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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. washington dc in lockdown: the fbi warns police across the us that the threat of violence remains high ahead ofjoe biden�*s inauguration on wednesday. mass vaccinations begin at another ten centres in england from tomorrow — as the foreign secretary lays out the government's targets for the roll—out. russian police detain the kremlin critic alexei navalny, who was nearly killed by nerve agent poisoning last year, as he lands back in moscow. they sing. and the american music producer, phil spector, who helped define the sound of the 60s — has died in prison — aged 81, while serving a sentence for murder.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. all 50 united states are on alert for possible violent protests this weekend, ahead of president—electjoe biden�*s inauguration on wednesday. members of the national guard are patrolling the streets around the capitol in washington, following the storming of the building by supporters of president trump. michigan, virginia, wisconsin and pennsylvania are among more than a dozen other states that have activated their national guards to strengthen security. i'm joined now by our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal. welcome correspondent, nomia iqbal. to you. tell us whatt atmosphere welcome to you. tell us what the atmosphere is like they are in the capital today? it atmosphere is like they are in the capital today?— atmosphere is like they are in the capital today? it feels really safe, ironicall . capital today? it feels really safe,
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ironically. and _ capital today? it feels really safe, ironically. and of _ capital today? it feels really safe, ironically. and of course, - capital today? it feels really safe, ironically. and of course, it - capital today? it feels really safe, | ironically. and of course, it should be, because of a number of armed troops on the ground. you know, the city is use to security in the run—up to a presidential inauguration, but it is on an unprecedented level. so evenjust inauguration, but it is on an unprecedented level. so even just my walk to work today, you see troops with guns, you see outside supermarkets, and it's quite something to see, that, on the streets of america. but of course, the city is taking nothing for chance after those deadly riots on congress last week. they are up to 200,000 national troops being flown in to protect the city. there is a kind of ring of steel around capitol hill, which many residency or have nicknamed the green zone. that was the name given to the fortified area in baghdad during the us—led invasion in iraq. so, the fbi has alerted to states across america about any potential protests. there is an expectation that it might happen here, and in state capitals
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across the country, which is why people are taking a lot of caution ahead ofjoe biden�*s inauguration on wednesday. that ahead ofjoe biden's inauguration on wednesda . . ., ., ., ., ahead ofjoe biden's inauguration on wednesda. . ., ., ., ., wednesday. that inauguration from as ou sa , wednesday. that inauguration from as you say. just — wednesday. that inauguration from as you say. just three _ wednesday. that inauguration from as you say, just three days _ wednesday. that inauguration from as you say, just three days away - wednesday. that inauguration from as you say, just three days away now. - you say, just three days away now. we are getting much more detail about what lays ahead for president—elect biden�*s plans in the coming days. president-elect biden's plans in the coming dam-— president-elect biden's plans in the coming days. that's right. and he is ”lannin coming days. that's right. and he is planning to — coming days. that's right. and he is planning to do _ coming days. that's right. and he is planning to do what _ coming days. that's right. and he is planning to do what he _ coming days. that's right. and he is planning to do what he can - coming days. that's right. and he is planning to do what he can to - coming days. that's right. and he is planning to do what he can to try i planning to do what he can to try and remove donald from's mark on america with a slew of executive orders, withjust america with a slew of executive orders, with just a signature, america with a slew of executive orders, withjust a signature, he's planning to reverse many of his controversial policies, an example is climate change, he is planning to return america to the paris agreement which is about lowering global gas emissions, we are also expecting him to have a plan for the illegal immigrants that live in america as well. he is planning to tackle covid—i9 as well. but it's worth bearing in mind that it would have to get the support of congress, which is likely to happen now because the democrats to control it
