a unique position in the country. my full title is well—being and polite — my full title is well—being and polite inspector. ifi my full title is well-being and polite inspector.— my full title is well-being and polite inspector. ifi am looking back at reference _ polite inspector. ifi am looking back at reference points - polite inspector. ifi am looking back at reference points about| polite inspector. ifi am looking i back at reference points about the concern of front line workers, maybe go back to the military and think, in years that go by in the military, they were bad at looking after their staff and that has been recognised now, the issues that people were facing and how they were helped. how do you think the police, you and your colleagues, how do you think your colleagues, how do you think you are doing so far in that regard? pretty much like you said there, from _ pretty much like you said there, from the — pretty much like you said there, from the military, it is exactly the same _ from the military, it is exactly the same it— from the military, it is exactly the some it is— from the military, it is exactly the same. it is something that has always— same. it is something that has always been here but we had never talked _ always been here but we had never talked about because it was a taboo subject— talked about because it was a taboo subject because we have these uniforms, _ subject because we have these uniforms, we are seen as superheroes, nothing can affect us.
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it is superheroes, nothing can affect us. it is only— superheroes, nothing can affect us. it is only now that i think coming to the _ it is only now that i think coming to the focus about trauma, complex trauma _ to the focus about trauma, complex trauma and — to the focus about trauma, complex trauma and this is what really worries— trauma and this is what really worries me with this pandemic, the aftermath— worries me with this pandemic, the aftermath that emergency services are going _ aftermath that emergency services are going to be dealing with because we are _ are going to be dealing with because we are also— are going to be dealing with because we are also busy caring for other people. — we are also busy caring for other people, because that is what we do, and rightly— people, because that is what we do, and rightly so. we don't get time to process— and rightly so. we don't get time to process anything. that worries me, the aftermath of how we need to pick up the aftermath of how we need to pick up and _ the aftermath of how we need to pick up and look— the aftermath of how we need to pick up and look after our bread and people — up and look after our bread and people at— up and look after our bread and people at the end of august. this does become _ people at the end of august. try 3 does become very personal. i don't how much you as an individual are prepared to share in that regard and feel free to say no, if you like, but what about you? have there been days when you have really struggled? how has it been for you? i am days when you have really struggled? how has it been for you?— how has it been for you? i am really luc . i how has it been for you? i am really lucky- i haven't _ how has it been for you? i am really lucky. i haven't coming _ how has it been for you? i am really lucky. i haven't coming into - how has it been for you? i am really lucky. i haven't coming into my i how has it been for you? i am reallyj lucky. i haven't coming into my 20th year now _ lucky. i haven't coming into my 20th year now and — lucky. i haven't coming into my 20th year now and predominantly on the front line _ year now and predominantly on the front line for the last 18 months, i
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have _ front line for the last 18 months, i have taken— front line for the last 18 months, i have taken this roll on. i am doing this role _ have taken this roll on. i am doing this role because it is what i have so and _ this role because it is what i have so and dealt with as a sergeant and inspector. — so and dealt with as a sergeant and inspector, and dealing with the teams. — inspector, and dealing with the teams, the aftermath. i have got quite _ teams, the aftermath. i have got quite good resilience and i have got a really— quite good resilience and i have got a really good family network, and at work at _ a really good family network, and at work at the — a really good family network, and at work at the moment, i am lucky in that respect. i think it is down to a lot— that respect. i think it is down to a lot of— that respect. i think it is down to a lot of organisation and supervisors to up the game a lot more _ supervisors to up the game a lot more and — supervisors to up the game a lot more and realise that well—being should _ more and realise that well—being should be — more and realise that well—being should be a priority. like all of us, we — should be a priority. like all of us, we have seen stuff, we have been stuff, _ us, we have seen stuff, we have been stuff, we _ us, we have seen stuff, we have been stuff, we have read stuff, we have dealt _ stuff, we have read stuff, we have dealt with— stuff, we have read stuff, we have dealt with it and you put it in a box _ dealt with it and you put it in a box that _ dealt with it and you put it in a box that is _ dealt with it and you put it in a box. that is what worries me. when people _ box. that is what worries me. when people retire or after this, that box is — people retire or after this, that box is going to explode and that's where _ box is going to explode and that's where people like me and are front line and _ where people like me and are front line and the royal foundation initiatives will need to be really at the — initiatives will need to be really at the forefront of well— being. there — at the forefront of well— being. there are _ at the forefront of well— being. there are still some stigma around
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about talking about these issues and you are still hearing and seeing that from people who contact the line. . , that from people who contact the line. ., , ., ., line. yeah, there is a whole layer of reasons _ line. yeah, there is a whole layer of reasons why _ line. yeah, there is a whole layer of reasons why people _ line. yeah, there is a whole layer of reasons why people choose i line. yeah, there is a whole layer| of reasons why people choose not line. yeah, there is a whole layer. of reasons why people choose not to use the line ranging from the stigma and stiff upper lip, but one of the most prevalent we are coming across at the moment is just not having the time to do it. when you get home from yet another shift, you are exhausted, or you want to do is sleep and get ready for the next one. that is part of their method of coping, of carrying on. my message is, part of coping and being able to carry on has to include looking after your own emotional well—being and keeping your resilience levels “p and keeping your resilience levels up because nobody out there would have been through this sort of thing before. i have been through this sort of thing before. , ., ., ., before. i will tell you what i am thinkina. before. i will tell you what i am thinking- i— before. i will tell you what i am thinking. iwill— before. i will tell you what i am thinking. i will ask _ before. i will tell you what i am thinking. i will ask you - before. i will tell you what i am thinking. i will ask you this i thinking. i will ask you this question as well. you are a call handler. let's reverse the equation. what about you? presumably when you
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are on the phone to other people, you are hearing some harrowing things. you are listening, you are like a sponge and taking the stuff in. what about you?— like a sponge and taking the stuff in. what about you? yeah, me and a remarkable — in. what about you? yeah, me and a remarkable group — in. what about you? yeah, me and a remarkable group of— in. what about you? yeah, me and a remarkable group of staff _ in. what about you? yeah, me and a remarkable group of staff and i remarkable group of staff and volunteers on the helplines, really. because of the type of organisation we are, we had quite a good and open culture of talking about our emotional well—being, of culture of talking about our emotionalwell—being, of addressing emotional well—being, of addressing resilience emotionalwell—being, of addressing resilience issues and knowing that is part of being able to deal with it. i run north yorkshire hospice care and that includes a couple of hospices that are out there. i am on the front line as well on an inpatient basis and in the community. we are doing well, but i agree with phil. it was something we spoke about the other day. there is going to come a time in this post covid era where people are going to stop and suddenly he faced with
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processing and reflecting on almost too much. i urge people to pick up the phone and start talking to people and just process as soon as they can. people and 'ust process as soon as the can. . ~ people and 'ust process as soon as the can. ., ,, i. people and 'ust process as soon as the can. ., ,, . they can. thank you both so much. amazin: they can. thank you both so much. amazing work _ they can. thank you both so much. amazing work that _ they can. thank you both so much. amazing work that you _ they can. thank you both so much. amazing work that you are - they can. thank you both so much. amazing work that you are both i amazing work that you are both doing. it does make a difference. we know that and appreciate you talking to us this morning. the sport is coming up in a moment along with the headlines. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. shoppers in wales will face tougher measures after the first minister
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said there was "significant evidence" that coronavirus is being spread in supermarkets. mark drakeford said the guidelines — which include providing sanitiser for hands and trolleys — will now become law. vaughan gething is the welsh health minister. good morning. thank you for your time. this is something that is very relatable for people because people are still going to supermarkets. what will be different bylaw under the new system in wales? the what will be different by law under the new system in wales? the new s stem the new system in wales? the new system puts _ the new system in wales? the new system puts until _ the new system in wales? the new system puts until all _ the new system in wales? the new system puts until all those - the new system in wales? the new system puts until all those things l system puts until all those things that are _ system puts until all those things that are already in the gate lines, so there — that are already in the gate lines, so there must be clear one—way systems. — so there must be clear one—way systems, signage, and opportunities for hand _ systems, signage, and opportunities for hand sanitiser and wiping down shopping _ for hand sanitiser and wiping down shopping trolleys and baskets and we are doing _ shopping trolleys and baskets and we are doing this specifically because we realise there are a number of supermarkets already doing this very well but _ supermarkets already doing this very well but we also have examples of
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significant complaints from the public— significant complaints from the public where it is not happening sooner— public where it is not happening sooner rather than guidance we are putting _ sooner rather than guidance we are putting it _ sooner rather than guidance we are putting it into law and making it a requirement for everyone to revise their risk— requirement for everyone to revise their risk assessment, the risk to their risk assessment, the risk to the public— their risk assessment, the risk to the public and also to staff. we need _ the public and also to staff. we need to — the public and also to staff. we need to think again about their control— need to think again about their control and we are doing this to help— control and we are doing this to help with — control and we are doing this to help with some of the clarity as well _ help with some of the clarity as well i— help with some of the clarity as well i am — help with some of the clarity as well. i am disturbed by some of the consistent— well. i am disturbed by some of the consistent reports of the abyss of shop _ consistent reports of the abyss of shop workers so making clear this is the law— shop workers so making clear this is the law should help the message and enforcement and the message about how serious the position we are in, the pressure — how serious the position we are in, the pressure on the health service and the _ the pressure on the health service and the harm still being caused by coronavirus — and the harm still being caused by coronavirus even as the rates declined _ coronavirus even as the rates declined slightly. ifi coronavirus even as the rates declined slightly.— declined slightly. if i am understanding _ declined slightly. if i am understanding what i declined slightly. if i am understanding what you | declined slightly. if i am i understanding what you said a declined slightly. if i am _ understanding what you said a moment ago correctly, the welsh government knows specifically, because he has been elected to that, of individual supermarkets who are getting this wrong, for whatever reason, so has
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anything been done about those places beyond this wider law change? because on the face of it if you know about places not doing it properly was anything done or is it being done?— properly was anything done or is it beinrdone? , ., �*, , , being done? yes, and it's because we know there are _ being done? yes, and it's because we know there are individual— being done? yes, and it's because we know there are individual outlets i know there are individual outlets getting _ know there are individual outlets getting it — know there are individual outlets getting it wrong, we know from the complaints — getting it wrong, we know from the complaints that there are individual circumstances, it doesn't appear to be a brand — circumstances, it doesn't appear to be a brand wide policy to ignore the guidelines. — be a brand wide policy to ignore the guidelines, but the clarity here is really— guidelines, but the clarity here is really important about what is required. _ really important about what is required, but is expected in terms of following the guidance, this is now a _ of following the guidance, this is now a requirement. that will also help our— now a requirement. that will also help our enforcement teams and this is part— help our enforcement teams and this is part of— help our enforcement teams and this is part of what lots of people in local— is part of what lots of people in local government are doing to keep us safe, _ local government are doing to keep us safe, environmental health officers. — us safe, environmental health officers, trading standards officers. _ officers, trading standards officers, working together to keep us safe _ officers, working together to keep
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us safe alongside colleagues in the nhs. us safe alongside colleagues in the nhs the _ us safe alongside colleagues in the nhs. the starting point is for us as members _ nhs. the starting point is for us as members of— nhs. the starting point is for us as members of the public going to do their shopping to make sure that we are doing _ their shopping to make sure that we are doing the right thing as well and there — are doing the right thing as well and there is a reason why there has to be _ and there is a reason why there has to be a _ and there is a reason why there has to be a queue, there is a reason we have _ to be a queue, there is a reason we have to _ to be a queue, there is a reason we have to keep— to be a queue, there is a reason we have to keep our distance, there is a reason _ have to keep our distance, there is a reason there is a one—way system, and it— a reason there is a one—way system, and it is— a reason there is a one—way system, and it is about — a reason there is a one—way system, and it is about keeping all of us safe _ and it is about keeping all of us safe |f— and it is about keeping all of us safe. , ., . and it is about keeping all of us safe. ., ., ., ., ., safe. if you had information that individual supermarkets - safe. if you had information that individual supermarkets were i safe. if you had information that l individual supermarkets were not corresponding with what was then advise why didn't you just shut them down? advise why didn't you 'ust shut them down? ., . .,. ., .,, advise why didn't you 'ust shut them down? ., . ., .,, ., ,, down? enforcement action has taken lace. down? enforcement action has taken place- have — down? enforcement action has taken place- have you _ down? enforcement action has taken place. have you shot _ down? enforcement action has taken place. have you shot supermarkets l place. have you shot supermarkets down? no supermarkets _ place. have you shot supermarkets down? no supermarkets for i place. have you shot supermarkets i down? no supermarkets for manacles but there have — down? no supermarkets for manacles but there have been _ down? no supermarkets for manacles but there have been enforcement i but there have been enforcement notices— but there have been enforcement notices and improvement notices but it is about _ notices and improvement notices but it is about making sure there is a very— it is about making sure there is a very clear— it is about making sure there is a very clear message. i am not going to name _ very clear message. i am not going to name individual stores but there have been— to name individual stores but there have been stores in different parts of the _ have been stores in different parts of the country where enforcement action— of the country where enforcement action has— of the country where enforcement action has taken place so we are doing _ action has taken place so we are doing what— action has taken place so we are doing what we can with enforcement.
