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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 7, 2021 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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overstated. hope bolger, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. we have a cold week ahead, particularly biting today, thanks to easterly winds, and we will also have those tomorrow. the fretful sum today of heavy, disruptive snowfall, and the met office have marked out and the met office have marked out an area across parts of east anglia and the south—east that could be at risk of up to 20 centimetres of snow falling. this is the tail end of storm darcy, bringing with it strong winds, so blizzard and drifting, and additional hazard. to the north, with a keen easterly, quite a few showers across northern england and into scotland as well. some areas will avoid them and see some decent sunshine, but even in the sunshine it will feel particularly raw. these are the temperatures you would read on the thermometer, but we have to
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factor in the chilling effect that easterly wind and actually step outside and for many it will feel closer to somewhere between —3 and minus five degrees. the easterly wind particularly strong as we head into monday as well, that shower streaming further westwards. this is bbc news, the headlines: the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine offers limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant of covid—19, according to early trials doctors in england are to be paid an additional £10
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for each house—bound patient they vaccinate against coronavirus. and covid testing is being offered to more companies in england, for staff who can't work from home during lockdown. tens of thousands of protestors gather for a second day in myanmar�*s main city to condemn the military coup and demand the release of leader aung sann suu kyi. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's for the first time in 38 years, scotland have beaten england at twickenham in the opening match of the 2021 six nations. the scots lifted the calcutta cup after an 11—6 victory. austin halewood reports. the calcutta cup back in scottish hands and the six nations back with a bang. there is never quite glean a calcutta cup like theirs. none of the fans are none of the atmosphere but the rivalry never in doubt. it was scotland who burst the game into life. winger duhan van der merwe inches away from an opening try but
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moments later he was in again and this time he made sure. on the stroke of half—time that progress was halted. and scotland never looked back from there, playmaker finn russell in the senate them —— in the sin bin. he kicked two penalties to keep his side ahead and seal a famous 11 points to 6 win for the scots. england were outplayed on their own patch. we england were outplayed on their own atch. ~ ., ., ., ., patch. we wanted to write our own bit of history _ patch. we wanted to write our own bit of history and _ patch. we wanted to write our own bit of history and today _ patch. we wanted to write our own bit of history and today we - patch. we wanted to write our own bit of history and today we have i bit of history and today we have done that. happy changing room. an done that. happy changing room. an historic win for scotland, their first at twickenham for 38 years. wales take on ireland in cardiff this afternoon. the welsh will have fit again
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captain alun wynjones but they won't have any fans to roar the team on. wales coach wayne pivac says his side will be ready, despite the game being behind closed doors. we learned a lot from playing with no crowds in the autumn and i think everybody did, some did it better than others and that something that we've learned from and we will look to within the camp generate some sort of spirit and the ability to go on as if there was a crowd there, to be honest. we're into the final session on day three of the first test between india and england in chennai, withjoe root�*s side on top. after being bowled out for 578, england's bowlers have stepped up withjofra archer taking two wickets before dom bess dismissed india's key man and captain, virat kohli forjust ii. ajinke rehanne was next to go, a fantastic catch from captain joe root off the bowling of bess again. such a great 100th test matchjoe root is having india are now 172—4.
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-- 181-4. football and manchester united missed the chance to go level on points with leaders manchester city after a dramatic 3—3 draw with everton at old trafford. united went 2—0 up in the first half, thanks to goals from edison cavani and then this stunner from bruno fernandes. everton drew level after the break, but united thought they had won it after they took the lead again thanks to scott mctominay. however, in the 95th minute, everton snatched a point thanks to dominic calvert lewin with the last kick of the game. so a disappointing end to ole gunnar solskjaer�*s 100th match in charge at the club. celtic won back—to—back games in the scottish premiership for the first time since december as they beat motherwell 2-1. odsonne edouard scored their second goal. celtic are 20 points behind leaders rangers with a game in hand. rangers are at hamilton
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in a midday kick off later. andy murray has blamed lax coronavirus protocols at the lawn tennis association's national training centre for the positive test that has forced him to miss the australian open. the former world number one had to isolate after testing positive last month and was unable to find a solution which would allow him to travel and quarantine in melbourne. the lta said "stringent and appropriate restrictions" had been applied. meanwhile, current british number one dan evans has warmed up ahead of the australian open in perfect style by winning his first atp title in melbourne. he beat canada's felix auger aliassime in straight sets. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news it's time for the papers.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us today. with me are the journalist and author shyama perera and the sun on sunday's political editor david wooding. let's take a look at the front pages. the observer reports that the volume of exports going through british ports to the eu fell by a staggering 68% last month compared with january last year, mostly as a result of problems caused by brexit. the telegraph says millions of people under 50 years old will be vaccinated at work under proposals being considered by ministers to accelerate the national roll—out from the spring. the express quotes the prime minister as, "borisjohnson vows not "to let the pandemic ruin the dreams of britain's young." he says, "there are no limits to what they can achieve."
