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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, the headlines at six. a stark warning from the head of the nhs in england, on the intense pressures, caused by coronavirus. staggeringly, every 30 seconds across england, another patient is being admitted to hospital with coronavirus. mass vaccinations begin at another ten centres in england from tomorrow — as the foreign secretary lays out the government's targets for the roll—out. this is the scene live in moscow where navalny has just landed. alex nirvana comes back to russia
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after being poisoned last year by another truck. the american music producer, phil spector, who helped define the sound of the �*60s and the creator of the wall of sound has died in prison — aged 81, while serving a sentence for murder. and it's stalemate so far in the top of the table clash between liverpool and manchester united. that and the rest of the day's sport in sportsday here in half an hour. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the head of the nhs in england, says one person is being admitted to hospital with coronavirus every 30 seconds. sir simon stevens also warns that
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despite the roll out of vaccines, the pressure will remain intense for several more weeks. but four times as many people are now being vaccinated in england, as those being infected, and ten new vaccine hubs will open tomorrow. here's our health correspondent, jim reed. the pressure on hospitals this winter shows no sign of easing up. the person in charge of the nhs in england said the service is now in the most precarious position in its 72 year history. since christmas day, we have seen another 15,000 increase in the inpatients in hospitals across england, the equivalent of filling 30 hospitals full of coronavirus patients. staggeringly, every 30 seconds across england, another patient is being admitted to hospital with coronavirus. new figures show more than 100,000 nhs workers off sick in england last week, half either had
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the virus or were self—isolating. adding to the pressure on busy wards. tomorrow, this vaccination centre at blackburn cathedral will open offering thousands ofjabs a day to nhs staff as well as care workers and those over 80. or by invitation only at this stage. we felt it would be really appropriate to offer this space up as a place where people could come and feel safe and secure. a place that they know. it is one of ten new regional vaccination centres opening across england next week. as well as blackburn, sites are in taunton, saint helens and bournemouth, slough, norwich, wickford and essex, lincolnshire, york and wembley in london. theyjoin the existing seven sites already opened in places from manchester in the north west to surrey in the south east. large vaccination hubs are already open in scotland more than 5000 staff were _ in scotland more than 5000 staff were vaccinated over the weekend.
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larger— were vaccinated over the weekend. larger centres are also opening in wales and northern ireland. it is part of a uk wide drive to vaccinate the 15 million people most at risk from covid by the middle of next month. the government pledged today all adults would be offered the job by september. there are some early signs that lockdown measures might be working and infections are starting to fall back in some places. it is more positive news but will take time to be reflected in hospital admissions meaning the pressure on nhs services is likely to continue for weeks to come. the latest government figures show there were 38,598 new coronavirus infections, recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means on average the number of new cases reported per day in the last week,was 46,231. across the uk an average of 35,882
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people were in hospital with coronavirus over the seven days to friday. 671 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test so on average in the past week, 1,119 deaths were announced every day, taking the total across the uk, to 89,261. 0n vaccinations, 298,087 people have had their first dose of one of the three approved covid—19 vaccines, in the latest 2a hour period taking the overall number of those who've had their firstjab, to more than 3.8 million. airports are to be offered financial support in england, as the government closes covid travel corridors in the uk from tomorrow.