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the change _ doing what we can with enforcement. the change in the law should make it much _ the change in the law should make it much clearer to everybody that the people _ much clearer to everybody that the people with responsibility for running — people with responsibility for running those supermarkets and managing those individual stores and the members of the public. the managing those individual stores and the members of the public.— the members of the public. the new travel restrictions _ the members of the public. the new travel restrictions coming _ the members of the public. the new travel restrictions coming on - the members of the public. the new travel restrictions coming on as i the members of the public. the new travel restrictions coming on as of l travel restrictions coming on as of monday, no travel corridors will be in place, on a point of clarity, are there any international flights coming into wales at the moment? the first minister last weekend at that point there were none, are there any coming in at the moment? ho. point there were none, are there any coming in at the moment?— point there were none, are there any coming in at the moment? no. this is about the important _ coming in at the moment? no. this is about the important of _ coming in at the moment? no. this is about the important of the _ coming in at the moment? no. this is about the important of the message l about the important of the message across— about the important of the message across the _ about the important of the message across the united kingdom. we need to be sure _ across the united kingdom. we need to be sure that we are in the same possession — to be sure that we are in the same possession. the clarity of message is really _ possession. the clarity of message is really important. we often get asked _ is really important. we often get asked about exceptions and we want to be clear— asked about exceptions and we want to be clear these are the same measures— to be clear these are the same measures that every one of the four nations— measures that every one of the four nations of— measures that every one of the four nations of the uk signed up to and agreed _ nations of the uk signed up to and agreed because the risk of new variants — agreed because the risk of new variants that may come into the
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country — variants that may come into the country through different routes of travel _ country through different routes of travel and — country through different routes of travel and this should give us the opportunity to help safeguard the population because we have seen the damage _ population because we have seen the damage the kent variant has done with much— damage the kent variant has done with much more rapid transmission. if with much more rapid transmission. if we _ with much more rapid transmission. if we had _ with much more rapid transmission. if we had other spreading variants where _ if we had other spreading variants where there is an obvious risk and it is supported by different governments and also by all four chief— governments and also by all four chief medical officers. it is clearly the _ chief medical officers. it is clearly the case _ chief medical officers. it is clearly the case you i chief medical officers. it is clearly the case you are i chief medical officers. it 3 clearly the case you are the welsh health minister, some people, limited numbers of people travelling, but some people could arrive in london, for example, and they could put on their form that they could put on their form that they are going to quarantine in cardiff, for example, or somewhere in wales. what processes in place to make sure that you as the welsh government know who those people are and what are you going to do? yes. and what are you going to do? yes, so the passenger— and what are you going to do? yes, so the passenger locator farm information is shared with us and that is— information is shared with us and that is how— information is shared with us and that is how we have been able to do
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contact _ that is how we have been able to do contact tracing activity earlier in the pandemic. we were talking about zante _ the pandemic. we were talking about zante flights we had, we know about people _ zante flights we had, we know about people travelling from bristol partway through the information, so it is already — partway through the information, so it is already shared and it goes into the — it is already shared and it goes into the public health system so we understand where people are and it allows _ understand where people are and it allows us— understand where people are and it allows us to do checks that they are ok, allows us to do checks that they are ok. that _ allows us to do checks that they are ok, that they are coping with the isolation — ok, that they are coping with the isolation they need to undertake. we are taking _ isolation they need to undertake. we are taking a — isolation they need to undertake. we are taking a public health approach in doing _ are taking a public health approach in doing this and we have good compliance. we also have the experience of when the danish link variant— experience of when the danish link variant was— experience of when the danish link variant was a particular issue and was acted — variant was a particular issue and was acted upon promptly across the uk. was acted upon promptly across the uk we _ was acted upon promptly across the uk. we could contact all the international travellers. on a s - ecific, international travellers. on a specific. one _ international travellers. on a specific, one other _ international travellers. on a specific, one other thing, i international travellers. on a i specific, one other thing, given international travellers. (in a specific, one other thing, given the small number of people that will be caught in this process and those that might arrive in london and possibly go to wales, can you
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guarantee every person saying they are quarantining in wales will be contacted? are you able to guarantee that, that they will be checked that they are doing that then they said they are doing that then they said they would be doing? we they are doing that then they said they would be doing?— they are doing that then they said they would be doing? we cannot give an absolute guarantee _ they would be doing? we cannot give an absolute guarantee because i they would be doing? we cannot give an absolute guarantee because it i an absolute guarantee because it relies _ an absolute guarantee because it relies on — an absolute guarantee because it relies on them doing their part. it relies _ relies on them doing their part. it relies on — relies on them doing their part. it relies on people not being deliberately dishonest and getting us the _ deliberately dishonest and getting us the right information. what i can say is _ us the right information. what i can say is that— us the right information. what i can say is that the experience with the danish— say is that the experience with the danish incident means we have a highly— danish incident means we have a highly effective system of contact tracing _ highly effective system of contact tracing that has helped to protect the public. i tracing that has helped to protect the public. lam tracing that has helped to protect the public. i am confident we will be able _ the public. i am confident we will be able to— the public. i am confident we will be able to act properly to protect the public— be able to act properly to protect the public ear. i cannot give an absolute — the public ear. i cannot give an absolute guarantee that nothing will slip through the net, that would not be realistic— slip through the net, that would not be realistic or honest.— be realistic or honest. welsh health minister, thank _ be realistic or honest. welsh health minister, thank you _ be realistic or honest. welsh health minister, thank you for _ be realistic or honest. welsh health minister, thank you for your - be realistic or honest. welsh health minister, thank you for your time. i
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we have a bit of cricket in sri lanka to keep us going. how is it going? lanka to keep us going. how is it auoin ? . lanka to keep us going. how is it ..oin ? ., ., , lanka to keep us going. how is it auoin ? ., ., , ., lanka to keep us going. how is it ..oin ? ., ., , ., ., going? england are still waiting for their first wicket. _ going? england are still waiting for their first wicket. i _ going? england are still waiting for their first wicket. i have _ going? england are still waiting for their first wicket. i have my - going? england are still waiting for their first wicket. i have my phone | theirfirst wicket. i have my phone with me and it will be a feeder. england are having to be patient as they try and take the wickets that will win them the first test in sri lanka. they still have two days left after today and so have time on their side, even if they're required to bat again. they're in such a strong position thanks to their captain, joe root. and this was the moment earlier today when he reached his double century, proving he's back to his brilliant best. his score of 228 is the second highest knock by an english cricketer in asia and his second—highest career total. while the england tail end around him didn't offer much resistance, it didn't matter as england were all out for 421, a lead of nearly 300. they're now having a bowl at sri lanka, who are 58 without loss.
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moving along patiently but rather nicely. maybe the tide is turning. there are five matches in the premier league today, and all eyes will be on goal celebrations, with players reminded about the league's covid protocols this week. football focus is on bbc one at midday, and dan's here. and dan, i can only imagine your celebrations, after your crawley team thrashed my leeds. sorry about that. fully deserved, but you didn't need to rein in your celebrations whereas the players do now. morning. it is a really hot topic in football at the moment and it is something we will discuss today. we will be talking about this and many other topics. yesterday we had the head of the premier league talking and saying that players have to adjust their behaviour. bn called the no hug rule. optics are important as they say and people
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struggling with their own situations and things that we cannot do things in everyday life, the hugging and the goal celebrations has caused some real issues and we have had players like harry kane saying players like harry kane saying players need to change their behaviour. looking ahead to one of the big matches in the premier league this weekend which sees manchester united take on liverpool who are second at the moment. it is five years since manchester united won at anfield and even though the manchester united boss has had quite a bit of criticism they are top of the table and she has the best win ratio of any manager since alex ferguson was in charge. i have been talking to him about last season when they went to anfield and at 2-0. we didn't feel we were a million miles away in those games. we felt there was one or two pieces of the jigsaw that you have to add
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to compete in those big games. we just didn't have the quality or belief round about that time. we still worked hard, we stayed in games, they scored their second goal with the last kick of the game, so we were still in it and it's going to be another test. it's going to be a test of humility, of fitness, of belief, of quality. everything this game is going to throw up at you you have to be ready for. that is one of the big games tomorrow in the premier league so we will keep an eye on that and discuss that with two arsenal players who are excited that arsenal have found are excited that arsenal have found a betterform, winning their last three and one of their youngsters impressing in the last few weeks. and wayne rooney will reflect on the fact he has permanent manager at derby and officially retired from football. a16—year—old who burst on the scene and became the leading goal school england. we will hear from the reading manager. and if you
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are a fan of 5 live, we will be handing out the mid—season awards. all of that to look forward to from the day. it is a good laugh. i do. all of that to look forward to from the day. it is a good laugh.- the day. it is a good laugh. i do. i listen to 5 — the day. it is a good laugh. i do. i listen to 5 live _ the day. it is a good laugh. i do. i listen to 5 live every _ the day. it is a good laugh. i do. i listen to 5 live every friday. it i the day. it is a good laugh. i do. i listen to 5 live every friday. it is l listen to 5 live every friday. it is excellent- _ listen to 5 live every friday. it is excellent. that _ listen to 5 live every friday. it is excellent. that will _ listen to 5 live every friday. it is excellent. that will be - listen to 5 live every friday. it 3 excellent. that will be worth watching later. time for the weather. this is proof that everybody is listening. it is from norfolk and i said i didn't think they would be enough snow to build a snowman. either you have very large ivy in your garden or it is a tiny snowman. it is raining in wales because much milder here as temperatures sitting at 9 degrees, so a milder story. that is going to be the picture for
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most of us as we go through the day. we have seen some snow which will linger across east anglia but for the rest of us it is turning readily back to rain and a contrast in the afternoon with sunny spells coming through. it means in east anglia there is this amber weather warning for snow and we could see significant totals starting to pep up significant totals starting to pep up as there snow lingers here but generally speaking the frontal system will continue to push steadily eastwards as we go through the day at the southerly wind responsible for driving at night milder air as well we are going to see some sunshine. it is a really messy story to try to tell. at the moment what you have is not what you are likely to keep. the frontal system eases away, brightening up behind, showers and to the far north west of scotland but generally speaking sunny spells and a blustery afternoon for many and a milder feel for most of us with the exception of
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east anglia where the temperatures may struggle but elsewhere we are likely to see ten, 11 celsius, so certainly a change to the story. as we go through tonight, we keep that quieter theme. the wind direction starting to swing back to the north westerly. no two days the same at the moment with the weather. a quiet and chilly start to tomorrow morning but also a dry start and there will be some lovely sunshine coming through. we run the risk of sudden showers into the far north—west and a cooler feel generally but i suspect the sunshine will compensate for that as we see highs of six to 8 degrees. make the most of it because low pressure is set to return. pushing north for tuesday and that is going to bring a spell of heavy rain and gates as well. if you've just finished another week of home schooling,
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well done! that was said with some assion. well done! that was said with some passion- how _ well done! that was said with some passion. how has _ well done! that was said with some passion. how has it _ well done! that was said with some passion. how has it been _ well done! that was said with some passion. how has it been going? i well done! that was said with some l passion. how has it been going? ok. you might feel the need to let off some steam — and there's a good chance your kids do, too. research by sport england suggests that most children are failing to get the recommended 60 minutes of daily exercise they need to stay healthy and happy. one man who may be able to help is the olympic gold medallist — and hero of super saturday — greg rutherford. hejoins us from milton keynes. remind as the age of your kids. my kids are six and three. when we last spoke. _ kids are six and three. when we last spoke. they— kids are six and three. when we last spoke, they both came running in and jumped _ spoke, they both came running in and jumped on— spoke, they both came running in and jumped on the bed that i was talking from _ jumped on the bed that i was talking from i_ jumped on the bed that i was talking from i am _ jumped on the bed that i was talking from. i am sure that will not happen today~ _ from. i am sure that will not happen today we _ from. i am sure that will not happen toda . ~ ,., from. i am sure that will not happen toda . ~ . ., today. we en'oyed it so much we want today. we en'oyed it so much we want to remind today. we enjoyed it so much we want to remind our— today. we enjoyed it so much we want to remind our listeners _ today. we enjoyed it so much we want to remind our listeners what _ to remind our listeners what happened. is it there? they are a bouncy crew which is understandable given they are members of the
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rutherford family. we will come to that in a moment but i imagine the children that age they are naturally active all the time. is it almost a case from trying to keep them climbing in the furniture than getting them off their bottoms? best lockdown has — getting them off their bottoms? best lockdown has become more difficult for people _ lockdown has become more difficult for people who cannot get outside as much _ for people who cannot get outside as much or— for people who cannot get outside as much or children do not want to go out and _ much or children do not want to go out and walk as much due to the fact that the _ out and walk as much due to the fact that the weather has been so bad. there _ that the weather has been so bad. there has— that the weather has been so bad. there has been a bit more snow. we are having _ there has been a bit more snow. we are having to— there has been a bit more snow. we are having to be more creative. this is something — are having to be more creative. this is something we are the movement has been so _ is something we are the movement has been so fantastic because you can go and find _ been so fantastic because you can go and find something to links on youtube — and find something to links on youtube which give you more inspiration to help your kids do what _ inspiration to help your kids do what they— inspiration to help your kids do what they want to do, which is jump around _ what they want to do, which is jump around most — what they want to do, which is jump around most of the time. from my point _ around most of the time. from my point of— around most of the time. from my point of view we have been looking and checking because they are sitting — and checking because they are sitting patiently at the moment, we are engaging then and some of the fun videos— are engaging then and some of the fun videos to burn off some of that