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the sunday times says amazon and other companies who have profited during the coronavirus crisis are facing a double tax raid under plans being drawn up by the government to plug the black hole in britain's finances. the sunday mirror says 750,000 over—75s have not paid their tv licence fee, leaving a £117 million funding hole for the bbc. and the mail on sunday reports that labour leader sir keir starmer is facing a backlash after one of his most senior frontbenchers described the covid pandemic as a "gift that keeps on giving" for lawyers during a briefing at a top city firm. so let's begin. shyama, vaccines that work for under 50 is from the spring, it's all part of this drive to notjust keep up the momentum but accelerate vaccine it is very exciting, this is called
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jabs at work so it is like music while you work but they will arrive at syringes and i'm imagining the way this will operate as they will set up vans near large offices a bit like near the london borough of brent, if you want a mammogram you go to the tesco car park at brent park and there is a big white van and you register and have your mammogram done their and i and you register and have your mammogram done theirand i imagine you will see a lot of big white vans being set up across the country where workers and nearby offices can book sessions and getjabs and i think it sounds great and will be even greater if it happens. it is a far cry from _ even greater if it happens. it is a far cry from the _ even greater if it happens. it is a far cry from the early _ even greater if it happens. it is a far cry from the early days, - even greater if it happens. it is a| far cry from the early days, david when we first heard about the pfizer vaccine and it had to be stored at -70. it vaccine and it had to be stored at -70. , ., , , , vaccine and it had to be stored at -70. , i, ., -70. it is undoubtedly been a success of— -70. it is undoubtedly been a success of the _ -70. it is undoubtedly been a success of the government. | -70. it is undoubtedly been a -
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success of the government. they have had a _ success of the government. they have had a lot _ success of the government. they have had a lot of— success of the government. they have had a lot of stick over the delays in imposing lockdown is on slow reactions— in imposing lockdown is on slow reactions but really when it comes to vaccines — reactions but really when it comes to vaccines the government, the nhs and public_ to vaccines the government, the nhs and public health england have worked — and public health england have worked together as a team and done a -reat worked together as a team and done a greaiiob_ worked together as a team and done a greatjob and the worked together as a team and done a great job and the fact that we are now looking to go into the under 505 is an incredible landmark because when _ is an incredible landmark because when all— is an incredible landmark because when all the over 505 are vaccinated that means — when all the over 505 are vaccinated that means 90% of vulnerable people will he _ that means 90% of vulnerable people will be protected which is quite an achievement and it does give you that glimmer of hope that life will soon he _ that glimmer of hope that life will soon be returning back to normal are closer— soon be returning back to normal are closer to _ soon be returning back to normal are closer to normal.— soon be returning back to normal are closer to normal. shyama more good news on the — closer to normal. shyama more good news on the sunday _ closer to normal. shyama more good news on the sunday times. - closer to normal. shyama more good news on the sunday times. they - closer to normal. shyama more good news on the sunday times. they say | news on the sunday times. they say it is official, delaying a second dose saves lives. this has been quite controversial, delaying for 12 weeks on the basis of you can vaccinate more people if you delay the second dose but now it looks like it might be more effective if
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you delay it anyway. if like it might be more effective if you delay it anyway.— like it might be more effective if you delay it anyway. if you read the story closely. _ you delay it anyway. if you read the story closely. all— you delay it anyway. if you read the story closely, all of— you delay it anyway. if you read the story closely, all of this _ you delay it anyway. if you read the story closely, all of this is - you delay it anyway. if you read the story closely, all of this is good - story closely, all of this is good news irrespective of what one feels about those seniors who were let down and told their second vaccine would not happen within forward spite within 12 weeks. it is more good news but is actually about the astrazeneca vaccine are not about the pfizer vaccine. the astrazeneca is stronger when given a 12 weeks but with pfizer the jury is still out except with the british jury thatis out except with the british jury that is giving it ten points. the world health organization said six weeks is the longest should be and pfizer says three to four weeks and we're seeing i2 pfizer says three to four weeks and we're seeing 12 weeks. all are is saying is the scientist who is
