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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 15, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. say his name! duante wright! a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer, who's been charged with second—degree manslaughter.
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the us confirms it will complete its military withdrawal from afghanistan by september the 11th— the twentieth anniversary of the al qaeda terror attacks. rehearsals have been taking place ahead of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh on saturday. we'll find out details of who will attend later. and a major landslide sends 4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on dorset�*sjurassic coast in the south of england. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the former uk prime minister david cameron says he'll "respond positively" to any requests for him to give evidence to an inquiry
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into the lobbying activities of the failed fintech company greensill. mr cameron has faced criticism for contacting government ministers in an attempt to win financial support for the firm before it collapsed. it's sparked a wider row over private companies�* attempts to influence government. 0ur political correspondent helen catt reports. the way david cameron used his contacts with ministers on behalf of the businessman who employed him, lex greensill, sparked a row about lobbying that has dominated westminster for days. yesterday, conservative mps voted against setting up a special parliamentary investigation. so the noes have it, the noes have it. but an existing committee of mps will look into at least some of it. greensill capital has since collapsed. the treasury select committee will look into the lessons that can be learned from that, and how the treasury itself responded to lobbying on the firm's behalf. it's thought other committees might do the same, and one of them is likely to ask david cameron
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to give evidence. his spokesman said he would respond positively to any such requests when the terms of reference were clear. the controversy is likely to come up again today in parliament. lord pickles, who chairs the body which vets jobs ministers and senior officials can take when they leave government, is due to appear before mps. it's been planned for a while, but earlier this week he expressed concerns when it emerged that a senior civil servant, bill crothers, had been allowed to work part—time for greensill in 2015 whilst still doing his governmentjob. the most senior civil servant in the country, simon case, has told the heads of all departments they have to declare by the end of the week if any of their officials have second jobs like this. none of this affects the review announced by borisjohnson into the links between greensill and government. that is being led by a lawyer, who the prime minister says will have free rein to speak to whoever he needs to. the evidence will be heard privately, but it's due to report the result injune. helen catt, bbc news.
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0ur political correspondent greg dawsonjoins me now. so, although the labour party didn't get the type of inquiry it wanted yesterday, there are a number of enquiries and investigations going on, one of them has already started, in fact. ., �* , on, one of them has already started, infact. , , in fact. that's right, yesterday, the labour _ in fact. that's right, yesterday, the labour party _ in fact. that's right, yesterday, the labour party wanted - in fact. that's right, yesterday, the labour party wanted to - in fact. that's right, yesterday, - the labour party wanted to establish its own separate parliamentary inquiry into this lobbying issue and they failed on that because ministers voted against that in the house of commons. but, despite all that, labourseems house of commons. but, despite all that, labour seems to have got its way because we heard from the public administration committee this morning that they do plan to investigate the greensill issue. we also heard from the treasury that they, too, will hold their own inquiry. the scope of those committees is yet to be revealed but we are getting a flavour already of what is going to be looked at. the public affairs committee is actually speaking to the head of the acoba
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body, which looks at the appointment of ministers and civil servants once they leave, that is eric pickles, they leave, that is eric pickles, the former government minister. eric pickles making very clear that he is not at all impressed with the current rules that are set up within the system for civil servants and indeed government ministers to go and work for private companies. i and work for private companies. i think the wider public are entitled to know_ think the wider public are entitled to know what these arrangements are, how they _ to know what these arrangements are, how they apply, what criteria is raised. — how they apply, what criteria is raised, what checks are raised, what conditions _ raised, what checks are raised, what conditions are made on an agreement to do so _ conditions are made on an agreement to do so i_ conditions are made on an agreement to do so. i mean, if bill crothers had decided he wanted to be —— have a milk_ had decided he wanted to be —— have a milk round — had decided he wanted to be —— have a milk round or something, i don't think— a milk round or something, i don't think we _ a milk round or something, i don't think we would be too worried but his particular commission in running procurement and working for a commercial organisation is something that does— commercial organisation is something that does require a full and frank and transparent explanation. lord
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pickles, and transparent explanation. lord pickles. the _ and transparent explanation. lord pickles, the former _ and transparent explanation. ii_f7"ic pickles, the former cabinet minister, plain speaking on his views. clearly, he wants his own body to have more powers. we are expecting a course a public accounts committee investigation into this. the government's own committee, led by the lawyer nigel boardman, is expected to report injune. greg, thank you very much for that. in the past few minutes, nhs england have published their latest stats. the total number waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. and nearly 388,000 patients had been waiting more than a year for non urgent surgery. 0ur health editor hugh pym is here with me now. i think if we look at that last
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figure, 388,000 people waiting for routine operations and procedures for more than a year and you contrast that with february the year before, it really is quite a difference.— before, it really is quite a difference. , . , , , difference. yes, a pretty shocking statistic, difference. yes, a pretty shocking statistic. just _ difference. yes, a pretty shocking statistic, just that _ difference. yes, a pretty shocking statistic, just that comparison. i statistic, just that comparison. that is the impact of the pandemic. i600 that is the impact of the pandemic. 1600 was regarded as being pretty unacceptable, people waiting for, say, a hip or knee replacement for more than a year and now it is 388,000. 50 more than a year and now it is 388,000-— more than a year and now it is 388,000. ., '~:::: , .,,':j~j~ ::' 388,000. so from 1600 up to 388,012 months. 388,000. so from 1600 up to 388,012 months- yes. _ 388,000. so from 1600 up to 388,012 months. yes, exactly. _ 388,000. so from 1600 up to 388,012 months. yes, exactly. of— 388,000. so from 1600 up to 388,012 months. yes, exactly. of course, - 388,000. so from 1600 up to 388,012 months. yes, exactly. of course, the i months. yes, exactly. of course, the andemic months. yes, exactly. of course, the pandemic caused _ months. yes, exactly. of course, the pandemic caused huge _ months. yes, exactly. of course, the pandemic caused huge pressure - months. yes, exactly. of course, the pandemic caused huge pressure on . months. yes, exactly. of course, the i pandemic caused huge pressure on the nhs, switching to covid patients with areas that needed to be made secure with infection control and staff were diverted into those areas, so a large amount of routine, nonurgent work procedures and operations had to be cancelled. there was a thought last autumn that it would start getting back to
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normal and, it would start getting back to normaland, certainly, it would start getting back to normal and, certainly, the numbers improved in the nhs in all parts of the uk. this is obviously a uk issue. the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland have considerable issues as well with these long waits. it had been thought there was the beginning of a path back to normality, with hospitals urged to get on with reducing their waiting lists and get to the most urgent patients within the list. then we had the latest wave in january and the list. then we had the latest wave injanuary and february, which set everything back and nhs england have made the point that 40% of all hospital covid admissions occurred in those two months, january and february, so there was particular pressure then. even so, this is a long—term challenge for nhs leaders, how will the list to be reduced? that is my next question, what is the plan to do that? i was talking to one of the regional directors for the royal college of nursing a few minutes ago, she was talking about 40,000 nursing vacancies as one example where there is a shortfall
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in staff, so what is the plan to tackle these waiting lists? stan tackle these waiting lists? staff are exhausted _ tackle these waiting lists? staff are exhausted and _ tackle these waiting lists? staff are exhausted and some - tackle these waiting lists? staff are exhausted and some say they are burned out after the huge workload in the last year. that itself is a problem. you obviously can't recruit staff to come in and start bringing down waiting lists, that is a longer term plan, you can put more money into the system and the government at westminster has allocated some more money for this current financial year to do some work on waiting lists. nhs analysts and commentators have said that more is needed, because you need to open up operating theatres for longer periods of time, bring in staff on overtime, just to get on through it. some hospitals are trying to do this in as a smarter way as possible, to ring fence their non—— covid work and extending theatre time, but it
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is far from easy when you have hospitals with these challenges and so it remains a big problem, another longer term impact of covid on people's lives. longer term impact of covid on peeple's lives-— longer term impact of covid on --eole's lives. ., ~ , ., , . people's lives. thank you very much. we have been _ people's lives. thank you very much. we have been asking _ people's lives. thank you very much. we have been asking you _ people's lives. thank you very much. we have been asking you to - people's lives. thank you very much. we have been asking you to tell - people's lives. thank you very much. we have been asking you to tell us i we have been asking you to tell us about your experiences of the nhs, whether there has been an impact for you because of covid pandemic. daisy jones has said she ruptured a ligament in her knee plus other damage injanuary 2020, surgery cancelled due to covid—19 and so she hasn't heard anything from hospitals about a timeframe. matt wilson says he was in a&e yesterday, waiting time was only two and a half hours, the doctors were brilliant and everything seemed to be flowing through. we spoke to an a&e a little while ago and he said pressure was relating in terms of covid patients but other pressures were building up. good to hear that matt had a speedy experience. jane whitfield said she was recently diagnosed with
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gallstones and has been in and out of a&e many times and has to wait six to eight weeks for an endoscopy and the surgery i need to remove my gall bladder is unlikely to take place until next summer. thank you very much to all of you for sending in your comments, we would love to hear if you have been impacted by the covid pandemic and has some of the covid pandemic and has some of the treatment you were expecting to have been delayed? have you been given a time scale for it to happen? given the huge waiting lists and numbers we are hearing for nhs england in these latest statistics, so do get in touch with me on twitter and use the hashtag bbcyourquestions and we will try to read out some of your comments. there's been a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer. kim potter, who's now resigned from the police, has been charged with second degree manslaughter. she says that she meant to draw her taser rather than her gun.
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barbara plett usher reports. protesters have been demanding justice for daunte wright. but the manslaughter charge against the policewoman who killed him wasn't good enough for them. they wanted it to be murder. and so, another face—off with police, the fourth night of unrest. kim potter had already resigned before she was arrested and booked into the countyjail. a bitter end to 26 years in the force. she was actually training a new officer when they stopped mr wright because of an expired car registration. they discovered a previous warrant for his arrest, and he tried to flee. the police department said she attempted to tase him but mistakenly drew her gun. ijust shot him. the civil rights attorney who represents the wright family called this an unlawful use of force, not an accident. all this training, at what point did you not feel that this was a gun in your hand, versus a taser?
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this has amplified tensions around the trial of derek chauvin, who is charged with killing george floyd. the latest witness was for the defence. he said mr floyd died of medical complications, rather than the force of mr chauvin's knee on his neck. is it your opinion that his knee in any way affected the structure of mister floyd's mare? itla. any way affected the structure of mister floyd's mare?— any way affected the structure of mister floyd's mare? no, it did not, none of the — mister floyd's mare? no, it did not, none of the vital _ mister floyd's mare? no, it did not, none of the vital structures. -- - none of the vital structures. —— mister— none of the vital structures. —— mister floyd's neck. all the defence needs to do is establish doubt that the former policeman is guilty, and only in the mind of onejuror. the jury is expected to begin consideration early next week. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. president biden is ending america's longest—ever war. american soldiers invaded afghanistan in 2001 — almost 20 years later, they are still there. but not for much longer. he will withdraw the remaining 2,500 troops by september the 11th — the anniversary of the terror attack
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that led to the invasion. here's what president biden had to say. keeping thousands of troops grounded and concentrated in just one country at a cost of billions each year makes little sense to me and to our leaders. we cannot continue the cycle of extending or expanding our military presence in afghanistan, hoping to create ideal conditions for the withdrawal, and expecting a different result. so how will president biden's announcement affect the millions of afghans living in a deeply divided country? the taliban still control many areas, including parts of balkh province. from there, our correspondent secunder kermani reports. victory, they believe, is theirs. as american troops prepare to leave afghanistan, the taliban promises to create what they call an islamic government. but where does that leave millions of ordinary afghans?
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we've been given rare access to their territory to find out. early morning, we set off from the northern city of mazar—i—sharif. this province was once one of the most stable, now it is one of the most violent. we are just around half an hour's drive outside the main city, and already we're in taliban territory. 0ur hosts have put on a show of force. their violent insurgency has cost the lives of tens of thousands of people. through checkpoints like this, the militants assert their authority. and where's the government control, then? us troops will be withdrawn later this year, but the fighting here will likely continue. negotiations between the taliban and afghan government have achieved little so far.
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for the past year, you've not been fighting against the americans, you've been fighting against other afghans, other muslims. haji hekmat is the taliban's shadow mayor in this part of balkh province. he gives us a tour of the area. 0ne, one, one. class one? class one. there are girls. in the 1990s, the taliban banned female education, and in other areas there are reports they still don't allow older girls to attend school. but, here, at least, they are supporting it. the school is funded by the government, but monitored by the taliban.
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local sources told us the taliban removed art and citizenship studies from the curriculum, adding islamic subjects, but otherwise follow the national syllabus. the taliban wanted to present us with a positive image. throughout the trip, we were accompanied by them at all times. residents we spoke to at a local bazaar expressed support for the group, saying they brought security, but later we were told about villagers being slapped for shaving their beards, or having stereos smashed for listening to music. many, particularly in afghan cities, fear the taliban want to recreate their repressive islamic emirate of the 1990s. do you think that you did things wrong back then, and would things be different now?