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steam. _ fun videos to burn off some of that steam, because home—schooling is quite _ steam, because home—schooling is quite difficult when kids are pent-up _ quite difficult when kids are pent—up as well. | quite difficult when kids are pent-up as well.— quite difficult when kids are pent-up as well. quite difficult when kids are --ent-u as well. ~ pent-up as well. i was in the park the other day _ pent-up as well. i was in the park the other day and _ pent-up as well. i was in the park the other day and there _ pent-up as well. i was in the park the other day and there was i pent-up as well. i was in the park the other day and there was a i pent-up as well. i was in the park| the other day and there was a man with a two—year—old and it was a very wet day, we have had quite a few of them, there were some very big puddles and she was standing next to her son or daughter and the child stepped into the paddle, lovely, splashing around, and then dropped down into it and just sat right down, and literally thatjust made me smile so much because i doesn't quite matter what you do. you do not have to set myself targets. it is about getting a little bit of outdoor time if you can and just enjoying the moment if you can. can and 'ust en'oying the moment if ou can. ~ , ,., y can and 'ust en'oying the moment if you can. absolutely. my youngest is a walkin: you can. absolutely. my youngest is a walking nightmare. _ you can. absolutely. my youngest is a walking nightmare. if— you can. absolutely. my youngest is a walking nightmare. if there i you can. absolutely. my youngest is a walking nightmare. if there is i you can. absolutely. my youngest is a walking nightmare. if there is a i a walking nightmare. if there is a puddle _ a walking nightmare. if there is a puddle of— a walking nightmare. if there is a puddle of mud he will find it. generally then people moan about it as well _
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generally then people moan about it as well he — generally then people moan about it as well. he doesn't particularly enjoy— as well. he doesn't particularly enjoy the — as well. he doesn't particularly enjoy the code. we still get him out. enjoy the code. we still get him out we — enjoy the code. we still get him out. we have as much fun as we possibly— out. we have as much fun as we possibly can. parents as well. when we are _ possibly can. parents as well. when we are out _ possibly can. parents as well. when we are out with kids they are moaning _ we are out with kids they are moaning you get them wrapped up warm and then— moaning you get them wrapped up warm and then you _ moaning you get them wrapped up warm and then you start splashing in puddles — and then you start splashing in puddles yourself and enjoying it, revert— puddles yourself and enjoying it, revert back to a child and that gets the kids— revert back to a child and that gets the kids more excited and willing and wanting to run around outside as well _ and wanting to run around outside as well things — and wanting to run around outside as well. things like that, we had exactly— well. things like that, we had exactly the same, a brilliant thing near our— exactly the same, a brilliant thing near our house, the packs have become — near our house, the packs have become so _ near our house, the packs have become so treacherous that rex managed — become so treacherous that rex managed to slip and was covered in mud, _ managed to slip and was covered in mud. so _ managed to slip and was covered in mud, so that was back home again and bath and _ mud, so that was back home again and bath and change. but engage in it, have fun _ bath and change. but engage in it, have fun and the kids get a lot out of it _ have fun and the kids get a lot out of it i— have fun and the kids get a lot out of it. ., ., ., ., , .,, of it. i do not have a problem with my ten-year-old _ of it. i do not have a problem with my ten-year-old or _ of it. i do not have a problem with my ten-year-old or four-year-old| of it. i do not have a problem with i my ten-year-old or four-year-old but my ten—year—old orfour—year—old but my ten—year—old orfour—year—old but my 15—year—old and my 13—year—old i think will be grey blobs by the time
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we finish this lockdown. how do you extract them from their bedrooms and devices? it is extract them from their bedrooms and devices? , , , . extract them from their bedrooms and devices? , , ' . ~ devices? it is very difficult. with the weather _ devices? it is very difficult. with the weather as _ devices? it is very difficult. with the weather as it _ devices? it is very difficult. with the weather as it is _ devices? it is very difficult. with the weather as it is it _ devices? it is very difficult. with the weather as it is it is - devices? it is very difficult. with the weather as it is it is quite i the weather as it is it is quite difficult _ the weather as it is it is quite difficult. there are things on the website — difficult. there are things on the website you can go through for all a-es website you can go through for all ages from — website you can go through for all ages from adults to children. speaking to some parents with teenage — speaking to some parents with teenage kids, obviouslyl speaking to some parents with teenage kids, obviously i do not have _ teenage kids, obviously i do not have that, — teenage kids, obviously i do not have that, ijust have my experience of being _ have that, ijust have my experience of being a _ have that, ijust have my experience of being a teenager playing sport, it is finding the thing that they thoroughly enjoy and doing it with them _ thoroughly enjoy and doing it with them it— thoroughly enjoy and doing it with them it is— thoroughly enjoy and doing it with them. it is down to as parents at them. it is down to as parents at the moment because they do not have that time _ the moment because they do not have that time at— the moment because they do not have that time at sports clubs, we have to take _ that time at sports clubs, we have to take the — that time at sports clubs, we have to take the initiative, if they enjoy— to take the initiative, if they enjoy kicking a football, get yourself down to the park or something along those lines to engage — something along those lines to engage them. it is so important kids of all— engage them. it is so important kids of all ages— engage them. it is so important kids of all ages do not switch off and stay fit — of all ages do not switch off and stay fit and active because we know when _ stay fit and active because we know when there — stay fit and active because we know when there are bugs and things around — when there are bugs and things around if— when there are bugs and things around if you are fit you have a better— around if you are fit you have a better chance of fighting it so we have _ better chance of fighting it so we have to _ better chance of fighting it so we have to make sure kids are staying active _ have to make sure kids are staying active as _ have to make sure kids are staying active as well as adults. who wants
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to see the rutherford _ active as well as adults. who wants to see the rutherford chaos - active as well as adults. who wants. to see the rutherford chaos moment again? i to see the rutherford chaos moment auain? ., we to see the rutherford chaos moment again? i do. we are not actually again? i do. we are not actually heanna again? i do. we are not actually hearing what — again? i do. we are not actually hearing what you _ again? i do. we are not actually hearing what you are _ again? i do. we are not actually hearing what you are seeing. by the time that happened no one was listening to you anyway. that is the nature of these things. by comparison with that moment, you are not in the same place in a high—risk, have you pat yourself on the corner? i high-risk, have you pat yourself on the corner?— the corner? i am in the corner of the corner? i am in the corner of the front room _ the corner? i am in the corner of the front room at _ the corner? i am in the corner of the front room at the _ the corner? i am in the corner of the front room at the moment. l the corner? i am in the corner of l the front room at the moment. we have _ the front room at the moment. we have been— the front room at the moment. we have been renovating and i have a front— have been renovating and i have a front room — have been renovating and i have a front room i— have been renovating and i have a front room i can sit in and i have noticed — front room i can sit in and i have noticed the _ front room i can sit in and i have noticed the hair is far more lockdown— noticed the hair is far more lockdown hair than it was when we first did _ lockdown hair than it was when we first did that so i have to try to address— first did that so i have to try to address that issue as well! always full of— address that issue as well! always full of energy and always trying to have fun — full of energy and always trying to have fun i— full of energy and always trying to have fun. i am genuinely amazed that they haven't... the older one is
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here _ they haven't... the older one is here and — they haven't... the older one is here and being very nice, the younger— here and being very nice, the younger one i think susie is probably— younger one i think susie is probably looking after them which is always— probably looking after them which is always a _ probably looking after them which is always a positive.— always a positive. thank you for talkin: to always a positive. thank you for talking to us. _ around this time last year, a song called dinosaurs in love took the internet by storm. it was funny, catchy, poignant — and its creator was just three—years—old. now, at the ripe age of four, fenn rosenthal hasjust had her first book published — and naturally it's all about dinosaurs in love. let's hear the song that inspired it. # dinosaurs meeting people. # dinosaurs in love #. # they eat food.
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# they fell in love. then what did they do? # they say thank you. # and they died. # dinosaurs, dinosaurs fell in love. # but they didn't say goodbye.# it is just so funny and sad and sweet and lovely. fenn, who wrote the song, and her dad, tom, join us now. can you tell us a bit about the dinosaurs then your book and what happens to them in this new story? well, they kind of guy. thea;r
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well, they kind of guy. they basically die, _ well, they kind of guy. they basically die, she _ well, they kind of guy. they basically die, she gave i well, they kind of guy. they basically die, she gave it i well, they kind of guy. they basically die, she gave it away. spoiler— basically die, she gave it away. spoiler alert! _ basically die, she gave it away. spoileralert! [— basically die, she gave it away. spoiler alert!— spoiler alert! i hope it doesn't ruin it for _ spoiler alert! i hope it doesn't ruin it for you. _ spoiler alert! i hope it doesn't ruin it for you. do _ spoiler alert! i hope it doesn't ruin it for you. do you - spoiler alert! i hope it doesn't ruin it for you. do you love i ruin it for you. do you love dinosaurs? _ ruin it for you. do you love dinosaurs? not _ ruin it for you. do you love dinosaurs? not really, i ruin it for you. do you love dinosaurs? not really, but| ruin it for you. do you love | dinosaurs? not really, but| ruin it for you. do you love i dinosaurs? not really, but i do ruin it for you. do you love - dinosaurs? not really, but i do like m sonr. dinosaurs? not really, but i do like my song- the _ dinosaurs? not really, but i do like my song- the song _ dinosaurs? not really, but i do like my song. the song is _ dinosaurs? not really, but i do like my song. the song is gorgeous. i dinosaurs? not really, but i do like| my song. the song is gorgeous. are ou aware my song. the song is gorgeous. are you aware lots _ my song. the song is gorgeous. are you aware lots of _ my song. the song is gorgeous. are you aware lots of people _ my song. the song is gorgeous. are you aware lots of people around i my song. the song is gorgeous. are you aware lots of people around the j you aware lots of people around the world love your song as well? yes. does that give _ world love your song as well? yes. does that give you _ world love your song as well? yes. does that give you a _ world love your song as well? yes. does that give you a nice _ world love your song as well? yes. does that give you a nice feeling? kind of. i does that give you a nice feeling? kind of. ~ , ., kind of. i think it is wonderful. following _ kind of. i think it is wonderful. following the _ kind of. i think it is wonderful. following the song _ kind of. i think it is wonderful. following the song we - kind of. i think it is wonderful. following the song we have i kind of. i think it is wonderful. | following the song we have the kind of. i think it is wonderful. i following the song we have the book. tell us about the book.— tell us about the book. essentially when it all happened _ tell us about the book. essentially when it all happened we _ tell us about the book. essentially when it all happened we got i tell us about the book. essentially when it all happened we got lots l tell us about the book. essentially| when it all happened we got lots of offers _ when it all happened we got lots of offers from — when it all happened we got lots of offers from various _ when it all happened we got lots of offers from various individuals - when it all happened we got lots of offers from various individuals andi offers from various individuals and organisations— offers from various individuals and organisations and _ offers from various individuals and organisations and it _ offers from various individuals and organisations and it was _ offers from various individuals and organisations and it was all - offers from various individuals and organisations and it was all a - offers from various individuals and organisations and it was all a bit . organisations and it was all a bit overwhelming _ organisations and it was all a bit overwhelming but— organisations and it was all a bit overwhelming but the _ organisations and it was all a bit overwhelming but the one - organisations and it was all a bit overwhelming but the one that i organisations and it was all a bit - overwhelming but the one that stood out was _ overwhelming but the one that stood out was the — overwhelming but the one that stood out was the idea _ overwhelming but the one that stood out was the idea of— overwhelming but the one that stood out was the idea of the _ overwhelming but the one that stood out was the idea of the book -
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overwhelming but the one that stood�* out was the idea of the book because it is nice _ out was the idea of the book because it is nice to— out was the idea of the book because it is nice to have _ out was the idea of the book because it is nice to have a _ out was the idea of the book because it is nice to have a tangible _ out was the idea of the book because it is nice to have a tangible object- it is nice to have a tangible object to come _ it is nice to have a tangible object to come out— it is nice to have a tangible object to come out of— it is nice to have a tangible object to come out of this _ it is nice to have a tangible object to come out of this viral - it is nice to have a tangible object to come out of this viral thing, i it is nice to have a tangible object to come out of this viral thing, so we thought— to come out of this viral thing, so we thought let's _ to come out of this viral thing, so we thought let's do _ to come out of this viral thing, so we thought let's do the _ to come out of this viral thing, so we thought let's do the book- to come out of this viral thing, so we thought let's do the book and| we thought let's do the book and then we — we thought let's do the book and then we worked _ we thought let's do the book and then we worked with _ we thought let's do the book and then we worked with my- we thought let's do the book and then we worked with my friend . we thought let's do the book and - then we worked with my friend hannah to make _ then we worked with my friend hannah to make it— then we worked with my friend hannah to make it and— then we worked with my friend hannah to make it and now— then we worked with my friend hannah to make it and now there _ then we worked with my friend hannah to make it and now there is— then we worked with my friend hannah to make it and now there is a - then we worked with my friend hannah to make it and now there is a book- to make it and now there is a book and yeah. — to make it and now there is a book and yeah. it's— to make it and now there is a book and yeah. it's got _ to make it and now there is a book and yeah, it's got the _ to make it and now there is a book and yeah, it's got the story- to make it and now there is a book and yeah, it's got the story of- to make it and now there is a book and yeah, it's got the story of the| and yeah, it's got the story of the song _ and yeah, it's got the story of the song and — and yeah, it's got the story of the song and everything _ and yeah, it's got the story of the song and everything and - and yeah, it's got the story of the song and everything and it- and yeah, it's got the story of the} song and everything and it should and yeah, it's got the story of the i song and everything and it should be good _ song and everything and it should be good ten _ song and everything and it should be aood. ., , ., ., song and everything and it should be aood. . ,, ., , song and everything and it should be nood. ., ., , ., good. can you tell me a bit about what it is like _ good. can you tell me a bit about what it is like for— good. can you tell me a bit about what it is like for you _ good. can you tell me a bit about what it is like for you at - good. can you tell me a bit about what it is like for you at home - good. can you tell me a bit about what it is like for you at home at| what it is like for you at home at the moment? you like making things. you do songs. do you do drawings? yes. ~ ., , , ., you do songs. do you do drawings? yes. ~ ., , ., ., you do songs. do you do drawings? yes. . ., , ., ., ., yes. what is your favourite thing to draw? happy _ yes. what is your favourite thing to draw? happy faces. _ yes. what is your favourite thing to draw? happy faces. happy - yes. what is your favourite thing to draw? happy faces. happy faces? l yes. what is your favourite thing to . draw? happy faces. happy faces? that is erfect. draw? happy faces. happy faces? that is perfect. everyone _ draw? happy faces. happy faces? that is perfect. everyone needs _ draw? happy faces. happy faces? that is perfect. everyone needs a _ draw? happy faces. happy faces? that is perfect. everyone needs a happy - is perfect. everyone needs a happy face at the moment. don't they? yes. that is why — face at the moment. don't they? yes. that is why peeple _ face at the moment. don't they? yes. that is why people have _ face at the moment. don't they? yes. that is why people have embraced this, because you have to take pleasure in the simple things, it is that kind of moment.—