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saying is the scientist who is saying this says that a delay second dose may provide better longer term protection. so i think it is still a wait and see on the pfizer but still the astrazeneca seems to be getting all the plaudits along the way. david, what you think about vaccine passports? quite a lot of younger people, people in their 20s who will probably be the very last to be vaccinated are saying why should they be discriminated against getting on a plane, they won't have a vaccine passport? i getting on a plane, they won't have a vaccine passport?— a vaccine passport? i think this will be a lot — a vaccine passport? i think this will be a lot simpler— a vaccine passport? i think this will be a lot simpler than - a vaccine passport? i think this will be a lot simpler than we i will be a lot simpler than we thought _ will be a lot simpler than we thought. i did a story a couple weeks — thought. i did a story a couple weeks ago about a company in manchester who are in talks with the department of health at the moment about a _ department of health at the moment about a vaccine pa55port on your phone _ about a vaccine pa55port on your phone it's — about a vaccine pa55port on your phone. it's a bit like one of those chords _ phone. it's a bit like one of those chords so—
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phone. it's a bit like one of those chord5. so when you go on holiday it would _ chord5. so when you go on holiday it would he _ chord5. so when you go on holiday it would be able to sure you have had a vaccine _ would be able to sure you have had a vaccine whether you have tested negative — vaccine whether you have tested negative and gives you a ticket for the football match your boarding pass for— the football match your boarding pass for the plane on your ticket for the _ pass for the plane on your ticket for the opera or whatever. and it can he _ for the opera or whatever. and it can be scanned at two metres to three _ can be scanned at two metres to three metres so it is another safe way of— three metres so it is another safe way of doing things. perhaps that will he _ way of doing things. perhaps that will be needed in the medium term, i would _ will be needed in the medium term, i would think — will be needed in the medium term, i would think. in this difficult stage we were — would think. in this difficult stage we were not quite sure whether it is safe to _ we were not quite sure whether it is safe to venture out that people will be asking _ safe to venture out that people will be asking have you been vaccinated? and so— be asking have you been vaccinated? and so perhaps that will be needed. ithink— and so perhaps that will be needed. i think in— and so perhaps that will be needed. i think in the long term once the government have got a grip on this virus _ government have got a grip on this virus most — government have got a grip on this virus most people will be vaccinated and will _ virus most people will be vaccinated and will he — virus most people will be vaccinated and will be a different game. did ou see and will be a different game. d c you see ticket for a football match? i've forgotten what that is. we can only dream. i've forgotten what that is. we can only dream-— i've forgotten what that is. we can only dream.- there - i've forgotten what that is. we can only dream.- there will. i've forgotten what that is. we can | only dream.- there will be only dream. one day. there will be event by registration. _
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only dream. one day. there will be event by registration. now- only dream. one day. there will be event by registration. now i - only dream. one day. there will be event by registration. now i can . event by registration. now i can prove it, here's my ticket.- prove it, here's my ticket. let's talk about _ prove it, here's my ticket. let's talk about the _ prove it, here's my ticket. let's talk about the sunday - prove it, here's my ticket. let's talk about the sunday telegraph main story about online companies, a lot of the making a lot of money, and assisting them or face a of the making a lot of money, and assisting them orface a big of the making a lot of money, and assisting them or face a big tax raid on their booming sales. do you see that happening? i raid on their booming sales. do you see that happening?— see that happening? i think it's onl fair. see that happening? i think it's only fair. the _ see that happening? i think it's only fair. the ones _ see that happening? i think it's only fair. the ones named - see that happening? i think it's only fair. the ones named ourl see that happening? i think it's - only fair. the ones named our amazon and just eat and deliveroo etc and all those five companies have been delivering to this house regularly during lockdown and this has been a period of reaping 44 anything and you ball —— of paying double for anything. if you run out of bread
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you can ring up and at a rate of an added two 50 it is at your door. those services have unquestionably done fantastically well out of the emergency. we have done fantastically out of their services. thank goodness for all of them but of course there should be a levy. i think the real question here is why was the never proper taxing enemy of giants like amazon? it's an old story in many ways and this is the proof of argument is made in the past four taxing of online giants. good to see you have jigsaw puzzles arriving in your household. there you are. arriving in your household. there ou are. , ., arriving in your household. there you are-_ maybel arriving in your household. there i you are._ maybe we you are. dozens of them. maybe we could aet you are. dozens of them. maybe we could get you _ you are. dozens of them. maybe we could get you to _ you are. dozens of them. maybe we could get you to do _ you are. dozens of them. maybe we could get you to do one _ you are. dozens of them. maybe we could get you to do one but - you are. dozens of them. maybe we could get you to do one but not - could get you to do one but not today. it could get you to do one but not toda . , ~ ., . ., today. it will be like watching one of those slow _ today. it will be like watching one of those slow train _ today. it will be like watching one of those slow train journeys. - today. it will be like watching one of those slow train journeys. are | of those slow train “ourneys. are aint of those slow train “ourneys. are paint dry. h