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there's a diplomatic push for the taliban to agree to a power—sharing arrangement. so far, though, the group has shown little desire to compromise. the price of peace may well mean giving into more of their demands. secunder kermani, bbc news, balkh province. the headlines on bbc news... david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man —
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daunte wright — by a white police officer, who's been charged with second—degree manslaughter. northern ireland is expected to announce plans later to allow hairdressers to re—open a week from tomorrow. under the proposed timetable, nonessential shops would also re—open at the end of the month. unlike the rest of the uk, northern ireland has yet to publish a road map out of lockdown. earlier i spoke to our ireland correspondent, chris page. i asked him if there was an air of expectancy about the easing of restrictions. there is definitely a sense of anticipation here in northern ireland this morning. so far, as you say, there are no dates in place for all of the different sectors of the economy to reopen, though restrictions have been eased somewhat over the last few weeks and, also, the devolved government here at the stormont executive have set out a five—stage plan to move
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northern ireland out of lockdown, although there wasn't a firm timetable attached to each of the five steps in that plan. that may well be changing today, the executive will be meeting later on this morning and it's understood they will be considering a paper which is setting out some dates over the next few weeks for reopening. for example, next friday, the 23rd of april, under the plan, close—contact services like hairdressers would come back, also driving tests would resume. a week after that, you'd have all shops reopening on the 30th of april and into next month, the 10th of may, hospitality businesses would reopen with up to six people from two households allowed to sit outside and enjoy a meal and a drink. so those are the key dates, i suppose, as regards many people and some sort of semblance of normal life returning. beyond that, the executive will,
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it is thought, decide, that really from the 1st ofjune, it will be the earliest there can be a wider reopening. for example, hotels wouldn't be able to reopen before then and indoor socialising wouldn't be allowed before the start ofjune, although it looks like, come mid—may, the number of people able to meet up outside inside private gardens will be increased, so 15 people from up to three households could meet in a garden, for example, so all of this to be decided by ministers and they will hear the latest health advice but all the indications are coronaviruses under control are coronavirus is under control here, the number of deaths and hospitalisations have fallen a lot and the stormont assembly has been recalled for a special sitting at 3pm this afternoon, so that points towards a significant announcement. let me also ask you about a meeting due to take place today between brandon lewis, secretary of state for northern ireland, and ireland's foreign minister simon coveney, questions around the northern ireland protocol and perhaps something else
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on the agenda. tell us about that. that's right, simon coveney is in london for two days to have talks with senior members of the government, brandon lewis, as you mentioned and the foreign secretary dominic raab, the government's chief brexit negotiator lord frost and mr coveney will also be meeting with keir starmer and senior members of the shadow cabinet, so on the agenda for all of those talks, as you say, the northern ireland protocol. while mr coveney can't negotiate on the details of the protocol, there will be various ideas around to smooth its operation and smooth the trade between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, because those negotiations are handled by brussels, of course, not by dublin, but he can certainly talk to the government about various aspects of the protocol and how it is operating and also of course about the recent street violence in northern ireland, most of which has taken
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place in loyalist areas. there have been nearly 90 police officers injured in a week of trouble on the streets, up until last friday night, so that has, of course, raised much concern here in belfast, also in london and dublin and one of the significant factors in all of that was a sense of unease in loyalist areas about the northern ireland protocol, which loyalists see as imposing a trade border between northern ireland and great britain, so that is all in the mix. talks between the uk and the eu do seem to be progressing and mr coveney�*s visit will discuss both the wider picture of the northern ireland protocol, the brexit arrangements for northern ireland and what has been happening on the ground here with those very unfortunate scenes of rioting in belfast and other places across northern ireland. four out of every five positive rapid coronavirus tests taken in england in the last month appear to have returned a correct result —
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that's according to the latest figures from public health england. there had been concerns about the reliability of the lateral flow tests, but scientists say the latest results show they can be a valuable tool in controlling the pandemic. the tests are now available for free to everyone in england, while a similar scheme will be introduced in scotland from the end of the month. the royal family has released new photographs of the duke of edinburgh, including one of him and the queen alongside their great—grandchildren. this was taken in 2018 by the duchess of cambridge. preparations are continuing for his funeral on saturday, which will take place at st george's chapel in the grounds of windsor castle. let's get more on this the the telegraph's associate editor and royal correspondent camilla tominey. thank you forjoining us today. and to what extent are the duke's own wishes and plans for his funeral
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able to be incorporated into the day, given the pandemic? well, because of— day, given the pandemic? well, because of the _ day, given the pandemic? well, because of the pandemic, - day, given the pandemic? well, because of the pandemic, to - day, given the pandemic? well, because of the pandemic, to a l day, given the pandemic? it because of the pandemic, to a great extent, to be honest, he had always insisted on a non—state funeral, so a royal ceremonial funeral more insisted on a non—state funeral, so a royal ceremonialfuneral more in line with the queen mother's in 2002 but, equally, because of restrictions, it will be significantly scaled down and many who knew the duke would agree he would have been quite in favour of a much more low—key event. i think he probably would have taken some delight in the idea of people not gathering to lay flowers or queueing to sign condolence books because, in light, as in death, he didn't want a fuss. having said that, it will seem quite military in feel and have quite military in feel and have quite a nautical tone to it, because there will be moments where there will be piping bands and moments where they echo some of the sounds, calls that are made on boats, as a nod to the duke of edinburgh's a previous career in the royal navy. he was mentioned in dispatches during the second world war so that
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is entirely appropriate and fitting. what will also be an interesting aspect is the fact the outdoor procession well include this adapted land rover hearse, which i think we will get more details later today among the more ceremonial details. however, the queen isn't taking part in the eight minute procession from the state entrance to windsor castle to the steps of st george's chapel, she will be inside and there is some speculation as to whether the 30 members of the congregation will have to wear masks. we think so under the rules but equally, the queen, because of the situation, will cut somewhat of an isolated figure because she will have to stand two metres apart from her nearest and dearest.— stand two metres apart from her nearest and dearest. and, as you sa , 30 nearest and dearest. and, as you say. 30 under— nearest and dearest. and, as you say, 30 under the _ nearest and dearest. and, as you say, 30 under the rules, - nearest and dearest. and, as you | say, 30 under the rules, attending and when you take into account children and grandchildren, that will account for the bulk of that number but will there be space for other people who we may not have expected to be there? close aides of the the duke, for example? we
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certainl the the duke, for example? - certainly think his private secretary archer miller bakewell will be there and we hear that three of the duke's cousins are isolating in windsor, they are currently behind closed door is at a house in ascot and, like prince harry, are having to go into quarantine. all of these people can at the funeral anyway under special circumstances but i think they will adopt the government's test and release scheme, said prince harry, at frogmore cottage now, we'll take a pcr test on friday to make sure that as well as attending the funeral, he can see other family members under different circumstances before returning to los angeles. thank you ve much returning to los angeles. thank you very much for— returning to los angeles. thank you very much for that. _ a major landslide has sent
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4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on dorset�*sjurassic coast. it's the biggest landslip to happen there in 60 years — and as you can see, the incident has dramatically changed the coast�*s landscape. i asked john maguire what had caused it to happen. i asked john maguire what had caused it to ha en. ~ i asked john maguire what had caused it to happen-— it to happen. wet, dry, geology, coastal erosion, _ it to happen. wet, dry, geology, coastal erosion, all— it to happen. wet, dry, geology, coastal erosion, all sorts - it to happen. wet, dry, geology, coastal erosion, all sorts of- coastal erosion, all sorts of factors which we will unpack in a second. since we have been here this morning, obviously the currents and tides have brought this silt across, which is still material coming down the landslide and although we are shooting into the sun here, so it is tricky and of course we are keeping a safe distance, it gives you an idea ofjust how much material has come down. it looks like mud to the naked eye but when you look closely, there are huge boulders in amongst it and out into the water, you can also see trees and bushes and some of the vegetation that would have come down from a certain part of the
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cliff. we think the cliffs here are probably around 500 feet high, so a spectacular sight to say the least. sam scriven, from thejurassic heritage trust, a geologist, anita was asking what has caused this, the science behind it. what do we think has happened? it is science behind it. what do we think has happened?— has happened? it is a completely natural event, _ has happened? it is a completely natural event, of _ has happened? it is a completely natural event, of course, - has happened? it is a completely natural event, of course, so - has happened? it is a completely natural event, of course, so in i has happened? it is a completely. natural event, of course, so in one sense _ natural event, of course, so in one sense it _ natural event, of course, so in one sense it is — natural event, of course, so in one sense it is the _ natural event, of course, so in one sense it is the cliffs doing their thing _ sense it is the cliffs doing their thing but — sense it is the cliffs doing their thing but the particular event is down _ thing but the particular event is down to— thing but the particular event is down to the arrangement of the geology — down to the arrangement of the geology. so you have this grey clay and on _ geology. so you have this grey clay and on top — geology. so you have this grey clay and on top of that, porous sandstone which _ and on top of that, porous sandstone which has _ and on top of that, porous sandstone which has soaked up a lot of water over the _ which has soaked up a lot of water over the wet winter months and you can see _ over the wet winter months and you can see it— over the wet winter months and you can see itjust dribbling out over the wet winter months and you can see it just dribbling out across the top _ can see it just dribbling out across the top of— can see it just dribbling out across the top of that grey clay, down the cliff face, — the top of that grey clay, down the cliff face, the wet patches is where the water — cliff face, the wet patches is where the water is literally flowing out from _ the water is literally flowing out from inside the cliff. so you have the heavy, wet sandstone on top _ so you have the heavy, wet sandstone on top and. _ so you have the heavy, wet sandstone on top and, as it starts to dry out, it's to _ on top and, as it starts to dry out, it's to change _ on top and, as it starts to dry out, it's to change and it weakens and
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collapses, — it's to change and it weakens and collapses, but why here? why here? why this _ collapses, but why here? why here? why this particular spot? nobody knows _ why this particular spot? nobody knows and these things are always completely unpredictable. and they do ha en completely unpredictable. and they do happen quite _ completely unpredictable. and they do happen quite often. _ completely unpredictable. and they do happen quite often. although i completely unpredictable. and they l do happen quite often. although this is a very large one and it is spectacular to us to see, this stretch of coastline, these events happen fairly regularly, don't they? that is one of the best things about the world _ that is one of the best things about the world heritage sites, these are largely— the world heritage sites, these are largely natural coastlines which are allowed _ largely natural coastlines which are allowed to evolve on its own with natural _ allowed to evolve on its own with natural processes and this is it, the coast — natural processes and this is it, the coast doing its thing. some people — the coast doing its thing. some people will look at this and think it is damaging the coast in some way and, it is damaging the coast in some way and. of— it is damaging the coast in some way and, of course, it is a hazard for people — and, of course, it is a hazard for people but— and, of course, it is a hazard for people but this, in a sense, is the coast _ people but this, in a sense, is the coast being — people but this, in a sense, is the coast being created, how this beautiful _ coast being created, how this beautiful environment forms. no one will come in — beautiful environment forms. no one will come in clear— beautiful environment forms. no one will come in clear this _ beautiful environment forms. no one will come in clear this away - beautiful environment forms. no one will come in clear this away but - will come in clear this away but will come in clear this away but will the natural element return to that stretch of the beach that is no cover to shingle, as we have here? it is interesting, what is likely to have _ it is interesting, what is likely to have happened is that will have brought— have happened is that will have brought down a whole load of very bil brought down a whole load of very big boulders with it but, as you said earlier, a lot of it is very
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loose — said earlier, a lot of it is very loose mud _ said earlier, a lot of it is very loose mud and sand and clay which will be _ loose mud and sand and clay which will be slowly stripped away naturally by the sea and the rain and so _ naturally by the sea and the rain and so if— naturally by the sea and the rain and so if you came back year after the winter. — and so if you came back year after the winter, for example, a lot of that will— the winter, for example, a lot of that will probably be gone but what is left _ that will probably be gone but what is left may be a big boulder arc, so that might — is left may be a big boulder arc, so that might be there for hundreds of years— that might be there for hundreds of years yet. _ that might be there for hundreds of years yet, so we may never get back to this _ years yet, so we may never get back to this shingle beach in that spot again _ to this shingle beach in that spot again we — to this shingle beach in that spot aaain. ~ ~' ., to this shingle beach in that spot aain, . ~' ., ., ., ., to this shingle beach in that spot aaain. ~ ~ ., ., ., ., , again. we know the nationaltrust, that owns the _ again. we know the nationaltrust, that owns the land _ again. we know the nationaltrust, that owns the land on _ again. we know the nationaltrust, that owns the land on the - again. we know the nationaltrust, that owns the land on the clifftop i that owns the land on the clifftop ear, have closed the coastal footpath that runs along the edge of the cliff so clearly people should respect nature, respect what is happening here and keep their distance. ., , distance. that is right, the footpath — distance. that is right, the footpath has _ distance. that is right, the footpath has been - distance. that is right, the l footpath has been diverted, distance. that is right, the i footpath has been diverted, i distance. that is right, the - footpath has been diverted, i should say, the _ footpath has been diverted, i should say, the countryside rangers have been _ say, the countryside rangers have been working with the national trust but they— been working with the national trust but they have cordoned off 250 metres — but they have cordoned off 250 metres of clifftop and within the cordon. — metres of clifftop and within the cordon, they are expecting some of the cliff— cordon, they are expecting some of the cliff edge to collapse so it is an active — the cliff edge to collapse so it is an active event, not only here on the beach— an active event, not only here on the beach in— an active event, not only here on the beach in front of us with the silt and — the beach in front of us with the silt and the mud washed away and we can imagine _ silt and the mud washed away and we can imagine how treacherous it would be if you _ can imagine how treacherous it would be if you tried to cross, but the
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cliff edge — be if you tried to cross, but the cliff edge is dangerous so the messages you can observe it from a safe distance but best to stay away. to be _ safe distance but best to stay away. to be honest, the drone footage and spectacular— to be honest, the drone footage and spectacular photographs taken from the air— spectacular photographs taken from the air by— spectacular photographs taken from the air by people is the best way to look at _ the air by people is the best way to look at this— the air by people is the best way to look at this thing. you the air by people is the best way to look at this thing.— look at this thing. you won't get a better view. _ look at this thing. you won't get a better view, thank— look at this thing. you won't get a better view, thank you _ look at this thing. you won't get a better view, thank you very - look at this thing. you won't get a better view, thank you very much | better view, thank you very much indeed from thejurassic heritage trust. i don't know if you will be able to see, it might be tricky to pick ad, shooting into the sun but where the top of the lower grey cliffs are, there are sheep there. we can see them. that wasjohn that was john maguire that wasjohn maguire reporting on that huge landslide. the headlines on bbc news... david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. a fourth night of protests in the us
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city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer, who's been charged with second—degree manslaughter. the us confirms it will complete its military withdrawal from afghanistan by september the eleventh — the twentieth anniversary of the al-qaeda terror attacks. rehearsals have been taking place ahead of the funeral of the duke of edinburgh on saturday — we'll find out details of who will attend — later. in three weeks' time, voters across england, scotland and wales will go to the polls for a series of elections. there'll be increased safety measures due to the pandemic and it will take longer to get the results. across bbc news today, we're looking ahead to those elections and taking a look
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at the role local and devolved government plays in society. in a moment, we'll speak to professorjohn curtice, professor of politics at university of strathclyde, but, first, let's take a look at what's happening where. it's the biggest election day until the next general election — and due to the cancellation of last year's local elections — on may the 6th — thousands of seats across the uk are up for grabs. in england they'll be voting in 143 local council authorities — with about 5,000 seats in contention. councillors are in change of many services — from bin collections to social care, sport facilities and libraries. there are also 13 mayoral elections — including greater manchester — the west midlands, london and for the first time in west yorkshire. voters in london will also elect 25 members of the london assembly — who examine the mayors decisions voters in england & wales will also be asked to elect police and crime commissioners. they set the budget and priorities for police in their area.
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there are also national elections in scotland & wales. 129 seats are up for grabs in the scottish parliament. that's made up of 73 constituencies — and a further 56 seats made up from regional lists. and in wales, 60 seats are in play — 40 constituencies — and a further 20 seats again made up from the regional list system. the election is on may the 6th, but due to the coronavirus restrictions it will be a few days until we find out the results. professorjohn curtice, professor of politics at university of strathclyde joins me now. i believe i am correct in saying that the date for applying for postal votes has already passed there? ., �* , postal votes has already passed there? . �*, . .,
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there? that's correct. the date was made earlier— there? that's correct. the date was made earlier in _ there? that's correct. the date was made earlier in scotland _ there? that's correct. the date was made earlier in scotland as - there? that's correct. the date was made earlier in scotland as a - there? that's correct. the date was made earlier in scotland as a resultj made earlier in scotland as a result of legislation for the selection. it's still the case that more people have applied to vote by post. we are expecting 24% of people to be registering to vote by post, previously it was 7%. postal votes are expecting to be delivered in the next few days. in that sense, at least, so far as the outcome of elections, the die is cast already. that is linked very much to the pandemic and people not wanting to physically go to polling stations. indeed, the parties and local authorities are encouraging people to apply for precisely that reason. tell us more about the make—up of the elections, including these regional lists which we were mentioning. regional lists which we were mentioning-— regional lists which we were mentionina. , ., ., mentioning. the scottish parliament election is double _ mentioning. the scottish parliament election is double balloted. - mentioning. the scottish parliament election is double balloted. people | election is double balloted. people have two votes. 0ne election is double balloted. people have two votes. one is for a local
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constituency msp, the other is for a party list. underthese constituency msp, the other is for a party list. under these two elements are combined to produce hollywood. essentially, we have 73 constituencies in which a single msp is elected as the local constituency msp. but then we also divide scotland into eight separate regions, in each of which there are seven additional msps to be elected on the basis of that second party list vote. what then essentially happens is that the typical region has 16 msps in total, nine constituency, seven regional lists. and what happens is that first of all we count the constituency votes and see who has won those. we then add up the list votes. we then allocate the seven additional seats in such a way that the total number of seats, constituency and lists won
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by each party in each region is as proportional as possible to the outcome in the list. so potentially, most likely, it is the outcome on that second list vote that is potentially the crucial one. we rarely talk _ potentially the crucial one. we rarely talk about scottish politics without looking at it through the prism of the independence question. what influence will that have on these elections? taste what influence will that have on these elections?— what influence will that have on these elections? we are fighting an election where _ these elections? we are fighting an election where it _ these elections? we are fighting an election where it looks _ these elections? we are fighting an election where it looks like - these elections? we are fighting an election where it looks like the - election where it looks like the country is pretty much divided, in terms of support for independence or not. previously it was a minority for independence, albeit a large one. point two, whether or not people are going to vote for the snp or not on that constituency vote, it is pretty much going to be
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determined by independence. polls suggest 90% of people in favour of independence say they are going to vote for the snp. 0nly independence say they are going to vote for the snp. only about 9% of people opposed to it. hitherto, an important element for the support of the snp has been gathering support from some people who are not necessarily in favour of independence, but think the snp could run the devolved administration more effectively. those days are thought to be over. this election looks like a quality referendum, at least in so far if you're going to vote for a nationalist party or not. what im act nationalist party or not. what impact the — nationalist party or not. what impact the alex _ nationalist party or not. what impact the alex salmond, - nationalist party or not. what | impact the alex salmond, the nationalist party or not. what impact the alex salmond, the former snp leader's new party, have won all that? ., , snp leader's new party, have won all that? . , , , ., that? that is the six question. he is standing _ that? that is the six question. he is standing only _ that? that is the six question. he is standing only on _ that? that is the six question. he is standing only on that _ that? that is the six question. he is standing only on that list - that? that is the six question. he is standing only on that list part l is standing only on that list part of the election. his stratagem is to say, actually, the snp do so well in constituencies, look at what happened last time, that they don't get entitled to getting list seats
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in the list allocation. it's a waste of time voting for them on the list vote, vote for me instead. that is his argument. now, so far most polls have suggested he is not doing that well. two 3% of the vote. 0ne polling company yesterday repeated its estimate of 6%. that might not sound much, but the way the system works, if you have 6% you are pretty likely to start picking up list msps. if you have 3%, you might end “p msps. if you have 3%, you might end up with nothing. mr salmond might end up with some representation. but along the way, the crucial issue perhaps is what impact does he have on the snp? although the snp, for the most part, look as though they are going to pick up constituency seats, there are a couple of regions in scotland, the highlands and the south of scotland, where they did pick up list seats last time. given where we are at in the opinion polls, the snp at around 50% of
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constituencies, maybe they will and maybe they won't need the odd list seatin maybe they won't need the odd list seat in order to get 65 seats. why does that matter? that matters because 65 seats as an overall majority. the snp would prefer to have a majority, rather than talking to mr salmond. 0verall, they would want an overall majority. the conservatives are trying to stop one, because the snp, of course, they last won an overall majority in 2011, in the wake of that, the then conservative prime minister david cameron accepted that the snp had won the moral right to hold a referendum. borisjohnson does not wish to give the snp a referendum after this election.— after this election. thank you, as ever, for after this election. thank you, as ever. foryour— after this election. thank you, as ever, for your encyclopedic - ever, for your encyclopedic knowledge and level of detail on all of that. professor sirjohn curtis. instagram has apologised for what it says was a mistake with its algorithm, that meant content about diet was promoted to users with eating disorders.
