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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 11, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at six... the duke of edinburgh's children pay tribute to their late father after a private church service attended by members of the royal family. i think the way i would put it is, we have lost almost the grandfather of the nation. and i feel very sorry and supportive of my mother, who is feeling it, i think, probably more than everybody else. it's been a bit of a, a bit of a shock. however much one tries to prepare oneself for something like this, it's still a dreadful shock. and we're sort of trying to come to terms with that. and it's very, very sad.
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in a statement released earlier, princess anne said her father has left a legacy that would inspire. we'll continue look at the tributes being paid. also ahead... one day more — lockdown easing in england will see outdoor hospitality, shops and hairdressers reopen tomorrow. in india, hospitals struggle to cope with the second wave of covid — and more than 150,000 new cases in 2a hours. after seven nominations — could the british film �*rocks' dominate the baftas tonight? and coming up on sportsday — twojesse lingard goals help west ham beat leicester, moving them back into fourth place in the premier league.
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good afternoon. the duke of edinburgh has been remembered today in a service at canterbury cathedral led by the archbishop of canterbury. at windsor, members of the royal family attended a private service this morning, speaking afterwards about the impact of the death of the duke — who prince andrew described as "the grandfather of the nation". he said the queen had described his passing as leaving a huge void in her life. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports on a day of pause and reflection, players for the duke were said. in many church services, and after the service at the chapel of all saints in windsor great park, members of his family spoke about him. it is a great loss. i think the way i would put it is that we've lost almost the grandfather of the nation. and i feel very sorry and supportive of my mother, who's feeling it,
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i think, probably more than everybody else. she described it as having left a huge void in her life, but we, the family, the ones that are closer, are rallying round to make sure that we are there to support her. the earl and countess of wessex also spoke about how the queen was dealing with the loss. thinking of others before herself. as always. she's amazing. as always, yes. but bearing up, and again it isjust that wave of affection for him - and just those lovely stories, theyjust mean so much - and the tributes have beenjust fantastic. and that is really, really important. i we really do appreciate it. and i think it's so lovely for so many people to learn about what he did because i think actually quite a lot of things that have come out will have surprised some people. it was right for him.
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it was so gentle. she said his passing had been very, very peaceful, as if someone had taken him by the hand and off he went. choir sings. at a special service of remembrance for the duke in canterbury cathedral, the archbishop spoke about loss. we may pray and offer love for all who find that a great life leaves a very great gap. britain's former prime minister, sirjohn major, knew the duke. he said his death would leave an enormous gap in the queen's life. i hope she will be given some time and space. i know she is the monarch. i know she has responsibilities, but she has earned the right to have a period of privacy in which to grieve with her family. and sirjohn said he hoped the duke's funeral would give
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princes william and harry a chance to mend their differences. the friction that we are told has arisen is a friction better ended as speedily as possible, and a shared emotion, a shared grief, at the present time, because of the death of their father, of their grandfather, i think is an ideal opportunity and i hope very much that is possible to mend any rift that may exist. 0utside buckingham palace, barriers have been erected around the pavements and signs are on display to discourage people from leaving flowers. but despite the discouragement, bouquets and personal tributes are still being placed. nicholas witchell, bbc news. daniela relph — our royal correspondent is in windsor — where both prince edward and prince andrew spoke today. and she told us how princess anne had also been speaking about her father. he was the last of the duke and queen's children to have something to say about her father, and that statement from princess
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and has come through quite recently. it is, again, a very personal statement from one of the duke's children. in it, she says, "you know it's going to happen, but you are never really ready. my father has been my teacher, my supporter and my critic, but mostly it is his example of a life well—lived and service freely given that i most wanted to emulate." "his ability to treat every person as an individual in their own right, with their own skills, comes through all the organisations through which he was involved. i regard it as an honour and a privilege to be asked to follow in his footsteps and it has been a pleasure to have kept him in touch with their activities. i know how much he meant to them in the uk, across the commonwealth and in the wider world. i would like to emphasise how much the family appreciate the messages and memories of so many people whose lives he also touched.