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after the georgia runoffs. but there could be a delay, because congress is also slated to basically hear donald trump's impeachment trial, the second trial that he will be facing hours into whenjoe biden takes office. facing hours into when joe biden takes office-— facing hours into when joe biden takes office. ~ ., , ., ., takes office. 0k, in washington for now, takes office. 0k, in washington for now. thank — takes office. 0k, in washington for now. thank you- — as countries around the world step up their coronavirus vaccination programmes — here in the uk ten new mass vaccination centres across england are set to open on monday — to help meet the government's target of offering vaccines to the most vulnerable groups by the middle of february. so how does the uk's progress compare the rest of the world? israel appears to be leading the way with 25 doses administered per 100 people. although it has faced criticism that it has not supported innoculation within palestinian territories. the united arab emirates is second on the list having administered over 18 doses per 100 people. the uk is next with nearly six doses per 100 people. the us has administered 3.7 doses per 100 people —
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us president—electjoe biden has just announced plans to boost that figure when he enters office on wednesday. italy, which is the first country in the eu to vaccinate a million people, has administered 1.76 doses per 100 people. and, the numberfor china is 0.69. because of the size of their populations, the us and china have given the most doses overall. for the latest on those uk plans to step up vaccinations, here'sjim reed the pressure on hospitals this winter shows no sign of easing up. the person in charge of the nhs in england said the service is now in the most precarious position in its 72—year history. since christmas day, we've seen another 15,000 increase in the in—patients in hospitals across england. that's the equivalent of filling 30 hospitals full of coronavirus patients. and staggeringly, every 30 seconds across england, another patient is being admitted
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to hospital with coronavirus. new figures show more than 100,000 nhs staff are currently off work in england. around half of those either have the virus or are self—isolating, adding to the pressure on busy wards. tomorrow, this vaccination centre at blackburn cathedral will open, offering thousands ofjabs a day to nhs staff, as well as care workers and those over 80 — all by invitation only at this stage. we felt it would be really appropriate to offer this space up as a place where people could come and feel safe and secure. a place that they know. nhs england said the new centres would offer thousands of jabs per week. blackburn is one of ten, stretching from york in the north to bournemouth in the south. theyjoin the existing seven sites already fully operational, from newcastle down to bristol in the south—west. in scotland more than 5,000 nhs
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staff were vaccinated here at a temporary hospital in glasgow over the weekend. larger centres are also open in wales and northern ireland. it's part of a uk—wide drive to vaccinate the 15 million people most at risk from covid by the middle of next month. the government pledged today that all adults would be offered the jab by september. there are some early signs that lockdown measures might be working, and infections are starting to fall back in some places. it is more positive news, but will take time to be reflected in hospital admissions, meaning the pressure on nhs services is likely to continue for weeks to come. jim reed, bbc news. the leading critic of the russian government, alexei navalny has been detained after landing back in moscow. he made a brief statement to reporters saying he was not afraid, and then kissed his wife before being led away by uniformed officials at moscow's sheremetyevo airport.
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the prison authorities said he'd broken parole conditions. from moscow 0leg boldyrev gave us this update. he spent about a0 minutes on russian soil, which is taking in from the plane to the terminal, then at the russian border, he was separated from his lawyer and his wife, and no arguments that his lawyer should be with him when the charges of violating parole of being present has not been taken into consideration, so he walked with police officers, his wife and the spokeswoman, they went back with the journalists who are hugely interested in those who manage to make it from the other moscow airport where the plane was initially going. in a few minutes later, the federal or prison service issued a statement saying that mr nepal any�*s detained pending trial on violating and the violation seems
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to be that he was not present for regular checks because he was recuperating from that attack. i'm joined now byjames nixey, director of the russia, eurasia and europe programmes at the chatham house think tank. welcome to you. thank you very much for being with us. why do you think alexei navalny went back was yellow well, to take a cynical view, i think he went back because he think that's the right thing to do, and he is the most effective opposition politician in russia, but also, i suppose, because in germany, or anywhere else in the world other than russia, he is pretty impotent, he can only make a difference in russia. you can form a government in exile from a russian federation like you can in some countries. so effectively, this was his only real option. he is purposely, i suppose, making a murder of himself right now. alive or dead.— now. alive or dead. what do you think will happen _ now. alive or dead. what do you think will happen to _ now. alive or dead. what do you think will happen to him - now. alive or dead. what do you think will happen to him now - now. alive or dead. what do you i think will happen to him now than?