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of those slow train “ourneys. are paint dry. this— of those slow train journeys. are paint dry. this will be interesting, the idea of contactless payments rising from £a5 maximum to £100. there has been a great explosion in the use _ there has been a great explosion in the use of— there has been a great explosion in the use of contactless notes and people _ the use of contactless notes and people of— the use of contactless notes and people of trying to avoid contact during _ people of trying to avoid contact during the pandemic. i have certainly— during the pandemic. i have certainly paid for a very small items— certainly paid for a very small items on— certainly paid for a very small items on my credit card using contactless avoid using cash and as we move _ contactless avoid using cash and as we move to — contactless avoid using cash and as we move to a cashless society it is becoming — we move to a cashless society it is becoming more involved but this figure _ becoming more involved but this figure of— becoming more involved but this figure of £100 is quite controversial. some people feel is it open— controversial. some people feel is it open to — controversial. some people feel is it open to fraud? you don't have to have _ it open to fraud? you don't have to have contactless on your mobile phone _ have contactless on your mobile phone on— have contactless on your mobile phone on your credit card but the reason _ phone on your credit card but the reason it— phone on your credit card but the reason it can be lifted is another add-on— reason it can be lifted is another add-on of— reason it can be lifted is another add—on of brexit because the european union set the limit at £45 or 50 _ european union set the limit at £45 or 50 euros — european union set the limit at £45 or 50 euros in their case and now we are not— or 50 euros in their case and now we are not in— or 50 euros in their case and now we are not inthe— or 50 euros in their case and now we are not in the european union it looks— are not in the european union it looks like — are not in the european union it looks like the chancellor will give the go—ahead for it to be raised to
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£100 _ the go—ahead for it to be raised to £100 which— the go—ahead for it to be raised to £100 which will make shopping a bit easier— £100 which will make shopping a bit easier unless you do it by mail order— easier unless you do it by mail order like _ easier unless you do it by mail order like shyama. in easier unless you do it by mail order like shyama.— easier unless you do it by mail order like shyama. in my opinion i think what will— order like shyama. in my opinion i think what will happen _ order like shyama. in my opinion i think what will happen as - order like shyama. in my opinion i think what will happen as it - order like shyama. in my opinion i think what will happen as it will i think what will happen as it will increase theft in the street. it is absolutely worth mugging someone for absolutely worth mugging someone for a credit card if you can get £100 worth of gear whatever that gear might be instantly before the card is stopped. £45 it seems to me was plenty and i worry because i think younger people who do carry cards will become targets very quickly. all the people don't ten to shop in this way and itjust all the people don't ten to shop in this way and it just worries all the people don't ten to shop in this way and itjust worries me. i think you'll get a lot more thefts in inner cities because the cards are suddenly really good collateral. that is definitely a legitimate concern, _ that is definitely a legitimate concern, i agree with you. but i suppose — concern, i agree with you. but i suppose the banks cover you for these _ suppose the banks cover you for these losses. that doesn't solve the
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problem _ these losses. that doesn't solve the problem if _ these losses. that doesn't solve the problem if you are mugged, of course — problem if you are mugged, of course. ., ., , course. three point. that was related to _ course. three point. that was related to brexit _ course. three point. that was related to brexit as _ course. three point. that was related to brexit as you - course. three point. that was related to brexit as you were | related to brexit as you were saying, dave. the observer have a story of fury at michael gove as exports to the european union is slashed by 60%. what are some of the reasons behind that? this slashed by 60%. what are some of the reasons behind that?— reasons behind that? this is the road haulage — reasons behind that? this is the road haulage association - reasons behind that? this is the | road haulage association writing reasons behind that? this is the - road haulage association writing to michael gove because it surveyed its members and they found that traffic dropped by 60% in the sense of british companies not sending goods to europe so therefore lorries coming in and delivering stuff to us and going home empty because people just aren't sure what paperwork is involved, there are not enough customs officers to process and to help road haulage members with what they are supposed to be doing and so what they are saying is that 60% falloff in exports and 60 5% of