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the feature has been changed after the social media platform received complaints. our business presenter, victoria fritz, joins me now. what is instagram saying about how this happened, and how many complaints do we know it got? it got complaints do we know it got? it got an awful lot — complaints do we know it got? it got an awful lot of— complaints do we know it got? it got an awful lot of complaints. _ complaints do we know it got? it grrt an awful lot of complaints. the way that this has happened, instagram has been looking for a long time to evolve its search feature. search as where lots of big companies, big tech companies make their money. they've been trying to evolve their search feature for some time. a lot of their developers were put on the back burner because of covid, but they are now trying to roll out different types of development and innovations on the platform. 0ne different types of development and innovations on the platform. one of which was trying to search beyond the usual hashtags and usernames. the idea was to try to promote general trends. the idea was to try to promote generaltrends. now, instagram says they should never have put diet tips
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and wellness and lifestyle as part of that. it should have been much more generic. as a result, individuals who might have looked for tips on how to fast, that kind of content was promoted to them. then, of course, the sort of people that are online looking for things like appetite suppressants, a proportion of those will be suffering from mental illnesses relating to anorexia. this, of course, has come in a week in which the former big brother contestant nicky graham has died this week, the age of 38, because her long—running battle with anorexia. she was somebody very much known to people who are on social media, and charities have said this is absolutely disgraceful, and they have seen a rise of 600% of calls to the charity because of anorexia
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because of the anxiety caused by covid. so, terrible timing for anything like this to have happened. instagram have said this was a complete vault, this was their fault, they should never have put it on there, and the fault was corrected on monday. ads, on there, and the fault was corrected on monday.- on there, and the fault was corrected on monday. on there, and the fault was corrected on monda . �* ., ., , ., , corrected on monday. a lot of people watchin: corrected on monday. a lot of people watching the — corrected on monday. a lot of people watching the big _ corrected on monday. a lot of people watching the big social— corrected on monday. a lot of people watching the big social media - watching the big social media company so instances like this. i want to talk to you about deliveroo, shares plunged when it was listed on the london stock exchange last month. but it is reporting some pretty healthy orders and sales for the last quarter? i pretty healthy orders and sales for the last quarter?— the last quarter? i suppose it is not surprising. _ the last quarter? i suppose it is not surprising. orders - the last quarter? i suppose it is not surprising. orders have - the last quarter? i suppose it is i not surprising. orders have more not surprising. 0rders have more than doubled over the course of lockdown. sales have more than doubled as well. the amount of money that people are spending per order is also rising, i guess that is good news for deliveroo. but also, it is a company that has been in the headlines for good news as well as bad news. you will remember there is a long—running dispute as to whether or not drivers, their 50,000 drivers
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working for deliveroo at the moment in this country, whether or not they are self—employed or whether they are self—employed or whether they are actually workers. although deliveroo has provided meals for people right up and down the country, the order base has grown by 93% over the last year. lots more people are on this platform, and it has been a lifeline to grocers, to retailers, restaurateurs, chefs, who otherwise would have been out of business. there are big question marks still, which a lot of investors are looking at, thinking, hang on, it is a business that is yet to make a profit. this is a business that has severe issues when it comes to corporate governance and when it comes to workers' rights. you are absolutely right. shares tumbled when they were launched on the stock market to market weeks ago. big question marks, but deliveroo is doing well when it comes to orders, which is helping p"°p up comes to orders, which is helping prop up the catering industry. i prop up the catering industry. i can't let you go without talking about a domestic situation. i
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retweeted your tweet a couple of minutes ago, believe me, viewers, tweet is the operative word, because a rook had come down your chimney. is still there? it is a rook had come down your chimney. is still there?— is still there? it is still there. i thinki is still there? it is still there. i think i have — is still there? it is still there. i think i have loaded _ is still there? it is still there. i think i have loaded into - is still there? it is still there. i - thinki have loaded into submission. think i have loaded into submission. it's been incredibly quiet. before i came on air, it was trying to scrape its way back up the chimney behind me. i think i'm to call it annita because it is behaving very well. that is a compliment, victoria! i know that you were really concerned about it. you're looking for anyone with advice on what is the best thing to do, to help get it out of your house?— thing to do, to help get it out of your house? exactly. i know they have been _ your house? exactly. i know they have been nesting _ your house? exactly. i know they have been nesting at _ your house? exactly. i know they have been nesting at the - your house? exactly. i know they have been nesting at the top - your house? exactly. i know they have been nesting at the top of. your house? exactly. i know they l have been nesting at the top of the chimney, because i hear little twigs falling down the chimney. anybody who has had roots nesting before will know that sound, when they keep tumbling down. yes, about five or ten minutes before coming on to do this interview, i heard the bird
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fall down. i think it is probably the female that is now away from the eggs. as soon as i can, i think i'm going to open the door, open the windows, let it do its thing. hopefully it will fly out. if anyone has better ideas, let me know. she does really — has better ideas, let me know. she does really need to get back to that nest very quickly. hopefully you can manage to get out of the living room. thank you, victoria. if anyone has any ideas on how victoria can do that, with the least trauma to the poor route, they can tweet her and give some advice. i am sure she would appreciate that. —— rook. the headlines on bbc news... david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest
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since modern records began in 2007. a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer, who's been charged with second—degree manslaughter. 20,000 people have been evacuated from their homes in st vincent. the humanitarian crisis caused by the eruptions will last for months, a un official has warned. nearby islands, including barbados, antigua and barbuda could also be badly affected. the united states is reportedly preparing to announce sweeping sanctions against russia for alleged misconduct, in particular what washington says are its efforts to disrupt the us election. the measures are expected to include sanctions against several russian entities and the expulsion of officials. presidentjoe biden earlier warned
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that moscow would pay a price for election meddling if it was confirmed. the sanctions are also a response to other issues, such as russia's involvement in crimea. more now on the funeral of the duke of edinburgh, which will take place in windsor on saturday. while the coronavirus pandemic has kept us locked—down for much of the past year, its impact on the natural world has from wild goats on the streets of llandudno in wales, to porpoises in the rivers of somerset, many people have reported seeing increased animal activity. now, in a new documentary called the year earth changed, sir david attenborough looks at how our relationship with wildlife and nature improved in 2020. 0ur science editor, david shukman, has been speaking to him. march, 2020. 0vernight, our lives are put on pause. you must stay at home.
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but as we stopped, remarkable things start to change. the lock downs have been tougher for people but great for wildlife, as we see in a spectacular new documentary with david attenborough. this is the year earth changed. david, great to talk to you and sorry we can't meet in person, but we have transported you electronically to the wonderful setting of chopwell in kent. i'v e i've been given some snakeskin. what surrised i've been given some snakeskin. what surprised you — i've been given some snakeskin. what surprised you most _ i've been given some snakeskin. what surprised you most about the way the natural world reacted to lockdown? well, how you would expect. the natural world by and large said great. and biodiversity does much
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better. , , , ., great. and biodiversity does much better. , ,, ., ., better. fewer ships mean the ocean is ruieter. better. fewer ships mean the ocean is quieter- and _ better. fewer ships mean the ocean is quieter. and the _ better. fewer ships mean the ocean is quieter. and the humpback- better. fewer ships mean the ocean| is quieter. and the humpback whales seem to hear each other better. flora. seem to hear each other better. now, the can seem to hear each other better. now, they can communicate _ seem to hear each other better. now, they can communicate across - seem to hear each other better. firm-o", they can communicate across greater distances without interruption, and some others, like this one, leave their calves alone. an extremely rare site. she can now head off to feed, safe in the knowledge that she can hear her calves if they need her. ~ ., ., can hear her calves if they need her. . . . ,., can hear her calves if they need her. ~ . ., , , ,., her. what are you suggesting is a more sustainable _ her. what are you suggesting is a more sustainable way _ her. what are you suggesting is a more sustainable way forward. i more sustainable way forward. clearly, lockdowns are extremely damaging for economies around the world. i damaging for economies around the world. , ,,.,, damaging for economies around the world. , , , ., damaging for economies around the world. , ., world. i suppose it is a lesson for us to realise _ world. i suppose it is a lesson for us to realise that _ world. i suppose it is a lesson for us to realise that we _ world. i suppose it is a lesson for us to realise that we have - world. i suppose it is a lesson for us to realise that we have alwaysj us to realise that we have always had a deleterious effect, and we ought to be more careful than we have been. we have thought that animals, like penguins in south africa, survive moderately well. but
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in fact when we retreated we discovered that the penguins actually normally would be doing very much better than they have been doing for decades. so, the lessons are saying, we should not be so domineering. you should allow animals to have more of a chance. that applies all over the place. david, as i was leaving home to come and do this interview, my daughter come in her mid—20s, said, you got to tell david attenborough that i love him. my whole generation loves him. what does it mean to you to have such enthusiastic, devoted, adoring support from a younger generation. adoring support from a younger generation-— adoring support from a younger reneration. ~ ., ., , ., generation. well, what it does to me is that it reminds _ generation. well, what it does to me is that it reminds me _ generation. well, what it does to me is that it reminds me that _ generation. well, what it does to me is that it reminds me that the - is that it reminds me that the natural world, is that it reminds me that the naturalworld, if is that it reminds me that the natural world, if it is allowed to appear and speak to people, it is full of drama. the best i can do is
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to keep out of the way. the best thing i can do is to keep quiet. i've got to say words every now and again to explain what has happened. but the heroes, the human heroes, other cameramen. they are the ones that get the pictures. the appearance _ that get the pictures. the appearance during - that get the pictures. the appearance during the day of this usually nocturnal hunter is a real surprise. not least for our film crew. you can see he is very taken aback. what do you do when a leopard appears out of a corridor? good luck to him and congratulations, he went on filming. it's a very dramatic sequence. i've had some intimidating moments in nry— i've had some intimidating moments in my life. _ i've had some intimidating moments in my life, but that is of the top
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of it _ in my life, but that is of the top of it. ., , ., in my life, but that is of the top of it. . , ., , ., in my life, but that is of the top ofit. . , ., . of it. have you ever been that close to a leopard? _ of it. have you ever been that close to a leopard? yes, _ of it. have you ever been that close to a leopard? yes, but— of it. have you ever been that close to a leopard? yes, but inside i of it. have you ever been that close to a leopard? yes, but inside a i of it. have you ever been that close | to a leopard? yes, but inside a land rover. to a leopard? yes, but inside a land rover- that — to a leopard? yes, but inside a land rover. that was _ to a leopard? yes, but inside a land rover. that was nothing _ to a leopard? yes, but inside a land rover. that was nothing but - to a leopard? yes, but inside a land rover. that was nothing but him i to a leopard? yes, but inside a land| rover. that was nothing but him and his camera between him and the leopard. his camera between him and the leoard. ., , .,, his camera between him and the leoard. ., , ., . leopard. for people watching your programme _ leopard. for people watching your programme that's _ leopard. for people watching your programme that's going _ leopard. for people watching your programme that's going to - leopard. for people watching your programme that's going to be i leopard. for people watching your. programme that's going to be shown on apple plus tv on friday, what message would you want them to take from it? ., message would you want them to take from it? . ., , , from it? that human beings, even with the best _ from it? that human beings, even with the best will _ from it? that human beings, even with the best will in _ from it? that human beings, even with the best will in the _ from it? that human beings, even with the best will in the world, i with the best will in the world, cannot restrict the natural world. that is what we are doing, pushing it aside. even the most considerate of us are pushing aside the natural world, denying space to other creatures which live on this planet. that is almost inevitable, to some degree. let us realise we are intruders, that we are late comers, and that the natural world actually, by and large, would do much better if we weren't there at all. to by and large, would do much better if we weren't there at all.— if we weren't there at all. to what extent is it _ if we weren't there at all. to what extent is it important _ if we weren't there at all. to what extent is it important or _ if we weren't there at all. to what extent is it important or not, i if we weren't there at all. to what extent is it important or not, or . if we weren't there at all. to what j extent is it important or not, or in what form, that the great climate summit takes place at the end of
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this year? summit takes place at the end of this ear? ~ , ., ., , this year? well, it is our last chance- _ this year? well, it is our last chance. and _ this year? well, it is our last chance. and young - this year? well, it is our last chance. and young people i this year? well, it is our last - chance. and young people understand the science pretty clearly. they cannot understand what it is that prevents grown—ups, adults, taking central action, prevents grown—ups, adults, taking centralaction, because prevents grown—ups, adults, taking central action, because they know what the action should be. we know what the action should be. we know what the action should be. we know what the problems are, we know how to solve it. why aren't they doing it? of course, the answer is that to do it, you've got to get the agreement of the entire human race. at no time in the history of the nations in the world, until now, said, ok, we are taking rather more of our share, said, ok, we are taking rather more of ourshare, we said, ok, we are taking rather more of our share, we will retreat and let you have a share. that unselfishness is not an attitude that has been present in human politics ever. it's got to come.
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because if it doesn't, we will lose the lot. ., ., ., . �* �* because if it doesn't, we will lose the lot. ., . ., . �* �* , now it's time for a look at the weather. nice, sunny day out there today. the winds are light as well. it's starting to feel warmer and warmer in that strong april sunshine, and not much change expected over the next two or three days. a look at the headline, dry for most. implying there could be some sprinkles of rain. even with this high pressure today, it's not going to be completely dry. in fact, we are expecting showers to form anywhere from lincolnshire, east anglia, the south—east, home counties possibly, even to the south coast. places like brighton, perhaps portsmouth and southampton might catch one or two showers. and the breeze is also coming off the north sea. so it is a little on the chilly side with that north—north—east wind. you know how sometimes we mention there are a lot of isobars on the maps and it's windy? well, look, there's hardly any isobars, just one circling the uk.
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so, very little in the way of wind, which means that temperatures of 9—13 degrees in that april sunshine feels absolutely fine. so, here's the forecast for this evening and overnight. it's going to be a repeat performance of what we've been used to for quite some time now. so, clear skies and light wind, leading to frost. not desperately cold this coming night. i think most towns and cities will be hovering around about the zero mark, and some of these western coasts should be frost free. here is the high pressure for tomorrow. you can see it's actually centred across scandinavia. still influencing us, but weather fronts are trying to push in. i think they will park themselves just to the west of ireland and the western isles during the course of friday. there might be some splits and spots of rain getting into the outer hebrides, but the vast majority of scotland should have a fine day. sunny for aberdeen, glasgow, liverpool and birmingham, all the way down to the south coast. another fine day tomorrow. i don't think we will have any showers in the south—east tomorrow. here's a look at a saturday. the high pressure is still there across scandinavia. it's still influencing our weather and the weather fronts are still to the north—west of us, they are just brushing us. so, the outlook as we head into the weekend, well, for most of us it's looking absolutely fine. out of the two, i'd say
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saturday is the better day. there'll be more sunshine around. temperatures will be about 13 degrees or so. in the north—west of the country, as we head through the weekend, cloud amounts will increase and there will be some spots of rain.
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this is bbc news, i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11. david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. say his name! daunte wright! a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer, who's been charged with second—degree manslaughter. the us confirms it will complete its military withdrawal from afghanistan by september
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the 11th — the 20th anniversary of the al-qaeda terror attacks. prince charles and the duchess of cornwall examine some of the floral tributes to the duke of edinburgh, ahead of saturday's funeral — we'll find out details of who will attend later. and a major landslide sends 4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on dorset�*sjurassic coast. good morning and welcome to bbc news. david cameron says he'll "respond positively" to any requests for him to give evidence to the lobbying inquiry into greensill. the former prime minister has faced criticism for contacting ministers in an attempt to win financial support for the firm
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before it collapsed. it's sparked a wider row over private companies' attempts to influence government. 0ur political correspondent helen catt reports. the way david cameron used his contacts with ministers on behalf of the businessman who employed him, lex greensill, sparked a row about lobbying that has dominated westminster for days. yesterday conservative mps voted against setting up a special parliamentary investigation. so the noes have it, the noes have it. but an existing committee of mps will look into at least some of it. greensill capital has since collapsed. the treasury select committee will look into the lessons that can be learned from that, and how the treasury itself responded to lobbying on the firm's behalf. it's thought other committees might do the same, and one of them is likely to ask david cameron to give evidence. his spokesman said he would respond positively to any such requests when the terms of reference were clear. the controversy is likely to come up
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again today in parliament. lord pickles, who chairs the body which vets jobs ministers and senior officials can take when they leave government, is due to appear before mps. it's been planned for a while, but earlier this week he expressed concerns when it emerged that a senior civil servant, bill crothers, had been allowed to work part—time for greensill in 2015 whilst still doing his governmentjob. the most senior civil servant in the country, simon case, has told the heads of all departments they have to declare by the end of the week if any of their officials have second jobs like this. none of this affects the review announced by borisjohnson into the links between greensill and government. that is being led by a lawyer, who the prime minister says will have free rein to speak to whoever he needs to. the evidence will be heard privately, but it's due to report the result injune. helen catt, bbc news. well, this morning a committee of mps has been taking evidence on the whole issue of lobbying —
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earlier i got the latest from our from our political correspondent greg dawson. the labour party wanted to establish its own separate parliamentary inquiry into this lobbying issue, and they failed on that because ministers voted against that in the house of commons yesterday. but, despite all that, labour seems to have got its way because we've heard from the public administration committee this morning that they do plan to investigate the greensill issue. we've also heard from the treasury that they, too, will hold their own inquiry. now, the scope of those committees is yet to be revealed but we're getting a flavour already of what is going to be looked at. the public affairs committee is actually speaking to the head of the acoba body, which looks at the appointments of ministers and civil servants once they leave — that's eric pickles, the former government minister. eric pickles making very clear that he is not at all impressed with the current rules that are set up within the system for civil servants, and indeed government ministers, to go and work for private companies.
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it shouldn't take place unless it could be taking place within a very clear, tight, regulated system and i think part of the problem we've got is it is not being clear where the boundaries lay. in fact — i hope this doesn't sound rude — there doesn't seem to be any boundaries at all. lord pickles, the former cabinet minister, plain—speaking on his views. clearly, he wants his own body to have more powers. we are expecting of course, as i mentioned, a public accounts committee investigation into this. the government's own committee, which will be led by a lawyer, nigel boardman, is expected to report injune. joining me now is dave penman, the general secretary of the fda, the union for managers and professionals in public service. thank you for your time this morning. we are talking about
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lobbying. presumably there is no account of quibble with the idea that governments can be opened to understand special interest of various groups but the question is, how do you make that process transparent and ethical? it is transparent and ethical? it is really important _ transparent and ethical? it is really important that - transparent and ethical? it 3 really important that government understands what private business and campaigning have to say because it makes a better government, but access to government has to be equal. the question here is whether people can pay for privileged access and whether former ministers are actually getting even extra special by texting, arranging drinks. perhaps in their final months of a governmentjob. moving into working
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for a private company that grey area overtiming. dealing for a private company that grey area over timing. dealing there should be a clear division that someone in a governmentjob cannot then be going on to work immediately or at the same time for a private company? it really depends on what they are going to do and whether there is a potential conflict at the moment. and there are rules there just now. many members have had to go through that process, even when there isn't an obvious conflict of interest. but in order to be transparent they need to apply. the committee at this
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point, too much of this, particularly ministers as a voluntary process. the self referral for approval and we are seeing time and time again ministers who have not declared this interest apologising after the fact, whereas if you are a civil servant you need approval before you are allowed to move to anotherjob. there is no doubt we need all this stifling. that is a really obvious point of potential for tightening that is a really obvious point of potentialfor tightening up. i spoke to a lobbyist earlier said that what is needed is a register of lobbying rather than a register of lobbyists because there are lots of people lobbying who are not registered lobbyists and that seems to make sense. how do you then deal with the fact there may well be lobbying going on in private? {lit fact there may well be lobbying going on in private?— going on in private? of course, ultimately. _ going on in private? of course, ultimately, greater— going on in private? of course, i ultimately, greater transparency is
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what we all need to build and rebuild public trust in all of this it does they will always be people who want to influence government and we need to make sure that government, whether civil servants or governments, what those obligations are and they have to report and everyone can see what is going on and who is trying to influence government. my concern is the private text messages, the meetings full stop we only found out some of this information. the government have been dragged into this position of greater transparency particularly around the contacts they have with vomit ministers and the former prime minister. we need that commitment from government —— can't wait ministers. maybe now the focus is not looking at the conduct of current ministers and that is why there is a series of additional
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enquiries from parliamentary committees on this because government have left a void in looking at the issues that need addressing. looking at the issues that need addressing-— looking at the issues that need addressina. , , addressing. some will be televised. we do not know— addressing. some will be televised. we do not know who _ addressing. some will be televised. we do not know who will _ addressing. some will be televised. we do not know who will be - addressing. some will be televised. we do not know who will be called i addressing. some will be televised. | we do not know who will be called to give evidence, potentially some very interesting individual could be called to give evidence. when we piece all six of these together it will be interesting to see to what point we get in terms of the transparency but it seems to me that what you are saying is if governments, the civil service and so on, is to be held up to the highest standards of transparency and democracy then reform is needed. can you still hear me? can you still hear me? i think unfortunately we have lost that line with dave penman, general secretary of the fda, which is a shame although we have got to the last question and we got through most of the points in that interview. in the past few minutes, nhs england have published their latest stats.