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we will miss him, but he leaves a legacy which can inspire us all." with that statement from the princess royal also came an image of her with her father. it is one that we are told that was personally chosen by her, a photo of them together from the london 2012 olympic games. it is informal, it's quite touching to see they are laughing, they clearly look very happy, and it clearly shows a bond between father and daughter there. what strikes you from all the comments that we have heard today from the duke's children and the prince of wales last night is just how freely they are speaking about them both personally and in public. i think perhaps a little more intimate than we had expected in terms of their own personal memories and explaining how wr are all feeling. and what is also very clear from what they have said is that they are now all very much focused on supporting their mother, the queen. exactly, and that was something that sirjohn major picked up on this morning as well, on how the queen would need time to be with her family and to grieve
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after this marriage of 73 years. court mourning now, but of course, the funeral on saturday, a small affair, and attended by prince harry, we understand, as well. yes, that's right. prince harry will be at the funeral on saturday afternoon. that will mean him travelling from the united states, and if all the covid protocols are followed, it would also mean him going into isolation for five days ahead of the funeral. so that means that harry would really have to arrive here in the uk today or tomorrow to give him enough time to isolate and to test again before his grandfather's funeral on saturday afternoon. so we will await his arrival. of course, there will be a lot of attention focused on his presence back here in windsor with the royal family. you know, it has been a tense time, relations particularly with his father and his brother, william, have been difficult, especially after that interview with oprah winfrey, and i tthink there will be a lot
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of eyes on how that plays out over the days ahead. to be honest, i think what we can expect to see, particularly in these very sad circumstances for the family is a united front. more than three months after a third national lockdown was imposed in england, thousands of businesses are preparing to reopen under the next phase of covid restrictions easing. shops are reopening and pubs and restaurants will be able to serve outdoors. hairdressers, salons, gyms and outdoor attractions like zoos and theme parks can also reopen. wales also reopens retail tomorrow — remaining pupils will return to school and restrictions on travelling across the border will ease. in scotland, all pupils, except those who are shielding, will return to the classroom. pupils in northern ireland will also go back to school. here's our business correspondent, katy austin, on the changes in england. staff are back from furlough, preparing this store
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in leamington spa for reopening. excited, yeah. it's the third time now that we're reopening again, so we just want to get back into it now. lockdown one pushed this lingerie and swimwear chain to the brink. they've ramped up online and closed some stores for good, but they see monday as hugely important. we've had lots of calls from customers, which tells us that, obviously, lots of customers are wanting to come into shops, but we know that some will want to continue shopping from home for some time, and we are yet to find out exactly how much of that mix is a permanent shift. changing rooms can open, carefully managed, and bra fittings will be done, contact free. 0ur teams are using actually the fitting rooms opposite, so rather than actuallyjoining them in the fitting room, they're doing exactly what they would normally do from further apart.
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people are being encouraged to shop alone and stay socially distanced. bravissimo is confident of opening safely. profitably? not sure. the british retail consortium said that non—food stores will have lost £30 billion worth of sales over the three lockdowns. it's also clear that the past year has sped up a change that was already under way towards there being fewer shops on our streets and people buying more online. but some things sell much better in person. after a slow winter, this bed retailer hopes to benefit from pent—up demand when it reopens 172 stores in england tomorrow. all of our stores will have very- clearly designated sanitising areas. our products are, for. the majority, requiring an assisted sales process, - where customers and the sales staff can touch and feel| and lie on the products, and so being able to do that is an integral partl of the sales process. pubs, restaurants and cafes can serve outside from tomorrow. gusto will open three restaurants, including this one in liverpool.
