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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  August 11, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones with the headlines at 9:00: thousands of civilians flee major afghan cities, as the taliban continue to gain ground — but president biden says he doesn't regret withdrawing us troops from the country. afghan leaders have to come together. we lost thousands through death and injury, thousands of american personnel. they've got to fight for themselves. after the gap between private and state school a—level results grows in england — the government insists it's committed to supporting students of all backgrounds. at least 42 people are killed as wildfires erupt across algeria, including 25 soldiers
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fighting the fires. the boyfriend of esther dingley — a british woman who went missing while hiking in the pyrenees last year — has found her body and belongings. and under threat — the sea horse species off the coast of dorset — but hopes environmentally friendly moorings could help save the vital sea bed. good morning and welcome to bbc news. the us president, joe biden, has called on afghanistan's leaders to "unite and fight", as the taliban claim to have captured nine out of 3a provincial capitals. the militants say they've taken
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the north—eastern city of faizabad. but afghan officials say air strikes and commando attacks have left dozens of taliban militants dead in other parts of the country. the washington post is reporting that us intelligence officials believe kabul could fall within ninety days. at a news conference overnight, president biden said he did not regret his decision to withdraw us troops. we've spent over $1 trillion over 20 years, we trained and equipped with modern equipment, over 300,000 afghan forces. and afghan leaders have to come together. we lost thousands through death and injury, thousands of american personnel. they've got to fight for themselves, fight for their nation.
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the united states insist we continue to keep the commitments we made in providing close air support, making sure that their air force functions and is operable. resupplying their forces with food and equipment and paying all their salaries. but they've got to want to fight. they have outnumbered the taliban and i am getting daily briefings. i think there is still a possibility of a significant new of our equivalent of a secretary of defence, bismillah khan, who is a serious fighter. i think they are beginning to realise they've got to come together politically at the top and we are going to continue to keep our commitment. but i do not regret my decision. let's speak to our south asia regional editor anbarasan ethirajan.
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good to have you with us again. and ninth provincial capital taken over night, bring us up—to—date if you would please? the night, bring us up-to-date if you would please?— night, bring us up-to-date if you would please? the taliban militants sa the would please? the taliban militants say they have _ would please? the taliban militants say they have captured _ would please? the taliban militants say they have captured faizabad, i would please? the taliban militants say they have captured faizabad, in| say they have captured faizabad, in the north—eastern part of the country. this is a significant victory for them as of now, because they are trying to control the entire northern region which is traditionally considered a stronghold of anti—taliban. afghan consists of various ethnic groups, so any opposition to the taliban should start from the northern province and that is why the militants are focusing there. in a show of support for troops and also the militia, the president made a surprise visit to the biggest city in the northern part and is also talking with the previous militia
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leaders, the former vice president and others to find a strategy to defend the city. because the city also witnessed heavy fighting in the past few days. it is the first visit by the president in recent weeks outside kabul. people are asking where is the leadership in these cities going through a difficult time. now he is there to express his support for the troops over there. what about those afghan government troops? what are you hearing about how much resistance they are putting up? how much resistance they are putting u - ? , how much resistance they are putting u . ? , ., , how much resistance they are putting u? , . , , , ., . up? they are putting resistance in other parts _ up? they are putting resistance in other parts of _ up? they are putting resistance in other parts of afghanistan. - up? they are putting resistance in other parts of afghanistan. they l other parts of afghanistan. they have pushed out most of the taliban insurgents from the southern city of lashkar gar, where british troops were based a few months ago. they are pushing militants out of kandahar, inflicting heavy damage on
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the militants because of us and afghan air strikes. but the army has been stretched, low on morale and they are short of supplies. many soldiers are complaining they were not getting enough rest, there is no rotation. when you see another soldier getting injured, if he is not getting evacuated as soon as possible, that really affects the morale. the afghan air force is stretched and the president blamed the american sudden withdrawal was the american sudden withdrawal was the reason for the situation at the moment, now. he did say he warned the americans about the situation, what will happen once the troops leave. ., ., ., , ., leave. there are ongoing peace talks auoin on in leave. there are ongoing peace talks going on in doha _ leave. there are ongoing peace talks going on in doha are, _ leave. there are ongoing peace talks going on in doha are, what— leave. there are ongoing peace talks going on in doha are, what is- leave. there are ongoing peace talks going on in doha are, what is your i going on in doha are, what is your assessment of the chances of a negotiated peace settlement? following intense pressure from various countries, for example, britain and other european countries. they are talking about
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finding a solution to stopping the violence in afghanistan. the west, the us, the uk and other countries have invested trillions of dollars in afghanistan to build infrastructure, roads, machinery. but all of them will go to the taliban if they capture the remaining territories in the coming months. that is why the us sent a representative to doha and they are trying to find a middle ground where they are to press on the taliban for a reduction in violence, a ceasefire and a political settlement. the taliban have the military momentum now and it is highly unlikely they will accept a ceasefire at this time and they will dictate their own terms. at the moment, they are talking from a position of strength. thank you so much for that update. with us now is charlie faulkner, freelance journalist in afghanistan,
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in kabul today. can we start there, what is the latest where you are?- can we start there, what is the latest where you are? yes, at the moment we _ latest where you are? yes, at the moment we are _ latest where you are? yes, at the moment we are seeing _ latest where you are? yes, at the moment we are seeing huge - moment we are seeing huge humanitarian crisis. yesterday i was in an unofficial idp camp in the north of kabul. hundreds of people are turning up every day, it has been open for about five days. there is no sanitation facilities, there's not really any food, they are relying on the generosity of locals, who are bringing food for them. we are talking about 900,000 people who have been displaced in afghanistan in the last few months and that number is growing. they are
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desperate, they have nothing. they have no belongings, no money but theyjust had no choice but to flee theyjust had no choice but to flee the violence in their provinces and the violence in their provinces and the only option for them is to head to the capital city, cardall. i the only option for them is to head to the capital city, cardall.- to the capital city, cardall. i know ou have to the capital city, cardall. i know you have been — to the capital city, cardall. i know you have been in _ to the capital city, cardall. i know you have been in one _ to the capital city, cardall. i know you have been in one of— you have been in one of afghanistan's largest cities last week, what did you see there, was it a similar picture? in week, what did you see there, was it a similar picture?— a similar picture? in herat, i spent a similar picture? in herat, i spent a few days — a similar picture? in herat, i spent a few days there, _ a similar picture? in herat, i spent a few days there, i _ a similar picture? in herat, i spent a few days there, i was _ a similar picture? in herat, i spent a few days there, i was on - a similar picture? in herat, i spent a few days there, i was on the - a similar picture? in herat, i spent| a few days there, i was on the front line with militia fighters and government troops. it was a particularly difficult regime. the city was being attacked from the north, around the periphery. you know, people were heading into the