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the total number waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million — the highest since modern records began in 2007. the figures also show there were nearly 388,000 patients waiting more than a year for non urgent surgery. i've been getting more detail on the figures from our health editor hugh pym. the pandemic caused huge unprecedented pressure on the nhs, resources had to be switched to dealing with covid patients in areas which had to be made secure with infection control and so on. staff were diverted into those areas, so a large amount of routine, nonurgent work procedures and operations had to be cancelled. there was a thought last autumn that it would start getting back to normal and, certainly, the numbers improved with the nhs in all parts of the uk — this is obviously a uk issue. the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland has considerable challenges, as well, with these long waits.
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it had been thought that there was the beginning of a path back to normality, with hospitals urged to get on with reducing their waiting lists and get to the most urgent patients within those lists. then of course we had this latest wave injanuary and february, which set everything back. and nhs england actually have made the point that 40% of all hospital covid admissions occurred in those two months —january and february — so there was particular pressure then. but even so, this is a long—term challenge for nhs leaders — how is this list going to to be reduced? absolutely — that is my next question — what is the plan to do that? i was talking to one of the regional directors for the royal college of nursing a few minutes ago — she was talking about 40,000 nursing vacancies as just one example where there's a shortfall in staff, so what is the plan to tackle these massive waiting lists? well, staff are exhausted and some say they're burned out after the huge workload in the last year. that itself is a problem —
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you obviously can't recruit staff just to come in and start bringing down waiting lists — that's a longer term plan, workforce. you can put more money into the system, and the government at westminster has allocated some more money for this current financial year to do some work on waiting lists. nhs analysts and commentators have said that more is needed because you need to open up operating theatres for longer periods of time, bring in staff on overtime, just to get on through it. now some hospitals are trying to do this in as smart a way as possible, to ringfence their non—covid work to make that as secure as possible in terms of infection risk, and to extend operating theatre time, but it's far from easy when you've got hospitals with these different challenges. so it remains a big problem — another longer—term impact of covid on everyone's lives and health.
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we can speak now to kruti shrotri, head of policy at cancer research uk and also to craig russell who started the catch up with cancer campaign, which is calling for the end to cancer treatment delays forced by the coronavirus pandemic. the campaign was started following the death of his daughter kelly, who died injune after her cancer treatment was stopped last march as she was told to stop chemo and self isolate. thanks to you both forjoining us. craig, oursympathies thanks to you both forjoining us. craig, our sympathies on the loss of your daughter, kelly, she was diagnosed with bowel cancer at a very young age. how much do you believe the pandemic contributed to her dying when she did lastjune? well, good morning, ithink the pandemic certainly contributed massively to kelly's death. she was
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a stage for a bowel cancer patient, so there was never going to be a cure, but the chemotherapy that she was on, whilst not curative was certainly a life extender. as soon as she was told to self—isolate due to the risk of covid that chemotherapy stops and that effectively meant there was nothing to stop the cancer spreading further which led to her death injune. what which led to her death in june. what sort of care — which led to her death in june. what sort of care was _ which led to her death in june. what sort of care was available _ which led to her death injune. what sort of care was available to her? she was not getting chemotherapy but was there any other sort of care, palliative care available to her? the only care they had is once by early may when it became apparent that she only had weeks to live, kelly moved in with myself and my wife so we could provide the best care we could come along with support from macmillan nurses and district nurses, but that was basically it. we were left to our
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own devices to do the best we could to a large extent.— to a large extent. sorry to go over this aaain to a large extent. sorry to go over this again but — to a large extent. sorry to go over this again but you _ to a large extent. sorry to go over this again but you were _ to a large extent. sorry to go over this again but you were told i to a large extent. sorry to go over this again but you were told very i this again but you were told very clearly that chemotherapy was absolutely out of the question because of the pressure on resources. because of the pressure on resources-— because of the pressure on resources. ., , ., resources. indeed. to the point where kelly _ resources. indeed. to the point where kelly had _ resources. indeed. to the point where kelly had actually - resources. indeed. to the point where kelly had actually gone i resources. indeed. to the point| where kelly had actually gone in resources. indeed. to the point i where kelly had actually gone in for her usual chemotherapy, gone through the process of checking blood and so on and it was only at that point that she was told that she wouldn't be having chemotherapy that day and to self—isolate for 12 weeks. i be having chemotherapy that day and to self-isolate for 12 weeks.— to self-isolate for 12 weeks. i want to self-isolate for 12 weeks. i want to brin: in to self-isolate for 12 weeks. i want to bring in kruti _ to self-isolate for 12 weeks. i want to bring in kruti shrotri. _ to self-isolate for 12 weeks. i want to bring in kruti shrotri. that i to self-isolate for 12 weeks. i want to bring in kruti shrotri. that is i to bring in kruti shrotri. that is an absolutely heartbreaking story to hear about create's daughter, kelly, and a very stark and brutal example, frankly, of how the pandemic has meant that so many other treatments, in this case a life extending treatment, as it would have been for kelly, had to be put on the back burner or indeed cancel entirely because of covid. the statistics we have seen today for nhs england
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paint a picture of a really serious ongoing situation. it is paint a picture of a really serious ongoing situation. it is desperately sad to hear about _ ongoing situation. it is desperately sad to hear about kelly _ ongoing situation. it is desperately sad to hear about kelly and - ongoing situation. it is desperately sad to hear about kelly and sadly l sad to hear about kelly and sadly that is— sad to hear about kelly and sadly that is one — sad to hear about kelly and sadly that is one story of many people whose _ that is one story of many people whose lives have been devastated by covid because people with cancer whose _ covid because people with cancer whose lives have been devastated by covid _ whose lives have been devastated by covid we _ whose lives have been devastated by covid. we have seen disruption to services _ covid. we have seen disruption to services across last year, across crass _ services across last year, across crass screening, diagnostic, treatment. the statistics out today show _ treatment. the statistics out today show that, — treatment. the statistics out today show that, whilst disruption during the second — show that, whilst disruption during the second wave of covid was not as bad the second wave of covid was not as had during _ the second wave of covid was not as bad during the —— was not as bad as during _ bad during the —— was not as bad as during the _ bad during the —— was not as bad as during the first, there has been a disruption — during the first, there has been a disruption and this has meant the backlog _ disruption and this has meant the backlog of— disruption and this has meant the backlog of people who were waiting to be seen for tests and treatment continued — to be seen for tests and treatment continued to grow. we are now at a stage _ continued to grow. we are now at a stage where — continued to grow. we are now at a stage where there are 46,000 people who should have been seen over the last year— who should have been seen over the last year and treated who have
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cancer — last year and treated who have cancer but are yet to get the care they need — cancer but are yet to get the care they need-— cancer but are yet to get the care the need. ~ :: :: :: , .,, ., , ., they need. 46,000 people who should have been seen, _ they need. 46,000 people who should have been seen, you _ they need. 46,000 people who should have been seen, you should _ they need. 46,000 people who should have been seen, you should have i have been seen, you should have started treatment, let me be accurate, who have yet to be seen as far as you understand. that accurate, who have yet to be seen as far as you understand.— far as you understand. that is riiht. a far as you understand. that is right- a huge _ far as you understand. that is right. a huge number- far as you understand. that is right. a huge number of- far as you understand. that is i right. a huge number of people. far as you understand. that is - right. a huge number of people. and a lot of— right. a huge number of people. and a lot of those people are people who are living _ a lot of those people are people who are living in — a lot of those people are people who are living in the community with cancer— are living in the community with cancer but — are living in the community with cancer but without knowing it, and the thing _ cancer but without knowing it, and the thing is — cancer but without knowing it, and the thing is that what we have seen is that— the thing is that what we have seen is that because of covid people have not been _ is that because of covid people have not been coming forward to their gp orto not been coming forward to their gp or to their— not been coming forward to their gp or to their health professional way potential— or to their health professional way potential signs and symptoms of cancer~ — potential signs and symptoms of cancer. , ,., potential signs and symptoms of cancer. , ., ., ., , cancer. the message all through last ear was cancer. the message all through last year was very — cancer. the message all through last year was very much, _ cancer. the message all through last year was very much, if _ cancer. the message all through last year was very much, if someone i cancer. the message all through last year was very much, if someone had | cancer. the message all through last. year was very much, if someone had a concern about really serious health conditions like heart disease, and certainly cancer, that they should still come forward. presumably a lot of people have nevertheless been put off because they have been afraid to go into a clinical setting because of the potential risk of catching the virus. ., �* ,
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of the potential risk of catching the virus. . �* , ., ., the virus. that's right. there are a coule of the virus. that's right. there are a couple of reasons. _ the virus. that's right. there are a couple of reasons. one _ the virus. that's right. there are a couple of reasons. one is - the virus. that's right. there are a couple of reasons. one is this i the virus. that's right. there are a couple of reasons. one is this fear of going _ couple of reasons. one is this fear of going in— couple of reasons. one is this fear of going in and catching covid and the other— of going in and catching covid and the other is that there was that stay at — the other is that there was that stay at home a message from the government which obviously had its purposes _ government which obviously had its purposes but also meant that people were put— purposes but also meant that people were put off going in at all because they felt— were put off going in at all because they felt they may burden the nhs and should not at a time when it is under— and should not at a time when it is under so _ and should not at a time when it is under so much pressure. that is absolutely— under so much pressure. that is absolutely not the case. i would piead _ absolutely not the case. i would piead to — absolutely not the case. i would plead to anyone who thinks there is something — plead to anyone who thinks there is something not right with their body to please _ something not right with their body to please go to their gp to get their— to please go to their gp to get their symptoms checked out. craig, our their symptoms checked out. craig, your campaign. _ their symptoms checked out. craig, your campaign. the _ their symptoms checked out. craig, your campaign, the catch _ their symptoms checked out. craig, your campaign, the catch up i their symptoms checked out. craig, your campaign, the catch up with l your campaign, the catch up with cancer campaign, as we said in the introduction, you are calling for an end to cancer treatment delays forced by the pandemic. are you being any signs that those delays, that there is a plan to deal with these delays, those delays are starting to be caught up on? frankly, no. from what we have seen so far, and we have met various
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people at the ministerial level in the nhs, not only is there no plan, from my perspective at this point there is even a failure to recognise that there is a problem. even as recently as two weeks ago we have it back from senior nhs leadership that the cancer action task force that was set up to deal with the backlog was set up to deal with the backlog was being disbanded at the end of march because it completed itsjob, but there is no plan, there is very little from the point of view of finance, the budget an extra £1 billion was allocated to deal with the elective backlog, which frankly does not even scratch the surface. your argument presumably is not with the front line staff.— the front line staff. absolutely not. m the front line staff. absolutely not- my wife _ the front line staff. absolutely not. my wife works _ the front line staff. absolutely not. my wife works for - the front line staff. absolutely not. my wife works for the i the front line staff. absolutely l not. my wife works for the nhs, the front line staff. absolutely i not. my wife works for the nhs, we know how hard they work and for the government in any way to say, well, people have to work overtime, have to work harder, is frankly inhumane
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and impossible to achieve. there needs to be investment so that we have additional workforce available to help. we have to have a better diagnostic system, better it infrastructure, and the nhs needs the support ideally from someone at a ministerial level who will actually take on the task of reducing the cancer backlog. we have seen this work very effectively with a ministerfor vaccines seen this work very effectively with a minister for vaccines and seen this work very effectively with a ministerfor vaccines and how seen this work very effectively with a minister for vaccines and how well that has gone so i would call upon the government to do exactly the same thing. so long as referrals are down and waiting lists are growing, people are dying unnecessarily. it is something that can be done but only if there is a plan that is a clear executed finance and has the will of the government to support it. in will of the government to support it. ,., will of the government to support it. ,. ., will of the government to support it. ., it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense — it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense of _ it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense of a _ it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense of a plan _ it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense of a plan to _ it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense of a plan to catch i it. in the same theme, kruti, do you have a sense of a plan to catch up i have a sense of a plan to catch up on this backlog where time is of the essence when it comes to an illness
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like cancer? 50 essence when it comes to an illness like cancer?— essence when it comes to an illness like cancer? ., , . , like cancer? so there are some plans in lace, i like cancer? so there are some plans in place. i think. — like cancer? so there are some plans in place, i think, that _ like cancer? so there are some plans in place, i think, that the _ like cancer? so there are some plans in place, i think, that the nhs i like cancer? so there are some plans in place, i think, that the nhs has i in place, i think, that the nhs has recentiy— in place, i think, that the nhs has recently got some money allocated from government and what needs to happen— from government and what needs to happen is— from government and what needs to happen is that that money needs to be directed towards boosting cancer service _ be directed towards boosting cancer service capacity. i think the biggest _ service capacity. i think the biggest problem is that, as craig mentioned, theyjust simply isn't enough _ mentioned, theyjust simply isn't enough resource. the nhs was chronically underfunded going into the pandemic. it meant it wasn't resilient — the pandemic. it meant it wasn't resilient going through the pandemic, it made the problem worse. and cancer— pandemic, it made the problem worse. and cancer research uk is clear there _ and cancer research uk is clear there needs to be investment to increase — there needs to be investment to increase the number of staff and the equipment— increase the number of staff and the equipment so that we can be better for the _ equipment so that we can be better for the future. you cannot magic that out— for the future. you cannot magic that out of— for the future. you cannot magic that out of nowhere so they need to be solutions put in place, early soiutions. _ be solutions put in place, early solutions, so the nhs can get through— solutions, so the nhs can get through those people who desperately need care _ through those people who desperately need care and treatment as quickly as possible and make that clear
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pians _ as possible and make that clear plans i— as possible and make that clear plans i need it.— as possible and make that clear plans i need it. kruti shrotri from cancer research _ plans i need it. kruti shrotri from cancer research uk _ plans i need it. kruti shrotri from cancer research uk and - plans i need it. kruti shrotri from cancer research uk and craig i cancer research uk and craig russell. again, so sorry for the loss of your daughter, talking about the catch up with cancer campaign. thank you for your time.— the catch up with cancer campaign. thank you for your time. we will touch again on those statistics aren't waiting times, waiting lists. the sheer size of those in just a waiting lists. the sheer size of those injust a moment waiting lists. the sheer size of those in just a moment with our head office statistics but also talking about four out of every five positive rapid coronavirus tests taken in the last month appear to have returned a correct result — that's according to the latest figures from public health england. there had been concerns about the reliability of the lateral flow tests but scientists say the latest results show they can be a valuable tool in controlling the pandemic. the tests are now available for free to everyone in england, while a similar scheme will be introduced in scotland from the end of the month. the bbc�*s head of statistics, robert cuffe, joins me now.
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so so this information is really interesting, considering the wider roll—out of lateral flow tests the public, something which schoolchildren of course have been using since the return to school recently. how significant do you think this information is? i recently. how significant do you think this information is? i think it is a reassurance _ think this information is? i think it is a reassurance but _ think this information is? i think it is a reassurance but crucially i think this information is? i think| it is a reassurance but crucially it is a reminder that these tests are not perfect. if you test positive with one of these rapid tests, self—isolate and go and get double—checked with the gold standard pcr because, as he said, one in five turned out to be false positives. that is a lot lower than some people have the same when the skill testing programme was rolled out, we have seen numbers thrown around about the majority of tests being false positives. that is not the case and so it is probably good news. not much comfort to the political who self isolated unnecessarily —— to the people who self—isolate. these tests can be a useful tool in the fight against coronavirus as long as people are using them properly and double
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checking and if you get a negative test it doesn't mean you are covid free. as long as you careful how you use the test, you need to be careful and aware they are not super precise, but useful.— and aware they are not super precise, but useful. one of those morninas precise, but useful. one of those mornings where _ precise, but useful. one of those mornings where we _ precise, but useful. one of those mornings where we are _ precise, but useful. one of those mornings where we are getting i precise, but useful. one of those i mornings where we are getting lots of statistics released. this just in the last couple of minutes. i don't even know if you have seen these stats. a total of 19,196 people testing positive for covid—19 in england at least once in the week to april the 7th, according to latest test and trace figures. that is down 34% of the previous week the lowest number since the week to september the 2nd 2020, so these are people testing positive for covid in england at least once in the week to april the 7th. us your analysis of that. it april the 7th. us your analysis of that. , ., ., ., ., that. it is a continuation of the aood that. it is a continuation of the good news _ that. it is a continuation of the good news but _ that. it is a continuation of the good news but i _ that. it is a continuation of the good news but i think- that. it is a continuation of the good news but i think we i that. it is a continuation of the good news but i think we have | that. it is a continuation of the i good news but i think we have also seen an increase in the number of
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people getting the lateral flow tests. they have been rolled out very widely in the schools and the week up to the 7th of april includes the easter holiday, went not many people would be going into school, not many people were taking these rapid tests as in previous weeks. i will go back to my desk and double check whether i say it is a decline in the virus or in the number of people testing a. it is in the virus or in the number of people testing a.— in the virus or in the number of people testing a. it is good to see these figures _ people testing a. it is good to see these figures and _ people testing a. it is good to see these figures and bring _ people testing a. it is good to see these figures and bring them i people testing a. it is good to see these figures and bring them as i people testing a. it is good to see. these figures and bring them as we get them and we appreciate your analysis. on the other figures, record waiting lists for people, again for nhs england i should emphasise, to get routine treatment in hospital. you know, it clearly shows the massive pressure on the nhs which is right around the uk, and talking to the last two guests, we can see the impact of the pandemic in other areas of medicine. it concerns about the plan to catch up it concerns about the plan to catch up on the waiting lists.— up on the waiting lists. there are three numbers _ up on the waiting lists. there are three numbers that _ up on the waiting lists. there are three numbers that summarise i up on the waiting lists. there are i three numbers that summarise the story. a year ago, 1600 people
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waiting more than one year before the pandemic a row. a month ago, nearly 300,000, just over 300,000, and after february it is about 390 thousand. those are the people who started waiting around february last year before the pandemic rolled into town. the effect when you dig into the numbers, it is not evenly spread across all types of operations because the kinds of staff who have been pulled into covid awards, for example they may be ear, nose and throat specialist, we see big waiting times in that specialty and also because beds have been repurposed they need to be turned into covid wards. if you need an overnight stay that is different to going for an operation. we have seen big rises in people waiting more than a year in a joint or bone surgery. than a year in a “oint or bone surie . ., than a year in a “oint or bone surie . . , ., , . ., surgery. knee and hip, though such a rocedure
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surgery. knee and hip, though such a procedure is- — surgery. knee and hip, though such a procedure is. those _ surgery. knee and hip, though such a procedure is. those areas _ surgery. knee and hip, though such a procedure is. those areas are - surgery. knee and hip, though such a procedure is. those areas are hit i procedure is. those areas are hit harder and _ procedure is. those areas are hit harder and it _ procedure is. those areas are hit harder and it is _ procedure is. those areas are hit harder and it is a _ procedure is. those areas are hit harder and it is a reminder- procedure is. those areas are hit harder and it is a reminder of- procedure is. those areas are hitj harder and it is a reminder of not just the immediate batten down the hatches but the hard work that will have to be done in the months and years to come to pull all that act. thank you very much, robert cuffe. introducing so—called coronavirus vaccine passports could amount to unlawful discrimination — that's the warning from the equalities watchdog. the government is considering introducing the covid—status certificates for entry into some events and venues in england. but the equalities and human rights commission says the scheme risks creating a two—tier society and further marginalising poorer people and those from some ethnic minority groups. in the past hour the earl of wessex has released a message paying tribute to his father, prince philip, and thanking the public for sharing their memories. it comes as preparations continue for the duke of edinburgh's funeral on saturday afternoon. 0ur correspondent helena wilkinson is at windsor castle.