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well, i don't obviously no. i don't have a crystal ball. i do suspect that he will be locked up. i do suspect he will be in jail. i expect that will be the easiest way over the kremlin. either way, this poses a different problem, because as i say, they failed to kill him the first time, last august, then another attempt would look incompetent and would look even worse if that makes any sense whatsoever. and having him loose on the streets where he can further embarrass the government as he does through his youtube videos, 20 million viewers, where he exposed the fsp�*s attempt on his life, but i suppose prison is the lesser of evils as far as the kremlin is concerned. evils as far as the kremlin is concerned-— evils as far as the kremlin is concerned. ~ , , ., concerned. we saw his plane diverted from one airport _ concerned. we saw his plane diverted from one airport to _ concerned. we saw his plane diverted from one airport to another— concerned. we saw his plane diverted from one airport to another to - concerned. we saw his plane diverted from one airport to another to avoid l from one airport to another to avoid the crowds that had gathered, it suspected, to greet his arrival, and also the crowds ofjournalists there. how much of assigned you to give up the kremlin are worried by his return?— his return? they are clearly worried- — his return? they are clearly worried. not _ his return? they are clearly worried. not because... -
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his return? they are clearly| worried. not because... not his return? they are clearly - worried. not because... not because they don't talk about them, because they don't talk about them, because they don't talk about them, because they do talk about them, mr putin refers to them, albeit not by name, but often, but they are worried because of their history, russia, revolution protest is in the dna, and in november of 1991, so they do suspect that there could be some form of trigger comes almost the next some sort of snowball. there are elections this year, then alexei navalny could act as some form of catalyst to eventually take control, because they see this elsewhere in the former soviet union. and because they see this elsewhere in the former soviet union.— the former soviet union. and how much support _ the former soviet union. and how much support does _ the former soviet union. and how much support does he _ the former soviet union. and how much support does he have - the former soviet union. and howj much support does he have within the former soviet union. and how- much support does he have within the country, do you think? how well—known is the? as you said, but rebooting does refer to them, albeit not always by name. == __ rebooting does refer to them, albeit not always by name. == —— put in. not always by name. -- -- put in. yellow not always by name. » —— put in. yellow nike doesn't have the supports by any stretch of the imagination supports by any stretch of the imaginatio—
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supports by any stretch of the imauinatio i'd ., , , . imagination 1096 of support,, which of course has _ imagination 1096 of support,, which of course has gone _ imagination 1096 of support,, which of course has gone down _ imagination 1096 of support,, which of course has gone down in - imagination 1096 of support,, which of course has gone down in recent. of course has gone down in recent months and years in fact. so he's not widely known, this particular event this evening has not been widely covered, as you might guess from russian stage tv. as —— having said that, the youtube videos are incredibly important, because many people look at those, they are very embarrassing, as many people look at them, as they do and russian state tv, channel one, so again, the kremlin takes him serious commonly —— even if they dismiss him outwardly. commonly -- even if they dismiss him outwardl . , ., outwardly. interesting to get your thou~hts. outwardly. interesting to get your thoughts. thank _ outwardly. interesting to get your thoughts. thank you _ outwardly. interesting to get your thoughts. thank you for - outwardly. interesting to get your thoughts. thank you for being - outwardly. interesting to get yourl thoughts. thank you for being with us. thank you. let's get some of the day's other news. the brazilian health regulator has approved two coronavirus vaccines for emergency use. it's authorized astrazeneca and oxford university's covishield shot as well as china's coronavac. the country will now gear up for a mass innoculation campaign amid a devastating second wave. the virus has killed more than 200,000 people in brazil. in a fresh blow to the afghan government and its attempt to maintain security, two femalejudges have