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city... the situation is getting serious. what is interesting is that despite the fighting going on, sometimesjust a few despite the fighting going on, sometimes just a few kilometres away from the city centre, life was continuing as normal. people are going out together, sports games where continuing being played. the front line i went to was just six kilometres from the city centre. so the fighting has been near the homes of afghans. we the fighting has been near the homes of afuhans. ~ ., ., ., ., of afghans. we are going to leave it there because _ of afghans. we are going to leave it there because the _ of afghans. we are going to leave it there because the line _ of afghans. we are going to leave it there because the line is _ of afghans. we are going to leave it there because the line is not - of afghans. we are going to leave it there because the line is not great l there because the line is not great to you in kabul, but charlie falconer, thank you very much. there are calls for reforms to the a—level system after this year's results saw record numbers of students given top grades. the government is considering a range of options for the future grading of results in england. labour says the coronavirus pandemic has widened the gap between private
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and state schools. simonjones has this report. oh, my god! a bumper yearfor top grades, with traditional exams replaced by teacher assessment. i've got three a*s. oh, my god, that's fantastic! hard work rewarded after the most challenging of years — but concerns, too, about how the grades are being awarded. 0verall, more than 44% of pupils received the top a* or a grades, *but in private schools that figure was more than 70%. in comprehensives, it wasjust over 39%. labour is asking why private schools did so much better. that might be because they've had access to better learning facilities over the past year, access to remote learning or more resources in school. it may be that some parents have intervened more actively to encourage schools to give their children grades that would enable them to take up university places. the department for education says
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there has been a rise in top grades for students from all backgrounds, and the relative increase of the proportion of top marks compared with last year is no higher in independent schools than in other schools. but the government may now consider changes over concerns about grade inflation. one possible idea is replacing the a*—e system with the numbers 9 to i. there's also debate about how next year's exams should be run. what we want from a national examination system, most importantly, is that all students are treated fairly and consistently with one another, that they have the same opportunity to demonstrate what they've learned. and that's what an exam system does. the fairest means of assessing people is by continuous assessment, and the only way that can be done properly is if teachers are taught how to assess. the pandemic has meant it's been a year of uncertainty, but how the exams will look in years to come is farfrom clear. simon jones, bbc news.
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let's get more with our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. very good morning to you, adam. this gap private schools and the state sector, what is the analysis going on as to why it exists? that sector, what is the analysis going on as to why it exists?— on as to why it exists? that is a battle over— on as to why it exists? that is a battle over the _ on as to why it exists? that is a battle over the interpretation i on as to why it exists? that is a j battle over the interpretation of these results. if you listen to the government they say there's not really a difference between independent schools and state schools, whether they are selective, academies or comprehensives. it is a bit of a statistical quirk. but labour are saying if you cut the data in a different way, it does look like the increase of a and a* was disproportionate in private schools. it is claimed it could have been avoided if the government were more organised with what it replaced exams with this year and the
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argument from labour is, the education secretary, gavin williamson, should have known at the start of the year there was a real risk exams could be cancelled and should have put more effort into a system that was more standardised. so we wouldn't be having a conversation if you can slice and dice the data to show different outcomes. dice the data to show different outcomes-_ dice the data to show different outcomes. the department for education _ outcomes. the department for education has _ outcomes. the department for education has said _ outcomes. the department for education has said it _ outcomes. the department for education has said it wants - outcomes. the department for i education has said it wants exams outcomes. the department for - education has said it wants exams to get back to normal in 2023. we had gavin williamson yesterday talking about a glide path to exams. when, in your view, do we get back to exams as they were before? the consultation _ exams as they were before? the consultation has _ exams as they were before? tue: consultation has finished exams as they were before? tte: consultation has finished about exams as they were before? t"t2 consultation has finished about what 2022 exams will be like in england. that includes things like letting people focus on particular bits of the syllabus in some subjects rather than having to cover everything. getting more advanced warning about what will be in the exam paper and in some subjects, may be bringing materials into the room with you, lists of equations for physics and maths. there is speculation this
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morning that the classic a—level system of letter grades could be replaced by the numbers one to nine, like gcses. it is still speculation at the moment, but not being ruled out. the plan is to have a different system in place for exams in 2022 and exams themselves would return to normal in 2023 but still the assessments around the exams, the grading, the marking, how it is compared to previous years there has been disruption, that may have to be tweaked for many years to come, because the disruption has been to all years in schooling, notjust people sitting exams this year that were at home doing their classes on a laptop, it is everyone. my goodness- _ a laptop, it is everyone. my goodness. speculation in the news paper about the position of gavin williamson, anything in it or is it just speculation? tt is williamson, anything in it or is it just speculation?— just speculation? it is not new speculation — just speculation? it is not new speculation because _ just speculation? it is not new speculation because people i just speculation? it is not new. speculation because people have just speculation? it is not new- speculation because people have been talking about the future of gavin
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williamson in the cabinet for weeks, months and months. fairly or unfairly, his reputation amongst conservative mps, amongst his own colleagues is already pretty low and i am not sure he could have sunk much lower, unfortunately for him. the question is, when will there be a reshuffle of the cabinet? 0ne the question is, when will there be a reshuffle of the cabinet? one has been round the corner for a really long time now and the latest rumour is it won't be untiljanuary. so any big changes to personnel around borisjohnson still big changes to personnel around boris johnson still looks big changes to personnel around borisjohnson still looks like it is a long way off, rumours are he doesn't like firing people irrespective of their performance. adam fleming, thank you. wildfires in algeria have killed at least 42 people, including 25 members of the military who were fighting the blazes. the fires have caused devastation in several mediterranean countries in recent days, including turkey, greece, lebanon and cyprus. 0ur reporter azadeh moshiri has more.