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vehicles went back empty. hopefully we'll see all this change in the next few months but in terms of a financial hit this is massive. what financial hit this is massive. what with the government _ financial hit this is massive. what with the government to _ financial hit this is massive. what with the government to be - financial hit this is massive. what with the government to be saying about this, dave? will they say this is teething trouble? i about this, dave? will they say this is teething trouble?— is teething trouble? i have read this thoroughly _ is teething trouble? i have read this thoroughly and _ is teething trouble? i have read this thoroughly and i _ is teething trouble? i have read this thoroughly and i think - is teething trouble? i have read| this thoroughly and i think there is teething trouble? i have read i this thoroughly and i think there is perhaps— this thoroughly and i think there is perhaps a — this thoroughly and i think there is perhaps a little touch of spin from the road — perhaps a little touch of spin from the road haulage association because the road haulage association because the clearly want a more smooth floor through— the clearly want a more smooth floor through dover and other major ports and i through dover and other major ports and i have _ through dover and other major ports and i have been other stories about problems— and i have been other stories about problems because there are only 10,000 — problems because there are only 10,000 customs officials when they need five _ 10,000 customs officials when they need five times that number. in the sun on— need five times that number. in the sun on sunday today we have done a feature _ sun on sunday today we have done a feature and — sun on sunday today we have done a feature and tried to go in the cab of a lorry— feature and tried to go in the cab of a lorry with a trucker over to europe — of a lorry with a trucker over to europe to _ of a lorry with a trucker over to europe to see how bad it was but because — europe to see how bad it was but because of— europe to see how bad it was but because of covid we are unable to do that so— because of covid we are unable to do that so we _ because of covid we are unable to do that so we spoke to the driver every day and _ that so we spoke to the driver every day and have compiled the drivers diary— day and have compiled the drivers diary which— day and have compiled the drivers diary which is fascinating reading. back to _ diary which is fascinating reading. back to these figures, 68% collapse
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in exports — back to these figures, 68% collapse in exports. we have a story as well about— in exports. we have a story as well about scotch whisky exports which are followed by £1 billion in the last year— are followed by £1 billion in the last year and the scotch whisky association says most of that is down _ association says most of that is down to — association says most of that is down to covid and also the tariffs in america — down to covid and also the tariffs in america was a suspect —— so i suspect— in america was a suspect —— so i suspect it — in america was a suspect —— so i suspect it is _ in america was a suspect —— so i suspect it is not all about brexit and the — suspect it is not all about brexit and the customer numbers at the pulsen _ and the customer numbers at the pulsen teething issues but i suspect also -- _ pulsen teething issues but i suspect also -- and — pulsen teething issues but i suspect also —— and the ports and teething issues _ also —— and the ports and teething issues but — also —— and the ports and teething issues but i — also —— and the ports and teething issues but i suspect also covid is having _ issues but i suspect also covid is having an — issues but i suspect also covid is having an impact.— issues but i suspect also covid is having an impact. shyama, back to the sunday — having an impact. shyama, back to the sunday telegraph _ having an impact. shyama, back to the sunday telegraph and - having an impact. shyama, back to the sunday telegraph and this i having an impact. shyama, back to the sunday telegraph and this is i the sunday telegraph and this is supposed grenfell under £5 million to ease the cladding crisis. this supposed grenfell under £5 million to ease the cladding crisis.- to ease the cladding crisis. this is aood to ease the cladding crisis. this is good news- _ to ease the cladding crisis. this is
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good news. rishi _ to ease the cladding crisis. this is good news. rishi sunak_ to ease the cladding crisis. this is good news. rishi sunak has i to ease the cladding crisis. this is good news. rishi sunak has held | good news. rishi sunak has held talks and are talking about a £5 billion fund to strip the cladding from unsafe flats but it makes me cross that host builders is not being penalised. we have read too many stories about profit companies taking short cuts, deliberately turning a blind eye to possible problems up ahead and i think ultimately relying on the government to bail them out when things go wrong. i know people who can't sell their homes because they are bought in flats that turn out to be technically dangerous and i think it's great that £5 billion of that is enough is great but at the end of the day, i hope that covid will have taught this government and all of us that we need to hold the feet to the fire of those people who actually do wrong instead of constantly covering up wrong instead of constantly covering up for them and bailing them out. and it's that little thing we have just been talking about amazon and