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been shot dead in kabul. both justices served on afghanistan's supreme court. the latest attack comes just days after the pentagon announced it had cut american troop levels in afghanistan. at least 73 people are now believed to have died in the earthquake on indonesia's sulawesi island. monsoon rains are hampering the effort to find anyone left alive. thousands of people have been left homeless by the quake which has reduced buildings to rubble. the music producer phil spector has died, while serving a prison sentence for murder. in 2009 he was found guilty of killing the actress lana clarkson six years earlier, at his house in california. during his career spector was credited with transforming pop with his "wall of sound" recordings, working with acts such as the righteous brothers, and ike and tina turner and john lennon. this report from our arts correspondent david silitto. # do you know what you did today...# the final public chapter of phil spector�*s life was a court case,
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a conviction for murder. he appeared eccentric, troubled, lonely, a man mired in his own darkness. but what he leaves behind are some of the mostjoyous masterpieces in the history of pop. # i knew what he was doing when he caught my eye # da doo ron—ron—ron, da doo ron—ron...# # you've lost that lovin' feelin'...# # is to love, love, love him #and i do...# and this was his first hit. here he is on the right, aged 18, but there was always a darkness. this love song wasn't about a girl. it was about his dead father. it was not a happy childhood. it wasn't. i mean, when yourfather blows his head open, you know, it's not funny, and it leaves a scar on you. # so won't you say you love me... his signature was the wall of sound. it turned pop into a sonic torrent of heightened emotion. # every place we go...# # imagine no possessions...#
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john lennon, leonard cohen, tina turner — he produced them all. there were also many stories of his erratic behaviour. he was abusive and controlling. excuse me, camera. he had a habit of threatening people with guns. aren't you lonely in this big house? must be very lonely. and then, in 2003, he invited lana clarkson, an actress he had met at a club, to his home. a few hours later she was found — she'd been shot dead. phil spector was convicted of second—degree murder. his death from covid—related complications comes 11 years into his 19 year sentence. phil spector said he wanted to turn pop into art. by the end, he had this to say. "trust me, you wouldn't want my life.
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"i've not been at peace." the headlines on bbc news... washington dc in lockdown: the fbi warns police across the us that the threat of violence remains high ahead ofjoe biden's inauguration on wednesday. mass vaccinations begin at another ten centres in england from tomorrow — as the foreign secretary lays out the government's targets for the roll—out. the russian opposition activist alexei navalny has been detained soon after he landed in moscow. he'd just returned after months spent abroad recovering from a nerve agent attack. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre here's gavin. hello. we will start with the premier league where leaders manchester united through 0-0 leaders manchester united through 0—0 against champions liverpool at anfield. after all the build—up and hype ahead of the match, the expected fireworks failed to
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materialize, although, the goalkeeper did have to make two smart saves from bruno fernandez in the second half. united are now two points clear at the top. it's only a good result. if we win the next game, because we feel it's an opportunity missed with the chances we pad, but then again, we are playing against a very good side. so, disappointed... but, still, appoint is ok if you win the next one. ., a, . , still, appoint is ok if you win the nextone. ., . , . ,~ , next one. for manchester city are up to second now. _ next one. for manchester city are up to second now, level _ next one. for manchester city are up to second now, level on _ next one. for manchester city are up to second now, level on points - next one. for manchester city are up to second now, level on points with l to second now, level on points with leicester after an emphatic a—0 when to crystal palace. and it is really tight at the top. for plane separating the leaders from tottenham who are fifth, spurs 13—1 a bottom club sheffield united. there are now 72 tennis players confined to the hotel room ahead of
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next month's australian open following a positive coronavirus test result on the third charter flight. some players expressed frustration at the confinements, but there are also thousands of australians annoyed that they have not been able to return home because of travel restrictions. adam wilde reports. tennis training in hotel quarantine, this is how many of the world's greatest players are having to prepare for the first grand slam of the year. everyone arriving into australia has to isolate in hotels for 1a days. that includes all 1200 players and coaches. they were, though, given special dispensation to leave for five hours training a day. but after three flights arrived with someone who tested positive, all 72 players aboard are now forbidden to leave their rooms at all. this happens going ahead, and we will continue to do the best we can possibly do to ensure those players have what is not a great situation, one that is somewhat acceptable.