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dozens killed and land scorched. algeria's the latest mediterranean country to face disastrous wildfires. more than 100 fires are raging in several provinces east of the capital, claiming the lives of both civilians and soldiers who were deployed to rescue algerians from the flames. while some villages were evacuated, others stayed back using tree branches to calm the flames. translation: there are fires everywhere. we have not seen the government here. we do not have a state. the people are the government. long live the members from the civil protection teams. the flames have burnt the country's famed olive trees, and clouded the streets with smoke. these are becoming worryingly familiar scenes as wildfires continue to burn across several countries. greece's prime minister apologised to the nation for the fires
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that have been tearing through since latejuly and said climate change has fuelled the wildfires, increasing the risk of hot, dry weather. his minister in charge of civil protection broke down when asked about the country's failings. translation: iwant to say something. - every house that is lost is a tragedy for all of us and is a strike to our hearts. but what i know is that a massive battle was raged during recent days. we have all remained without sleep throughout all these days. more high temperatures are expected in the coming weeks, meaning more land and lives could be vulnerable. azadeh moshiri, bbc news. zine ghebouli, is an algerian political analyst who is from the region where the fires are occurring. he is currently based in beirut. a very good morning to you. good
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mornin: , a very good morning to you. good morning, thanks _ a very good morning to you. good morning, thanks for _ a very good morning to you. good morning, thanks for having - a very good morning to you. (limo. morning, thanks for having me. pleasure. what do you know about how and when these fires started and how quickly they have spread? this tar and when these fires started and how quickly they have spread?— quickly they have spread? as far as we know, quickly they have spread? as far as we know. the _ quickly they have spread? as far as we know, the fires _ quickly they have spread? as far as we know, the fires first _ quickly they have spread? as far as we know, the fires first erupted - quickly they have spread? as far as we know, the fires first erupted on | we know, the fires first erupted on monday morning. they started in the north eastern area of algeria. it has been home to an indigenous community for a very long time. the fires first erupted in the morning and they were under control by local authorities. however, throughout the afternoon and at the beginning of the evening they started to propagate at a very rapid scale. the fires were across 18 different provinces and that is when authorities lost control and we registered casualties. seven deaths at the time. however, during
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tuesday, it became more dangerous and more critical as the forest fires expanded to approximately 88 and also across at least 20 provinces. what we know now, 42 people have passed away, including 25 military personnel. significant casualties and material damage and we are waiting for the latest update on the overall death toll. t5 we are waiting for the latest update on the overall death toll.— on the overall death toll. is there an truth on the overall death toll. is there any truth in _ on the overall death toll. is there any truth in the _ on the overall death toll. is there any truth in the rumour— on the overall death toll. is there any truth in the rumour that - on the overall death toll. is there | any truth in the rumour that these fires were started deliberately? t fires were started deliberately? i think it is still too early to claim such an assumption. i think algerian authorities would want to escape some sort of the responsibilities for what is happening. but i think making these claims, being sure of them would require an impartial and fair investigation, which is
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concerning given the state of the algerian judiciary over recent years. algerian “udiciary over recent ears. , ., ., , years. given the nature of these fires, it is _ years. given the nature of these fires, it is having _ years. given the nature of these fires, it is having a _ years. given the nature of these fires, it is having a huge - years. given the nature of these fires, it is having a huge effect l years. given the nature of these l fires, it is having a huge effect on a huge number of people. presumably, many have been evacuated, what is the impact on the ground? i many have been evacuated, what is the impact on the ground?- many have been evacuated, what is the impact on the ground? i think we are lookin: the impact on the ground? i think we are looking at — the impact on the ground? i think we are looking at a _ the impact on the ground? i think we are looking at a social— the impact on the ground? i think we are looking at a social and _ the impact on the ground? i think we are looking at a social and economicl are looking at a social and economic but also environmental tragedy. that region has been home to generations of indigenous people and they think it is very sad to look at the situation right now. i have seen pictures, i have talked to friends and it seems entire villages were ravaged by the forest fires. people have abandoned their homes, their farms and abandoned all the heritage that existed there. we are having a serious crisis at the moment. thank ou ve serious crisis at the moment. thank you very much _ serious crisis at the moment. thank you very much for — serious crisis at the moment. thank you very much for your— serious crisis at the moment. thank you very much for your thoughts - serious crisis at the moment. thank you very much for your thoughts and
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insights. meanwhile firefighters in california are continuing to tackle a wildfire which has become the second largest in state history. the dixie fire has already destroyed hundreds of buildings and entire communities and authorities warn it could take weeks to contain. it is one of 11 major wildfires currently burning in california. the boyfriend of a british woman who went missing while hiking in the pyrenees last november, has found her body. esther dingley who was 37 and from durham had been walking solo in the mountains near the spanish and french border. her partner daniel colegate had spent weeks walking hundreds of miles searching for her since she went missing. graham satchell has this report. this is the last picture of esther dingley, a selfie taken high up in the pyrenees sent to her boyfriend dan in november last year. she'd been hiking on her own when she went missing. esther and dan had spent the last seven years travelling around europe ina campervan.
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they'd given up a successful business career for the freedom of the road after dan had a life—changing health scare. search teams combed mountain trails for weeks and weeks after esther disappeared. last month, a small piece of her bone was found next to animal remains. now her body and belongings have been discovered by her partner, dan. he's walked hundreds and hundreds of miles looking for signs of her. in a statement, the charity lbt global, which is helping the family, said... esther dingley was 37, a confident solo hiker. last year, dan told the bbc she was doing what she absolutely loved to do and had never been happier. graham satchell, bbc news. the first school pupils in scotland are set to return
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from their summer break today, in the week most covid restrictions were lifted. pupils will be back in classrooms in angus for the first time since the move beyond level zero. the majority of schools across the country will return on wednesday and thursday next week. people living in uk cities will typically have to pay eight times the average earnings to buy a home. the analysis from halifax found a 10% surge in house prices has offset a 2% rise in average earnings. winchester was named the least affordable city — with properties now 1a times annual income for residents. while londonderry in northern ireland was the most affordable location, with homes costing less than five times earnings. boats at a beauty spot in dorset are being encouraged not to drop their anchors, but to use new "eco—moorings" instead.