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tell us what the earl of wessex has said. ., �* , tell us what the earl of wessex has said. . �* , ., , tell us what the earl of wessex has said. . �*, .,, ., said. that's right. in the last hour the earl of— said. that's right. in the last hour the earl of wessex _ said. that's right. in the last hour the earl of wessex has _ said. that's right. in the last hour the earl of wessex has released i said. that's right. in the last hour the earl of wessex has released a statement. it is not the first time we have heard from him since his father's death on friday of last week, but this is a message to all of those people who have taken part in the duke of edinburgh award. the award scheme, that scheme founded by prince philip in 1956. thousands upon thousands of young children have benefited from it through various ways including through volunteering and expeditions. we have had this statement from the earl of wessex. he has thanked all the participants of the duke of edinburgh award. i will read you a bit. readingjust edinburgh award. i will read you a bit. reading just some of the wonderful memories you have shared about your experiences of the duke of edinburgh's award, and in some cases of meeting my father has been
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truly uplifting. it goes on to say, l, truly uplifting. it goes on to say, i, like all my family, have a lifetime of lasting impressions, inspiration, shared passions and love. he may have departed this world but his spirit and ethos lives on through his award, through each and every life touched, transformed, inspired then, now and in the future. a personal message from the earl of wessex to all of those who have taken part and continue to take part in the duke of edinburgh award, thousands of young people who have benefited from that programme that, as i say, was founded by prince philip himself. this as i say, was founded by prince philip himself.— philip himself. as preparations continue and _ philip himself. as preparations continue and rehearsals i philip himself. as preparations continue and rehearsals for. continue and rehearsals for saturday's funeral, prince charles and camilla have been looking at some of the floral tributes that people have left in memory.
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yes, that's right. they have pulled out this morning at marlborough housein out this morning at marlborough house in central london, looking at some of those floral tributes, and many have been left, of course, taking some time. you are looking at some pictures of a couple taking some pictures of a couple taking some moments there this morning, no doubt, those floral tributes have also the cards, very personal cards, many have and loved by people that the duke of edinburgh, of course, but lots of cards and flowers, as you can see there, and the couple having a look at those tributes this morning, taking some time, and as i say, no doubt some comfort to them this morning. of course, though, important to stress as we have said since last friday, because of the covid restrictions that we are still under, people are being discouraged from leaving floral tributes and candles and other pieces outside
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royal residences. here in windsor in particular, not outside the castle but by the long walk, which is not too far away, people have continued too far away, people have continued to leave flowers, and they want to come and reflect, take a moment and show their support for the queen and the other members of the royal family, but, of course, people are discouraged from leaving flowers because of the covid restrictions. thanks very much, helena. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. we had a nice, crisp, sunny start to the day. the afternoon is looking absolutely fine. lots of sunshine on the way. dry for most of us, but not for everybody. in fact, by lunchtime, we are expecting a few showers to form anywhere from lincolnshire, east anglia and down to the south east, so places like norwich, perhaps into london, down towards the south coast, maybe southampton even, or portsmouth, we could catch one
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or two sprinkles of rain. but the vast majority of the country are in for sunshine. and not so bad there in glasgow, 14 degrees celsius, a little bit warmer than elsewhere in the uk. now, tonight, little change expected, it's going to be another clear night. plenty of frost on the way, as well, apart from these extreme western coasts, i think here temperatures will be just above freezing. now, notice, there is a weather front approaching and we are expecting some rain over the next few days in the far northwest of the uk. but generally speaking, it's looking dry and sunny. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england
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is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. prince charles and the duchess of cornwall have been examining some of the floral tributes to the duke of edinburgh, ahead of saturday's funeral. we'll find out details of who will attend later. a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man, daunte wright, by a white police officer, who's been charged with second—degree manslaughter. and a major landslide sends 4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on dorset�*sjurassic coast in the south of england. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn watson. good morning. is this the year manchester city fulfill their aim of winning
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wurope's premier club compeetion the champions league? manager pep guardiola says reaching the semi finals of the tournament is psychologically a big moment for the club. city failed to reach the final four in their four previous attempts under guardiola and had to come from behind against borussia dortmund in the tie. england'sjude bellingham becoming the youngest goalscorer in the competition. a great goalfrom him adding to his growing reputation. that made it 2—2 on aggregate, but city progressed thanks to a penalty from riyad mahrez and a great strike from phil foden. they'll face paris saint germain next. psychologically for all of us, for the players, myself, of course, for all of the staff, the chairman, for this moment, the quarterfinals, to get to the semifinal, that was necessary. now, of course, we want more. we are going to prepare the game against psg. we know how tough they were, we will see what happens and how we arrive. for the club, especially the players, good moment for all us.
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liverpool were unable to overturn their first leg deficit as they were knocked out by real madrid. the second leg at anfield finished goalless as the 13—time champions won 3—1 on aggregate. they face chelsea in the semi finals. we didn't lose the tie tonight. we lost the game obviously in madrid, that's clear, with the performance we put out there, which was not good enough. today it was good enough to go 1—0 up, forsure, and enough. today it was good enough to go 1—0 up, for sure, and then it would have been a different game, but so, with the experience of real madrid and the situation like, we have to chase a game and score, and stuff like this, it got more and more difficult. before the game, a window on real madrid's team bus was smashed as several items were thrown at the vehicle as it arrived at anfield.
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liverpool called it the "unacceptable and shameful behaviour" of "a few individuals", apologising for the distress caused. merseyside police have launched an investigation. arsenal bid to reach the semifinals of the europa league with their tie level at one all heading into the second leg against slavia prague tonight. manchester united host granada holding a 2—0 advantage heading into the second leg and are big favourites to reach the final four, where ajax or roma await. 0le gunner solskjaer keen to guard against complacency. we have got a great foundation to play from and a great result, but we go into this game wanting to win a game. we want to play a good game, perform well. we know grenada will come here and give it everything they've got, so we have to go out there, try to dominate the ball, score goals like we always want to do, and just keep carrying on. in the last half hour, the draw for the first
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round of this year's world snooker championship's been made. ronnie 0'sullivan's going for a record—equalling seventh world title and begins the defence of his title against debutant markjoyce, who's ranked 46th in the world. uk championship winner neil robertson starts against liang wenbo, while the world number one judd trump faces liam highfield. with fewer than 100 days to go until the tokyo 0lympics, adam peaty produced a world leading time in the 100m breastroke. competing at the british olympic selection trials, he won the 100 metre breastroke with ease. his time of 57.39 seconds was more than a second quicker than anybody else — and he's now recorded the 20 fastest times in the history of the event. shaping up nicely ahead of the tokyo games. and ben stokes has been named leading cricketer in the world for the second year in a row by wisden. he's currently injured with a broken finger, ruling him out of the ipl. but there was also a surprise inclusion in the bible of cricket. kent's darren stevens has become the oldest person since 1933 to be named as one of wisden's five
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cricketers of the year, and the fourth oldest recipient of all time at 44 years old. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much, john. in three weeks' time, voters across england, scotland and wales will go to the polls for a series of elections. they'll be increased safety measures due to the pandemic and it will take longer to get the results. across bbc news today, we're looking ahead to those elections and taking a look at the role local and devolved government plays in society. let's take a look at what's happening where. it's the biggest election day until the next general election, and due to the cancellation of last year's local elections on may the 6th, thousands of seats across the uk are up for grabs. in england, they'll be voting in 143 local council authorities, with about 5,000 seats in contention. councillors are in change of many services,
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from bin collections to social care, sport facilities and libraries there there are also 13 mayoral elections, including greater manchester, the west midlands, london and for the first time in west yorkshire. voters in london will also elect 25 members of the london assembly, who examine the mayor's decisions. voters in england and wales will also be asked to elect police and crime commissioners. they set the budget and priorities for police in their area. there are also national elections in scotland and wales. 129 seats are up for grabs in the scottish parliament. that's made up of 73 constituencies, and a further 56 seats made up from regional lists. and in wales, 60 seats are in play, 40 constituencies, and a further 20 seats again made up from the regional list system. the election is on may 6th, but due to the coronavirus restrictions, it will be a few days until we find
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out the results. laura mcallister, professor of public policy at cardiff university and former wales football captain, joins me now. we will talk a little of football in a few minutes, but first, the elections in wales. tell us the shape of the election that will happen on may the 6th they are. i happen on may the 6th they are. i think the first thing to say is that it is pretty unpredictable for a whole host of reasons. you know most of them, covid and some of the restrictions, but also because what we understand in the welsh political environment at the moment is that there is a fairly even split in terms of voting intentions between the three biggest parties. labour has been in government in wales since the very outset of devolution 21 years ago. it has never been out of power here, but a lot of the
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time, it has been a minority government or in power with another party, whether the lib dems, or more recently plaid cymru. we know labour has most to lose, but is also in the most powerful position. but votes are also split according to polling between the welsh conservatives and plaid cymru. at the moment, it looks as if small shifts in certain constituencies could have quite a big impact on the number of seats that each party wins, and therefore in terms of the prospects for coalition ordeals after the election. so when you say that a lot is up in the air because of the pandemic, are you talking about the effect on people physically going to vote, or people's responses to how the different parties have handled the coronavirus pandemic? i different parties have handled the coronavirus pandemic?— different parties have handled the coronavirus pandemic? i think both of those. clearly, _ coronavirus pandemic? i think both of those. clearly, we _ coronavirus pandemic? i think both of those. clearly, we are _ coronavirus pandemic? i think both of those. clearly, we are uncertain| of those. clearly, we are uncertain whether people will feel going to a polling station is a priority after a period of extended lockdown. but more importantly, we have seen quite
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a shift in welsh politics over the last 12 months, not least in the visibility of the first minister mark drakeford. it is pretty clear now that everyone in wales now is that mark drakeford is first minister of wales. we know about the powers of the welsh government in terms of what down, in terms of health, public health, education, school closure and so on. and that has given a greatly enhanced profile for the first minister, but of course, not everybody would agree with some of his decisions. i have to say, he has been fairly consistently popular and his approval ratings have been consistently higher than for the uk prime minister borisjohnson in this regard. so there are lots of uncertainty is how that will play out, but also in terms of how covid recovery will not. i mentioned a moment ago, labour has been in power here for over two decades, and if there is a sense that in order to bring that out of the pretty dreadful economic period outpaced on the back of covid, we need change,
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then i think both plaid cymru and then i think both plaid cymru and the welsh conservatives will play that card hard. however, if people can be assured that they safety deserve what they already know, was labelled to this point defensively and offer reassurance to the electorate that they can also take us out of the pandemic successfully. so it will be a weird mix, and i think this will be very small margins in terms of how seats are spread have to make the sixth. he raised some interesting points there about the profile of devolved politics, and talking to professor john curtice about the forthcoming scottish elections, everything there is new to the prism of independence, but the last year or so has given a higher profile to local democracy and devolved democracy and its operation, hasn't it? for and devolved democracy and its operation, hasn't it?— and devolved democracy and its operation, hasn't it? for sure. we were starting _ operation, hasn't it? for sure. we were starting with _ operation, hasn't it? for sure. we were starting with quite _ operation, hasn't it? for sure. we were starting with quite a - operation, hasn't it? for sure. we were starting with quite a low i operation, hasn't it? for sure. we| were starting with quite a low base in wales, in that there was very
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little awareness of the powers of the parliament or indeed the welsh government and the first minister, but you would have to be away from any form of media for the last 13 months not to know that mark drakeford has been able to wield quite considerable influence and power over public policy that has touched all our lives. people have been watching the press briefings on a weekly, sometimes daily basis, so there is a much greater familiarity with the devolved model of governance, but whether that inspires people to go out and vote, and indeed, vote for the party that the first minister belongs to, is the first minister belongs to, is the unknown in all of this. we too have had quite — the unknown in all of this. we too have had quite a _ the unknown in all of this. we too have had quite a bit _ the unknown in all of this. we too have had quite a bit of— the unknown in all of this. we too have had quite a bit of traction i have had quite a bit of traction around the constitutional debate in wales. we have seen a rise in support for independence, and plaid cymru is trying to capitalise on that in its manifesto. but overall, i think the constitutional question will play out in wales rather differently to how it plays out in scotland. there will be a debate
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about the future of wales and what powers we should or should not have, but i think by and large, this will be an election fought on the traditional ground of public policies that have the largest impact on people's lives, so nhs, social care, school meals, education and so on. i could not help but noticing some sporting analogies creeping into your descriptions there. that brings me onto the subject of you standing in an election of your own. tells about that?— own. tells about that? yes, i am “u: ailin own. tells about that? yes, i am juggling two _ own. tells about that? yes, i am juggling two balls _ own. tells about that? yes, i am juggling two balls at _ own. tells about that? yes, i am juggling two balls at the - own. tells about that? yes, i am | juggling two balls at the moment, wearing two hats, however you want to put it! next tuesday will be my own election, and i am standing for the uefa female representative position on fifa council, the world governing body of football, and it's a straight fight between me and my italian opponent. we have fought a pretty positive and constructive campaign, based on my background in the sport. i'm a former international player, was captain of
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wales, and have been involved in the governance of football with uefa and the football association of wales since. so we anticipate a close contest, but it will be a tough one to win. we are up against a very powerful country in the tough opponent, but i have offered myself as someone with credibility in the game, and it has gained a lot of traction amongst the 55 uefa nations. whether that is enough to get us to the line, like any election, it is pretty unpredictable! isjust unpredictable! is just another thought on that, if you would. you have written that this is a tipping moment for women's football and women's influence in the game. we saw that great result for northern ireland the night before last. what do you mean by that, a tipping point? traditionally, there have been very few women represented in the upper echelons of football, and indeed sport, but particularly football, and those women that have been there
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by and large have not been from football backgrounds. there is a whole host of reasons why that is the case, but i think now is the time we need women on fifa, uefa, andindeed time we need women on fifa, uefa, and indeed all the football associations domestically, who know the game, who can speak with credibility and have a background in the game. that's me, i have played, administered and led football, and i hope people recognise this is the moment when we listen to women's voices, that we bring to the table the expertise of women as we have in the expertise of women as we have in the media, for example, and that now is the moment, i hope, to have somebody like myself elected to fifa who can speak with authority and with an authentic voice, and who knows? if the world of football is ready for that. but i sense that i am tapping into the zeitgeist of the game at the moment, and the support we have had from across the world has been tremendous, so let's hope it is enough to get us over the line on tuesday. it is enough to get us over the line on tuesday-_
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on tuesday. great to hear your thou . hts on tuesday. great to hear your thoughts on — on tuesday. great to hear your thoughts on elections, - on tuesday. great to hear your thoughts on elections, both i on tuesday. great to hear your thoughts on elections, both of| on tuesday. great to hear your i thoughts on elections, both of the worlds of football and politics! professor laura mcallister, of cardiff university, thanks for your time. ., ~' ,, there's been a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer, kim potter, who's now resigned from the police, and has been charged with second degree manslaughter. she says that she meant to draw her taser rather than her gun. barbara plett usher reports. protesters have been demanding justice for daunte wright. the police officer was not enough for them. they wanted better. so another face—off with the police, a fortnight and addressed. kim porter had already resigned before he was arrested and booked into the county jail, the bitter end to 26 years in the force. she was actually training
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a new officer when they stopped mr right because of an expired car registration. they discovered a previous warrant for his arrest and he tried to flee. the police department said she attempted to tase him but mistakenly drew her plan. i tase him but mistakenly drew her lan. , ., he tase him but mistakenly drew her plan-_ he civil- plan. i shot him! he civil rights attorney who — plan. i shot him! he civil rights attorney who represents i plan. i shot him! he civil rights attorney who represents the i plan. i shot him! he civil rights- attorney who represents the wright family court there is an unlawful use of force, not an accident. bill use of force, not an accident. all this training. at what point did you not feel_ this training. at what point did you not feel that this was a gun in your hand, _ not feel that this was a gun in your hand. versus — not feel that this was a gun in your hand, versus a taser? this not feel that this was a gun in your hand, versus a taser?— hand, versus a taser? this has amplified _ hand, versus a taser? this has amplified tensions _ hand, versus a taser? this has amplified tensions around i hand, versus a taser? this has amplified tensions around the l hand, versus a taser? this has i amplified tensions around the trial of derek chauvin, who is charged with killing george floyd. the latest witness was for the defence. he said mr boyd died of medical complications rather than be. mr chauvin's near his neck. —— mr floyd. or is it your opinion that
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derek chauvin's me in any way impact of the structures of mr floyd's neck? no, did not, none of the vital structures. all the defence needs to do is establish doubt that the former policeman is guilty, and only in the mind of onejuror. the jury is expected to begin consideration early next week. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. hundreds of british gas engineers have lost theirjobs after they refused to sign new contracts. the company had given staff until midday yesterday to agree to new terms. our business presenter, victoria fritz, joins me now. this has been running since last year since the owners said they need to sign his new contract or risk losing theirjobs. it is known as fire and rehire. yes, this is a long—running dispute, now six months, with a lot of strike action by engineers as a result of this. 43 days of strike action, which has, according to the gmb union, lot of corners of people. it has created a
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big backlog of repairs, so has affected customers will work for british gas. it has created a big backlog of repairs, so has affected customers will work for british gas. british disc is just the job bullied out of them, and change in contractual obligations, a change in hours. if you have to work more hours, and a change in pay as well. engineers are saying they were devastated as a result. five engineers, the owners of british gas and we think it is about 2% of the workforce. engineers are saying it is notjust about workforce. engineers are saying it is not just about the workforce. engineers are saying it is notjust about the make—up is about time. last year, has been forced to reassess their working life and conditions, wife used to
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them, so a lot of engineers have felt devastated by the changes in conditions that have been forced on them. centrica says this was their choice, the backlog of repairs fought by contractors and the problems have not been as bad as you have been saying. but if you look at this company, they have seen profits halved over the last ten years, lost something like 15,000 jobs and more than 3 million customers. so life is difficult for the parent company as well. the gmb union is saying looking at the graveyard of vans, which will be taken of the world as a result of engineers losing their jobs. let's also look at social media, at instagram. a lot of focus on social media companies and what level of influence they can exert, instagram has been apologising over some diet
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content that it had promoted? yes. content that it had promoted? yes, exactl . content that it had promoted? yes, exactly- so — content that it had promoted? yes, exactly. so what _ content that it had promoted? yes, exactly. so what has _ content that it had promoted? is: exactly. so what has been happening over the last year is coming increasingly social media has played a more dominant force in the lives of people notjust here in the uk put all round the world, and there is a question over the power with which tech dominates our lives. when they make big changes to things like search pensions, it matters. these algorithms to promote content, and says it was changing its search algorithms just hashtags and usernames to promote healthy lifestyles, wellness, that sort of things, but in fact, some search terms coming up on things like appetite suppressants, fasting, and if you put those words in front of vulnerable people with existing mental health issues, particularly around things like anorexia, and you have a recipe for disaster. so what doctors call this out. there have
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been lots of complaints from people all over social media at instagram doing this. instagram says it is not your mental illness or any kind of eating disorder whatsoever and bounce content like this. it says it is now changing the search function once again so this will be possible. just over the demonstration of how important tech is to us now. and the reach of their influence. before you go, i know that people will be interested to know about the fate of the poor bird that fell down the chimney, when i spoke to you an hour ago, she was sitting there quietly in your fireplace. have you managed to get her out? i quietly in your fireplace. have you
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managed to get her out?- quietly in your fireplace. have you managed to get her out? i have. so the jackdaw — managed to get her out? i have. so the jackdaw has _ managed to get her out? i have. so the jackdaw has escaped. _ managed to get her out? i have. so the jackdaw has escaped. i - managed to get her out? i have. so the jackdaw has escaped. i quietly i the jackdaw has escaped. i quietly went over and open fireplace. i could not find him at all. she was hiding slightly further up the chimney, but there were signs of a few twigs and branches that turn down as well. quietly left the room, and within a few seconds, she was out and flying around, and after a couple of minutes, she did not get too excitable, so all the furniture is too tight, but she flew straight out of the door and is hopefully out enjoying herfreedom. so the jackdaw lives to see another day. enjoying her freedom. so the 'ackdaw lives to see another day._ lives to see another day. hopefully buildin: a lives to see another day. hopefully building a nest _ lives to see another day. hopefully building a nest or— lives to see another day. hopefully building a nest or whatever - lives to see another day. hopefully building a nest or whatever she i lives to see another day. hopefully| building a nest or whatever she was up building a nest or whatever she was up to before she fell down the chimney! good to hear, and thank you to you, because i know some were sending advice to victoria and how to handle that situation.