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they're fully booked — but it's not worth opening nine others with small outdoor areas. by the time we've got in the team of chefs, someone to wash the pots, a front of house team to make the drinks and serve the food and the manager to run the place, we would actually be worse off than we would be by staying closed. hairdressers are already open in wales and scotland, and can also open in england tomorrow. some have booked up for months. shops can open late to cope with an expected initial rush. after a painful yearfor retail, they're relying on customers to keep coming back. katy austin, bbc news. miles connolly and lotte lyster have run the prince albert in stroud, for 25 years — a pub well—known locally for its live music. it is opening its doors again and theyjoin me now. hello to you both. how do you feel about tomorrow?— hello to you both. how do you feel about tomorrow? sorry, we lost you have a bit- — about tomorrow? sorry, we lost you have a bit- an _ about tomorrow? sorry, we lost you have a bit. an exciting _ about tomorrow? sorry, we lost you have a bit. an exciting day - about tomorrow? sorry, we lost you have a bit. an exciting day if- about tomorrow? sorry, we lost you have a bit. an exciting day if i - have a bit. an exciting day if i come to the _ have a bit. an exciting day if i come to the festival. - have a bit. an exciting day if i come to the festival. how- have a bit. an exciting day if i come to the festival. how do | have a bit. an exciting day if i . come to the festival. how do you feel about tomorrow? bier? come to the festival. how do you feel about tomorrow? very exciting. it is a bit feel about tomorrow? very exciting. it is a bit like _
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feel about tomorrow? very exciting. it is a bit like opening _ feel about tomorrow? very exciting. it is a bit like opening a _ feel about tomorrow? very exciting. it is a bit like opening a new - feel about tomorrow? very exciting. it is a bit like opening a new pub - it is a bit like opening a new pub every time we reopen after a lockdown. it is something to consider and yes, i'm really looking forward to it. great to have people back and i like everyone else of miss the social part of it all. how much outside _ miss the social part of it all. how much outside space _ miss the social part of it all. how much outside space if— miss the social part of it all. how much outside space if you got, lottie? ~ ., ., ., lottie? we have got a covered courtyard _ lottie? we have got a covered courtyard which _ lottie? we have got a covered courtyard which we _ lottie? we have got a covered courtyard which we assess - lottie? we have got a covered courtyard which we assess and lottie? we have got a covered i courtyard which we assess and at lottie? we have got a covered - courtyard which we assess and at the moment_ courtyard which we assess and at the moment and staresjust behind as we have got— moment and staresjust behind as we have got a _ moment and staresjust behind as we have got a garden which we have just had a _ have got a garden which we have just had a new_ have got a garden which we have just had a new beautiful structure put in and we _ had a new beautiful structure put in and we have got about seven tables up and we have got about seven tables up there. _ and we have got about seven tables up there, so we can seat about 36 people _ up there, so we can seat about 36 people there and about 40 down the bottom _ people there and about 40 down the bottom. gk, people there and about 40 down the bottom. ., ., ., , ., , ., bottom. 0k, and have had people had to book and — bottom. 0k, and have had people had to book and you _ bottom. 0k, and have had people had to book and you know _ bottom. ok, and have had people had to book and you know your— bottom. 0k, and have had people had to book and you know your locals - bottom. 0k, and have had people had to book and you know your locals and | to book and you know your locals and they can all come in when they won? no. we run a booking system so that we can_ no. we run a booking system so that we can make — no. we run a booking system so that we can make sure that everybody can -et we can make sure that everybody can get in _ we can make sure that everybody can get in when _ we can make sure that everybody can get in when they want to nobody turns _ get in when they want to nobody turns up— get in when they want to nobody turns up and gets turned away so you asked _ turns up and gets turned away so you asked people to book by colin. how tou~h is it asked people to book by colin. how-oi tough is it being? asked people to book by colin. how tough is it being? -- _ asked people to book by colin. how tough is it being? -- book- asked people to book by colin. how tough is it being? -- book by- tough is it being? -- book by callinu. tough is it being? -- book by calling- we — tough is it being? -- book by calling. we were _ tough is it being? -- book by calling. we were a _ tough is it being? -- book by calling. we were a music - tough is it being? -- book by. calling. we were a music venue rimaril calling. we were a music venue primarily and — calling. we were a music venue primarily and that _ calling. we were a music venue primarily and that is _ calling. we were a music venue primarily and that is how - calling. we were a music venue primarily and that is how we . calling. we were a music venue i primarily and that is how we relied on a living. in recent months and