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pleasure in the simple things, it is that kind of moment. yeah, i think it was 'ust that kind of moment. yeah, i think it wasiust a _ that kind of moment. yeah, i think it wasjust a child _ that kind of moment. yeah, i think it wasjust a child singing - that kind of moment. yeah, i think it wasjust a child singing a - it wasjust a child singing a meaningful— it wasjust a child singing a meaningful song, - it wasjust a child singing a meaningful song, but- it wasjust a child singing a meaningful song, but also| it was just a child singing a i meaningful song, but also it it was just a child singing a - meaningful song, but also it is slightly— meaningful song, but also it is slightly apocalyptic— meaningful song, but also it is slightly apocalyptic and - meaningful song, but also it is slightly apocalyptic and that i slightly apocalyptic and that played. ~~ _ slightly apocalyptic and that played... it_ slightly apocalyptic and that played... it was _ slightly apocalyptic and that played... it was before - slightly apocalyptic and that played... it was before the i slightly apocalyptic and that - played... it was before the virus happened — played... it was before the virus happened but_ played... it was before the virus happened but it _ played... it was before the virus happened but it was _ played... it was before the virus happened but it was a _ played... it was before the virus happened but it was a time - played... it was before the virus happened but it was a time and i played... it was before the virus - happened but it was a time and lots of other— happened but it was a time and lots of other things _ happened but it was a time and lots of other things were _ happened but it was a time and lots of other things were happening - happened but it was a time and lots of other things were happening still| of other things were happening still and i of other things were happening still and i don't — of other things were happening still and i don't know, _ of other things were happening still and i don't know, i— of other things were happening still and i don't know, i think— of other things were happening still and i don't know, i think it- of other things were happening still and i don't know, i think it touched| and i don't know, i think it touched and i don't know, i think it touched a nerve _ and i don't know, i think it touched a nerve. de— and i don't know, i think it touched a nerve. ~ , a nerve. do you think she might cover is a _ a nerve. do you think she might cover is a little _ a nerve. do you think she might cover is a little bit _ a nerve. do you think she might cover is a little bit of _ a nerve. do you think she might cover is a little bit of one - a nerve. do you think she might cover is a little bit of one of - a nerve. do you think she might cover is a little bit of one of the | cover is a little bit of one of the songs? cover is a little bit of one of the son . s? ,, cover is a little bit of one of the sonus? ,, ,., cover is a little bit of one of the songs?_ just - cover is a little bit of one of the songs?_ just a i cover is a little bit of one of the i songs?_ just a little songs? sing the song? just a little bit. no. it wasn't _ songs? sing the song? just a little bit. no. it wasn't in _ songs? sing the song? just a little bit. no. it wasn't in her— songs? sing the song? just a little bit. no. it wasn't in her contract! l bit. no. it wasn't in her contract! that is my _ bit. no. it wasn't in her contract! that is my life! _ bit. no. it wasn't in her contract! that is my life! she doesn't do anything — that is my life! she doesn't do anything i_ that is my life! she doesn't do anything i tell— that is my life! she doesn't do anything i tell her— that is my life! she doesn't do anything i tell her today. - that is my life! she doesn't do anything i tell her today. you. that is my life! she doesn't do anything i tell her today. you stay 'ust as anything i tell her today. you stay just as you _ anything i tell her today. you stay just as you are- — anything i tell her today. you stay just as you are. it _ anything i tell her today. you stay just as you are. it has _ anything i tell her today. you stay just as you are. it has been - anything i tell her today. you stay just as you are. it has been lovelyj just as you are. it has been lovely chatting to you. could you give us a wave goodbye? there we go. thank you
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very much, guys. i wave goodbye? there we go. thank you very much. guys-— very much, guys. i think more people should 'ust very much, guys. i think more people should just say _ very much, guys. i think more people should just say no _ very much, guys. i think more people should just say no to _ very much, guys. i think more people should just say no to you. _ very much, guys. i think more people should just say no to you. just - should just say no to you. just sa in: , should just say no to you. just saying. iust — should just say no to you. just saying. just say _ should just say no to you. just saying, just say no. _ you're watching bbc breakfast. still to come on today's programme: he's the former busker whose track "let her go" has been watched a whopping three billion times on youtube. now "passenger" has a new album out — and he'll bejoining us for a chat just before ten. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. our headlines today... all travellers arriving in the uk from monday will have to quarantine as the government closes all "travel corridors" to prevent new strains of covid entering the country. tougher lockdown restrictions come into force in scotland to tackle what's being described as a "very serious situation". fears that police investigations may have been compromised after thousands of arrest records were deleted from from the police national computer. one of the best innnings ever by an english cricketer in asia, but afterjoe root�*s double century in the first test in sri lanka, his side's bowlers,
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are yet to make a break through as the hosts bat again. morning, it is a messy start to our saturday morning. a combination of rain, sleet and snow sweeping its way east but into the afternoon, sunny spells and scattered showers. all the details from me throughout the morning. it's saturday the 16th of january. our top story. all travel corridors into the uk will be closed from monday in an attempt to stop new strains of coronavirus entering the country. the change means anyone travelling to the uk will need proof of a negative covid test. they'll also need to isolate on arrival for up to ten days. charlotte wright reports. another measure to tighten up travel. this week saw passengers from south america and portugal banned from flying into the uk to stop the spread of a new covid strain from brazil. but the government says it may be difficult to predict
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where new variants might come from and so further action is needed. to protect us against the risk of as yet unidentified new strains we will also temporarily close all travel corridors from 01r00 hours on monday. this latest announcement is not a travel ban. it introduces quarantine for passengers no matter where they have flown from in the world. it means from monday anyone travelling to the uk will have to show a negative covid test less than 72 hours before they depart. when they arrive, they must now self isolate for ten days, or pay for a covid test on the fifth day. if it is negative, they can leave quarantine early. the policy also applies to the eurostar and seaports, but not to those travelling within the uk or ireland or to some jobs, like hauliers. travel corridors were first introduced in the summer, allowing people to come to the uk from some countries with low covid
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rates without having to quarantine on arrival. described as a lifeline for the industry, they kept people going on holiday. now many say they support the suspension so long as it can be lifted later in the year. we've had no revenue now for 12 months and people take a few months in the summer last year. if we're going to have an aviation sector coming out of this, we need to open up in the summer and we look forward to having conversations with the government about that, but for the here and now, we are absolutely clear that we will support the government. i think the government needs a longer term plan for the airline industry. they've been hit time and time again and they rightly have asked the support from the government. they were promised support months ago but the package hasn't been put into place. government has said they have put in a comprehensive set of measures for the travel and tourism sector including extending the fellow scheme, business rates relief and tax deferrals.
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it says it is committed to bring the sector back to full strength as soon as it is safe to do so. charlotte wright, bbc news. scotland's covid restrictions are being tightened from today — with changes for takeaway food outlets and click—and—collect shopping. our scotland correspondent alexandra mackenzie is in glasgow. alexandra, remind us of the new rules — and how they've been received. good morning. there is real concern about the number of cases in scotland at the moment. we are seeing around 2000 cases a day, there were just over 2000 yesterday. that is meaning more people are in hospital now than last spring. it is in this context we are seeing these new tough restrictions, even though most of scotland is already in lockdown. what we will see from todayis lockdown. what we will see from today is tighter restrictions on click and collect. you can still click and collect. you can still click and collect certain items, things that are seen as more
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essential like baby equipment, clothes, shoes, some homeware. those are still available. but you cannot just turn up to get them, you need to have an appointment. and also if you are going out for your takeaway coffee this morning, you will see some differences. you cannotjust go into the cafe or restaurant. you will have to wait outside and you will have to wait outside and you will get you a coffee through a hatch. these things are to try and cut down on the number of people gathering outside and to try and cut down on the transmission of the virus. one of the things we are seeing tighter restrictions on us having tradespeople into your house. this time of year e meet the unfortunate and need a tradesperson to come in to fix your central heating system. that is definitely still allowed, heating system. that is definitely stillallowed, it heating system. that is definitely still allowed, it is for essential reasons only. that was the guidance
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before and now it has gone into law. if you have alcohol as a takeaway, you cannot now drink that outside. no where across the whole of scotland can you drink alcohol outside. the main concern is, or the main message across scotland, is to stay—at—home except for essential purposes. stay-at-home except for essential --uroses. . ~' stay-at-home except for essential --uroses. . ~ ,, police chiefs say that investigations have been compromised after thousands of fingerprint, dna and arrest records were accidentally deleted from the national computer. our political correspondent jonathan blake can tell us more. the language being used here is investigations could be compromised. i guess that is another way of saying criminals will not face a trial, is it? is that a consequence? the extent of the problem and the consequences aren't clear at the moment. what is clear is that the
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problem is worse than had first been thought and according to the national police chiefs council who have written to forces across the uk, in a letter seen by the bbc, there were 213,000 records inadvertently deleted. we are talking about things like fingerprint records, dna records and records of arrest. in terms of the impact of this, there is a possibility that investigations have been compromised. they cancel themselves talk about a couple of near misses where a biometric match wasn't found, but offenders were arrested due to other records being used. there is pressure on the government to explain what has happened here and the shadow home secretary has been calling for answers from the home secretary this morning here on breakfast. this answers from the home secretary this morning here on breakfast.— morning here on breakfast. this is extraordinarily _ morning here on breakfast. this is extraordinarily serious. _ morning here on breakfast. this is extraordinarily serious. priti - morning here on breakfast. this is extraordinarily serious. priti patel|
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extraordinarily serious. priti patel will be _ extraordinarily serious. priti patel will be responsible for criminals walking — will be responsible for criminals walking free. we are not going to be able to— walking free. we are not going to be able to lead suspects to crime scenes— able to lead suspects to crime scenes without the dna and fingerprint evidence —— link. we need _ fingerprint evidence —— link. we need the — fingerprint evidence —— link. we need the home secretary to take responsible to explain what has happened here to the public on how she is— happened here to the public on how she is going to fix it. so happened here to the public on how she is going to fix it.— she is going to fix it. so far at the government _ she is going to fix it. so far at the government has - she is going to fix it. so far at the government has said - she is going to fix it. so far at the government has said it i she is going to fix it. so far at l the government has said it has already put a stop to the problem. thejunior home office minister talking yesterday and said the government is trying to recover the data and assess the full extent of the problem. i am sure there will be questions by the home secretary, the home office and the government as a whole going into this week as a result of this breach. a man has appeared in court charged with fraud and common assault — after a 92—year—old woman was allegedly tricked into paying 160 pounds for a fake coronavirus vaccination. david chambers, who is 33 and from surbiton, in south—west london, is accused of administering the fake vaccine at the woman's home last month.
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he denied all the charges and was remanded in custody until a crown court hearing next month. the us president—electjoe biden has set out ambitious plans to vaccinate 100 million americans within his first 100 days in office. he made the pledge as his health chiefs warned that the covid variant first detected in the uk could become the dominant strain in the us by march. our north america correspondent peter bowes sent this report. in a city where officials believe one in three of its population has been infected with covid—i9 since the start of the pandemic, there's a sense of urgency. hospitals in los angeles are overwhelmed. here, someone is dying from the virus every eight minutes. it's rough to see people who are really sick and we have to tell them that there's not much we can do. we can take you to the hospital to sit on these gurneys, it is not comfy. the race is on to get as many people vaccinated as soon as possible.
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this is the car park at dodgers stadium — the baseball venue in los angeles that's been transformed into the largest vaccination site in america. by the middle of next week, officials say at least 12,000 people a day will receive the covid jab here. but it isn't enough. we've got to increase the pace in distribution in the administration of these vaccines. the reality is we need to get these vaccines out of the freezer and we need to get them into people's arms. this is a scene that's playing out across the country, around the world, but america's so—called operation warp speed has failed to live up to its name, at least as far as distribution of the vaccine is concerned. joe biden says when he takes over donald trump on wednesday, he'll launch an ambitious plan to roll it out fast. he said efforts so far had been a dismalfailure. our plan is as clear as it is bold, get more people vaccinated for free, create more places for them to get vaccinated.