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up to £8 million will be available for each airport to help with costs such as business rates. here's katy austin. from tomorrow, nearly all arrivals to the uk will have to quarantine for ten days because the travel corridor system will be suspended. it is another blow for travel and tourism. last night, the aviation minister acknowledged the impact of tighter restrictions would have and said a preplanned grant scheme for england will open within the next fortnight. the airports trade body said this was welcome, but with traffic still extremely low, more support would be needed. we understand that it will be a grant towards fixed costs such as business rates and it will be equivalent to business rates, but up to about 8 million. so very, very useful for a number of our airports but clearly for some of the very large airports, it is actually quite a small amount financially. heathrow, they pay 120 million a year business rates. a requirement for travellers to show a negative cocoa that has before
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travelling to the uk also kicks in tomorrow and the government has said the enforcement of quarantine will now be stepped up. temporary stricter isolation rules have been in place before, early last year, some travellers returning from wuhan in china or houston nhs hospitalfacilities after police escorts. today, the government was asked if they would now require arrivals to quarantine in hotels. there is a challenge in the workability and deliverability, but we need to look at that based on the account of the experience. i don't accept we have been too slow in this, we are broadly the same pace as canada and germany. we will keep other potential measures under review, but they have got to be workable. travel businesses from airlines to eurostar a struggling while traffic remains at extremely low levels. the industry accepts the public health need for tighter rules but says a pathway out of the crisis needs to be mapped out. in the last hour the leading critic
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of the russian government, alexei navalny, has returned to moscow for the first time, since accusing the kremlin of poisoning him last year. he collapsed on an internalflight in siberia in august, and it later emerged he'd been poisoned with a novichok nerve agent. 0ur correspondent steve rosenberg sent this update from moscow. the plane has landed but can you know the russian authorities often claim that alexei navalny is not popular amongst russians, that he isn't a threat to president putin but his return home has sparked a major security operation, and the airport where i am now, where the plane was supposed to land, the police pushed mr navalny�*s supporters out of the hole and made some detentions and it was announced the airport had closed and the plane was re—routed to another moscow airport. we believe that passengers
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are getting off the plane at the moment. his return is a direct challenge to vladimir putin and it poses a dilemma for the kremlin because if mr navalny is put in prison, that could turn him into a political martyr. if he is not detained, then he could remain a thorn in the side of the russian president. that was steve rosenberg in moscow. i'm joined now by the bbc�*s 0leg boldyrev in moscow. an hour or so ago we were hearing some of his supporters had been arrested or detained at another airport, so has the clamp—down started? airport, so has the clamp-down started? , _, , airport, so has the clamp-down started? , , , ., ., started? this could be situation where it all— started? this could be situation where it all depends _ started? this could be situation where it all depends on - started? this could be situation| where it all depends on whether started? this could be situation - where it all depends on whether his supporters will come out in support of navalny. 0bviously, supporters will come out in support of navalny. obviously, you just spoke to steve there, at the airport for several hundreds of people turned out to meet navalny and the
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aeroplane made the squiggles in the air and went aeroplane made the squiggles in the airand went to aeroplane made the squiggles in the air and went to the northern airport. we saw navalny walking into the airport, then he was stopped at border control legally on the russian border when he was separated from his wife and lawyer, crucially, and a few minutes ago, russian prison service confirm he has been detained for clarification so doesn't give us any idea whether he will be apprehended for a long time or whether he will be let go free. this all goes back to the statement by the prison service that he violated the terms of his parole by not turning up at the end of december. so whether this means he is under arrest, whether he is on long—term detention, we don't yet know. long-term detention, we don't yet know. ., , ., ., ., ., know. the european court of human richts know. the european court of human rights rolled — know. the european court of human rights rolled back— know. the european court of human rights rolled back to _ know. the european court of human rights rolled back to the _ know. the european court of human rights rolled back to the 2014 - rights rolled back to the 2014 conviction that this was a political stunt so he has international support on his side for that. what
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does he do now, in terms of his followers? he has millions of facebook and twitter and other followers as well. has that been addressed by the state? have they tried to block those channels? hot tried to block those channels? not so far tried to block those channels? iirrt so far although we have seen the cases where navalny has been raided, and it happens regularly. certainly, people who tweet and retweet are facing danger. matter of fact, navalny�*s anti—corruption foundation navalny�*s anti—corru ption foundation cameraman navalny�*s anti—corruption foundation cameraman was arrested for 30 days because of two protest tweets he made lately. certainly, there is a risk that public support in the social networks will carry some blowback from the authorities. let me put it this way, the authorities are very nervous. we hear from president putin that navalny is