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people in dorset are being reminded to stay away from cliffs, after a major landslide has sent 4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on thejurassic coast. it's the biggest landslip to happen there in 60 years — and as you can see, the incident near seatown has dramatically changed the coast�*s landscape. the local council has warned that with ground drying out, more landslips and rockfalls could happen very quickly. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. we had a nice, crisp, sunny start to the day. the afternoon is looking absolutely fine. lots of sunshine on the way. dry for most of us, but not for everybody. in fact, by lunchtime, we are expecting a few showers to form anywhere from lincolnshire, east anglia and down to the south east — so places like norwich, perhaps into london, down towards the south coast, maybe southampton even, or portsmouth — we could catch one or two sprinkles of rain. but the vast majority of the country
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are in for sunshine. and not so bad there in glasgow — 14 degrees celsius — a little bit warmer than elsewhere in the uk. now, tonight, little change expected — it's going to be another clear night. plenty of frost on the way, as well, apart from these extreme western coasts — i think here temperatures will be just above freezing. now, notice, there is a weather front approaching and we are expecting some rain over the next few days in the far northwest of the uk. but generally speaking, it's looking dry and sunny.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. surge testing for the south african covid variant is expanded — it's now taking place in parts of smethwick and cape hill in the west midlands as well as four london boroughs — in a bid to halt its spread. prince charles and the duchess of cornwall examine some of the floral tributes to the duke of edinburgh, ahead of saturday's funeral — we'll find out details of who will attend later.
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a major landslide sends 4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on dorset�*sjurassic coast. and marks & spencer begins legal action against aldi over the colin the caterpillar cake — arguing its rival�*s product, cuthbert the caterpillar, is too similar. hello and welcome to bbc news. david cameron says he'll "respond positively" to any requests for him to give evidence to an inquiry into the lobbying activities of the failed finance company greensill. the former prime minister has faced criticism for contacting government ministers in an attempt to win financial support for the firm
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before it collapsed. it's sparked a wider row over private companies' attempts to influence government. 0ur political correspondent helen catt reports. the way david cameron used his contacts with ministers on behalf of the businessman who employed him, lex greensill, sparked a row about lobbying that has dominated westminster for days. yesterday conservative mps voted against setting up a special parliamentary investigation. so the noes have it, the noes have it. but an existing committee of mps will look into at least some of it. greensill capital has since collapsed. the treasury select committee will look into the lessons that can be learned from that, and how the treasury itself responded to lobbying on the firm's behalf. it's thought other committees might do the same, and one of them is likely to ask david cameron to give evidence. his spokesman said he would respond positively to any such requests when the terms of reference were clear. the controversy is likely to come up again today in parliament.
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the most senior civil servant in the country, simon case, has told the heads of all departments they have to declare by the end of the week if any of their officials have second jobs like this. none of this affects the review announced by borisjohnson into the links between greensill and government. that is being led by a lawyer, who the prime minister says will have free rein to speak to whoever he needs to. the evidence will be heard privately, but it's due to report the result injune. helen catt, bbc news. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young is at westminster. labourdid labour did not get the sort of enquiry it wanted in a vote in the commons yesterday but there are quite a few other inquiries about to happen, including on this morning. we are in this extraordinary position where we have several different inquiries or looking and very similar areas and i think this will end up causing a bit of a problem in the sense there is going to be a lot of repetition
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potentially. what everybody wants to know of course is, will these committees people like david cameron, his spokesman has made it clear he would be willing to speak to mps about all of this but particularly about greensill and the collapse and why it happened. will they call people like the chancellor, rishi sunak, and other ministers about lobbying? these are the two sides. you have a lot of systems in place, a lot of rules in place for people, they are the people who leave public life, whether public service or former ministers, they have to wait for two years before they are allowed to lobby government directly so there is a rule there for all of that. before they get the job they are supposed to get advice from a committee that is already in existence, the independent advisory committee on business appointments, chaired by eric pickles. he is a form form cabinet minister himself,
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now in the house of lords. they are supposed to ask about taking up this role after being in public life. is it allowed for appropriate? that committee will then advise them about it and maybe put some conditions on what they go on to do. but today eric pickles was asked by mps about all of that and he absolutely thinks things need to change in the future. i think the wider public are entitled _ i think the wider public are entitled to know what these arrangements are, how they apply, what criteria is raised, what checks are raised. — what criteria is raised, what checks are raised, what conditions are made on an— are raised, what conditions are made on an agreement to do so. i mean, if mr crowther— on an agreement to do so. i mean, if mr crowther decided he wanted to have a _ mr crowther decided he wanted to have a milk round or something, you wouldn't _ have a milk round or something, you wouldn't be — have a milk round or something, you wouldn't be terribly worried that this particular decision, in terms of reading — this particular decision, in terms of reading procurement is something that does— of reading procurement is something that does require a full and frank and transparent explanation.
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he was talking about bill carruthers, a senior civil servant, and there was an overlap between working in the civil service and working in the civil service and working for another company, greensill most of the people i have two in government says this is highly unusualfor this two in government says this is highly unusual for this to happen with this overlap. they say this really is maybe a one off but they do consider lots of people that there does need to be more transparency about the whole thing because they have to accept that civil servants and ministers who leave office have to earn a living somehow. leave office have to earn a living somehow— leave office have to earn a living somehow. ., ,, , ., , . . somehow. thank you very much. vicky youn: , somehow. thank you very much. vicky youni, i somehow. thank you very much. vicky young. i deputy _ somehow. thank you very much. vicky young, i deputy political— somehow. thank you very much. vicky young, i deputy political editor. i the number of people waiting for treatment from the nhs in england has reached its highest level since modern records began in 2007 — according to statistics released in the last hour. in february, 4.7 million people were waiting for routine operations and procedures in england. and nearly 388,000 patients had been waiting more than a year for non urgent surgery.
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i've been getting more detail on the figures from our health editor hugh pym the pandemic caused huge unprecedented pressure on the nhs, resources had to be switched to dealing with covid patients in areas which had to be made secure with infection control and so on. staff were diverted into those areas, so a large amount of routine, nonurgent work procedures and operations had to be cancelled. there was a thought last autumn that it would start getting back to normal and, certainly, the numbers improved with the nhs in all parts of the uk — this is obviously a uk issue. the nhs in scotland, wales and northern ireland has considerable challenges, as well, with these long waits. it had been thought that there was the beginning of a path back to normality, with hospitals urged to get on with reducing their waiting lists and get to the most urgent patients within those lists.
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then of course we had this latest wave injanuary and february, which set everything back. and nhs england actually have made the point that 40% of all hospital covid admissions occurred in those two months —january and february — so there was particular pressure then. but even so, this is a long—term challenge for nhs leaders — how is this list going to to be reduced? absolutely — that is my next question — what is the plan to do that? i was talking to one of the regional directors for the royal college of nursing a few minutes ago — she was talking about 40,000 nursing vacancies as just one example where there's a shortfall in staff, so what is the plan to tackle these massive waiting lists? well, staff are exhausted and some say they're burned out after the huge workload in the last year. that itself is a problem — you obviously can't recruit staff just to come in and start bringing down waiting lists — that's a longer term plan, workforce. you can put more money into the system, and the government at westminster has allocated some more money for this current financial year to do some
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work on waiting lists. nhs analysts and commentators have said that more is needed because you need to open up operating theatres for longer periods of time, bring in staff on overtime, just to get on through it. now some hospitals are trying to do this in as smart a way as possible, to ringfence their non—covid work to make that as secure as possible in terms of infection risk, and to extend operating theatre time, but it's far from easy when you've got hospitals with these different challenges. so it remains a big problem — another longer—term impact of covid on everyone's lives and health. four out of every five positive rapid coronavirus tests taken in the last month appear to have returned a correct result — that's according to the latest figures from public health england. there had been concerns about the reliability of the lateral flow tests but scientists say the latest results show they can be a valuable tool
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in controlling the pandemic. earlier i asked the bbc�*s head of statistics, robert cuffe, what he thought of the data. i think it's a reassurance but crucially it's a reminder that these tests aren't perfect. if you test positive with one of these rapid tests, self—isolate and go and get it double—checked with the gold standard pcr because, as you said, one in five of them turned out to be false positives. so that's a lot lower than some people had been saying when the school testing programme was rolled out — we were seeing numbers thrown around about the majority of tests being false positives. that turns out not not to be the case and so that's probably good news — not much comfort to the people who self isolated unnecessarily as you said, it implies these tests can be a useful tool in the fight against coronavirus as long as people are using them properly and double checking them and, crucially, if you get a negative test it doesn't mean you are covid—free.
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as long as you're very careful with how you use the tests, they can be helpful but you just need to be careful and aware they are not super precise, but useful. it's one of those mornings where we are getting lots of statistics released. this just in the last couple of minutes — i don't even know if you have seen these particular stats — a total of 19,196 people testing positive for covid—19 in england at least once in the week to april the 7th, according to latest test and trace figures. that is down 34% on the previous week — the lowest number since the week to september the 2nd 2020, so these are people testing positive for covid in england at least once in the week to april the 7th. give us your analysis of that. it is a continuation of the good news but i think we have also seen a reduction in the number of people getting the lateral flow tests.
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they were rolled out very widely in the schools and the week up to the 7th of april includes the easter holiday, when not many people would be going into school, not many people were taking these rapid tests as in previous weeks. i will go back to my desk and double check before i say it is a decline in the virus or in the number of people testing. it is good to bring these figures as we get them and we appreciate your analysis. 0n the other figures, record waiting lists for people, again for nhs england i should emphasise, to get routine treatment in hospital. you know, it clearly shows the massive pressure on the nhs which is right around the uk, and talking to the last two guests, we can see the impact of the pandemic in other areas of medicine. big concerns about the plan to catch up on the waiting lists. there are three numbers that summarise the story. a year ago, 1600 people
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waiting more than one year before the pandemic. a month ago, nearly 300,000, just over 300,000, and after february it is about 390,000. those are the people who started waiting around february last year before the pandemic rolled into town. the effect when you dig into the numbers, it is not evenly spread across all types of operations because the kinds of staff who have been pulled into covid awards, pulled into covid wards, for example they may be ear, nose and throat specialist, we see big waiting times in that specialty and also because beds have been repurposed they need to be turned into covid wards. 0r or it may need to be spread out in order to reduce the risk of infection. if you need an overnight stay that is different to going for a day operation. we have seen big rises in people waiting more than a year forjoint or bone surgery.
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knee and hip, those such procedures. those areas are hit harder and it is a reminder of notjust the immediate batten down the hatches but the hard work that will have to be done in the months and years to come to pull all that back. you're watching bbc news. introducing so—called coronavirus vaccine passports could amount to unlawful discrimination — that's the warning from the equalities watchdog. the government is considering introducing the covid—status certificates for entry into some events and venues in england. but the equalities and human rights commission says the scheme risks creating a two—tier society and further marginalising poorer people and those from some ethnic minority groups. northern ireland is expected to announce plans later to allow hairdressers to re—open a week from tomorrow. under the proposed timetable, non—essential shops would also re—open at the end of the month. unlike the rest of the uk, northern ireland has yet to publish a roadmap out of lockdown. there's been a fourth night of protests in the us city of minneapolis, following the fatal
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shooting of a young black man — daunte wright — by a white police officer. kim potter, who's now resigned from the police, has been charged with second degree manslaughter. she says that she meant to draw her taser rather than her gun. barbara plett usher reports. protesters have been demanding justice for daunte wright. but the manslaughter charge against the policewoman who killed him wasn't good enough for them. they wanted it to be murder. and so, another face—off with police, the fourth night of unrest. kim potter had already resigned before she was arrested and booked into the countyjail. a bitter end to 26 years in the force. she was actually training a new officer when they stopped mr wright because of an expired car registration. they discovered a previous warrant for his arrest, and he tried to flee. the police department said she attempted to tase him but mistakenly drew her gun. ijust shot him.
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the civil rights attorney who represents the wright family called this an unlawful use of force, not an accident. all this training, at what point did you not feel that this was a gun in your hand, versus a taser? this has amplified tensions around the trial of derek chauvin, who is charged with killing george floyd. the latest witness was for the defence. he said mr floyd died of medical complications, rather than the force of mr chauvin's knee on his neck. is it your opinion that mr chauvin's knee in any way impact of the structures of mr floyd's neck? no, it did not, none of the vital structures. all the defence needs to do is establish doubt that the former policeman is guilty, and only in the mind of onejuror. the jury is expected to begin consideration early next week. barbara plett usher, bbc news, minneapolis. the headlines on bbc news... david cameron has indicated that
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he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. surge testing for the south african covid variant is expanded — it's now taking place in parts of smethwick and cape hill in the west midlands as well as four london boroughs — in a bid to halt its spread. sport, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. merseyside police have launched an investigation after a window on real madrid's team bus was smashed before their champions league quarter—final with liverpool at anfield. the club have called the incident "unacceptable and the shameful behaviour" of "a few individuals".