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mobilise more medical teams to get the shots in people's arms. he's promising 100 million jabs in 100 days. 100 mass vaccination centres around the country, and mobile units to get into areas that are hard to reach. the president—elect also had a blunt warning for americans — things, he said, would get worse before they get better. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. one of the biggest vaccine roll—outs in the world starts today. india is aiming to inoculate 300—million people byjuly. earlier we spoke to our correspondent rajini vaidyanathan at a hospital in delhi. this is one of 3006 vaccination centres which have been set up across india. the goal here and at other centres is to vaccinate around hundred people a day. if you do the
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maths on that, that means today alone, if everything goes to plan, more than 300,000 indians will have received a coronavirus vaccine. front of the queue, a bit like back in the uk will be health care workers, front line workers, like police officers, then the priority goes to the over 50s and people with underlying health conditions. there is a huge logistical task, a population of 1.3 billion people who live in all kinds of terrain, mountains, deserts, urban and rural. one thing to point out is to vaccines are being rolled out today. one is the oxford astrazeneca vaccine which is being manufactured here in india. the other one is an indian developed vaccine from a company called biotech. there have been some concerns about that because it has been given approval to be ruled out before it has actually passed at stage three track clinical trials for efficacy, which means the vaccine is being rolled out here and people don't know how
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effective it will be. some health experts have raised concerns but the government is stressing they think it is a safe vaccine and it will be administered under very strict supervision. wonderful bit of detail before i leave you. when people have been coming out from getting the vaccines they have been coming up with a red rose. everyone is getting a red rose. this hospital in delhi so some of the west of the pandemic, treating thousands of coronavirus patients. there is a sense of hope and optimism and a positive mood here today now india are starting to get the vaccine. they are hoping over a period of time between now and july they are helping a total of 1.2 billion people will be vaccinated as part of this programme. we've seen heavy snow cause disruption in yorkshire over the last few days —
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but it wasn't a problem for everyone. these four polar bears — nobby, hamish, luka and sisu — have been making the most of the chilly conditions at their home near doncaster. nothing like an impromptu slide, there we go! there is something like bears, it is like they know how to relax. do you know what i mean? yeah. do you know what i mean or are you just saying yes? i think i know what you mean. if there was a polar bear on the sofa, i think it would lounge. frankly, i think we would not be here. i think we would be fast exiting the building. that is yorkshire wildlife park. yesterday there was a lot of talk about widespread snow but i am not about widespread snow but i am not sure how that unfolded in the end. actually, most of the heavy snow was over the last couple of days across scotland and northern england, and actually it is just out to
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lincolnshire, east anglia and the south—east. already it is turning to wet sleety snow and a real contrast into the afternoon. get out and enjoy it now by this afternoon it will have gone. this is norfolk, just a covering of snow at the moment. further west, just a covering of snow at the moment. furtherwest, beautiful started the day in somerset. i know it is cloudy and murky, but it is mild. here, temperature 80 degrees already. in norfolk they are just sitting above freezing. —— eight greece. that has been the story so far today. that is the snow, but turning quite readily back to rain and already it is sweeping through at quite a pace. we are, as you go into the afternoon, going to see quite a contrast. a real messy story to try to tell but this afternoon sunny spells and scattered showers. if you are going out for fresh air, hang on a bit. it will get better. that rain pushes its way steadily south and east. you can see where
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this snow is sitting across narvik and down into the south—east corner, but the milder air is squeezing in across the country as we go through the day. through this afternoon, still some rain, sleet and snow to clear away from the extreme south—east. behind it, drier, brighter, some scattered showers into scotland and the north west of england. a breezier across scotland, may be gusting to gale—force on exposed coasts, but in terms of the feel of things, noticeably milder. 9-11 c the feel of things, noticeably milder. 9—11 c the further west you are. staying on the cool side for narvik. for this evening and overnight it stays quiet. some scattered showers close to the coast and in the final west of scotland, some of these to the tops of the higher ground may still be wintry but those temperatures are holding just above freezing in many spots first thing tomorrow morning. tomorrow is going tomorrow morning. tomorrow is going to be a lovely day, quite straightforward for me to paint the picture tomorrow. dry, lots of sunshine coming through for many. showers into northern ireland and
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western scotland, but on the whole not a bad day for most of us. top temperatures of 6—9 c. there is a mooring to come in the forecast. monday to tuesday doesn't look great. they heavy rain starts across england and wales. it moves up into scotland and northern ireland by tuesday. that is going to be accompanied by gale—force gust of wind as well. it is 70 minutes past nine. —— 17. even by the standards of this pandemic, it's been a really tough week. when you look at some of the figures we have been presented with, they are staggering. miss too much ability convoys. —— almost too much to take on board. let's remind ourselves of the latest figures. there were close to 56,000 new coronavirus infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. sadly, there were also 1,280 new deaths reported — that's people who died within 28
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days of a positive covid—19 test. in more positive news, more than 316,000 people had their first vaccine dose yesterday. that takes the overall number of people who've had at least one jab to more than 3.2 million. to help us process all these figures — and answer your questions — we're joined now by two of our regular experts — the virologist chris smith, and linda bauld, who's professor of public health at the university of edinburgh. good morning to both of you. linda, can i start with you? this is a thought rather than a question. it is something a lot of people are having anecdotal conversations about. it feels like the virus is getting closer. inevitably, ithink over time that is something that is a fact. you will know someone, had a connection. but there is that sense generally, as we look at the statistics and think about it terms of everyday
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life. . , ,., y think about it terms of everyday life. . , ., , think about it terms of everyday life. ~ , ., , ~ life. absolutely, and this week we haven't seen _ life. absolutely, and this week we haven't seen the _ life. absolutely, and this week we haven't seen the ons _ life. absolutely, and this week we haven't seen the ons infection . haven't seen the ons infection survey data which is normally released on a friday. you will remember that the figures were really high, one in 20 people in some parts of the country, one in 50 elsewhere. it is much closer to us just because the infection levels are so significant and unfortunately we are now even heading towards a potentially hundred thousand lost lives during this pandemic. there will be people who still haven't come into contact with it directly, but most of us know a family member or a friend or somebody who has been affected or indeed work with people who are at the front line of this. it is a crisis and it continues to be a crisis that is touching all of our lives. , ,._ be a crisis that is touching all of our lives. , , ., our lives. chris, we were saying on five live a — our lives. chris, we were saying on five live a little _ our lives. chris, we were saying on five live a little bit _ our lives. chris, we were saying on five live a little bit earlier - our lives. chris, we were saying on five live a little bit earlier this - five live a little bit earlier this week that the numbers of cases appear to be coming down slightly or flattening at least. the question thenis flattening at least. the question
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then is are these lockdowns working? how and when do we know if they are working? the how and when do we know if they are workin: ? , ., , ., ,, ., how and when do we know if they are workinu? , ., , ., ,, ., ., working? the number does appear to be cominu working? the number does appear to be coming down. _ working? the number does appear to be coming down. the _ working? the number does appear to be coming down. the curve _ working? the number does appear to be coming down. the curve has - be coming down. the curve has stapped — be coming down. the curve has stopped growing. it has flattened off and _ stopped growing. it has flattened off and it — stopped growing. it has flattened off and it is dropping. some reference was made to this at the downing — reference was made to this at the downing street press briefing yesterday where it was highlighted that those areas showing the biggest decrease _ that those areas showing the biggest decrease in the infection rate at those _ decrease in the infection rate at those that have been placed in tier 4 prior— those that have been placed in tier 4 prior to _ those that have been placed in tier 4 prior to the introduction of the lockdown — 4 prior to the introduction of the lockdown. those areas are seeing the biggest _ lockdown. those areas are seeing the biggest drops but on the average, the r_ biggest drops but on the average, the r value is still 1.2 to 1.3 across— the r value is still 1.2 to 1.3 across the _ the r value is still 1.2 to 1.3 across the country. pandemic is still growing. it getting bigger. we have still— still growing. it getting bigger. we have still got to carry on and get as best — have still got to carry on and get as best as— have still got to carry on and get as best as we can to use these as best as we canto use these nreasures— as best as we can to use these measures to rein it in. i think it well _ measures to rein it in. i think it well it— measures to rein it in. i think it well it is— measures to rein it in. i think it well. it is beginning to level off and dropping, so it will work but we have to _ and dropping, so it will work but we have to be — and dropping, so it will work but we have to be tenacious and hang in there _ have to be tenacious and hang in there that— have to be tenacious and hang in there. that is the only way we can do this _ there. that is the only way we can do this. . , ., there. that is the only way we can do this. ., i. , a there. that is the only way we can do this. ., i. ,.~ , there. that is the only way we can
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do this. ., , ,., do this. can you pick up on the sto ? do this. can you pick up on the story? we _ do this. can you pick up on the story? we were _ do this. can you pick up on the story? we were talking - do this. can you pick up on the story? we were talking to - do this. can you pick up on the story? we were talking to the | do this. can you pick up on the - story? we were talking to the world health organization a little earlier and some of these issues. how worried should we be about the new coronavirus variants? you worried should we be about the new coronavirus variants?— coronavirus variants? you are discussing — coronavirus variants? you are discussing that _ coronavirus variants? you are discussing that with _ coronavirus variants? you are discussing that with my - coronavirus variants? you are - discussing that with my colleague earlier. we should be concerned. it is not unusual, viruses change and unfortunately in countries where we still have high levels of infection are giving the virus opportunity to change because it is circulating so much. three main variants are being discussed recently, one that was identified in kent back in september, the one in south africa identified in october and now one brazilian variant of concern in particular. forthe brazilian variant of concern in particular. for the south african and brazilian variants, they are not well studied. we do understand all their properties and it is appropriate we would be cautious and try to prevent more of those coming into this country. we should be concerned, but as i think we have said in discussion with you before on this programme, the two key
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things and chris said this before, these variants allow the virus to be transmitted more easily but they don't cause more disease severity and we don't have any definitive evidence that they will not work with vaccination programmes. there is a lot of research and we will continue to see unfortunately new variants in the future. referencing border control, _ variants in the future. referencing border control, that _ variants in the future. referencing border control, that is _ variants in the future. referencing border control, that is a _ variants in the future. referencing border control, that is a question | border control, that is a question we have been asked by our audience in different ways. here is how one person put it. while shutting the borders actually help? we are not shutting them, we are introducing stricter testing regimes and quarantine regimes, but is that essential? will it be effective? better the devil you do know than the one _ better the devil you do know than the one you don't. if you have surveillance in place, you can spot them, _ surveillance in place, you can spot them, track— surveillance in place, you can spot them, track them and predict what them, track them and predict what the next _ them, track them and predict what the next move might be. the reason we are _ the next move might be. the reason we are in— the next move might be. the reason we are in the — the next move might be. the reason we are in the position of knowing about— we are in the position of knowing about these variants, especially the uk variants, that surge before christmas, is we have an excellent
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group _ christmas, is we have an excellent group in _ christmas, is we have an excellent group in uk — christmas, is we have an excellent group in uk and its role is to scrutinise _ group in uk and its role is to scrutinise the genomes of these viruses — scrutinise the genomes of these viruses as— scrutinise the genomes of these viruses as people are diagnosed with them, _ viruses as people are diagnosed with them, in _ viruses as people are diagnosed with them, in orderto viruses as people are diagnosed with them, in order to keep tabs of how them, in order to keep tabs of how the viruses — them, in order to keep tabs of how the viruses are moving. that is like training _ the viruses are moving. that is like training a _ the viruses are moving. that is like training a spotlight on the virus to see how— training a spotlight on the virus to see how it— training a spotlight on the virus to see how it is changing, and what it is doing _ see how it is changing, and what it is doing it— see how it is changing, and what it is doing. if you keep it spotlighted you can _ is doing. if you keep it spotlighted you can predict what its next step ntight— you can predict what its next step might be — you can predict what its next step might be. many others like closing borders— might be. many others like closing borders are useful cautionary measures in the early phases of things— measures in the early phases of things while begin more understanding and therefore, we can potentially keep things out. the point _ potentially keep things out. the point that patrick vallance made at the downing street press briefing yesterday was a good one. the variant — yesterday was a good one. the variant that emerged in brazil and the one _ variant that emerged in brazil and the one that emerged in south africa, — the one that emerged in south africa, they have emerged totally independently of each other but they share many of the same changes in the virus. _ share many of the same changes in the virus, and that is because when you have _ the virus, and that is because when you have large amounts of virus circulating. _ you have large amounts of virus circulating, you are rolling the genetic— circulating, you are rolling the genetic dice of the virus many times and giving _ genetic dice of the virus many times and giving it many opportunities to change _ and giving it many opportunities to change it— and giving it many opportunities to change. it will settle on changes that enable it to spread the best
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way and — that enable it to spread the best way and in the most optimal way among _ way and in the most optimal way among human beings. that is why these _ among human beings. that is why these viruses are settling on the same _ these viruses are settling on the same changes in parts of the virus each _ same changes in parts of the virus each time — same changes in parts of the virus each time. therefore, there is every possibility— each time. therefore, there is every possibility we could disclose the same _ possibility we could disclose the same sorts of variants here at home as well _ same sorts of variants here at home as well if_ same sorts of variants here at home as well if we — same sorts of variants here at home as well. if we do see it popping up your. _ as well. if we do see it popping up your, it _ as well. if we do see it popping up your. it may— as well. if we do see it popping up your, it may well be home—grown. | your, it may well be home—grown. i .ot your, it may well be home—grown. got another your, it may well be home—grown. i got another question this morning. this is a very simple question anyway. our supermarkets helping to spread the virus? it is worth saying, i don't know if you saw earlier, we were speaking to the welsh health minister. they have changed what was advised before into legal requirements for supermarkets. the reason they are giving is they are of the belief that some supermarkets are frankly, were not adhering to what they put out as advice. everybody needs to advise food and the allow to be open, so what are the issues around supermarkets and fundamentally, any
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safe? ., , safe? one of the interesting things- -- — safe? one of the interesting things... was _ safe? one of the interesting things... was it _ safe? one of the interesting things... was it for - safe? one of the interesting things... was it for me? - safe? one of the interesting l things... was it for me? yes, lease. things... was it for me? yes, please- one _ things... was it for me? yes, please. one of _ things... was it for me? yes, please. one of the _ things... was it for me? yes, | please. one of the interesting thins please. one of the interesting things from — please. one of the interesting things from a _ please. one of the interesting things from a behavioural - things from a behavioural perspective is as we are all reflected in the way we are now, we may be focusing more on the environment to be allowed to go into. i am getting e—mails from members of the public saying why are people not wearing face coverings properly in my local supermarket? i completely understand the public concern. supermarkets in themselves are not more risky than other indoor environments and i think we heard that from the first minister in wales. he was quite clear about that, but you are in us. if guidance is not well followed, that would be physical distance and, especially given these new variants which spread more easily, make sure people are wearing face coverings, that they have access to hand sanitiser is and are wiping down the trolleys etc, though transition from sepsis is not a big risk, but it is a risk.