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years i have become a dab hand at making pizzas so we have relying on takeaway pizzas and burgers. along with some beer delivery service, so thatis with some beer delivery service, so that is been pretty tough diversifying into those areas, and some things that i have just never done before. some things that i have 'ust never done beforefi some things that i have 'ust never done before. ., ., ., done before. have you had staff that ou have done before. have you had staff that you have had — done before. have you had staff that you have had to _ done before. have you had staff that you have had to let _ done before. have you had staff that you have had to let go _ done before. have you had staff that you have had to let go or— done before. have you had staff that you have had to let go or have - done before. have you had staff that you have had to let go or have you . you have had to let go or have you been able to stay below them? irate been able to stay below them? we have let some stuff go. we have had some _ have let some stuff go. we have had some stuff— have let some stuff go. we have had some stuff on furlough. in the last few days _ some stuff on furlough. in the last few days we have had staff in and friends _ few days we have had staff in and friends and neighbours coming in frantically — friends and neighbours coming in frantically planting and replanting in painting andjust frantically planting and replanting in painting and just getting us all back _ in painting and just getting us all back we — in painting and just getting us all back. we just still have a little way than — back. we just still have a little way than global fog lots clocks are the doors — way than global fog lots clocks are the doors will be open and we're reaiiy— the doors will be open and we're really looking forward to it. —— four— really looking forward to it. —— four o'clock _ really looking forward to it. —— four o'clock tomorrow at the doors will be _ four o'clock tomorrow at the doors will be open and we really looking forward _ will be open and we really looking forward to — will be open and we really looking forward to it. we will be open and we really looking forward to it— forward to it. we are going to be auoin for forward to it. we are going to be going for quite — forward to it. we are going to be going for quite a _ forward to it. we are going to be going for quite a while _ forward to it. we are going to be going for quite a while yet! - forward to it. we are going to be going for quite a while yet! i - forward to it. we are going to be | going for quite a while yet! i have just changed all the light bulbs in the yard so i am waiting to see what that looks like in the doubt. what that looks like in the doubt. what about the ordering _ that looks like in the doubt. what about the ordering for— that looks like in the doubt. what about the ordering for beer. i
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suppose you had advanced warning that you would be able to reopen so if you're are. you need to because you don't want to be giving it all away, do you? you don't want to be giving it all away. do you?— you don't want to be giving it all away, do you? we're quite lucky because we _ away, do you? we're quite lucky because we have _ away, do you? we're quite lucky because we have been _ away, do you? we're quite lucky because we have been doing - away, do you? we're quite lucky because we have been doing the away, do you? we're quite lucky - because we have been doing the beer delivery— because we have been doing the beer delivery system we have sellers togather— delivery system we have sellers together getting ready to below and we haven't overawed it because you 'ust we haven't overawed it because you just don't— we haven't overawed it because you just don't know what is going to happen— just don't know what is going to happen and the weather is going to be pretty— happen and the weather is going to be pretty awful too. we happen and the weather is going to be pretty awful too.— happen and the weather is going to be pretty awful too. we also waited in a maintenance _ be pretty awful too. we also waited in a maintenance team _ be pretty awful too. we also waited in a maintenance team because - be pretty awful too. we also waited l in a maintenance team because when we clean the pipes today we found out that two of them were leaking all over the floor, so we're waiting on the maintenance team to come in and try and sort that out either the seeming or tomorrow my goodness. by the seat of our pants. 25 seeming or tomorrow my goodness. by the seat of our pants.— the seat of our pants. 25 years of runnina the seat of our pants. 25 years of running this _ the seat of our pants. 25 years of running this pub, _ the seat of our pants. 25 years of running this pub, this _ the seat of our pants. 25 years of running this pub, this must - the seat of our pants. 25 years of running this pub, this must have | running this pub, this must have been the worst mf of that quarter of a century that you have both been running it?— running it? well, we did have an electrical fire _ running it? well, we did have an electrical fire here _ running it? well, we did have an electrical fire here 16 _ running it? well, we did have an electrical fire here 16 years - running it? well, we did have an electrical fire here 16 years ago i running it? well, we did have an| electrical fire here 16 years ago in the middle of the night so myself and children in the dog were all carried — and children in the dog were all carried out by the fire brigade and we were _ carried out by the fire brigade and we were closed then for four or five months _ we were closed then for four or five months so — we were closed then for four or five
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months so that was quite shocking and i_ months so that was quite shocking and i thought that was the only time in nry— and i thought that was the only time in my life _ and i thought that was the only time in my life i_ and i thought that was the only time in my life i wasn't going to be working — in my life i wasn't going to be working all day seven days a week. you know. — working all day seven days a week. you know, we've tried to make the best out _ you know, we've tried to make the best out of— you know, we've tried to make the best out of this these last few months. — best out of this these last few months, but we can't wait to get the pub open, _ months, but we can't wait to get the pub open, really. it isjust whether we can— pub open, really. it isjust whether we can stay— pub open, really. it isjust whether we can stay standing up that long, because _ we can stay standing up that long, because we have got to get you sitting — because we have got to get you sitting down really.— sitting down really. really good look. thanks _ sitting down really. really good look. thanks very _ sitting down really. really good look. thanks very much - sitting down really. really good look. thanks very much for- sitting down really. really good i look. thanks very much forjoining us here in bbc news. it is 60 minutes past six. however i was headlines. —— 16 minutes past six. the headlines on bbc news... the duke of edinburgh's children pay tribute to their late father — after a private church service attended by members of the royal family: one day more — lockdown easing in england will see outdoor hospitality, shops and hairdressers reopen tomorrow in india — hospitals struggle to