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the ten moorings being installed at studland bay are safer for the creatures living below the water's surface — like seahorses — which can have their habitat damaged by traditional anchors. john maguire reports. these underwater meadows of seagrass provide a vital habitat teeming with wildlife. and it is where you can find the spiny sea it is a protected species and studland bay is a marine conservation zone, but boats visiting this popular area off the dorset coast can create problems. we've counted up to a50 boats here in one day. it's the noise, the anchors, the general movement of everything seems to affect the sea horses. they're very prone to stress and so if you can sort of reduce that stress, then they're quite happy, relaxed sea horses. if they have a lot of stress,
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then they move back out to sea. the wildlife presenter steve backshall has dived here, and says boat anchors and mooring chains can damage the sea bed. they completely destroy all the substrate around it, which means that all the seagrass dies, and it gets rid of that binding substrate, which then washes away as sand. and so you just end up with these big, barren circles around all the moorings. and within that, nothing can live — and particularly not sea horses. so here's a solution. the sea horse trust is installing this environmentally friendly design. instead of a chain, the mooring is attached to a fixed point in the sea bed via a large elasticated rope that stretches with the tide and minimises damage. and, if beneficial, it will mean seafarers and sea horses can co—exist successfully. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with carol kirkwood somewhere in the south—east today could _ somewhere in the south—east today could see _ somewhere in the south—east today could see 23 degrees. we have sunny spells _ could see 23 degrees. we have sunny spells and _ could see 23 degrees. we have sunny spells and pleasantly warm in the sunshine — spells and pleasantly warm in the sunshine. in the north and west, a weather— sunshine. in the north and west, a weather front is bringing rain and breezy— weather front is bringing rain and breezy conditions. it is all attached to this area of low pressure _ attached to this area of low pressure in the atlantic. high ressure pressure in the atlantic. high pressure clinging _ pressure in the atlantic. high pressure clinging on - pressure in the atlantic. high pressure clinging on by - pressure in the atlantic. ti qt pressure clinging on by the skin of its teeth. all this rain in western areas is going to continue to journey eastward through the course of the day with cloud building ahead of the day with cloud building ahead of it. eventually it will clear western scotland and northern ireland so it will brighten up for you. you can see the extent of the rain of the way down and the isles of scilly. ahead of it, the cloud building and the odd shower and some of it hanging on across the far south—east and it is the far south—east and it is the far south—east that could hit 23 or 25 today. underthe south—east that could hit 23 or 25 today. under the cloud and rain, temperatures will be that bit lower. through this evening and overnight the weather front pushes southwards and eastwards as a weakening band of
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cloud and rain. clear skies there will be mist and fog forming a temperatures low in the north compared to last night. in sheltered glens it could fall as low as three or 4 degrees. breezy must in areas blowing in showers across western scotland and northern ireland. this is a weak weather front tomorrow and low pressure coming closer to us, taking further outbreaks of rain with it. many starting on a drying out, but still are elements of cloud and rain in the south—east and that will brighten up. but the rain comes in from the west accompanied by brisk winds, touching gale force gusts across the western isles. temperatures 15 to about 2k, but we could see 25 somewhere in the south—east. 0n could see 25 somewhere in the south—east. on friday, loaf pressure is a cross is so further showers, brisk winds across the board and we still do have the remnants of our weather front in southern areas, producing cloud and the odd spot of rain. between these two areas we're looking at dry conditions and some
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sunshine but temperatures down a touch, 15 to about 23 degrees will be the order of the day, north to south. as we head into the weekend there is some uncertainty about the forecast. we think on saturday there will be rain in the south, dry in the north and the opposite on sunday.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: thousands of civilians flee major afghan cities, as the taliban continue to gain ground — but president biden says he doesn't regret withdrawing us troops from the country. after the gap between private and state school a—level results grows in england — the government insists it's committed to supporting students of all backgrounds. at least 42 people are killed as wildfires erupt across algeria, including 25 soldiers fighting the fires. the boyfriend of esther dingley — a british woman who went missing while hiking in the pyrenees last year — has found her body and belongings. and under threat — the seahorse species off the coast of dorset — but hopes environmentally
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friendly moorings could help save the vital seabed. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sally nugent: can we talk about the olympics? i am auoin to can we talk about the olympics? i am going to talk — can we talk about the olympics? i am going to talk about _ can we talk about the olympics? i —n going to talk about the olympics for several weeks. we need to talk to the medal winners and talk to them about how they got to the podium basically. i am really enjoying that at the moment. we are having a tiny breakfrom the at the moment. we are having a tiny break from the olympics just for a second. after all the speculation and emotion, the deal is done — lionel messi has signed for paris st—germain. the argentinian star's move from barcelona, where he played for 21 years, is one of the biggest transfers in the game. let's get more from our senior sports news reporter laura scott, who's at psg —
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he must have been overwhelmed by the fans�* reaction in paris.barcelona couldn't afford to keep him — how can psg afford his wages? absolutely. a huge day for psg and there is a real buzz in the french capital this morning about the arrival of the two. he came over from barcelona last night and several hundred fans were outside the stadium this morning to catch a glimpse of him. i spoke to some of them outside the stadium and they felt they had to be here to show their love and respect a2. it was their love and respect a2. it was the heroes —— that historic day for the heroes —— that historic day for the club to have signed. one if not the club to have signed. one if not the greatest player of all—time. we will hear from the two and a press conference alongside the president later. he said in a statement last night he was excited about new chapter in his career at psg and the
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emotion of that press conference was very different from the messi that we saw on sunday saying a tearful goodbye to barcelona. a lucrative contract worth around £30 million a year. a huge boost for french football. psg now have one of the strongest front lines ever assembled in club football. you wonder how they can afford it. i imagine that they can afford it. i imagine that the president will be asked those questions in the press conference. this is a new era a2 and his family. a new adventure. not one they were expecting this time last week, the deal has been done very quickly. the french fans were not expecting it. the psg fans are excited about what the future could bring with messi as part of it. long, a press conference with messi coming up in the next hour. rangers manager steven gerrard said "fear and panic" had cost them their place in the champions league. they were knocked out by malmo in a qualifier.