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this is britton's heather watson running five km in the bedroom she's now stuck and for the next fortnight. after someone tested positive on her flight from abu dhabi. 0thers took to social media to complain, tweeting that had she been told the rules, she would've thought twice about coming. so the fact that these players are here at all has been questioned by the many thousands of australian citizens stranded around the world. unable to return home due to the strict restrictions. the mac i think many are very happy that tennis is going ahead in australia, but the fact that ahead in australia, but the fact than , ahead in australia, but the fact tha | , ., , ahead in australia, but the fact tha i , ., , ., ., ., that they are being let in ahead of australians _ that they are being let in ahead of australians who _ that they are being let in ahead of australians who have _ that they are being let in ahead of australians who have been - that they are being let in ahead of australians who have been trying | australians who have been trying desperately to come home, you know, 8000 _ desperately to come home, you know, 8000 are _ desperately to come home, you know, 8000 are considered on the vulnerable list, and yet, we are welcoming thousands of foreign tennis— welcoming thousands of foreign tennis players in. despite the controversy, the tournament is still scheduled to begin on time. players just having to train as best they can. adam wilde, bbc news. those are some surreal scenes there. update on
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cricket now, england urges 36 runs away from victory in their first test against tree getting over the line hasn't been easy forjoe read's site after pulling sri lanka out in their second innings. the visitors needed just 7a runs for the win. they lost three wickets in a chaotic end in the fourth day. some dub by the runout of captain root forjust one. they will return on monday to try and see it through. john higgins is closing in on the third masters snicker title 15 years after last winning the trophy. he currently leads against china's in milton kings with ten needed for victory. a win for kings with ten needed for victory. a winfor higgins kings with ten needed for victory. a win for higgins would make in the oldest ever winner of the masters. that is all from us. you can of course get all the latest on the bbc sport website. we will see you soon. gavin, thanks very much. the team of ten nepali climbers who scaled the summit of k2 for the first time in winter — have made it safely back to base camp. team leader nirmal purja shared this
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picture a short while ago, saying they are back safe and sound. he also paid tribute to fellow climber — sergi mingote — who died during a separate expidition on k2. he said they feel grateful to be a part of history for humankind but equally very deeply saddened to hear they've lost a friend. the team will now take time to recover before sharing their story of reaching one of the world's most dangerous summits, in the harshest of conditions. in the meantime — we've spoken to alan arnette — staying with climbers, a professional paraplegic climber has become the first person in hong kong to climb more than 250 metres of a skyscraper while strapped to a wheelchair. lai chi—wai scaled the great height using a piece of rope and sheer grit and determination, as our reporter freya cole explains. from dizzying heights, lai chi—wai looks tiny, but in the grand scale of the situation, he has more strength than most. translation: i was quite scared climbing up a mountain, - i could hold onto rocks or little holes.
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but with glass, all i can really rely on is the rope that i'm hanging off. ten years ago, lai chi—wai was in a car accident which left him paralyzed from the waist down. it ended his highly successful professional career as a climber, as he knew it. but over time, he's overcome mental and physical barriers and now there is very little that will stop him. translation: i want to climb something higher| than lion rock mountain. i want the image of me climbing up in a wheelchair to become a reality, and it's always been a dream. lai chi—wai came so close to the top when he had to stop due to exhaustion. he raised almost 700,000 us dollars for spinal cord patients, a huge contribution with a strong message to live life with no limits. freya cole, bbc news.
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quite incredible. winter in rome means starling season, when millions of the birds gather in the italian capital on their migration from europe south to africa. theirformations in the skies are beautiful — but their droppings create a hazard and the city authorities are trying new methods to move them on. 0ur rome correspondent mark lowen reports. in the roman twilight, nature's great dancers flock to the stage. the acrobatic twirls like wisps of smoke. a synchronised spectacle of breathtaking beauty. the starlings migrate in winter south to africa. nesting at night in central rome for warmth, flying in formation to avoid predators.