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cope with the second wave of covid — and more than 150,000 new cases in 24 hours. let's take a look now at the latest government figures on coronavirus. there were 1,730 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means an average of 2,629 new cases reported per day in the last week. seven deaths were reported — that's people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, there were 36 deaths per day. the total number of uk deaths is now 127,087. 0n vaccinations, 111,109 people were given their first vaccine dose in the last 24 hours. the overall number of people who've had their first jab is over 32 million. over 7.4 million people have now had their second jab. while cases continue to fall here, india's second wave of covid has
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just seen it record more than 150,000 new daily cases — as the disease spreads faster than anywhere else in the world. some hospitals have already been overwhelmed, particularly in the worst affected state of maharashtra. from mumbai, the capital of the state, yogita limaye reports. a hospital in the western town of bhavnagar. "these are covid patients, and there are no doctors to treat them," says the man filming the video. in pune city, people are given oxygen outside a hospital because it's too full. medical facilities are falling short during a fierce and rapid covid surge. 73—year—old mary was turned away from six hospitals. she died on her way to the seventh. her son, anthony, spoke to me from isolation. "all these years she never needed to go to a hospital, "and when she did, i failed her," he said.
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field hospitals built last year are already full. this one in pune is managed by dr samran, who's been on the front line since the pandemic began. right now, what i'm seeing is if a single member of the family gets positive, the entire family is positive. the virulence has gone up, the infectivity ratio has gone up... it is affecting young adults, which is quite, you know, surprising. deaths remain low compared to india's population, still to be conclusively explained, but hundreds are dying every day. the government says the flouting of covid norms has caused the surge, but many argue that's not the main reason. it cannot explain the kind of surge in cases that we are seeing now currently in india, which clearly suggests that there is a great role for highly infectious variants of the virus which are spreading faster. in the midst of the crisis,
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dozens of vaccination centres in mumbai and around are closed because of a lack of supplies. india's health minister says there's no shortage of vaccines. this country has been mass—producing them, and over the past few months, has exported tens of millions of doses. so, people who've been turned away from centres like this one are asking where their doses are. the worst—hit areas are locked down, but surges are being seen across india. despite that, mass gatherings are being held for political rallies and religious festivals. this country appears to have let its guard down. yogita limaye, bbc news, india. a man has been charged with murdering one of britain's richest men in dorset last week. sir richard sutton was attacked at his home on wednesday. a woman in her 60s, believed
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to be his long—term partner, was seriously injured in the incident and remains in hospital in a critical condition. thomas schreiber — who's 34 — is due to appear in court tomorrow. there's been another eruption from the volcano on the caribbean island of st vincent. after remaining quiet for nearly 42 years, la soufriere first erupted on friday. heavy ashfall has caused power outages and cut off water supplies. scientists warn that eruptions could continue for days — or even weeks. 0ur central america correspondent will grant reports. it is an awe—inspiring, frightening sight, captured by the islanders of st vincent as they fled the affected areas. huge, thick plumes of smoke and dust were sent shooting several kilometres into air, as la soufriere unleashed its incredible explosive power. it was bright, but then the light
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began to deteriorate. it wasn't at a slow pace, it was rapidly deteriorating. it was just darkness. and then what happened, you began to feel something hitting your skin — ash. and as the ash filled the sky and blocked out the sun, these were the scenes as daytime on the island turned as dark as night in moments. these eruptions are rare — just a handful in 200 years. the last was some 40 years ago, with no casualties, and the government on st vincent are trying hard to avoid loss of life this time, too. i hereby order as follows. one, the evacuation of all premises in the areas designated as the red zone on the north—east and the north—west of st vincent. and the evacuation
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of the area itself. to aid the evacuation order, a vessel was sent to the leeward side of the east caribbean island. a number of large commercial cruise lines which operate in the caribbean have also pitched in, and some residents found themselves aboard ships if they didn't have safe haven with family elsewhere. this is not a drill! disaster preparedness in the caribbean is generally well co—ordinated. however, a volcanic eruption of this magnitude is a challenge of a different order — especially amid a pandemic. the threat of what could happen if the evacuation doesn't go smoothly is ever—present. when la soufriere erupted at the turn of the 20th century, 1,600 people are believed to have died.