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rangers were 1—nil ahead at half—time, and the swedish side were reduced to 10 men at ibrox. but antonio cholak struck twice, as the scottish champions lost 2—1 on the night, a—2 on aggregate. they slip down into the europa league qualifers. britain's harriet dart has been knocked out in the second round of the montreal 0pen.she put in a strong performance, taking the second seed bianca andreescu to three sets, and the canadian needed over two hours to come through the match. to cricket — and london spirit won their first match in the men's hundred, beating manchester originals by six runs at old trafford. but play of the day went to the originals' matt parkinson, with this incredible catch to send adam rossington back to the stands. spirit's victory was sealed as heinrich klaasen dismissed himself, hitting the wicket with his back foot. spirit's women also won, beating the orignals by five wickets, thanks largely to a brilliant all—round performance
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from india's deepti sharma — she took two wickets in 20 balls and then hit an unbeaten 3a to see them over the line with two balls to spare. that's all the sport for now. let's get more now on our main story. president biden has told afghan leaders to unite and fight for their country as the taliban continue to make rapid territorial gains. a ninth major city, faizabad, is reported to have fallen to the insurgents. afghan officials say air—strikes have killed dozens of taliban fighters elsewhere in the country. china, russia, pakistan and others seem to have a choice between watching afghanistan slip into civil war, or be run once again by the taliban. pakistan has always been seen as crucial to the discussion,
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so let's cross to islamabad and talk to a geopolitical analyst shahid raza. thank you so much forjoining us. all afghanistan regional neighbours have an interest in avoiding a crisis in afghanistan. speaking specifically about pakistan, give us an idea about what the country wants from ongoing discussions that are happening. from ongoing discussions that are ha eninu. ., ~ from ongoing discussions that are ha eninu. . ~ i. from ongoing discussions that are ha eninu. ., ~' ,, ., from ongoing discussions that are haueninu. ., ,, ., ., happening. thank you for having me. what they want _ happening. thank you for having me. what they want from _ happening. thank you for having me. what they want from the _ happening. thank you for having me. what they want from the discussions| what they want from the discussions is to have a compromise, that is the only practical way from an impending civil war. only practical way from an impending civilwar. in only practical way from an impending civil war. in the coming winter, in ten to 11 weeks' time, there will be a siege and it is going to continue after the winter ends. they will be after the winter ends. they will be a fighting season for eight months. in this situation, time is running
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out. what they would like to see from the government and the taliban is to sit together and strike a compromise in our transitional period and a transitional mechanism. we need a strategy. the primary interest in pakistan right now is to civil war because it will have a direct impact on pakistan. how likely is that given the advances we have seen from the taliban in recent weeks? thea;r advances we have seen from the taliban in recent weeks? they have not been a — taliban in recent weeks? they have not been a source _ taliban in recent weeks? they have not been a source of _ taliban in recent weeks? they have not been a source of surprise - taliban in recent weeks? they have not been a source of surprise for i not been a source of surprise for people who follow the events on a regular basis. the taliban has been preparing for this advance for 20 years. now that the power demand eggs are neutralised, there are not the benefits of air strikes, the balance is more even. they have been cultivating their influence in various capitals. and that is what
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you have seen. it is not an advance in a sense that the taliban are marching from one area of afghanistan to another area, that is not what is happening. they have cultivated their influence in those areas. talking about islamabad and kandahar, they are taliban strongholds over a decade ago and they have been preparing for a situation like this. it is not a surprise. an interesting person effective is that the afghan government has not taken any meaningful initiative to sit down with the taliban brokered by pakistan or other countries to have a meaningful outcome. the taliban have been stating clearly that if we can talk to the americans, we can talk to the kabul government. we do not want a civil war. we want to resolve this issue with as little bloodshed as possible. we do not want to find a military solution.
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the taliban are also under pressure. it is very difficult because the narrative has changed. they no longer claim to fight a foreign occupation force. that is not what is going to happen. it is difficult and complex from the taliban perspective. pakistan wants to see some promise from the afghan government. the afghan government is not willing to sit down and have a one—on—one conversation with the taliban. this is a decision that has to be taken by the campbell government. once the decision is taken, they want to have face—to—face and meaningful conversations with the taliban to find a practical solution for the transition period and after the transition period and after the transition period and after the transition period to share an agreement and a set of principles and how they will be governed. the
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fundamental disagreements... pakistan wants to see a conversation from both sides.— pakistan wants to see a conversation from both sides. what you are saying is fascinating. — from both sides. what you are saying is fascinating, but _ from both sides. what you are saying is fascinating, but because _ from both sides. what you are saying is fascinating, but because of - from both sides. what you are saying is fascinating, but because of time i is fascinating, but because of time pressures i had to cut you short. thank you so much for your thoughts. thank you so much for your thoughts. thank you. research for the bbc by two recruitment websites suggests a large increase injobs being advertised with the option to work from home this year. however, they remain a relatively small proportion of all vacancies posted. the agencies �*reed' and �*cv library�* say 12 percent of posts are now offering more flexibilty, compared to 5 percent of posts which stipulated this before the pandemic. so what does this mean for the future of office working? the research comes as it's being reported that google is planning to cut the pay of staff who work remotely. let's speak now to anna whitehouse who is founder of the parenting blog mother pukka.