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a murmuration, it's called, and this city of art marvels at the show. but beneath their charm, rome is rotting, and it's a hell of a mess. in the cold light of day, the other side of these gorgeous birds is clear, and for those unlucky enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, it's not exactly sightly, it can be a safety hazard, and i can tell you that even with the mask, the stench is rancid. "i slipped on the droppings when it was muddy", this man says. "the world has invented everything, just not bird underpants." beside the ancient forum, a new attempt to try and solve the problem. city officials shining lasers onto trees, which the birds dislike, prompting them to move on.
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the project is focused on rome's tourist heart in a bid to clean up its image. translation: this doesn't cause the birds any stress. _ it is more like a nuisance for them. i do this work, but i'm actually a nature lover. we are not stopping them from sleeping. we are just telling them to find another location. and it works. this tree used to be completely full and now there are about 10% of what there were. even the starling fans seem supportive. i personally love to see them, like it's amazing, but as long as it is not hurting the birds, i think it's a good system. while the lasers are harmless, fireworks are not. this last new year's eve here, starlings were caught and killed by the firecrackers, pictures going viral. not managing the issue can end in tragedy. in ancient rome, the starlings were seen to auger the gods wishes.
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centuries on, these dazzling creatures keep visiting. how man and nature can coexist is the eternal problem of the eternal city. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. beautiful weather in rome. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good evening. after the snow that some of saw last week, this coming week is going to be dominated not by wintry weather but by wet weather. in fact, for some parts of the uk, a lot of heavy and persistent rain, which will bring the risk of flooding. through this evening and tonight, many spots will be dry, particularly down towards the southeast. a few showers for wales, northwest england and certainly some showery rain at times for northern ireland and scotland. a bit of snow mixing in over high ground across the northern half of scotland. temperatures getting quite close to freezing, most spots will hold just above. then, as we go through tomorrow,
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we will have this band of rain affecting parts of southern scotland, that will drift northwards back into the central belt. showers for northern scotland, some of which will be wintry, not a bad day for northern ireland, and eastern parts of england will hold onto some brightness, but for wales, the western half of england, it will turn increasingly cloudy, misty and murky with some outbreaks of rain at times. it's going to be turning milder down towards the southwest as well. now, as we move out of monday into tuesday, this is where things turn very wet indeed. this procession of weather fronts pushing in from the atlantic will bring relentless rain for some. that rain pushing across much of england and wales into northern ireland for a time, but it looks wettest of all across parts of northern england and over the hills of wales as well. a blustery day down towards the south, could easily see gusts of wind in excess of a0 mph for some. lighter winds further north, it will be chilly here, cold enough for some snow on the northern edge of our rain band, but further south, very, very mild indeed. but i think the rain will be of most concern. there are already met office
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warnings in force for much of england and wales, and this amber warning — which covers parts of the southern pennines and the peak district — this is an area where we are expecting some quite significant disruption. there could well be some flooding, and you can see the rain continues through tuesday night and into wednesday. so very much worth staying in touch with the weather situation. for northern ireland and scotland on wednesday, we will see some brighter weather, some spells of sunshine, but here, it will be a rather chilly day. and that chilly weather is set to win out for all of us by the end of the week, as our area of low pressure bringing the rain pulls away eastwards, it will deepen. the winds will strengthen, and those winds will start to come down from the north. so the end of the week will be colder, and there could be snow for some.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: a warning of mounting pressure on hospitals and staff by the head of nhs england. mass vaccinations begin at another ten centres in england from tomorrow, as the foreign secretary pledges every adult in the uk will be offered a first dose by september. the anti—kremlin activist alexei navalny is detained in moscow, embracing his wife before he was taken away. mr navalny flew back to russia for the first time since he was nearly killed by a nerve agent attack last year. the jailed american music producer, phil spector, who helped define the sound of the �*60s and the creator of the wall of sound has died in prison, aged 81. now on bbc news, for the first time, a mass movement is openly calling for reform of the monarchy in thailand, shattering a taboo surrounding the royal institution's near—sacred status. a warning — this programme
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contains images some viewers may find upsetting.

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