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though many on st vincent hoped they would never live through such an eruption, the hope is now that they can ride it out safely. will grant, bbc news. more questions have emerged about david cameron's lobbying work on behalf of the greensill financial company today — with the sunday times reporting that he arranged for the company's founder — lex greensill — to have a "private drink" with the health secretary matt hancock. and in the last few minutes we've heard from the former pm. he has now issued a statement. two and a half pages of a4 in the front i have printed it out us. this is david cameron walking through his justification for his relationship with lex greensill and australian banker who worked as an advisor in downing street and mr cwmbran was the prime minister and then the professional relationship was with us afterwards mr mr cameron became a paid employee of greensill capital,
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the company run by lex greensill. firstly, the working government when david cameron was prime minister and then the work he did as lobbyist, is an adviser, afterwards. in a statement, david cameron talks about how he completely understands the public interest in this issue, three weeks of headlines, only now have we heard directly on the record on the pull down —like former prime minister. he explains that lex greensill was not a political employee but was part of the civil service to improve government efficiency and that the then cabinet secretaryjeremy heywood who has since died was acting in good faith but might part of the civil service to improve government efficiency and that the then cabinet secretary jeremy heywood who has since died was acting in good faith like faith to solve a real problem which is the issue of ensuring that small and medium—sized companies can access credit. he says impression has been created that lex greensill lex greensill at this stage. as i netting twice at most in my entire time in five minister. —— as i recall, i met him twice at most. but
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he did work — recall, i met him twice at most. but he did work at number ten and had an e—mail address and telephone number number ten. e—mail address and telephone number numberten. he e—mail address and telephone number number ten. he did e—mail address and telephone number numberten. he did indeed. so, that is david, was much argument about the closeness or otherwise of their relationship when mr cameron was my minister. let relationship when mr cameron was my minister. , ., , ., ., ., ., minister. let us fast forward to a mr prime. _ minister. let us fast forward to a mr prime, cameron _ minister. let us fast forward to a mr prime, cameron is _ minister. let us fast forward to a mr prime, cameron is no - minister. let us fast forward to a mr prime, cameron is no longer| minister. let us fast forward to a - mr prime, cameron is no longer prime minister or in politics but is a private citizen. we knew that he stuck to the rule which says that you can't meal be knowest is next most of the two years, that period pass before he did the lobbying work. despite you can't be a lobbyist as an ex minister for two years. the rules on lobbying, he was in keeping with and didn't break any of those rules. he acknowledges here that his renumeration, his pay, was partly in the four by the grant of shares. he says his their value was nowhere near the much speculated about in the press and the suggestion was potentially could be in line to an millions. green cell, though, did go bust at the beginning of... i though, did go bust at the beginning of... ~' ., , ~:: of... i think the figure was 60 million. of... i think the figure was 60 million- so — of... i think the figure was 60 million. so he _ of... i think the figure was 60 million. so he said _ of... i think the figure was 60 million. so he said no - of... i think the figure was 60 million. so he said no near. of... i think the figure was 60 i
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million. so he said no near that. of... i think the figure was 60 - million. so he said no near that. he talks about — million. so he said no near that. he talks about the _ million. so he said no near that. he talks about the work _ million. so he said no near that. he talks about the work he _ million. so he said no near that. he talks about the work he did - million. so he said no near that. he talks about the work he did for- talks about the work he did for greensill around the world and acknowledges that he visited the kingdom of saudi arabia injanuary of last year and met the crown prince, mohamed ben someone, when he was there. he makes a point, though, he did raise concerns about human rights, as he had done when he was prime minister. then here, if you like, an element of if you like regret or lessons learnt from the former prime minister, he says i understand the concern about the ability of former ministers and especially prime ministers to be able to access government decision—makers in the sense and reality of ease of access and familiarity. i thought it was right to make representations in behalf of the company and financing a large number of uk firms. he felt that a time of crisis of the uk economy about a year ago during the first lockdown, that was the appropriate thing to do. he says, though, consent has been raised about the nature of my contact via text message and e—mail. he texted rishi