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she started a campaign called flex appeal after her own request for flexible working was denied by her employer. good to have you wet as. i will come onto the appeal at the moment, but why in your view is flexible working such a good thing? it is why in your view is flexible working such a good thing?— why in your view is flexible working such a good thing? it is not 'ust my view. we such a good thing? it is not 'ust my view. we tend * such a good thing? it is not 'ust my view. we tend there's i such a good thing? it is not 'ust my view. we tend there's to i such a good thing? it is notjust my view. we tend there's to mothers l view. we tend there's to mothers shoulders but anyone with caring responsibilities, anyone living with disabilities, it is really down to any employers listening right now, are you willing to be a diverse and inclusive employer? it is no more complicated. the equality and human rights commission has said it is the best way to close the gender pay gap- best way to close the gender pay gap. why would you not one that on yourjob ad being a diverse and inclusive employer?—
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yourjob ad being a diverse and inclusive employer? there are two roblems, inclusive employer? there are two problems. one _ inclusive employer? there are two problems, one as _ inclusive employer? there are two problems, one as professional, i inclusive employer? there are two i problems, one as professional, what say to the argument that if we are not in the office we miss out on making contacts, networking, exchanging ideas and that therefore promotion and rising in a company is easier if you are present? what about that? it easier if you are present? what about that?— about that? it is wrong to consistently _ about that? it is wrong to consistently speak - about that? it is wrong to consistently speak in i about that? it is wrong to l consistently speak in these about that? it is wrong to i consistently speak in these two extremes of being strapped europe your kitchen table or an office chair, —— we are moving towards a hybrid way of working where employees ebb and flow between hq and their kitchen table, town centres will still flourish, people will have a choice of work and wane as opposed to being confined. it is not either or, they do not set on the two extremes, the set between. what do you think of the idea of cutting people say if they do not go into the office?— into the office? when you work remotely. _ into the office? when you work remotely. you _ into the office? when you work remotely, you are _ into the office? when you work remotely, you are not - into the office? when you work. remotely, you are not accounting into the office? when you work-
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remotely, you are not accounting for the costs accrued of increased electricity, increased heating, there are costs everywhere. and i think we need to stop looking at where people are setting, focus on what they are doing, and that is when you have a benchmark as to whether someone is a good employee or not. helping pay, i heard, the minister talking about that earlier, it is a lot of hot air from archaic mines. ~ ., ., ., mines. we had to leave it there, it is time pressure. _ mines. we had to leave it there, it is time pressure. really _ mines. we had to leave it there, it is time pressure. really good i mines. we had to leave it there, it is time pressure. really good to i is time pressure. really good to talk to you. a teenager who learnt to ride a bike in lockdown is set to start an epicjourney from lands end tojohn o'groats. 1a year—old jonathan is autistic and was born with hydrocephalus which affects his balance and meant he was unable to walk independently until he was nearly a years old. but during lockdown, his dad brett taught him to ride a bike for the first time, and the pair were spurred on to set the challenge of cycling 1,000 miles. they are hoping the journey
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will also help to raise £10,000 for their dilapidated local scout hut, which is in need of urgent repair. they are just about to head off to lands end and before they hop on the train we can speak to them now: welcome. can i just welcome. can ijust check, can you hear me? welcome. can i 'ust check, can you hear me? , welcome. can i 'ust check, can you hear meafi now- welcome. can i 'ust check, can you hear me?i how are i welcome. can i 'ust check, can you hear me?i how are you | hear me? yes, i can. how are you feelin: hear me? yes, i can. how are you feeling at _ hear me? yes, i can. how are you feeling at the — hear me? yes, i can. how are you feeling at the head _ hear me? yes, i can. how are you feeling at the head of— hear me? yes, i can. how are you feeling at the head of an - hear me? yes, i can. how are you feeling at the head of an epic- feeling at the head of an epic journey? i feeling at the head of an epic “ourne ? ., feeling at the head of an epic journey?_ what l feeling at the head of an epic. journey?_ what are feeling at the head of an epic- journey?_ what are you journey? i feel great. what are you lookin: journey? i feel great. what are you looking forward _ journey? i feel great. what are you looking forward to? _ journey? i feel great. what are you looking forward to? 14 _ journey? i feel great. what are you looking forward to? 14 days, i looking forward to? 14 days, 1�*t-year-old- _ looking forward to? 14 days, 14-year-old. tell _ looking forward to? 14 days, 14-year-old. tell us - looking forward to? 14 days, 14-year-old. tell us more i looking forward to? 14 days, i 14-year-old. tell us more about looking forward to? 14 days, -
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14-year-old. tell us more about the challenae 14-year-old. tell us more about the challenge that _ 14-year-old. tell us more about the challenge that you _ 14-year-old. tell us more about the challenge that you faced _ 14-year-old. tell us more about the challenge that you faced growing i 14-year-old. tell us more about the | challenge that you faced growing up. he was born with hydrocephalus, he had balance problems because he never— had balance problems because he never learned how to crawl. he did not walk_ never learned how to crawl. he did not walk independently until he was three years old, and when he was ability— three years old, and when he was ability to— three years old, and when he was ability to walk, he was not safe on his feet _ ability to walk, he was not safe on his feet because if he fell he did not learn — his feet because if he fell he did not learn how to save himself. at the age _ not learn how to save himself. at the age of— not learn how to save himself. at the age of nine, he started to learn how to _ the age of nine, he started to learn how to save — the age of nine, he started to learn how to save himself when he fell. taking _ how to save himself when he fell. taking on— how to save himself when he fell. taking on an experience of riding a bicycle _ taking on an experience of riding a bicycle was — taking on an experience of riding a bicycle was not one of the things that we — bicycle was not one of the things that we thought he would be able to do. that we thought he would be able to do his— that we thought he would be able to do. his occupational therapist thought— do. his occupational therapist thought he would never be a confident cyclist. during the lockdown, covid—19 was not such a bad thing — lockdown, covid—19 was not such a bad thing for me, we spent six months — bad thing for me, we spent six months working out on gym equipment and building up core muscles. when we got _ and building up core muscles. when we got freedom, we got out and got