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as for the game, it finished goalless, meaning liverpool are out of europe having failed to overturn their 3—1 first leg defecit. a better night for manchester city though, they beat borussia dortmund 2—1 on the night to set up a semi final against paris st—germain. tonight the focus is on the europa league, and manchester united have a 2—0 advantage heading into their second leg against grenada, meaning they're big favourites to reach the semi finals, where ajax or roma await. but arsenal have work to do if they're to reach the final four. they're in the czech republic for their second leg against slavia prague, which is delicately poised at 1—1. arsenal manager mikel arteta knows his side face a tough test. we have been really impressed with the forum, with what that team transmit, the real attitude a show in every single game. and that is why they are here because they
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knocked out in big teams along the way and they deserve to be where they are and they showed in the first leg against us that they never give up. we now know the draw for the first round of this year's world snooker championship, as ronnie 0'sullivan begins his quest to win a record—equalling seventh world title. he'll begin the defence of the trophy against debutant markjoyce, who's ranked 46th in the world. elsewhere, uk championship winner neil robertson starts against liang wenbo, while the world number one judd trump will face liam highfield. with fewer than 100 days to go until the tokyo 0lympics, adam peaty has given us a taste of what he's capable of. competing at the british olympic selection trials, he won the 100 metre breastroke with ease. his time of 57.39 seconds was more than a second quicker than anybody else — and he's now recorded the 20 fastest times in the history of the event. and ben stokes has been named leading cricketer in the world for the second
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year in a row by wisden. he's currently injured with a broken finger, ruling him out of the ipl. but there was also a surprise inclusion in the bible of cricket. kent's darren stevens has become the oldest person since 1933 to be named as one of wisden's five cricketers of the year, and the fourth oldest recipient of all time at 44 years old. well done to him. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. i will have another update at around 1:30pm. thank you. let's get more on our top story — the row over david cameron's lobbying activities as an advisor for of the failed fintech company greensill. i am joined now by lionel zetter, he was a lobbyist for forty years and is author of lobbying, the art of political persuasion. very apt guest to have with us today, thank you forjoining us. is
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there enough control over lobbying in the uk, do you believe? short answer is — in the uk, do you believe? short answer is no. _ in the uk, do you believe? short answer is no. the _ in the uk, do you believe? short answer is no. the profession i in the uk, do you believe? short answer is no. the profession has been saying so for many years. i used to be president of the cip are chairman of the public affairs board, both of those professional bodies have been saying for the past pro verse four to seven years now that better regulation is required. in 2014, the act will make about 20% of the industry. that needs to be expanded. we recognise that we operate very close to parts of the body politic. we need to be regulated and we are happy to be regulated. regulated and we are happy to be reaulated. , ., ., . ,, ., regulated and we are happy to be reaulated. , ., ., ., regulated. does that lack of control lead to a lack _ regulated. does that lack of control lead to a lack of— regulated. does that lack of control lead to a lack of clarity _ regulated. does that lack of control lead to a lack of clarity about i regulated. does that lack of control lead to a lack of clarity about what l lead to a lack of clarity about what the boundaries are? we saw boris johnson yesterday in the house of commons during prime minister's questions suggest some people may not have been fully aware of where
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the boundaries lie. are the rules to elastic? , l, the boundaries lie. are the rules to elastic? , a, my the boundaries lie. are the rules to elastic? , a, a, , a elastic? they are way too elastic, both in terms _ elastic? they are way too elastic, both in terms of— elastic? they are way too elastic, both in terms of the _ elastic? they are way too elastic, both in terms of the people - elastic? they are way too elastic, both in terms of the people they| both in terms of the people they cover and the areas under which they have to report. the original act, the 2014 act, as i say, it was really very inadequate. there needs to be a new lobbying act, the office of the registrar consultant lobbyists needs to be given more power and more resources, and on the other side of the street, the advisory committee on business appointments, and lloyd pickles was talking about this, that needs its remit expanded —— lord pickles. if other things are done problems should arise like this less frequently if at all.- should arise like this less frequently if at all. should arise like this less freauentl ifat all. ., , ., , frequently if at all. lots of people ma not frequently if at all. lots of people may not be _ frequently if at all. lots of people may not be aware _ frequently if at all. lots of people may not be aware of— frequently if at all. lots of people may not be aware of the - frequently if at all. lots of people may not be aware of the orcl. i frequently if at all. lots of people i may not be aware of the orcl. you mentioned them emerge ago. tell us more about that office and what they
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do popular what they do is to run a registerfor do popular what they do is to run a register for every multiclient agency lobbyist, which means agencies that represent not a single client but a whole raft of clients. therefore the activities of their staff are less transparent than if someone were in—house, but only about 20% of lobbyists in the uk, and there are about 5000, actually work for agencies, so they are regulated, probably not tightly enough, and in—house lobbyists are not regulated. when you get amateurs that stray into the field like david cameron, who is not regulated, has not been trained, is not a member of the professional bodies, then unfortunate circumstances may arise. do you need a register of lobbying rather than lobbyists because, as you say, anyone potentially can lobby, can't they?—
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you say, anyone potentially can lobby, can't they? anybody can. amateurs _ lobby, can't they? anybody can. amateurs lobby, _ lobby, can't they? anybody can. amateurs lobby, charities - lobby, can't they? anybody can. amateurs lobby, charities do, i lobby, can't they? anybody can. . amateurs lobby, charities do, trade associations. trade unions and lobby. the dividing line is if you lobby. the dividing line is if you lobby for money then you are a professional lobbyist stop if you are a professional lobbyist ought to be regulated and registered. home are a professional lobbyist ought to be regulated and registered. how can ou be regulated and registered. how can you mitigate — be regulated and registered. how can you mitigate against _ be regulated and registered. how can you mitigate against the _ be regulated and registered. how can you mitigate against the lobbying - you mitigate against the lobbying that goes on via back channels, entirely in private? {lila that goes on via back channels, entirely in private?— that goes on via back channels, entirely in private? 0k, well, that the emphasis _ entirely in private? 0k, well, that the emphasis is _ entirely in private? 0k, well, that the emphasis is on _ entirely in private? 0k, well, that the emphasis is on politicians, - entirely in private? 0k, well, that the emphasis is on politicians, on| the emphasis is on politicians, on the emphasis is on politicians, on the mps and ministers. if i had, when i was working, the opportunity to bump into a minister, whether in stjames's park or at to bump into a minister, whether in st james's park or at party conference, i might say to him or her, look, iam conference, i might say to him or her, look, i am acting for it so and so, i really need to discuss with you at the issue which they currently have. the correct response and the response i would expect would be, well, that's really interesting, contact mike diarist,
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we will arrange a meeting, that meeting will have civil servants in attendance and will be minuted. that is re attendance and will be minuted. that is pretty clear- _ attendance and will be minuted. that is pretty clear. how important do you think it is, because lobbying and controversy around it, is not, as you alluded to at the beginning, not a new thing. there has been controversy for decades about it. do you think there will be the will this time, given that labour didn't get the sort of enquiry it wanted yesterday, will there be the will this time to actually bring about reform to the rules, which lobbyist themselves, as you have been saying, have been asking for? yes. themselves, as you have been saying, have been asking for?— have been asking for? yes, i think the industry _ have been asking for? yes, i think the industry wants _ have been asking for? yes, i think the industry wants it, _ have been asking for? yes, i think the industry wants it, parliament i the industry wants it, parliament wants it, borisjohnson was not a member of the david cameron government so he has no axe to grind on the site. the 2014 act came about at the very last minute in the dying
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days of the coalition. neither the conservatives not the lib dems have much of an appetite for it at that time. i think there is now a strong public, professional and political appetite for reform and regulation of the lobbying industry. thank you ve much of the lobbying industry. thank you very much for— of the lobbying industry. thank you very much for your _ of the lobbying industry. thank you very much for your time, _ of the lobbying industry. thank you very much for your time, lionel- very much for your time, lionel zetter, lobbyist for 40 years. in three weeks' time voters across england, scotland and wales will go to the polls for a series of elections. there'll be increased safety measures due to the pandemic and it will take longer to get the results. across bbc news today, we're looking ahead to those elections and taking a look at the role local and devolved government plays in society. let's take a look at what's happening where. it's the biggest election day until the next general election and due to the cancellation of last year's local elections on may the 6th, thousands of seats across the uk are up for grabs. in england, they'll be voting in 143 local council authorities with about 5,000 seats in contention. councillors are in change of many services from bin collections to social care,
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sport facilities and libraries. there are also 13 mayoral elections, including greater manchester, the west midlands, london, and for the first time in west yorkshire. voters in london will also elect 25 members of the london assembly, who examine the mayor's decisions. voters in england and wales will also be asked to elect police and crime commissioners. they set the budget and priorities for police in their area. there are also national elections in scotland and wales. 129 seats are up for grabs in the scottish parliament. that's made up of 73 constituencies and a further 56 seats made up from regional lists. and in wales, 60 seats are in play — 40 constituencies, and a further 20 seats again made up from the regional list system. the election is on may 6th, but due to the coronavirus restrictions, it will be a few days until we find
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out the results. joining me now is matt forde, comedian and host of political party podcast. great to have you with us. we have had some footballing analogy is shared to shed some light on the election coming forward with my last guest of this subject and perhaps you can give a slightly right view of it all. you have been pushing for much more awareness around the postal vote and that is interesting to discuss because there is evidence in some places like scotland where there has been an increase in people applying for postal votes that the deadline they're already finished. why do you feel so passionately around postal votes? i why do you feel so passionately around postal votes?— why do you feel so passionately around postal votes? i used to work in olitics around postal votes? i used to work in politics and _ around postal votes? i used to work in politics and was _ around postal votes? i used to work in politics and was always _ around postal votes? i used to work| in politics and was always concerned about low turnout, particularly local elections, let alone general elections, because they are
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important and deliver a lot of services. you think about these elections, policing has been one of the biggest issues of the year and electing us police and crime commissioner is across england and wales is really important and i have always been concerned that in general we drive voter turnout at a general we drive voter turnout at a general election but in other elections we don't get the big hit we usually get at the general election time. this year, in a pandemic, i shielded election time. this year, in a pandemic, ishielded in election time. this year, in a pandemic, i shielded in the first lockdown, due to my asthma, i have been wary about where i go. we are asking people who, as the best of times it is hard to get people into polling stations, but in a public health crisis when many people are very scared, ijust health crisis when many people are very scared, i just cannot health crisis when many people are very scared, ijust cannot believe that as a country we haven't had a major drive on postal votes. i know individual parties rights to their supporters to get them out but it is not the same thing. i just think we don't look after our democracy properly in this country and during a crisis it would have been a really important time and a great time to get so many more people registered to vote by post and that would have benefits at elections far into the
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future. ~ h, ,, benefits at elections far into the future. ~ ,, . ., , future. we saw in the us elections that the really _ future. we saw in the us elections that the really decisive _ future. we saw in the us elections that the really decisive role - future. we saw in the us elections that the really decisive role of - that the really decisive role of postal votes in that election for joe biden will stop really you are saying that you are concerned that local democracy may be undermined by a lack of awareness, of publicity around using this form of voting stock yeah, and just think in general we don't promote voting in general we don't promote voting “i local elections as much as we should. they are less exciting, less sexy, people perceive there is less power but local government has changed a lot in the last decade. the natural nails have a lot of power, police and crime commissioner is have a lot of power. as citizens we should be far more involved in choosing the people who govern our local area. ~ a, choosing the people who govern our local area. ~ i, i, .,, choosing the people who govern our local area. ~ i, i, i,, ' local area. what about the last 12 months? people _ local area. what about the last 12 months? people have _ local area. what about the last 12 months? people have been - local area. what about the last 12 months? people have been at. local area. what about the last 12 i months? people have been at home local area. what about the last 12 - months? people have been at home so much more. they have been really immersed in what is going on in their immediate locality, so don't you think, actually, people may be looking at these elections from different perspective? i looking at these elections from different perspective?- looking at these elections from different perspective? i hope so.
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there has never— different perspective? i hope so. there has never been _ different perspective? i hope so. there has never been a - different perspective? i hope so. there has never been a better i different perspective? i hope so. i there has never been a better time to get people to register to vote by post. it is easy, safe. if you don't feel you are going to be comfortable going into a polling station, and three weeks today at elections, you have until monday in england and wales to register to vote by post. it is not something i have registered to do before because i'm quite sad and enjoy going into polling stations etc some people will be watching this you share this threat but this year ijust will be watching this you share this threat but this year i just thought i really worry about where i go, i don't want to lose my voice so i have registered to vote by post and now i can vote. that piece of mind really helps. now i can vote. that piece of mind really helps-— now i can vote. that piece of mind really helps. everyone who likes to co really helps. everyone who likes to no down really helps. everyone who likes to go down to — really helps. everyone who likes to go down to the _ really helps. everyone who likes to go down to the local _ really helps. everyone who likes to go down to the local polling - really helps. everyone who likes to| go down to the local polling station in purpose with their dog and tweet their dogs at polling station photograph. that is an important element of any election. people may be a bit wary but the push from you, no matter who you are voting for, it is getting out there, exercise your vote and make it count.
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yes, and they all count, and there are some parts in this country, particularly in areas where you don't have elected mayors, where people get elected to councils with sometimes 200 votes and they can end “p sometimes 200 votes and they can end up running that city. that is a real problem for our democracy, and there is a breakdown in huge parts of the uk between the people who govern us and us as citizens, and we as citizens have a responsibility to register to vote and to go down there and have our say, and registering to vote by post makes it even easier. and at the beginning of this, you alluded to the fact you used to work in politics for the labour party. there is pressure on all the parties going into this election, and it was something i was discussing with our guest looking at the elections in wales a little earlier. the fact we have had this pandemic for the last 12 months or so, it's going to be really interesting to see how that influences people's vote. are they influences people's vote. are they in part looking at how the various
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parties have responded to the challenges of the pandemic, so pressure on all of them as a result? definitely. it's really hard to have a set of... every local candidate will tell you it's about local issues, unless they lose, in which case it was the party leadership and it was national issues! and if they win, they'll say, we won a great local campaign. labour, tory, snp, all those independent parties will have the same view when they finally get the results when they are counted. it is very hard when you are holding elections at a time like this. how can you notjudge the government and opposition to what you have seen nationally? locally, things will of course make a difference, but on the whole, i think these things tend to be a bit of a temperature check. but the crucial thing that undermines any of that analysis is turn out. if the tories have a good night, you are talking about a 20% turnout or less in some areas, then that underlines the whole reason why you've got to get out and vote, because no matter who you... whether you vote or not, someone wins, so you might as well
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have your say. thank you very much, matt forde, former labour staffer and podcast host. thanks for your time. well, meanwhile, on the campaign trail, nicola sturgeon has said the snp would freeze income tax for the whole of the next parliament if it wins next month's elections. the current first minister made the announcement as she launched her party's manifesto, saying it would "provide stability to the economy and households" while the country recovers from coronavirus. in the last parliament, putting our progressive values into practice, the snp introduced a fairer tax system. as a result, most people pay less income tax in scotland than in other parts of the uk, but those who can afford to pay slightly more do so. this has helped us boost investment and keep vital services free of charge, services like university education, prescriptions and personal care, and bus travel
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for our older people. if we are re—elected, we will maintain that progressive tax system, and to provide stability to the economy and to household budgets during this period of recovery. i can confirm that our intention is to freeze the rates of income tax throughout the next parliament. these practical steps are designed to make a real difference. the earl of wessex has released a message paying tribute to his father, prince philip, and thanking the public for sharing their memories. it comes as preperations continue for the duke of edinburgh's funeral on saturday afternoon. 0ur correspondent helena wilkinson is at windsor and explained more about prince edward's message. this is a message to all of those people who have taken part in the duke of edinburgh awards. of course, the award scheme, that programme, which was founded by prince philip backin
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which was founded by prince philip back in 1956, and thousands upon thousands of young children have benefited from it through various ways, including through volunteering and expeditions. we have had a statement from the earl of wessex. he has thanked all of the participants of the duke of edinburgh award. i will read you a little of that statement. he says: reading just some of the wonderful memories you have shared about your experiences of the duke of edinburgh's award, and in some cases of meeting my father, has been truly uplifting. it goes on to say, l, truly uplifting. it goes on to say, i, like all my family, have a lifetime of lasting impressions, inspiration, shared passions and love. he may have departed this world, but his spirit and ethos lives on through his award, through each and every life touched, transformed, inspired, then, now, and in the future. so a personal message there from the earl of wessex to all those who have taken part and continue to take part in
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the duke of edinburgh awards, the thousands of young people who have benefited from that programme, which, as i say, was founded by prince philip himself. and as preparations continue and rehearsals for saturday's funeral, the duchess of cornwall and prince charles have looked at some of the floral tributes that people have left in memory of the prince? yes. left in memory of the prince? yes, that's right- _ left in memory of the prince? yes, that's right. they _ left in memory of the prince? yes, that's right. they have _ left in memory of the prince? yes, that's right. they have both - left in memory of the prince? ia: that's right. they have both been out this morning at marlborough housein out this morning at marlborough house in central london. they have been looking at some of those floral tributes and many have been left, of course, taking some time, and we can show you some pictures of the couple taking some moments there this morning, and no doubt those floral tributes and also the cards, very personal cards, many have been left by people who never met the duke of edinburgh, of course, but lots of cards and flowers as you can see
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there, of the couple having a look at those tributes this morning, taking some time, and as i say, no doubt some comfort to them this morning. of course, though, are important to stress, as we've been saying since last friday, because of the covid restrictions that we are still under, people are being discouraged from leaving floral tributes and candles and other pieces outside of royal residences. here in windsor in particular, not here outside the castle, butjust by the long walk, not too far away, of course, people have continued to leave flowers, and people do want to come and reflect, take a moment and show their support for the queen and the other members of the royal family, of course, but people are continuing to be discouraged from leaving flowers because of covid restrictions.—
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orders and sales more than doubled at deliveroo in the first three months of 2021. in a trading update, the delivery firm also said the number of customers using it each month rose by 91% year—on—year to 7.1 million. our business presenter, victoria fritz, joins me now. perhaps no surprise, given the pandemic and lock down and so on, but nonetheless, those figures very impressive? yes, very impressive, and from deliveroo's point of view, it's important that the amount of money that each of those new people is spending on the app is increasing, so that is good news for them. however, remember, this is a company that has yet to make a profit, and they are spending a huge amount of money. they have 50,000 drivers for a start. there is another controversy surrounding this company, because, yes, they have been a real lifeline in terms of jobs, employment, income for restaurants, for lots of caterers that would have otherwise been shut completely over the lockdown period.
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so, yes, they have kept some people in business. however, there is a big question mark over corporate governance and won over workers' rights as well, because delivery drivers are considered self—employed, but after we have seen those victories for uber drivers, it will be interesting to see what happens with deliveroo, whether or not they will be considered workers as drivers and therefore entitled to a minimum wage, for example, and things like holiday pay, sick pay and the like. that is one reason why investors have been turning away from the stock. this stop launched and, to be perfectly honest, completely crashed and burned. investors don't have the same rapacious appetite for deliveroo as its customers. meanwhile, another business story developing this lunchtime. colin versus cuthbert, the legal battle. tell us more?— tell us more? you can tell it's almost lunchtime! _
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tell us more? you can tell it's| almost lunchtime! absolutely! tell us more? you can tell it's i almost lunchtime! absolutely! yes, colin the caterpillar, _ almost lunchtime! absolutely! yes, colin the caterpillar, who _ almost lunchtime! absolutely! yes, colin the caterpillar, who has i colin the caterpillar, who has legions of fans, the likes of david cameron, david beckham, judi dench, taylor swift, me. loads of people of colour in the caterpillar. more than 15 million have been sold by m and s since their launch more than 30 years ago. there is even a national: caterpillar des, the 26th of august. 0ne caterpillar des, the 26th of august. one for the calendar. i did caterpillar des, the 26th of august. one for the calendar.— caterpillar des, the 26th of august. one for the calendar. i did not know that! i did one for the calendar. i did not know that! l did not— one for the calendar. i did not know that! i did not either— one for the calendar. i did not know that! i did not either until _ one for the calendar. i did not know that! i did not either until i - that! i did not either until i learned more _ that! i did not either until i learned more about - that! i did not either until i learned more about this i that! i did not either until i i learned more about this story! that! i did not either until i - learned more about this story! i'm not totally obsessed with colin! but less caterpillar and more cash cow, to be honest. it has made a huge amount of money for m and s, and sport lots of copycats. i will read out the list for you. lally has cuthbert, asda has clyde, tesco has curly, waitrose has cecil, of course, sainsbury�*s has wiggles, morrisons has morris, and the co—op as charlie. the thing about this,
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even though colin is over 30 years old, he does not age, and this is clever what he has done here. colin has three trademarks that protect his shape and general demeanour, which according to m&s, gives him a distinctive character and reputation. although he looks like an easy going guy, he has decided, via m&s, to launch an intellectual property claim at the high court this week. this is all about consumers being led to believe, according to m&s, that cuthbert over at ld is of a similar standard, and it would allow cuthbert to —— and i am not making this up —— ride on the coat—tails of colin, and potentially his sidekick connie, though the nature of that relationship is ambiguous, and this is an important claim for m&s. whether we will see more against more retailers and supermarkets, it is yet to be seen.