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basically no one and no one is afraid of him which is certainly not true. authorities went to extraordinary lengths to prevent his landing, when his supporters met, and even tax is going to the air plane was redirected was stopped by the police, the police inquiring whether they have legitimate business at the airport or whether they are going there to support navalny. certainly, a very nervous situation and we don't know whether navalny will be free to speak to people, or whether he will go straight to detention. it people, or whether he will go straight to detention. it seems extraordinary _ straight to detention. it seems extraordinary that _ straight to detention. it seems extraordinary that only - straight to detention. it seems extraordinary that only five - straight to detention. it seems - extraordinary that only five months ago he very nearly died, didn't he? it was only through the fact he landed in germany that he survived from the another truck poisoning which doctors have confirmed. then there will was that extraordinary interview navalny did and recorded what he said was one of the men behind the team of people who had been sent to assassinate him. how widely is that story known in
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russia? , , ~ , widely is that story known in russia? , , ., , , russia? very, very. certainly it is known he — russia? very, very. certainly it is known he is _ russia? very, very. certainly it is known he is not _ russia? very, very. certainly it is known he is not giving _ russia? very, very. certainly it is known he is not giving up, - russia? very, very. certainly it is known he is not giving up, he - russia? very, very. certainly it is known he is not giving up, he is l russia? very, very. certainly it is. known he is not giving up, he is not raising his hands, and the fact he decided to go back to russia is quite unusual. navalny himself is unusual and he is very prominent but many russian opposition figures had to stay abroad because there is a direct threat to their lives and to their freedom. direct threat to their lives and to theirfreedom. he is not afraid. his statement say there is nothing to be afraid of. of course, this is posturing. he is a lot to be afraid of in the situation shows he has been detained 14 minutes after the plane landed in moscow but certainly people are aware. whether this adds massively to his popularity, we don't know. certainly, his support baseis don't know. certainly, his support base is as large as russian authoritarian situation can allow. whether the latest happenings, arrest, detention will add much to this remains to be seen, i'm not
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certain this will happen. certainly, he is a very widely recognised and the most popular opposition politician in russia. qm. the most popular opposition politician in russia. ok, thanks very much- _ all 50 us states are on alert for possible violent protests this weekend, ahead of president—electjoe biden's inauguration on wednesday. members of the national guard are patrolling the streets around the capitol in washington, following the storming of the building by supporters of president trump. so far, there have been none of the mass protests that had been feared. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. america are on high alert like never before. the nation's capital has been turned into a fortress. with security worthy of a war zone, the national guard has been deployed to try to ensure a smooth transition of power when joe try to ensure a smooth transition of power whenjoe biden is inaugurated on wednesday. in the meantime there is concern that armed supporters of donald trump might try to stage more
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protests, still refusing to accept the result of the election. the capitol hill buildings stormed by a mob earlier this month is now surrounded by a high fence, and the city is under lockdown. it is surrounded by a high fence, and the city is under lockdown.— city is under lockdown. it is a lace in city is under lockdown. it is a place in our _ city is under lockdown. it is a place in our history _ city is under lockdown. it is a place in our history that - city is under lockdown. it is a place in our history that i - city is under lockdown. it is a place in our history that i am | city is under lockdown. it is a - place in our history that i am sad that we have come to. american troops should not have to be armed against their fellow americans. but what we saw was an unprecedented attack on our democracy, in the cradle of that democracy! br; cradle of that democracy! by wednesday, 25,000 troops will be in the capital to try to keep the peace. the goal is to try to prevent a repeat of the attack that led to mr trump being impeached for a second time on the charge of incitement of insurrection. he now faces a trial in the senate. the fbi has warned police agencies around the country that state capitals could be the target a further protest in the coming days. the state of emergency has already been
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declared in maryland, new mexico and utah. state by state, members of the national guard have been deployed over fears that extremists may infiltrate planned protest. minnesota guards are in the capital which has been descended on by protesters. in california near the capital city sacramento riot police are patrolling outside the home of the state governor, gavin newsome. in some cities, the post office has removed letterboxes from the streets as part of the security clamp—down. away from the fray for now as he prepares to take officejoe biden has been to church and it has been revealed that within hours of moving into the white house he will sign an executive orders to reverse some of donald trump's key policies including rejoining the paris climate accord and scrapping a travel ban on several predominantly muslim countries. but this is a nation on edge holding its breath for