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it is i was the little people who pay the taxes as well as supporting those companies by buying their products and then cushioning them by paying the tax that they should be playing and i think if we have learned nothing else we have learned that there is a moral obligation here to all of us and we each ought to each of us so ijust really hope we don't see stories like this in ten years time of people doing wrong and that they are actually forced to do it right. and that they are actually forced to do it riuht. and that they are actually forced to do itriht. ,, do it right. dave, the observer has an article about _ do it right. dave, the observer has an article about a _ do it right. dave, the observer has an article about a new— do it right. dave, the observer has an article about a new bbc- do it right. dave, the observer has an article about a new bbc series | an article about a new bbc series about donald trump. there have been quite a few documentaries about the donald trump either. —— hero. this is called covid. this is called trump takes on the world. one nugget is
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that when he took the hand of theresa may at the white house she had to phone home and say there was not another man in her life. fiona hill rives not another man in her life. fiona hill gives an _ not another man in her life. fiona hill gives an interview _ not another man in her life. fiona hill gives an interview and - not another man in her life. fiona hill gives an interview and says i not another man in her life. fiona hill gives an interview and says the first thing — hill gives an interview and says the first thing theresa may said after she came — first thing theresa may said after she came away from omitting the donald _ she came away from omitting the donald trump and the cameras the world _ donald trump and the cameras the world were — donald trump and the cameras the world were focused on her the first thing _ world were focused on her the first thing she _ world were focused on her the first thing she said was i need to call philip _ thing she said was i need to call philipjust— thing she said was i need to call philipjust to let him know i have been _ philipjust to let him know i have been holding hands with another man before _ been holding hands with another man before it _ been holding hands with another man before it hits the media. theresa may once — before it hits the media. theresa may once said the notice thing she ever did _ may once said the notice thing she ever did was run through a wheat field _ ever did was run through a wheat field when — ever did was run through a wheat field when she was a child so holding — field when she was a child so holding hands with another man was very naughty. the holding hands with another man was very naughty-— very naughty. the other great story that emerges _ very naughty. the other great story that emerges from _ very naughty. the other great story that emerges from this _ very naughty. the other great story that emerges from this is _ very naughty. the other great story that emerges from this is that i very naughty. the other great story| that emerges from this is that when she was with mr trump she asked if he had spoken to mr putin, the russian leader and he said he had not but one have his aides said we did have a call from mr putin but we
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did have a call from mr putin but we did not put it through to you, mr president and donald trump went from orange to red, actually. iwhich president and donald trump went from orange to red, actually.— orange to red, actually. which was the correct — orange to red, actually. which was the correct colour. _ orange to red, actually. which was the correct colour. it _ orange to red, actually. which was the correct colour. it sounds i orange to red, actually. which was the correct colour. it sounds like i the correct colour. it sounds like this will be a very funny three—part documentary there are all sorts of secrets coming out. i'm afraid i have to go back to the hand but i do think fiona hill might have been to blame in part because were she not the one who put theresa may in a bronze leather trousers which may have given mr trump the wrong idea? it was certainly his colour. john major and edwina currie and boris and carrie and all these people in the public eye doing things you never have idea about at all until much later but pooled —— poor old theresa may, the worst thing she
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will have ever done is put on a seven kilo necklace to give a speech about the worst thing she is anxious about the worst thing she is anxious about having to hold the sweaty part of donald trump. find about having to hold the sweaty part of donald trump.