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those things need to be followed at the moment. what you see around the country is guidance being put into regulations to strengthen it. i would emphasise to the public that going to the supermarket is not a risky activity, but it is not risk free and therefore it is very important that businesses follow the guidance and the people themselves also make sure they are doing their best. we have to buy food and we have to continue to do that. i can understand why wales is strengthening that remark. fist understand why wales is strengthening that remark. at the start of the _ strengthening that remark. at the start of the pandemic _ strengthening that remark. at the start of the pandemic there - strengthening that remark. at the start of the pandemic there was . strengthening that remark. at the start of the pandemic there was a | start of the pandemic there was a lot of discussion about how infectious this virus was and how much you could pick it up from touching services. it was something the prime minister referenced as well this week. do we know anything more about that? if you are in a supermarket picking up a box of cereal that someone has put there, is that a problem?— is that a problem? early on in the andemic is that a problem? early on in the pandemic people _ is that a problem? early on in the pandemic people did _ is that a problem? early on in the pandemic people did research - is that a problem? early on in the i pandemic people did research where the added certain amounts of virus to certain different surfaces and then came back a certain time later, swapped the surfaces and tested if they could grow the virus having
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swab that service, thus proving there was infectious viable virus on that service. initially it looked like certain services could sustain the virus are up to 72 hours, some from is no time at all. the surfaces that were the worst culprit was a stainless steel. kept it viable for maybe three days, but subsequent studies have been done and publish indecentjournals studies have been done and publish indecent journals that say the number might extend as far as 28 days. researchers in australia show that under ideal conditions you can still recover the virus as long as 28 days later, which is far longer than viruses like the flu. the general rule of thumb is that viruses don't like heat and bright sunshine, so surfaces outside, in the woman when it is dry, they are not going to stay there very long —— in the warm. call environments, such as meat processing plants and things like that, there was lots of indo ——
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where the temperatures are kept very low could harbour it viruses for much longer. how does this apply to a supermarket? it is an indoor environment and has lots of contact with people who might have infections. there is also metal surfaces including stainless steel which could harbour the virus for longer. the best thing to do is to regard any surface as a potential risk and wash your hands after you have touch your eyes. to rub your nose and mouth and fiddle with your face covering if you have been in contact with the surfaces until you have washed your hands and when you buy shopping, regarded as potentially infectious. it is very low risk but regarded as potentially infectious and empty all the things that are in their out and don't eat the packaging obviously. so that way, wash your hands afterwards and the risk will be minimal. did way, wash your hands afterwards and the risk will be minimal.— the risk will be minimal. did you 'ust sa the risk will be minimal. did you just say don't — the risk will be minimal. did you just say don't eat _ the risk will be minimal. did you just say don't eat the _ the risk will be minimal. did you| just say don't eat the packaging? the risk will be minimal. did you l just say don't eat the packaging? i don't think we entirely needed that expert advice. i did don't think we entirely needed that expert advice-—
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expert advice. i did say that. is my sho -|n~ expert advice. i did say that. is my shopping a — expert advice. i did say that. is my shopping a threat? _ expert advice. i did say that. is my shopping a threat? normally - expert advice. i did say that. is my shopping a threat? normally you l expert advice. i did say that. is my l shopping a threat? normally you eat what is in the packet are not around it. some people have made mistakes of bananas and things in the past. but things you can peel, things are going to cut anyway, very low risk because the temperature of cooking or the process of peeling, washing and throwing away, that is going to get rid of any virus. but things like tins, there is a low risk, a small probability that there might be some virus on that surface. it is very low risk and it will dwindle with time. butjust washing your hands after you have opened the ten and dispense the contents and entering the ten away will completely negate that risk and is probably the best practice. thank ou ve probably the best practice. thank you very much- — probably the best practice. thank you very much. chris, _ probably the best practice. thank you very much. chris, i _ probably the best practice. thank you very much. chris, i haven't i you very much. chris, i haven't heard the word snazzy for a while. it brought back to the table this morning. i it brought back to the table this morninu. ., ,., ., ., ., morning. i thought so too. i thought it needed using. _ morning. i thought so too. i thought it needed using. well— morning. i thought so too. i thought it needed using. well done, - morning. i thought so too. i thought it needed using. well done, linda i morning. i thought so too. i thought it needed using. well done, linda of the continent _ it needed using. well done, linda of the continent as _ it needed using. well done, linda of the continent as laid _ it needed using. well done, linda of the continent as laid down. - it needed using. well done, linda of
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the continent as laid down. next - the continent as laid down. next time we speak you will need to bring a word we have inherited the table. i will be practising. my my kitchen is snazzy. our special guest is comedian ed gamble full stop good to have you here. we will talk about your podcast everything that's going on injust a bit. however, heaven or hell? that's going on in just a bit. however, heaven or hell? heaven, some steak — however, heaven or hell? heaven, some steak but _ however, heaven or hell? heaven, some steak but with _ however, heaven or hell? heaven, some steak but with asian - however, heaven or hell? heaven, some steak but with asian flavours| some steak but with asian flavours may be _ some steak but with asian flavours may be. and then hell, pork chop and cauliflower _ may be. and then hell, pork chop and cauliflower. cauliflower is the devil's — cauliflower. cauliflower is the devil's fruit.— devil's fruit. that is quite straightforward. - devil's fruit. that is quite straightforward. watch . devil's fruit. that is quite i straightforward. watch up? devil's fruit. that is quite - straightforward. watch up? it is alwa s straightforward. watch up? it is always dry. _ straightforward. watch up? it is always dry. i — straightforward. watch up? it is always dry, i don't _ straightforward. watch up? it is always dry, i don't have - straightforward. watch up? it is always dry, i don't have to - straightforward. watch up? it is always dry, i don't have to cookj straightforward. watch up? it is. always dry, i don't have to cook it properly — always dry, i don't have to cook it properly. i— always dry, i don't have to cook it properly. i am asking for guidance. two great — properly. i am asking for guidance. two great chefs here as well, tom brown. ~ . . two great chefs here as well, tom brown. ~ ., ., i. two great chefs here as well, tom brown. ~ ., ., ., ,, two great chefs here as well, tom brown. ~ ., ., h. ., brown. what are you making? i am auoin to brown. what are you making? i am going to be — brown. what are you making? i am going to be doing — brown. what are you making? i am going to be doing monkfish - brown. what are you making? i am | going to be doing monkfish saturday with roast carrots, peanuts, lime, chili. . ,, ., ., ., ., ., chili. nice. shivi ramoutar, how are ou? how chili. nice. shivi ramoutar, how are you? how is— chili. nice. shivi ramoutar, how are you? how is the _ chili. nice. shivi ramoutar, how are you? how is the home _ chili. nice. shivi ramoutar, how are you? how is the home schooling - you? how is the home schooling going? you? how is the home schooling auoin ? . you? how is the home schooling ..oin ? ., ., .,
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you? how is the home schooling uuoin? . ~ you? how is the home schooling ..oin? ., �* ., going? yeah, good! always happy to beuin. i going? yeah, good! always happy to begin- i have — going? yeah, good! always happy to begin- i have got _ going? yeah, good! always happy to begin. i have got a _ going? yeah, good! always happy to begin. i have got a little _ going? yeah, good! always happy to begin. i have got a little quick - begin. i have got a little quick trick— begin. i have got a little quick trick to — begin. i have got a little quick trick to make your own salt fish at home _ trick to make your own salt fish at home and — trick to make your own salt fish at home and then i will whisk you away to the _ home and then i will whisk you away to the tropics, salt fish fritters. helen— to the tropics, salt fish fritters. helen is— to the tropics, salt fish fritters. helen is in— to the tropics, salt fish fritters. helen is in charge of the drinks. how are you? i helen is in charge of the drinks. how are you?— helen is in charge of the drinks. how are ou? ., ., , ., ~ how are you? i am really well thank ou. i how are you? i am really well thank you- i have — how are you? i am really well thank you. i have coffee _ how are you? i am really well thank you. i have coffee at _ how are you? i am really well thank you. i have coffee at the _ how are you? i am really well thank you. i have coffee at the moment i how are you? i am really well thank. you. i have coffee at the moment but i will you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have _ you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have lots — you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have lots of— you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have lots of wind _ you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have lots of wind to _ you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have lots of wind to put - you. i have coffee at the moment but i will have lots of wind to put in - i will have lots of wind to put in your— i will have lots of wind to put in your later~ _ i will have lots of wind to put in your later-— i will have lots of wind to put in your later. i will have lots of wind to put in our later. �* ., ,., ., your later. brilliant. do we need to be drinking — your later. brilliant. do we need to be drinking wine _ your later. brilliant. do we need to be drinking wine from _ your later. brilliant. do we need to be drinking wine from a _ your later. brilliant. do we need to be drinking wine from a mug? - your later. brilliant. do we need to be drinking wine from a mug? i - be drinking wine from a mug? i promise you this is coffee. not| be drinking wine from a mug? i - promise you this is coffee. not many eo - le promise you this is coffee. not many people believe _ promise you this is coffee. not many people believe you. _ promise you this is coffee. not many people believe you. you _ promise you this is coffee. not many people believe you. you guys - promise you this is coffee. not many people believe you. you guys are - promise you this is coffee. not many people believe you. you guys are at| people believe you. you guys are at home are in charge of what ed gets to eat. go to the website for put in detail. and we will see you at ten o'clock. what is wrong with cauliflower? we have lost the sound. i am sure it was hiuhl we have lost the sound. i am sure it was highly entertaining. _ stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and charlie stayt. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. travel corridors to the uk are being closed from monday, the prime minister has announced. the change means anyone flying into the country from overseas will have to show proof of a negative covid test before setting off — and they'll also need to isolate for up to ten days on arrival. borisjohnson said the new rules will be in place until at least mid—february. scotland's covid restrictions are being tightened from today. takeaway food and drink outlets can only serve customers via a hatch — and only shops selling essential items are allowed to offer click—and—collect. the changes are among six new rules announced by first minister nicola sturgeon earlier this week. police chiefs say that
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investigations have been compromised after thousands of fingerprint, dna and arrest records were accidentally deleted from the national computer. a letter sent by the national police chiefs council — and seen by bbc news — says the mistake might prevent officers from linking offenders to crime scenes. policing minister kit malthouse said officers are trying to recover the data. how are england getting on against sri lanka? , ., ., ., ., sri lanka? they have gone for tea. no wickets — sri lanka? they have gone for tea. no wickets at _ sri lanka? they have gone for tea. no wickets at all. _ sri lanka? they have gone for tea. no wickets at all. we _ sri lanka? they have gone for tea. no wickets at all. we can - sri lanka? they have gone for tea. no wickets at all. we can reflect i sri lanka? they have gone for tea. | no wickets at all. we can reflect on what happened earlier. what a morning it's been for the england captainjoe root. he's scored a double—century, with england opening up a strong lead over sri lanka in the first test. if you missed it earlier, or even if you didn't it's worth seeing again. this is how he reached his 200 — a lovely sweep to the boundary. it's the fourth time he's scored a double—century in test cricket. root was eventually out for 228,
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as england were all out for a21 — that was a first innings lead of nearly 300. they're now having a bowl at sri lanka, and they'll be anxious to take their first wicket as the hosts just start to make a bit of a dent in that big total. they're currently 90 without loss at tea. there are still two days after today to go so plenty of time for england, but the momentum has shifted a little bit in the last hour. there are increasing problems for organisers of the australian open tennis, after positive coronavirus tests on two of the charter flights bringing players to melbourne for the tournament. 47 players have been identified as close contacts on the flight, which came in from los angeles. so, that means that they'll quarantine for two weeks like everyone else, but they'll miss out on the opportunity to leave their rooms for five hours a day to train like the rest of the players who are already there. bear in mind the tournament starts on 8th february, so that leaves them very little time to properly prepare.
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football clubs that play below the sixth tier of english football are being asked this week how they want the season to end. many expect it will be declared null and void for the second campaign in a row. at the same time, they're waiting to see what money or help they might get. patrick gearey�*s been looking into the challenges facing non—league football. seaham red stars' numberfour might have a while to dwell on that penalty miss. it might be the last kick at this level of football for months. now seaham, the victorious north ferriby united and all clubs below the sixth level of english football could be looking at a second straight abandoned season. the only outcome would be we'll be null and void again. when the season starts, our funds are going to be lower than they should be and we'll have to cut the cloth accordingly. and hopefully it will be ok but you're teetering on the brink of folding, notjust
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us, but many clubs, because of the situation. clubs are nervously waiting on what money they can get from the government's winter survival fund. at least marine fc have their money from the cup tie against spurs but government rules mean they're not allowed to play a game. all clubs at their level have been sent a questionnaire this week asking how the season should end. some feel the football association should have had a plan. there appears to be no forward planning from the fa. that's two seasons where volunteers have put time, effort, commitment into trying to keep the game going at our level and nothing at all back. the fa told us they were working with all involved to... for all of society, these are turbulent times and those clubs
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that can have disconnected water, gas and electric fellow players and locked gates. that leaves those within the game with a part of their lives shut down in the past. i've had issues with the mental health and with anxiety and things that so playing with the football team really does help. with such a serious situation all day every day at the moment, it's either work or when you finish work, it's then lockdown. just that 90 minutes, two hours while you are at the football match, you kind of forget about what's going on. few in non—league football disagree that the game had to stop, and now it has to survive. thoughts are already turning to next season — a chance to make up for lost time and missed penalties. patrick geary, bbc news. such a desperate situation, especially when richard masters were saying he didn't expect fans to be back at premier league grounds this season and they had to prepare for that next season when they hope fans will be back, so there could be little choice for the non—league clubs. little choice for the non-league
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clubs. , ., ., ., clubs. the thing you mentioned a moment ago _ clubs. the thing you mentioned a moment ago about _ clubs. the thing you mentioned a moment ago about the _ clubs. the thing you mentioned a j moment ago about the australian clubs. the thing you mentioned a - moment ago about the australian open and issues around that, they have tried to be so careful.— tried to be so careful. yes, two ositive tried to be so careful. yes, two positive cases _ tried to be so careful. yes, two positive cases on _ tried to be so careful. yes, two positive cases on the _ tried to be so careful. yes, two positive cases on the flight - tried to be so careful. yes, two | positive cases on the flight from tried to be so careful. yes, two - positive cases on the flight from la and all the people associated, the close contacts on the flight, having to isolate, and a second flight from abu dhabi and the same situation. tens of dozens of players really thrown into chaos with the tournament starting on the 8th of february. a lot of them are in the same boat. it could make it unpredictable when the tournament starts. irate unpredictable when the tournament starts. ~ , ., ., ,, , you've probably seen a lot of pictures this week of the meagre food parcels which have been sent out to some families — to replace the free meals their children would normally receive at school. now it seems the row is having a knock—on effect across the catering supply industry — even forfirms which have been trying to provide a good service. our business correspondent
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katy austin has more. providing lunch parcels to children eligible for free school meals while covid restrictions are keeping them at home is helping this hampshire wholesaler keep going while its pubs and restaurant customers are shut. they provide some schools with ingredients and deliverfully packed boxes for others, but in the past few days they've had bad news. we've gone down from 3,000 to just 1,400 so 1,600 meals have been cancelled now. the impact for us is of course we bought the stock in, we're faced with potentially having to throw away — although we won't, we'll give it a few charities — but it costs us and causes us to take a loss. the cancellations follow a row over pictures shared on social media by parents who have branded the offer in some areas inadequate. it's prompted more schools and parents to choose vouchers instead of lunch parcels. richard's firm and others say those pictures don't represent what they supply. this greater manchester wholesaler has stayed open at a loss to serve its public sector clients, but here, too, cancellations are now coming in thick and fast. it would mean us furloughing, having to furlough maybe 40%
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of our team if this continues. our team have been moving mountains to make this work for schools, we've sourced new lines, so what this means is we're sat on more stock when we've already been sat on stock due to the quick shutdown of schools, the lockdowns last year, having to stockpile for the brexit negotiations going to the very last minute. itjust adds to the problem. there's always been a choice between locally—provided vouchers and meal parcels, but from monday a national voucher scheme is due to begin. the wholesalers' trade body said its members should get compensation for the loss of business following the storm of publicity in the past week. it will have a devastating impact on a sector which is already on its knees and what we're seeing is that the move to the voucher scheme is essentially the government giving yet more income to the supermarkets. our sectors receive no government support whatsoever and this is a body blow.