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the days ahead. the headlines on bbc news... a warning of mounting pressure on hospitals and staff by the head of nhs england. mass vaccinations begin at another ten centres in england from tomorrow — as the foreign secretary pledges every adult in the uk will be offered a first dose by september. in the past few minutes, as were just heard, russian police have detained the anti—kremlin activist alexei navalny, who has flown back to moscow for the first time since he was nearly killed by a nerve agent attack last year. the music producer phil spector has died, while serving a prison sentence for murder. in 2009 he was found guilty of killing the actress lana clarkson six years earlier, at his house in california. during his career spector was credited with transforming pop with his "wall of sound" recordings,
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working with acts such as the righteous brothers, and ike and tina turner and john lennon. this report from our arts correspondent david silitto. # do you know what you did today? the final public chapter of phil spector�*s life was a court case, a conviction for murder. he appeared eccentric, troubled, lonely, a man mired in his own darkness. but what he leaves behind, are some of the mostjoyous masterpieces in the history of pop. # looked so quiet but my o my... # you've lost that lovin' feelin' # whoa, that loving feeling # is to love, love him this was his first hit, here he is on the right aged 18 but there was a darkness always. this love song wasn't about a girl. it was about his dead father. it was not a happy childhood. it wasn't, i mean when your father
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blows his head open, you know it is not funny, and it leaves a scar on you. # so won't you say you love he... his signature with was the wall of sound. it turned pop into a torrent of emotion. # imagine all possessions... leonard coen, tina turner, john lennon he produced them all. there are also many stories of his erratic behaviour. he was abusive and controlling.— erratic behaviour. he was abusive and controlling. excuse me, camera. he had a habit _ and controlling. excuse me, camera. he had a habit of _ and controlling. excuse me, camera. he had a habit of threatening - and controlling. excuse me, camera. he had a habit of threatening people | he had a habit of threatening people with guns. share he had a habit of threatening people with nuns. �* ,, ., ., , with guns. are you not lonely in this big house? _ with guns. are you not lonely in this big house? must _ with guns. are you not lonely in this big house? must be - with guns. are you not lonely in this big house? must be very i with guns. are you not lonely in - this big house? must be very lonely. then in 2003, he invited an actress lana clarkson back home. a few hours later she was found, shot dead.
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phil spector said he wanted to turn pop into art. full spectre was convicted of second—degree murder. his death from covid—19 complications came seven years into his conviction. by the end, he has this to say. "trust me, you wouldn't want my life. i've not been at peace. i have not been happy. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson explained more about the characteristic style of music spector produced. he wanted to take pop music and as he said turn into symphonies. you wanted to make it more bombastic thanit wanted to make it more bombastic than it used to be, used over layers, layers of guitars, three or four pianos, multiple drum kits, so much percussion, you can hear castanets, snare drums, timpanis creating this enormous sound. he was
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simply one of the greatest music producers of all time. he was also a murderer, a man who shot dead an actress in his la mansion in 2003 and you always have to save you two things. a genius at producing brilliant pop music but a criminal and a man who was serving 19 years in prison for the murder of a woman. associated with so many bands that my generation remember, and the 70s and 80s as well so did he have that musical training? was he an orchestrator as well? did he perform the role of george martin with the beatles, bringing strings in, trumpets in on hits? he beatles, bringing strings in, trumpets in on hits? he started off bein: a trumpets in on hits? he started off being a pop — trumpets in on hits? he started off being a pop star— trumpets in on hits? he started off being a pop star himself _ trumpets in on hits? he started off being a pop star himself when - trumpets in on hits? he started off being a pop star himself when he l trumpets in on hits? he started off i being a pop star himself when he was 18, a song he wrote for the teddy bears and he was in that group, he fell out with a record company, decided he'd go off to new york and actually quit the business to become actually quit the business to become a french translator for the actually quit the business to become a french translatorfor the un. you never made it as that so he came back into the music business and
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started off as a songwriter, teaming up started off as a songwriter, teaming up with others to write to spanish harlem for benny king. he then started to produce the songs, the crystals, songs with dark meanings, but huge hits in the us and he was a millionaire by the age of 21. you spoke about him, if a conductor conduct an orchestra, he was the man who conducted in the recording studio, bringing in people like glenn campbell to play guitar, all time greats were behind the scenes for him working away creating this huge sound. the ronnettes, one of the most influential drum intro is of all time. he actually married the lead singer of the ronnettes. ronnie. 0verthe lead singer of the ronnettes. ronnie. over the years terrible stories have emerged of abuse in that relationship, how he was said to have kept a gold coffin in his basement with a glass case that he
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said to her he would display her in if she ever left him. in her biography she talks about how phil spector made her drive around with an inflatable phil spector indycar if he wasn't there. that is how possessive this man was. and what broke him or caused him to crack was in 1966 when he produced what is masterpiece, river deep mountain high, and although it was a hit in the uk, it flopped in the us causing him to withdraw to his mansion which is when the stories of his erratic behaviour continued to emerge but so many greats have grown up loving his music and they wanted to work with him. the beatles brought him into try to salvage their final album, let it be. john lennon worked him on an album. imagine as one of the greatest singles of all time produced by phil spector. he worked with leonard cohen, he wrote a whole