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but m&s certainly want cuthbert crawling off the shelves, and any future offspring that cuthbert may spawn, they don't want those crawling into shopping baskets either, so we wait with bated breath. �* , , a, either, so we wait with bated breath. �* , , ., i, breath. and this is a legal challenge _ breath. and this is a legal challenge that _ breath. and this is a legal challenge that will - breath. and this is a legal challenge that will really l breath. and this is a legal i challenge that will really capture the public imagination, i think. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... david cameron has indicated that he's prepared to give evidence to mps investigating how the government responded when he lobbied ministers on behalf of the collapsed finance company, greensill capital. latest figures reveal the total number of people waiting for routine operations and procedures in england is 4.7 million, the highest since modern records began in 2007. surge testing for the south african covid variant is expanded. it's now taking place in parts of smethwick and cape hill in the west midlands as well as four london boroughs in a bid to halt its spread. more than a year into
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the pandemic, deaths in brazil are now at their peak. but what is most shocking in brazil is the number of babies dying from covid—19. since the beginning of the pandemic, 1,300 babies under the age of1 have died from covid—19. with exclusive access to one children's icu in the northeast of the country, nathalia passarinho has this report. the touch of a hand, a warm voice, but no familiarfaces. the touch of a hand, a warm voice, but no familiar faces. with no visits allowed due to the fear of infection, it is doctors and nurses who offer comfort to the children.
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it is just words exchanged over the phone. it is so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical, and in some cases unfortunately the child might die. lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. his mum jessica took his mumjessica took him to his mum jessica took him to the hospital with a fever and breathing difficulties. worried, she asked for a covid test. translation: , i ,, , translation: the duchess said, my dear, don't translation: the duchess said, my dear. don't worry. — translation: the duchess said, my dear, don't worry, there _ translation: the duchess said, my dear, don't worry, there is _ translation: the duchess said, my dear, don't worry, there is no - translation: the duchess said, my dear, don't worry, there is no need i dear, don't worry, there is no need for a covid test. it is probably just a minor sore throat. weeks later his condition _ just a minor sore throat. weeks later his condition worsened i just a minor sore throat. weeks | later his condition worsened and just a minor sore throat. weeks i later his condition worsened and he was finally admitted when i see you. i keep thinking a covid test could
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have saved my son, because then he would have received proper treatment. but the doctor simply didn't want to. hejust gave but the doctor simply didn't want to. he just gave a diagnosis of the top of his head. more young children are known to have died of covid—19 in brazil than anywhere else in the world. the death toll for babies under one is 22 times higher than in the united states. why are there more children dying of covid in brazil than in other parts of the world? translation: ~ i, i, ofthe world? translation: i, i, , i, , translation: we have a serious roblem translation: we have a serious problem detecting _ translation: we have a serious problem detecting cases. - translation: we have a serious problem detecting cases. we i translation: we have a serious| problem detecting cases. we don't have enough tests for the general population. even fewerfor children. because there is a delay in the diagnosis, there is a delay in care for the child, so only when they are already seriously ill do we get a diagnosis. the children in this hospital have won theirfirst the children in this hospital have won their first battle. they were
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offered and i see you bed and proper treatment. —— and i see you bed. now they must wait hopeful for this moment. of finally being reunited with their parents. a second wave of coronavirus infections continues to surge in india. 200,000 new cases were reported in the last 24 hours — a daily record. there've been reports of a shortage of hospital beds and life—saving drugs and in the western state of maharashtra new restrictions have come into effect. however, that hasn't been enough to stop some mass gatherings. millions of hindu devotees have been making their way to haridwar city to participate in the kumb mela festival. tanya dendrinos reports. a ritual cleansing of sins. hindus believe the ganges river to be holy.
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devotees bathing for salvation, and faith outweighing concerns in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. translation:— translation: there is fear of coronavirus— translation: there is fear of coronavirus but _ translation: there is fear of coronavirus but faith _ translation: there is fear of coronavirus but faith is - translation: there is fear of coronavirus but faith is at i translation: there is fear of coronavirus but faith is at its . coronavirus but faith is at its peak. it only repeats itself once every 12 years. we left our daily job to come here. translation: ~ , i, i, translation: we definitely have a fear of infection, _ translation: we definitely have a fear of infection, because _ translation: we definitely have a fear of infection, because people i fear of infection, because people are extremely careless. they are only wearing masks because they fear a fine _ only wearing masks because they fear a fine they— only wearing masks because they fear a fine. they are not afraid at all on the — a fine. they are not afraid at all on the contrary, they are peddling conspiracy— on the contrary, they are peddling conspiracy theories that is that government created scare. that is far from _ government created scare. that is far from the — government created scare. that is far from the truth.— far from the truth. millions have taken part _ far from the truth. millions have taken part in _ far from the truth. millions have taken part in the _ far from the truth. millions have taken part in the ritual, - far from the truth. millions have taken part in the ritual, but- far from the truth. millions have | taken part in the ritual, but fears surrounding the spread of infection are well placed. hundreds have tested positive here. across the country, the second wave is wreaking havoc. tighter restrictions have come into effect in the state of maharashtra, with only essential services able to operate for the next 15 days. with their work and
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little hope, migrant workers attempted to leave mumbai yesterday. translation: i5 attempted to leave mumbai yesterday. translation:— attempted to leave mumbai yesterday. translation: , i i, i, i, i, translation: is the common man who suffers the most- _ translation: is the common man who suffers the most. i— translation: is the common man who suffers the most. i have _ translation: is the common man who suffers the most. i have no _ translation: is the common man who suffers the most. i have no ration i suffers the most. i have no ration card or any other local documents, and only those who are locals will get rations like groceries. outsiders get nothing at all. how will migrant workers at least feed themselves? that's why they are leaving for the villagers. the situation, as impossible as the pandemic itself. close to 14 million cases recorded, india is now second only to the united states. despite its mass vaccination drive, the world ahead still appears to be fraught. —— the road ahead. sean logan, a 25—year—old piano prodigy from edinburgh, found solace in his music throughout lockdown, saying it opened up the world to him. sean, who has autism, is now the focus of a new short film called harmonic spectrum which examines the role music has played in helping sean navigate life with his condition. hope webb went to meet him.
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sean is 25 and spends most of his days writing music here. here is edinburgh's pianodrome, an amphitheatre made solely from recycled pianos, and constructed by artists and volunteers. it's currently in storage as it awaits the return of live performance. through the medium of art, i was able to sort of interface with people a lot better and with a lot more clarity than i was otherwise able to, what with having an autistic spectrum disorder, meaning that you kind of have a deficiency when it comes to the understanding of people. you can take people through a story and, in doing so, for me, i realised from an extremely young age, that i could help not only bring people into my world and show them what i was thinking and feeling about the world around me, but i was
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able to understand them better. local film—makers recently discovered his talent and now he's the subject of a new short film. the documentary, called harmonic spectrum, has been shown at the glasgow film festival and is now being screened across the country. we've had such a positive response. not so much from musicians and things like that, but from other people on the spectrum that also pursue their creative interest. having people take interest in me because of my art, i wouldn't have been shown what i needed to learn and how in order to now be where i am, where i can co—operate with people to have a film being made. i want to be able to help other people get there because i know what i was like when i wasn't there. my hope is that, with the film, we will be able to make a positive impact on those things. hope webb, bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with a major landslide has sent 4,000 tonnes of rock tumbling onto a beach on dorset�*sjurassic coast. it's the biggest landslip to happen there in 60 years, and as you can see, the incident has dramatically changed the coast�*s landscape. our correspondentjohn maguire is on the beach near the landslide. earlier, i asked him what conditions caused it to happen. it's a combination of wet, dry geology, coastal erosion, and all sorts of factors. perhaps science for you in a second. i want to show you this. since we've been here this morning, the currents and tides have brought this silt across, which is still material that's coming down from the landslide, and although we are shooting into the sun here, so it's a bit tricky, and we are keeping a safe distance, that gives you an idea of how much material has come down. it looks like murder to the naked eye, but when you look
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very closely, there are huge boulders in amongst it, i out into the water, you can also see trees and bushes and some of the vegetation that would have come down from a certain part of the cliff as well. we think these clips are probably around 500 feet high, so a spectacular sight to say the least. good morning, sam, from thejurassic heritage trust. a geologist. we wonder what was causing this, the science behind it? it is a completely natural events, of com pletely natural events, of course, completely natural events, of course, some in one sense, it'sjust the cliffs course, some in one sense, it's 'ust the cli i, , �* the cliffs doing their things. but it is down to _ the cliffs doing their things. but it is down to the _ the cliffs doing their things. but it is down to the arrangement . the cliffs doing their things. but| it is down to the arrangement of the cliffs doing their things. but i it is down to the arrangement of the geometry— it is down to the arrangement of the geometry of god. at the base, there is this— geometry of god. at the base, there is this grey— geometry of god. at the base, there is this grey clay, then at the top, some _ is this grey clay, then at the top, some beds— is this grey clay, then at the top, some beds are quite porous sandstone that have _ some beds are quite porous sandstone that have soaked up quite a lot of water _ that have soaked up quite a lot of water over— that have soaked up quite a lot of water over the wet winter months. you carr— water over the wet winter months. you can see — water over the wet winter months. you can see it dribbling out across the top _ you can see it dribbling out across the top of— you can see it dribbling out across the top of that grey clay down the cliff face — the top of that grey clay down the cliff face. these wet patches are where _ cliff face. these wet patches are where the — cliff face. these wet patches are where the water is flowing out from inside _ where the water is flowing out from inside the _ where the water is flowing out from inside the cliff onto the cliff face — inside the cliff onto the cliff face so—
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inside the cliff onto the cliff face. so you've got this heavy, wet sandstone — face. so you've got this heavy, wet sandstone on top, and then as it starts _ sandstone on top, and then as it starts to— sandstone on top, and then as it starts to dry out, its property start — starts to dry out, its property start to — starts to dry out, its property start to change, it weakens and collapses — start to change, it weakens and collapses. but why hear? why this particular— collapses. but why hear? why this particular spot? nobody knows, these things— particular spot? nobody knows, these things are _ particular spot? nobody knows, these things are always completely unpredictable.— things are always completely unredictable. �* , i, i, , , unpredictable. and they do happen uuite unpredictable. and they do happen quite often. _ unpredictable. and they do happen quite often, though _ unpredictable. and they do happen quite often, though this _ unpredictable. and they do happen quite often, though this is - unpredictable. and they do happen quite often, though this is a i unpredictable. and they do happen quite often, though this is a very . quite often, though this is a very large one and spectacular to ask to see, this stretch of coastline, these events happen fairly regularly, don't they? yes, it's one of the best things about— yes, it's one of the best things about the — yes, it's one of the best things about the world heritage site here, it is that _ about the world heritage site here, it is that it— about the world heritage site here, it is that it is a largely natural coastline _ it is that it is a largely natural coastline which is allowed to evolve on its _ coastline which is allowed to evolve on its own — coastline which is allowed to evolve on its own with natural processes. this is— on its own with natural processes. this is the — on its own with natural processes. this is the code is doing its thing. some _ this is the code is doing its thing. some people will look at this and think— some people will look at this and think it _ some people will look at this and think it is — some people will look at this and think it is damaging the coast in some _ think it is damaging the coast in some way _ think it is damaging the coast in some way. of think it is damaging the coast in some way. of course, think it is damaging the coast in some way. of course, it's a hazard for people. — some way. of course, it's a hazard for people, but this is the coast being _ for people, but this is the coast being created. this is how this beautiful— being created. this is how this beautiful environment forms. no one is auoin to beautiful environment forms. no one is going to clear— beautiful environment forms. no one is going to clear this _ beautiful environment forms. no one is going to clear this away, _ beautiful environment forms. no one is going to clear this away, but i is going to clear this away, but will natural elements return that stretch of the beach now covered two single, as we have here? it is
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interesting- — single, as we have here? it is interesting. i— single, as we have here? it is interesting. i think _ single, as we have here? it is interesting. i think what is likely to have — interesting. i think what is likely to have happened is that we'll have brought— to have happened is that we'll have brought down a whole load of very bil brought down a whole load of very big boulders with it, but as you said earlier, a lot of it is very loose — said earlier, a lot of it is very loose mud _ said earlier, a lot of it is very loose mud and sand and clay, which will be _ loose mud and sand and clay, which will be naturally stripped away by sea and _ will be naturally stripped away by sea and rain, so if you came back here _ sea and rain, so if you came back here after— sea and rain, so if you came back here after the winter, a lot of that would _ here after the winter, a lot of that would probably be gone, but what is left may— would probably be gone, but what is left may be what is called a big boulder— left may be what is called a big boulder arc, left may be what is called a big boulderarc, so left may be what is called a big boulder arc, so that they be there for hundreds of years. so we may never— for hundreds of years. so we may never get — for hundreds of years. so we may never get back to this shingle beach in that— never get back to this shingle beach in that spot again. and _ in that spot again. and we know the national trust that owns the land here and the cliff tops have closed the coastal footpath that runs across the edge of the cliff, so clearly, people should respect nature, respect what's happening here, and keep their distance.— their distance. that's right. i should say — their distance. that's right. i should say the _ their distance. that's right. i should say the footpath i their distance. that's right. i should say the footpath has | their distance. that's right. i i should say the footpath has been diverted. — should say the footpath has been diverted, so the rangers have worked with the _ diverted, so the rangers have worked with the national trust on that, but they have _ with the national trust on that, but they have cordoned off 250 metres of cliff top. _ they have cordoned off 250 metres of cliff top, and within that code in, they— cliff top, and within that code in, they expect some of the cliff edge to collapse, so it's still an active event, _
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to collapse, so it's still an active event, not — to collapse, so it's still an active event, not only here on the beach in front— event, not only here on the beach in front of— event, not only here on the beach in front of us, — event, not only here on the beach in front of us, with the silt and mud being _ front of us, with the silt and mud being washed away, and you can imagine — being washed away, and you can imagine how treacherous it would be to cross _ imagine how treacherous it would be to cross that here, but the cliff edge _ to cross that here, but the cliff edge is — to cross that here, but the cliff edge is dangerous too. so you can observe _ edge is dangerous too. so you can observe from a safe distance, best to stay— observe from a safe distance, best to stay away. to be honest, the drone _ to stay away. to be honest, the drone footage, and the spectacular photographs taken from the air by people. _ photographs taken from the air by people. is— photographs taken from the air by people, is the best way to look at this thing — people, is the best way to look at this thin. i, i, �* i, , this thing. you won't get a better view than that. _ this thing. you won't get a better view than that. thank _ this thing. you won't get a better view than that. thank you - this thing. you won't get a better view than that. thank you very i this thing. you won't get a better. view than that. thank you very much indeed. sam scriven from the jurassic heritage trust. i'm not sure if you can see this, especially shooting into the sun, but where the top of that lower grade cliff is, there are sheep there.- top of that lower grade cliff is, there are sheep there. yes, we can see them- — there are sheep there. yes, we can see them- - — there are sheep there. yes, we can see them. . they _ there are sheep there. yes, we can see them. . they did _ there are sheep there. yes, we can see them. . they did not _ there are sheep there. yes, we can see them. . they did not come i there are sheep there. yes, we can| see them. . they did not come down with the landslide. _ with the landslide. some sure—footed sheep looking glorious on thejurassic coast. in a moment, the bbc one news, but first, the weather. hello there. after that cold and frosty start this morning, some
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sunshine. some showers, though, across east anglia. the odd rainbow pushing on, showers to the south as well. a western scotland with the sunshine, western scotland with the sunshine, we could see the highest temperatures today, about 15 degrees or so. these are the numbers at the end of the afternoon. quite a bit cooler around north sea coast with the onshore breeze. cooler also where we have the showers for east anglia and the south—east of england, a nagging north—easterly breeze here, and breezy through the english channel as well. there could be one or two sharp showers for a while, probably extending their way down into hampshire. as the sun goes down, the showers go away. we're skies overnight, later, patchy cloud for linkage, and fog likely around the home counties. with clear skies and light winds, temperatures fall away sharply, and like last night, we have a frost across many parts. sony start for most, fog not lasting too long to was the home counties, then we see the cloud bubbling up more than today across england and, spreading over land with more sunshine for coastal areas. sunshine
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for scotland and northern ireland, away from the north—west, we see rain arriving in the western isles. temperatures generally similar to today, ii—13 typically. that rain coming into the western isles doesn't get any further in because the weather front moves away. another front moving in from the atlantic, but this is further away from the uk for the time being, getting blocked off by that area of high pressure, keeping it dry on saturday, so the dry weather is continuing, and after a chilly start, we find a fair bit of sunshine across the uk. it may turn hazy towards the north—west, with the breeze picking up as well, but it should be a dry day. we could see temperatures as high as it should be a dry day. we could see temperatures as high 3514—15. near normal for this temperatures as high 3514—15. near normalfor this time of temperatures as high 3514—15. near normal for this time of the year. second half of the weekend, the weather front gets closer and it looks like we will see warcloud across scotland and northern ireland on saturday. some light on patchy rain in the north west of scotland, the western side of northern ireland. some cloud could push into england and wales, but dry here. more sunshine through the midlands
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and into eastern england, and it is here we are likely to see temperatures rising to around 15—16. so for these areas, quite a bit warmer than it is today.
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the number of people waiting to start hospital treatment in england reaches a record high of 4.7 million people. more than 380,000 people were waiting more than a year for non—urgent surgery — that figure was just 1,600 before the coronavirus pandemic. the nurses within the nhs are going to have to continue to work at levels beyond what you would normally expect, and that comes on top of the last year and a half where, because of covid, they have been working...going above and beyond. we'll hear from our health editor about how the nhs can deal with the backlog. also this lunchtime... the conservative chair of a watchdog looking at mps and civil servants working in the private sector says the whole system needs urgent reform.
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prince charles and camilla view some of the floral tributes laid

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