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sunak, the chancellor, and since. he understands that consent and says at the time the government was quite rightly making rapid decisions about the best way to support the real economy. he emphasises as we have another porting in the newspapers have too that he didn't break any codes of conduct or government rules which says i have reflected on this at length. there are important lessons to be learnt as a former prime minister except that communication with government needs to be done through only the most formal channels so there can be no room for misinterpretation but he felt what he was doing would benefit the company but also benefit the wider uk economy and businesses at a challenging time but in exceptions from david cameron in the long and lengthy and detailed statement about lots of claims that have been made in recent weeks and acknowledgement that his behaviour, whilst not breaking any rules all codes of conduct, perhaps could have been better. �* ., , ., ., , better. and the irony in all of this is that when _ better. and the irony in all of this is that when he _ better. and the irony in all of this is that when he was _ better. and the irony in all of this is that when he was by _ better. and the irony in all of this is that when he was by mistake i better. and the irony in all of this | is that when he was by mistake he always said that lobbying was going to be the next big scandal to engulf
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the palace of westminster. he to be the next big scandal to engulf the palace of westminster.- the palace of westminster. he did. 11 ears the palace of westminster. he did. 11 years ago. _ the palace of westminster. he did. 11 years ago. just — the palace of westminster. he did. 11 years ago, just before _ the palace of westminster. he did. 11 years ago, just before becoming| 11 years ago, just before becoming famous to he said it was the next big scandal to come. the quiet lunches, the access for mixed ministers, the very thing that his critics in the last week of the key is to be doing since leaving office. this, thank you very much indeed. this, thank you very much indeed. this makes in. the british film and television awards continue this evening, for the second night of this year's ceremony. the presenters will be at the royal albert hall but all the nominees will appear via video link because of the coronavirus pandemic. the baftas will pay tribute to prince philip who was a long standing patron of the academy — as our arts editor will gompertz reports. prince philip, the duke of edinburgh. the first president of the society of film and television arts, known today as bafta, at the 1963 awards. he supported the organisation — and, more widely, the british film industry — for over 60 years. bafta said, "the duke occupies a special place in the academy's history and will be missed enormously." his royal highness's death will cast a shadow over this year's awards which, because of the pandemic,
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will be held behind closed doors in a largely virtual event celebrating bafta's most diverse group of nominations ever. this is rocks, the eponymous teenage protagonist who's trying to keep her inner—city london life together in a wonderfully observed drama that has bukky bakray up for a bafta best actress award, with rocks' friend, played by kosar ali, in the running for best supporting actress. the film is directed by sarah gavron, who could be a rare female best director winner. but first, she'll have to overcome the challenge from chloe zhao, whose film, nomadland, sees its star frances mcdormand up for best actress. riz ahmed is among those in the running for best actor for his portrayal of a drummer in a heavy rock band who suddenly loses his hearing. i'm not leaving my flat! anthony hopkins, another best actor nominee, is losing his mind in the father. i don't see your name in lights. it's a competitive category that could see chadwick boseman awarded
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a posthumous best actor bafta for his performance

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