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on our— we got freedom, we got out and got on our bicycles. jonathan was really enjoying _ on our bicycles. jonathan was really enjoying the freedom and the ability to do a _ enjoying the freedom and the ability to do a sport that he could get a grasp— to do a sport that he could get a grasp on — to do a sport that he could get a grasp on it _ to do a sport that he could get a grasp on. it was not long before we were _ grasp on. it was not long before we were doing — grasp on. it was not long before we were doing long journeys. then we started _ were doing long journeys. then we started joking about the idea of a bil started joking about the idea of a big journey from land's end tojohn 0 groats~ _ big journey from land's end tojohn o groats. he was doubtful it. i gave him a _ o groats. he was doubtful it. i gave him a book— o groats. he was doubtful it. i gave him a book to read about two brothers— him a book to read about two brothers who date a massive bike ride from — brothers who date a massive bike ride from the centre of england to the centre — ride from the centre of england to the centre of china. on the back of reading _ the centre of china. on the back of reading the — the centre of china. on the back of reading the book, he became inspired and he _ reading the book, he became inspired and he wanted to do this journey. reading the book, he became inspired and he wanted to do thisjourney. we felt it— and he wanted to do thisjourney. we felt it was— and he wanted to do thisjourney. we felt it was a _ and he wanted to do thisjourney. we felt it was a great thing to do along — felt it was a great thing to do along with what we were doing for the scouts — along with what we were doing for the scouts because the scout hut is falling _ the scouts because the scout hut is falling apart and we need to help them _ falling apart and we need to help them in — falling apart and we need to help them in some way. to get the funds for a _ them in some way. to get the funds for a refurbishment project in planning _ for a refurbishment project in planning for over five years and we did not— planning for over five years and we did not have the funding to take it
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forward _ did not have the funding to take it forward a— did not have the funding to take it forward. �* , ., ., q ., ., ., did not have the funding to take it forward. , ., ., ., ., forward. a question forjonathan, as well as doing _ forward. a question forjonathan, as well as doing the _ forward. a question forjonathan, as well as doing the cycle, _ forward. a question forjonathan, as well as doing the cycle, you - forward. a question forjonathan, as well as doing the cycle, you are i well as doing the cycle, you are also planning to write a blog. is that right?— also planning to write a blog. is that right?_ tell- also planning to write a blog. is that right?_ tell us i also planning to write a blog. is i that right?_ tell us about that right? yes, yes. tell us about that. we that right? yes, yes. tell us about that- we are _ that right? yes, yes. tell us about that. we are working _ that right? yes, yes. tell us about that. we are working of _ that right? yes, yes. tell us about that. we are working of the i that right? yes, yes. tell us about that. we are working of the blog i that. we are working of the blog that. we are working of the blog that we have _ that. we are working of the blog that we have got _ that. we are working of the blog that we have got which - that. we are working of the blog that we have got which will i that. we are working of the blog that we have got which will be i that. we are working of the blog that we have got which will be a | that we have got which will be a life story — that we have got which will be a life story which will turn into how to make — life story which will turn into how to make the best of the situation when _ to make the best of the situation when you — to make the best of the situation when you are faced with the challenges like jonathan experiences. let's be honest, jonathan _ experiences. let's be honest, jonathan is not unique in having autism — jonathan is not unique in having autism for— jonathan is not unique in having autism for a life challenge, many people _ autism for a life challenge, many people have that, but the bike ride that we _ people have that, but the bike ride that we are — people have that, but the bike ride that we are going to do... is not the result— that we are going to do... is not the result of— that we are going to do... is not
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the result of constant input from a whole _ the result of constant input from a whole team of people —— is the result— whole team of people —— is the result who _ whole team of people —— is the result who have helped him to grow. having _ result who have helped him to grow. having no _ result who have helped him to grow. having no balance, no social skills, no confidence at very early ages, because — no confidence at very early ages, because we have put so much work and he has _ because we have put so much work and he has put _ because we have put so much work and he has put so _ because we have put so much work and he has put so much work and himself over the _ he has put so much work and himself over the past 14 years, his overall ability— over the past 14 years, his overall ability to— over the past 14 years, his overall ability to take things on has grown massively — ability to take things on has grown massively. i think that is something that we _ massively. i think that is something that we need to help other parents with challenges like jonathan understand that using the skills that he — understand that using the skills that he has gained, he has been able to take _ that he has gained, he has been able to take on _ that he has gained, he has been able to take on challenges that everybody else can _ to take on challenges that everybody else can do. it is to take on challenges that everybody else can do. , ., to take on challenges that everybody else can do-— else can do. it is an inspirational sto , else can do. it is an inspirational story. thank— else can do. it is an inspirational story. thank you _ else can do. it is an inspirational story, thank you both, _ else can do. it is an inspirational story, thank you both, i- else can do. it is an inspirational story, thank you both, i wish i else can do. it is an inspirational| story, thank you both, i wish you else can do. it is an inspirational i story, thank you both, i wish you a very good luck. keep in touch with
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us as to how you get on. thank you. i truly people can link into his blog — i truly people can link into his blog which isjonathan i truly people can link into his blog which is jonathan slater. i truly people can link into his blog which isjonathan slater. or 'ust blog which isjonathan slater. or just giving which is he will never ride a _ just giving which is he will never ride a bike — just giving which is he will never ride a bike opposed tojust giving. thank— ride a bike opposed tojust giving. thank you — ride a bike opposed tojust giving. thank you for talking to us. the reuters news agency have reported that german police have arrested a british man who worked at the british embassy in berlin on suspicion of passing documents to the russian intelligence service in exchange for cash. this is prosecutors in germany who have made
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this announcement. they said in a statement that the apartment and workplace of the man who has been identified as david s has been searched and the team will be brought before an investigating judge later today. it is the result of a joint investigation by german and british authorities. a british man who worked at the british embassy in berlin on suspicion of passing documents to the russian intelligence service has been arrested by german police. we will bring more details on that as we get them. deliveroo has said demand for its services has strengthened despite covid restrictions easing. the food delivery firm saw orders double to 1a8.8 million in the first half of this year, while the value of its transactions also doubled. let's get more on this now from our business correspondent alice baxter: good morning. this is the proof we