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this small caterer understands some parents are concerned about food boxes but says when well done they provide an opportunity. what better way to educate as many people as possible over such a short period of time than to send out food boxes with recipes and really try to engage children and parents to cook? these firms feel they are taking yet another unfair hit at their toughest time because of a few bad corporate apples. katy austin, bbc news. we can speak to people directly involved in this. siobhan collingwood is a primary school head teacher in morecambe bay. shejoins us now, along with katie newton, a mum—of—three from york who has received one of these meagre food parcels. when you got the parcel, your children are entitled to free school meals, describe what was in it. tiara meals, describe what was in it. two otatoes, meals, describe what was in it. two potatoes. two _ meals, describe what was in it. “ii-arc
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potatoes, two pre—packed meals, describe what was in it. “ii-mp potatoes, two pre—packed sandwiches, two yoghurts, and apple, an orange and a small portion of grated cheese. ., ., ., and a small portion of grated cheese._ five i and a small portion of grated - cheese._ five school cheese. for how long? five school lunches. cheese. for how long? five school lunches- for— cheese. for how long? five school lunches. for two _ cheese. for how long? five school lunches. for two children. - cheese. for how long? five school lunches. for two children. no, - cheese. for how long? five school lunches. for two children. no, for| lunches. for two children. no, for one child- — lunches. for two children. no, for one child. even _ lunches. for two children. no, for one child. even taking _ lunches. for two children. no, for one child. even taking that - lunches. for two children. no, for one child. even taking that into i one child. even taking that into account it _ one child. even taking that into account it doesn't _ one child. even taking that into account it doesn't seem - one child. even taking that into account it doesn't seem like . one child. even taking that into account it doesn't seem like it | account it doesn't seem like it would stretch across the week. definitely not. it wasn't substantial enough. it was an adequate basic mail but not substantial enough at all. different local authority _ substantial enough at all. different local authority areas _ substantial enough at all. different local authority areas are _ substantial enough at all. different local authority areas are doing - local authority areas are doing different things, some doing parcels, some vouchers, some having a choice. do you think you would have been better with a voucher? definitely. i could get so much more for £15 and i know poorerfamilies would be able to get a lot more for £15. b. would be able to get a lot more for £15. �* ., ., would be able to get a lot more for £15.�* ., ., , .,, would be able to get a lot more for £15. �* ., ., , .,, ., would be able to get a lot more for £15.�* ., ., , ., , , £15. a lot of people have suggested art of the £15. a lot of people have suggested part of the reasons _ £15. a lot of people have suggested part of the reasons the _ £15. a lot of people have suggested part of the reasons the parcels - £15. a lot of people have suggested part of the reasons the parcels are l part of the reasons the parcels are going out rather than the vouchers is because schools are concerned about making sure their children get
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access to nutritionally valuable food. do you think that is perhaps underestimating the ability of parents to be able to provide for their own children?— parents to be able to provide for their own children? yes, of course, we all want — their own children? yes, of course, we all want our _ their own children? yes, of course, we all want our children _ their own children? yes, of course, we all want our children to - their own children? yes, of course, we all want our children to be - their own children? yes, of course, we all want our children to be fed l we all want our children to be fed healthy. but as everybody, notjust myself. we should be given the option to go is the vouchers, which obviously now we can.— option to go is the vouchers, which obviously now we can. good morning. you are a head _ obviously now we can. good morning. you are a head teacher. _ obviously now we can. good morning. you are a head teacher. for— obviously now we can. good morning. you are a head teacher. for a - obviously now we can. good morning. you are a head teacher. for a lot - obviously now we can. good morning. you are a head teacher. for a lot of i you are a head teacher. for a lot of people when they sell that image, we showed at a moment ago, of what was in the food parcel, they were shocked. did you know anything about this before? because of your connection with your parents. did you know it was like that? to connection with your parents. did you know it was like that?- you know it was like that? to be honest, you know it was like that? to be honest. we _ you know it was like that? to be honest, we have _ you know it was like that? to be honest, we have always - you know it was like that? to be honest, we have always gone i you know it was like that? to be i honest, we have always gone down you know it was like that? to be honest, we have always gone down the route of— honest, we have always gone down the route of the _ honest, we have always gone down the route of the voucher scheme for our parents _ route of the voucher scheme for our parents so _ route of the voucher scheme for our parents so we haven't had that as an issue _ parents so we haven't had that as an issue because i agree with what katie _ issue because i agree with what katie was — issue because i agree with what katie was seeing previously that i
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know— katie was seeing previously that i know that — katie was seeing previously that i know that my parents are really skilled — know that my parents are really skilled. forthose know that my parents are really skilled. for those people who are already— skilled. for those people who are already experiencing some financial difficulties they are really good at making _ difficulties they are really good at making that money stretch. they know how to _ making that money stretch. they know how to get _ making that money stretch. they know how to get the best out of that £15 and i_ how to get the best out of that £15 and i trust — how to get the best out of that £15 and i trust them completely to make the right— and i trust them completely to make the right choices. i remember one of them _ the right choices. i remember one of them telling me about how to find them telling me about how to find the labels that are reduced and how to stretch _ the labels that are reduced and how to stretch the money, so why wouldn't _ to stretch the money, so why wouldn't l _ to stretch the money, so why wouldn't i trust them to make those decisions _ wouldn't i trust them to make those decisions and choices?— decisions and choices? clearly there is a lot of common _ decisions and choices? clearly there is a lot of common sense _ decisions and choices? clearly there is a lot of common sense in - decisions and choices? clearly there is a lot of common sense in that. i is a lot of common sense in that. are there any issues around the voucher scheme that you have found via your parents?— via your parents? there were issues initiall . via your parents? there were issues initially- when _ via your parents? there were issues initially. when the _ via your parents? there were issues initially. when the system - via your parents? there were issues initially. when the system was i via your parents? there were issues initially. when the system was first| initially. when the system was first set up _ initially. when the system was first set up it _ initially. when the system was first set up it was shockingly bad. my staff were — set up it was shockingly bad. my staff were having to log in at midnight, two or three o'clock in the morning, the system kept collapsing, parents are turning up at the _ collapsing, parents are turning up
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at the tail— collapsing, parents are turning up at the tail and the vouchers are not being _ at the tail and the vouchers are not being collected which was quite stigmatising and embarrassing for them. _ stigmatising and embarrassing for them. but — stigmatising and embarrassing for them, but those problems have gone now and _ them, but those problems have gone now and the system is up and running and it— now and the system is up and running and it is— now and the system is up and running and it is smooth and i do not really want _ and it is smooth and i do not really want to— and it is smooth and i do not really want to deviate from that because once the _ want to deviate from that because once the system is working and working — once the system is working and working well and parents are happy and i_ working well and parents are happy and i want — working well and parents are happy and i want to stick with it. you have made _ and i want to stick with it. you have made the _ and i want to stick with it. you have made the point _ and i want to stick with it. gm. have made the point you haven't gone down the path of getting the third parcel so it is not something you have really encountered, but when you saw the story unfolding didn't speak to you about a bigger problem? aboutjust how much attention was given to people in very difficult circumstances.— given to people in very difficult circumstances. , �* circumstances. food poverty hasn't 'ust circumstances. food poverty hasn't just happened _ circumstances. food poverty hasn't just happened during _ circumstances. food poverty hasn't just happened during covid. it i circumstances. food poverty hasn't just happened during covid. it has| just happened during covid. it has been _ just happened during covid. it has been there for a long time and covid has shone _ been there for a long time and covid has shone a — been there for a long time and covid has shone a spotlight on the problem of food _ has shone a spotlight on the problem of food insecurity and child hunger across _ of food insecurity and child hunger across our— of food insecurity and child hunger across our country, and that is a stain— across our country, and that is a stain on— across our country, and that is a
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stain on our— across our country, and that is a stain on our country that 30% of our children. _ stain on our country that 30% of our children, nine out of 30 children in the class. — children, nine out of 30 children in the class, experience food insecurity as part of their everyday life, insecurity as part of their everyday life. so _ insecurity as part of their everyday life. so to — insecurity as part of their everyday life, so to see those children being insulted _ life, so to see those children being insulted with a pack that is frankly. _ insulted with a pack that is frankly, if i were given that, would throw— frankly, if i were given that, would throw it _ frankly, if i were given that, would throw it away and see it is not fit for purpose, so i was cross when i saw that — for purpose, so i was cross when i saw that. ., ., . ., saw that. you have three children at home and l— saw that. you have three children at home and i know _ saw that. you have three children at home and i know what _ saw that. you have three children at home and i know what it _ saw that. you have three children at home and i know what it is - saw that. you have three children at home and i know what it is like i home and i know what it is like having kids at home at the moment. it is feeding them almost constantly through the day. bill it is feeding them almost constantly through the day-— it is feeding them almost constantly through the day.- describe l through the day. all day. describe the extra pressure _ through the day. all day. describe the extra pressure that _ through the day. all day. describe the extra pressure that puts i through the day. all day. describe the extra pressure that puts on i the extra pressure that puts on year. the extra pressure that puts on ear. , ., ., , , the extra pressure that puts on ear. , ., ., , . ., year. they are always hungry. we are meant to home-school— year. they are always hungry. we are meant to home-school at _ year. they are always hungry. we are meant to home-school at home. if i meant to home—school at home. if they are not hungry, sorry, if they have not had a good meal, they are hungry, but if they have had a good lunch they are not going to whinge, so to speak, i'm hungry, can i have
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something out the fridge? that constant cruising _ something out the fridge? that constant cruising to _ something out the fridge? that constant cruising to the cupboards and is never ending, isn't it? do you think the politicians get it? because it always seems, and this is wherever they come from politically, almost taken by surprise when they look at the reaction to a story like this and people seeing this really is not helping us. do you think they really understand the plight of some parents at the moment? i really understand the plight of some parents at the moment?— really understand the plight of some parents at the moment? i don't know, because i think — parents at the moment? i don't know, because i think obviously _ parents at the moment? i don't know, because i think obviously marcus i because i think obviously marcus rashford put this to them. if it wasn't for him who knows what would have happened? if they would have thought about it or you don't know what they would have done but because of the press they have had to do something about it. fries. because of the press they have had to do something about it.— to do something about it. yes, the ower of to do something about it. yes, the power of the _ to do something about it. yes, the power of the footballer. _ to do something about it. yes, the power of the footballer. no i to do something about it. yes, the power of the footballer. no doubt | to do something about it. yes, the i power of the footballer. no doubt he has had a massive influence. as we move forward with this, these are
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really challenging times. katie has laid out pretty bare these are really challenging times and the last thing people need in difficult circumstances is this, isn't it? i mean, it really is. i circumstances is this, isn't it? i mean, it really is.— circumstances is this, isn't it? i mean, it really is. i know that our food bank — mean, it really is. i know that our food bank usage _ mean, it really is. i know that our food bank usage during _ mean, it really is. i know that our food bank usage during this - mean, it really is. i know that our food bank usage during this covid i food bank usage during this covid prices _ food bank usage during this covid prices increased by 338% and four children_ prices increased by 338% and four children over 320% increase in accessing _ children over 320% increase in accessing food bank usage so it has been _ accessing food bank usage so it has been a _ accessing food bank usage so it has been a massive problem across our society— been a massive problem across our society and — been a massive problem across our society and we really need to work together— society and we really need to work together now to find a solution so this isn't— together now to find a solution so this isn't a — together now to find a solution so this isn't a problem that grows after— this isn't a problem that grows after covid. is this isn't a problem that grows after covid-— this isn't a problem that grows aftercovid. , ., ., ., , after covid. is that a piano i see behind you? _ after covid. is that a piano i see behind you? yes. _ after covid. is that a piano i see behind you? yes. i _ after covid. is that a piano i see behind you? yes. i am - after covid. is that a piano i see behind you? yes. i am so - after covid. is that a piano i see - behind you? yes. i am so tempted, but i am not — behind you? yes. i am so tempted, but i am not going _ behind you? yes. i am so tempted, but i am not going to do it. head teacher, i will not ask you that question! good to see you. thank you very much. question! good to see you. thank you ve much. ,., ., question! good to see you. thank you ve much. , a question! good to see you. thank you
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ve much. ., very much. good luck, katie. the kind of pressure _ very much. good luck, katie. the kind of pressure parents - very much. good luck, katie. the kind of pressure parents are - very much. good luck, katie. the| kind of pressure parents are under at the moment, especially parents on their own, trying to work and home school, so credit to anybody going through that and has got to the weekend, enjoy it. i through that and has got to the weekend, enjoy it.— through that and has got to the weekend, enjoy it. weekend, en'oy it. i think we are auoin to weekend, enjoy it. i think we are going to have — weekend, enjoy it. i think we are going to have a _ weekend, enjoy it. i think we are going to have a look— weekend, enjoy it. i think we are going to have a look outside. - going to have a look outside. someone making a snow angel in stevenage. someone making a snow angel in stevenage— someone making a snow angel in stevenaue. ., g ., , , stevenage. claire jones tweeted this video of her other _ stevenage. claire jones tweeted this video of her other half _ stevenage. claire jones tweeted this video of her other half making - stevenage. claire jones tweeted this video of her other half making a - video of her other half making a snow angel. that was in hertfordshire. that was a pretty good smattering of good—quality snow. good—quality snow in hertfordshire, but you need to get out and enjoy it quickly because it is going if it hasn't already gone. maybe in norfolk the snow might
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linger this morning but it is incredibly mild out to the west. temperatures in cornwall around 10 degrees and in somerset we had cloudy skies but it is mild and dry as the rain has already eased away. this is what has been happening. on the leading edge we have had the snow pitching into east anglia. behind it, rain, and even that is going to clean away pretty promptly today so once it does so actually this afternoon what a difference, sunny spells in just a few scattered showers for some. in more detail, may be east anglia clinging onto the snow where we have had the weather warning and the warning and the warning and the warning and the warning enforced. that system pushing throughout greater peace and you can see the brighter weather behind it. it will linger in the south—east for a time, sunny spells, mostly sellers to the north west of scotland and one or two pushed down by the north—westerly wind. gale
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force across the exposed west coasts of scotland but elsewhere dry, bright, breezy. temperatures on the mild side. maybe in norfolk it will stay cool. through the night we have got this ridge of high pressure building on from the south—west so that keeps things quiet through the night and also for sunday. it will be a chilly start, not as cold as it has been that low single figures for many, but if you are up and about early perhaps walking the dog you will not be disappointed. plenty of sunshine. showers to the west and northern ireland. temperatures are little more subdued but hopefully the sunshine will compensate. unfortunately there is dry and story is not set to last with rain spreading through england and wales on monday. in scotland by tuesday so that means it is going to turn pretty unsettled and as we head into the early part of next week, oh, i
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have disappeared, sorry! heavy rain and gates. she have disappeared, sorry! heavy rain and ales. ,, ., ., mike rosenberg — aka "passenger" — started his musical career by busking on the streets of brighton as a teenager. in 2012, he released a song called "let her go" — which has been streamed a staggering three billion times on youtube alone. have a look. # you only need the light when it's burning low. # only miss the sun when it starts to snow. # only know you love her when you let her go. # only know you've been high when you're feeling low. # only hate the road when you're missing home. # only know you love her when you let her go. # cos you only need the light when it's burning low.