— of donald trump. and he is loving life without _ of donald trump. and he is loving life without twitter? _ of donald trump. and he is loving life without twitter? of _ of donald trump. and he is loving life without twitter? of course i life without twitter? of course twitter bind — life without twitter? of course twitter bind him. _ life without twitter? of course twitter bind him. -- _ life without twitter? of course twitter bind him. -- sweaty i life without twitter? of course i twitter bind him. -- sweaty paw. it twitter bind him. —— sweaty paw. it reveals the president tweeted 34,000 times while in the white house. that is 23 times— times while in the white house. that is 23 times per day so treating once an hour— is 23 times per day so treating once an hour a _ is 23 times per day so treating once an hour a day and night while president. he says this is the first time _ president. he says this is the first time in _ president. he says this is the first time in ucs— president. he says this is the first time in ucs in the president look truly— time in ucs in the president look truly relaxed and he seemed to be ekhaling _ truly relaxed and he seemed to be exhaling for once and seeing he is -lad exhaling for once and seeing he is glad to— exhaling for once and seeing he is glad to be — exhaling for once and seeing he is glad to be off to a toaster may be that they — glad to be off to a toaster may be that they have done him a favour, maybe _ that they have done him a favour, maybe they have done us all a
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favour~ — maybe they have done us all a favour~ -- _ maybe they have done us all a favour. —— he is glad to be off twitter~ — favour. -- he is glad to be off twitter. , ., ., ., . twitter. dave, you have a nice teacu- twitter. dave, you have a nice teacup they — twitter. dave, you have a nice teacup they are. _ twitter. dave, you have a nice teacup they are. big _ twitter. dave, you have a nice teacup they are. big match i twitter. dave, you have a nice| teacup they are. big match this afternoon. i am saying nothing. teacup they are. big match this afternoon. iam saying nothing. i afternoon. lam saying nothing. i like your teacup. i afternoon. lam saying nothing. i like yourteacup. i might afternoon. lam saying nothing. i like your teacup. i might have to drink a little more than tea before the match to calm my nerves attached. the match to calm my nerves attached-— the match to calm my nerves attached. ., ,, ., ., attached. dave and shyama, thanks so much for sharing _ attached. dave and shyama, thanks so much for sharing your _ attached. dave and shyama, thanks so much for sharing your sunday - attached. dave and shyama, thanks so much for sharing your sunday morning | much for sharing your sunday morning with us. hello. we've a particularly cold week ahead across the uk as we are set to sit in arctic air with biting eastern winds, particularly for today and tomorrow. the results of the threat
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of some heavy snowfall to contend with, potentially causing disruption for some. we are is the very cold air coming from? all the way from the arctic via the baltic and then speeding on across the uk on a strong easterly wind. for the south—east of the uk today we have the tail end of storm darcy. darcy herself is off into the continent but this lingering weather front could produce some snow across some counties of eastern england. the met office has marked out a number of areas with a warning for the risk of disruption. we did start out with a mixture of rain and sleet in the south—east but as the cold air drives its way for the site of the
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afternoon it is likely to bring more persistent snow as the day draws to a close. it will perhaps retreat a little bit further eastwards through the afternoon, the snowfall. strong to gale force gusts of wind as well, blizzards and drifting could be an issue. the wind also driving shows across northern england, scotland, perhaps a few even for northern ireland and the welsh mountains. cold across the board and if you factor in the wind it will feel —3 or —4 quite typically. through the evening and overnight, as darcy pulls away we pick up a more direct, perhaps easterly air stream across the uk and that is able to send the showers further west across the midlands into wales, perhaps towards the movers of the south west so further snow for central and eastern england over night for southern and northern england as well. but perhaps the showers a little fewer and farther between here. monday, some more persistent will be setting up across scotland
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are streaming into northern england. not all areas will see the showers, there are gaps between those bands and there will be some sunshine but if you are stuck underneath one of the bands of showers the snow could pile up quite significantly blow around with the strength of the easterly wind which again on monday keeps things filling raw. nothing changes very dramatically through the week ahead. we still set on this cold arctic air. the isobars, though, do as you can see reorientate themselves slightly tuesday into wednesday. what that will mean, hopefully, is that the wind will ease back somewhat.
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this is bbc world news, i'm ben brown. our top stories: the oxford astrazeneca vaccine offers limited protection against mild disease caused by the south african variant of covid—19, according to early trials. oxford vaccinologist professor sarah gilbert said the jab will still protect against the virus. we may not be reducing the total number of cases, but there is still protection in that case against deaths, hospitalisations and severe disease. tens of thousands of anti—coup protestors gather for a second day in myanmar, demanding the release of leader aung sann suu kyi. because of this military dictatorship, many of our lives have been destroyed. we cannot let our future generation meet the same fate.
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the collapse of a himalayan glacier causes flash flooding in northern india. over 100 people are missing, feared dead.

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