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album in three weeks. tellingly when he worked with leonard cohen one of the many artists that he pulled a gun on. he held a gun to leonard cohen's megan said i love you, leonard. leonard turned around and said, i hope you do, phil. there are always stories of him firing a gun. when the court case came out in 20005, when the court case came out in 2000s, with lana like some's murder, debbie harry from blondie felt it necessary to come forward to tell the story of how phil spector when he was trying to make a comeback in the late 80s invited the lead singer of blondie to his mansion and she said he pulled a gun on her. he is one of these people who produced absolutely unbelievably brilliant art, and it was art, his music, but he was a murderer and a man who terrorised women with guns. icollin terrorised women with guns. colin paterson on _ terrorised women with guns. colin paterson on phil _ terrorised women with guns. colin paterson on phil spector has died at the age of 81. the government is planning new laws to give protection
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to historic statues in england. the communities secretary, robertjenrick, says monuments which have stood for generations shouldn't be — in his words — "removed on a whim or at the behest of a baying mob". the legislation would require planning permission for any changes and a government minister would be able to veto the move. from bristoljon kay reports.. it was one of the key moments of 2020. in bristol, the toppling of edward colston's statue last summer. a 17th—century slave trader thrown into the city's harbour. as the figure was recovered and restored, a debate ensued across the uk about how we memorialise controversial figures from our past. and now the government's planning new laws to protect statues in england, with planning permission and public consultation required before they can be removed by local people or councils. writing in today's sunday telegraph, the communities secretary,
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robertjenrick, says... critics question whether changing the law like this would really make a difference, and whether it would stop impulsive moments of protest. in the last few months, the future of statues across the country has been challenged, from cecil rhodes in oxford, sir francis drake in plymouth, sir winston churchill in parliament square. the government's plans will be outlined inside parliament tomorrow. jon kay, bbc news. winter in rome means starling season, when up to four million birds gather in the italian capital on their migration from europe to africa. their murmerations in the skies are beautiful —
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but their droppings create a hazard, and the city authorities are trying new methods to move them on. here's our rome correspondent, mark lowen. in the roman twilight, nature's great dancers flock to the stage. the acrobatic twirls like wisps of smoke. a synchronised spectacle of breathtaking beauty. the starlings migrate in winter south to africa. nesting at night in central rome for warmth, flying in formation to avoid predators. a murmuration, it's called, and this city of art marvels at the show.
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but beneath their charm, rome is rotting, and it's a hell of a mess. in the cold light of day, the other side of these gorgeous birds is clear, and for those unlucky enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, it's not exactly sightly, it can be a safety hazard, and i can tell you that even with the mask, the stench is rancid. "i slipped on the droppings when it was muddy", this man says. "the world has invented everything, just not bird underpants." beside the ancient forum, a new attempt to try and solve the problem. city officials shining lasers onto trees, which the birds dislike, prompting them to move on. the project is focused on rome's tourist heart in a bid to clean up its image. translation: this doesn't cause the birds any stress. _
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it is more like a nuisance for them. i do this work, but i'm actually a nature lover. we are not stopping them from sleeping. we are just telling them to find another location. and it works. this tree used to be completely full and now there are about 10% of what there were. even the starling fans seem supportive. i personally love to see them, like it's amazing, but as long as it is not hurting the birds, i think it's a good system. while the lasers are harmless, fireworks are not. this last new year's eve here, starlings were caught and killed by the firecrackers, pictures going viral. not managing the issue can end in tragedy. in ancient rome, the starlings were seen to auger the gods wishes. centuries on, these dazzling creatures keep visiting. how man and nature can coexist is the eternal problem of the eternal city. mark lowen, bbc news, rome.
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not sure if it is good starling weather over here. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello. we have severe waether the way for the week ahead, today's been fairly quiet. this evening we have thicker cloud bringing wet weather for a while across scotland and northern ireland before it turns showery again. some of that cloud will push into england and wales, a bit of a breeze overnight. shouldn't get too cold, many places temperatures will be just above freezing, there is the risk of a few icy patches here and there. tomorrow we are left with this line of rain in southern scotland. to the north there will be sunshine, showers, wintry over the hills, bright enough start elsewhere, with the odd light shower but it will cloud over from the south—west, getting rain into the south—west, pushing into wales, west country in the afternoon. in the south—west it will turn misty later, temperatures may be making double figure, elsewhere a chillier five to seven.

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