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# only miss the sun when it starts to snow. # only know you love her when you let her go. passenger has a new album out, and we can talk to him now. ican i can see you are grooving along to that. i wonder how many times you might have heard it, is there is stage you might get bored? that is embarrassing _ stage you might get bored? that is embarrassing you _ stage you might get bored? that is embarrassing you saw _ stage you might get bored? that is embarrassing you saw me - stage you might get bored? that is embarrassing you saw me dancing! j stage you might get bored? that is| embarrassing you saw me dancing! i didn't_ embarrassing you saw me dancing! i didn't think— embarrassing you saw me dancing! i didn't think anyone would notice. that song — didn't think anyone would notice. that song is crazy. i don't know what _ that song is crazy. i don't know what to — that song is crazy. i don't know what to think about it any more. it has exploded into the world and it never— has exploded into the world and it never stops, itjust has exploded into the world and it never stops, it just carries has exploded into the world and it never stops, itjust carries on doing — never stops, itjust carries on doing its— never stops, itjust carries on doing its an amazing thing. you have to own it with _ doing its an amazing thing. you have to own it with things _ doing its an amazing thing. you have to own it with things like _ doing its an amazing thing. you have to own it with things like that, - doing its an amazing thing. you have to own it with things like that, it - to own it with things like that, it doesn't matter how many things you are requested to play at, if that is are requested to play at, if that is a platform that allows you to go on and make other music i guess you have to give it credit for that. that is it, absolutely. when i wrote that song _ that is it, absolutely. when i wrote that song i— that is it, absolutely. when i wrote
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that song i was busking in australia and i_ that song i was busking in australia and i wrote — that song i was busking in australia and i wrote that backstage at a pub before _ and i wrote that backstage at a pub before i_ and i wrote that backstage at a pub before i went on to play to about 46 people. _ before i went on to play to about 46 people. so — before i went on to play to about 46 people. so i— before i went on to play to about 46 people, so i am constantly reminded of the _ people, so i am constantly reminded of the reality of what my life was like and — of the reality of what my life was like and what that song allowed my music— like and what that song allowed my music to _ like and what that song allowed my music to become, yeah.— music to become, yeah. morning. i su ose music to become, yeah. morning. i sunpose we — music to become, yeah. morning. i sunpose we are _ music to become, yeah. morning. i suppose we are all _ music to become, yeah. morning. i suppose we are all being _ suppose we are all being philosophical at the moment. you are saying you in australia busking, doesn't feel different now? yeah, it was an amazing _ doesn't feel different now? yeah, it was an amazing adventure. - doesn't feel different now? yeah, it was an amazing adventure. i - doesn't feel different now? yeah, it was an amazing adventure. i was i doesn't feel different now? yeah, it was an amazing adventure. i was al was an amazing adventure. i was a busher— was an amazing adventure. i was a busker for— was an amazing adventure. i was a busker for four or five years and it was a _ busker for four or five years and it was a fantastic experience not just musically. — was a fantastic experience not just musically. i— was a fantastic experience not just musically, i honed my craft on street— musically, i honed my craft on street corners, but i thinkjust meeting — street corners, but i thinkjust meeting so many people, travelling, playing _ meeting so many people, travelling, playing so _ meeting so many people, travelling, playing so many gigs, it was a great way to— playing so many gigs, it was a great way to learn— playing so many gigs, it was a great way to learn my craft. you playing so many gigs, it was a great way to learn my craft.— playing so many gigs, it was a great way to learn my craft. you have some new music — way to learn my craft. you have some new music out- _ way to learn my craft. you have some new music out. has _ way to learn my craft. you have some new music out. has that _ way to learn my craft. you have some new music out. has that been - way to learn my craft. you have some j new music out. has that been created during lockdown?— during lockdown? yeah, it is a long sto . the during lockdown? yeah, it is a long
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story- the new— during lockdown? yeah, it is a long story. the new album _ during lockdown? yeah, it is a long story. the new album is _ during lockdown? yeah, it is a long story. the new album is called - during lockdown? yeah, it is a long i story. the new album is called songs for the _ story. the new album is called songs for the drunk and broken hearted which _ for the drunk and broken hearted which is — for the drunk and broken hearted which is probably quite apt for the times— which is probably quite apt for the times we — which is probably quite apt for the times we are living in and it was finished — times we are living in and it was finished in — times we are living in and it was finished in early 2020 and was meant to come _ finished in early 2020 and was meant to come out— finished in early 2020 and was meant to come out on me but because of tockdown— to come out on me but because of lockdown and everything else i ended up lockdown and everything else i ended up hotding _ lockdown and everything else i ended up holding it back and i am so glad idid up holding it back and i am so glad i did because i ended up writing toads— i did because i ended up writing loads of— i did because i ended up writing loads of songs on lockdown and actually — loads of songs on lockdown and actually adding some of the new ones onto the _ actually adding some of the new ones onto the record and i think it is a far better— onto the record and i think it is a far better record for it, so it is a smatt— far better record for it, so it is a small silver— far better record for it, so it is a small silver lining, yeah. we can see a bit of— small silver lining, yeah. we can see a bit of it _ small silver lining, yeah. we can see a bit of it now. _ # time flies and it's so slow. # i'm up and down like a yo—yo. # i can't do it on my own. # and i've tried and i can't pull the sword from the stone. # how are your mum and dad? # how's your brother too?
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# my folks are holding up. that is an appropriate video as well, that sense of isolation. did you have that in mind when you are putting it together?— putting it together? yeah, this is one of the _ putting it together? yeah, this is one of the songs _ putting it together? yeah, this is one of the songs i _ putting it together? yeah, this is one of the songs i wrote - putting it together? yeah, this is one of the songs i wrote in - putting it together? yeah, this is - one of the songs i wrote in lockdown and i_ one of the songs i wrote in lockdown and i think— one of the songs i wrote in lockdown and i think because of that it has sort of— and i think because of that it has sort of captured quite a universal struggte — sort of captured quite a universal struggte i— sort of captured quite a universal struggle i think. it is about isotation _ struggle i think. it is about isolation and loneliness and coping on your— isolation and loneliness and coping on your own with this crazy situation, _ on your own with this crazy situation, so yeah, i feel like the timing _ situation, so yeah, i feel like the timing of— situation, so yeah, i feel like the timing of this one is pretty good and hopefully people can resonate with it _ and hopefully people can resonate with it. ed and hopefully people can resonate with it. ,, ., ., , and hopefully people can resonate with it. ,, ., ., ., with it. ed sheeran has had quite an im ortant with it. ed sheeran has had quite an important role _ with it. ed sheeran has had quite an important role in _ with it. ed sheeran has had quite an important role in your— with it. ed sheeran has had quite an important role in your career- important role in your career because i think you toured with him. do you keep in touch?— do you keep in touch? yeah, i have heled do you keep in touch? yeah, i have helped about _ do you keep in touch? yeah, i have helped about an _ do you keep in touch? yeah, i have helped about an awful _ do you keep in touch? yeah, i have helped about an awful lot! - do you keep in touch? yeah, i have helped about an awful lot! the - do you keep in touch? yeah, i have| helped about an awful lot! the truth is he has _ helped about an awful lot! the truth is he has been an incredible friend to me _ is he has been an incredible friend to me over— is he has been an incredible friend to me over the years. we met years a-o to me over the years. we met years ago when — to me over the years. we met years ago when i _ to me over the years. we met years ago when i was busking and i played
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ago when i was busking and i played a little _ ago when i was busking and i played a little pub— ago when i was busking and i played a little pub in cambridge and he happened to be on the same bill and we have _ happened to be on the same bill and we have been friends ever since. he has been _ we have been friends ever since. he has been so — we have been friends ever since. he has been so sweet taking me on tour a number— has been so sweet taking me on tour a number of— has been so sweet taking me on tour a number of times and putting me in front of— a number of times and putting me in front of his _ a number of times and putting me in front of his legions of fans. we have _ front of his legions of fans. we have always talked about collaborating in some way and when i wrote _ collaborating in some way and when i wrote this _ collaborating in some way and when i wrote this song i sent ten very rough — wrote this song i sent ten very rough phone recording of it and he .ot rough phone recording of it and he got back— rough phone recording of it and he got back to — rough phone recording of it and he got back to me and about seven minutes— got back to me and about seven minutes and was super excited and wanted _ minutes and was super excited and wanted to— minutes and was super excited and wanted to get involved, so he ended up wanted to get involved, so he ended up going _ wanted to get involved, so he ended up going away that his producer and creating _ up going away that his producer and creating a _ up going away that his producer and creating a separate alternative version — creating a separate alternative version which is called the gingerbread mix and it is on spotify if anyone _ gingerbread mix and it is on spotify if anyone wants to check it out. definitely — if anyone wants to check it out. definitely well. a lot of the artists we have spoken to over the last few months have talked about the fact they feel if successful in a very fortunate position to weather the year we have had but acutely aware so many people you would normally work alongside, whether in the studio, engineers, touring,
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roadies and so on are having a much tougher time. roadies and so on are having a much toughertime. how roadies and so on are having a much tougher time. how do you support those other people?— tougher time. how do you support those other people? yeah, it is such a tou . h those other people? yeah, it is such a tough time — those other people? yeah, it is such a tough time for _ those other people? yeah, it is such a tough time for those _ those other people? yeah, it is such a tough time for those guys, - a tough time for those guys, especially the ones who are involved in live _ especially the ones who are involved in live music. me and my producer have _ in live music. me and my producer have managed to carry on in the studio— have managed to carry on in the studio but— have managed to carry on in the studio but the guys who are out on the road _ studio but the guys who are out on the road nine or ten months of the year. _ the road nine or ten months of the year. that— the road nine or ten months of the year. that is— the road nine or ten months of the year, that is all they know, it is all year, that is all they know, it is at! they— year, that is all they know, it is all they have ever done and they are brilliant _ all they have ever done and they are brilliant at _ all they have ever done and they are brilliant at it and suddenly that has vanished overnight with very limited _ has vanished overnight with very limited support, so it is a really tough _ limited support, so it is a really tough time. the people i talk with is an— tough time. the people i talk with is an amazing little touring family and i_ is an amazing little touring family and t have — is an amazing little touring family and i have obviously tried to look after— and i have obviously tried to look after them — and i have obviously tried to look after them as best i can but the bigger— after them as best i can but the bigger problem is a really difficult one. , ., ., , , one. there will be a huge appetite unleashed for _ one. there will be a huge appetite unleashed for live _ one. there will be a huge appetite unleashed for live music— one. there will be a huge appetite unleashed for live music when - one. there will be a huge appetite unleashed for live music when we | one. there will be a huge appetite i unleashed for live music when we are allowed to again. thank you so much. thanks for your time.
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that's all from us today. breakfast is back at six o'clock tomorrow. enjoy your weekend.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines. a sanitation worker becomes the first person in india to receive a covid vaccine — as the country begins to vaccinate more than 1.3 billion people. president—electjoe biden sets out plans to speed up immunisations in the united states — promising to vaccinate 100 million people within his first 100 days in office. our plan is as clear as it is bold. get more people vaccinated for free. calls for more support for the uk's travel and tourism sector — after the government imposes tougher restrictions on arrivals to keep out new strains of coronavirus. senior police officers in the uk says their investigations have been compromised — after hundreds of thousands of arrest records were deleted from the police national computer.
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