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needed that _ good morning. this is the proof we needed that some _ good morning. this is the proof we needed that some of _ good morning. this is the proof we needed that some of those - good morning. this is the proof we needed that some of those habits l good morning. this is the proof we i needed that some of those habits we picked up at the height of lockdown in 2020 have continued into 2021. home delivery, ordering food direct to ourfront door via home delivery, ordering food direct to our front door via our mobile phone to the comfort of our sofa, so many more of us have continued to do that. the dabbled in the first of last year and pre—tax profit narrowed. it is an important set of numbers for the company, the first set of results since the disappointing rotation on the stock market back in march. —— flotation on the stock market. we have talked so much over the past 18 months about how difficult the pandemic has been for businesses up and down the country, but if we divide businesses into covid—19 winners and losers, deliveroo is in the former camp. fiur
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deliveroo is in the former camp. our love affair for _ deliveroo is in the former camp. our love affair for takeaway is that was established during the pandemic does not show— established during the pandemic does not show any sign of abating just deliveroo— not show any sign of abating just deliveroo really winning here with a surge _ deliveroo really winning here with a surge in _ deliveroo really winning here with a surge in orders doubling to 148 million — surge in orders doubling to 148 million. also the value of the orders — million. also the value of the orders to— million. also the value of the orders to 3.4 billion. there are headwinds _ orders to 3.4 billion. there are headwinds facing the company. that is why— headwinds facing the company. that is why we _ headwinds facing the company. that is why we have seen the shares all by 3%_ is why we have seen the shares all by 3% today despite the bumper numbers — by 3% today despite the bumper numbers. because the company has said that _ numbers. because the company has said that it— numbers. because the company has said that it does expect that the situation — said that it does expect that the situation may change a little towards _ situation may change a little towards the end of this year. it expects — towards the end of this year. it expects that consumer behaviour will change _ expects that consumer behaviour will change a _ expects that consumer behaviour will change a little. although since restaurants reopened we have been ordering _ restaurants reopened we have been ordering takeaway is like we did during _ ordering takeaway is like we did during the pandemic, but i think the types _ during the pandemic, but i think the types of— during the pandemic, but i think the types of takeaway we are ordering, we are _ types of takeaway we are ordering, we are perhaps not spending quite so
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much _ we are perhaps not spending quite so much on _ we are perhaps not spending quite so much on high—end restaurants, but the football will have helped with pizza delivery. consumer behaviour is expected to change towards the end of— is expected to change towards the end of the — is expected to change towards the end of the year which could pose problems— end of the year which could pose problems for the company going forward — problems for the company going forward. it is still making a loss despite — forward. it is still making a loss despite the surge, 82% surge of revenue — despite the surge, 82% surge of revenue during the pandemic. it is still making _ revenue during the pandemic. it is still making a _ revenue during the pandemic. it 3 still making a loss. the expert consumer patterns to change, perhaps we will not order so many takeaways in the future, but the ceo says he feels confident about growth and the coverage the company has across the uk is better than they had initially expected now, 72% of the uk. figs uk is better than they had initially expected now, 72% of the uk. as far as the uk market _ expected now, 72% of the uk. as far as the uk market is _ expected now, 72% of the uk. as far as the uk market is concerned, i expected now, 72% of the uk. as far as the uk market is concerned, in i as the uk market is concerned, in many— as the uk market is concerned, in many ways, — as the uk market is concerned, in many ways, you could say that
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deliveroo _ many ways, you could say that deliveroo has been extremely successful but now perhaps the market — successful but now perhaps the market is — successful but now perhaps the market is becoming saturated in the bil market is becoming saturated in the big towns— market is becoming saturated in the big towns and cities where it is extremely successful. it is harder to operate — extremely successful. it is harder to operate in the rural locations. and have — to operate in the rural locations. and have the same kind of profit margin — and have the same kind of profit margin. what the company is doing is looking _ margin. what the company is doing is looking at— margin. what the company is doing is looking at notjust margin. what the company is doing is looking at not just expansion margin. what the company is doing is looking at notjust expansion in other— looking at notjust expansion in other markets geographically but also going to different sectors, grocery— also going to different sectors, grocery delivery, dark kitchens where — grocery delivery, dark kitchens where it — grocery delivery, dark kitchens where it can offer restaurants the chance _ where it can offer restaurants the chance to — where it can offer restaurants the chance to expand, expand —— without expanding _ chance to expand, expand —— without expanding their own premises, but working _ expanding their own premises, but working with deliveroo. there are two areas — working with deliveroo. there are two areas where they are hoping to -ain two areas where they are hoping to gain ground. the gig economy model means— gain ground. the gig economy model means it _ gain ground. the gig economy model means it could run into problems. it is not _ means it could run into problems. it is not going — means it could run into problems. it is not going to operate in spain because — is not going to operate in spain because of a change in rules there,
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how delivery firms cannot hire people — how delivery firms cannot hire people as _ how delivery firms cannot hire people as contractors but only as workers — people as contractors but only as workers and give them more rights. there _ workers and give them more rights. there could — workers and give them more rights. there could be some trouble ahead. that was _ there could be some trouble ahead. that was very interesting to get your views. the love affair with takeaways continues.— your views. the love affair with takeaways continues. thank you very much. two royal air force police dogs are being honoured today with the animal equivalent of an obe. english spaniel alfie and labrador aj — who are now both retired — have been awarded the pdsa order of merit for their careers in the raf, sniffing out explosives and completing 15—hundred hours of searches between them. in the next hour, we will be hearing from the at his new club in esg. we
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have got pictures to show you of the 3a—year—old, he is leaving his hotel in paris surrounded by a lot of security. iris shanjaman need to protect their —— paris saint—germain need to protect their investment. he is making his way to the stadium were in use conference will take place after the signing of the two—year deal. that is the scene at the stadium, and that is the paris saint—germain twitter feed. they are waiting for the arrival of messi and the news conference we are expecting at around ten o'clock this morning. we will bring you news of that. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood: hello again. yesterday, 25.3 celsius was the temperature recorded in
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parts of warwickshire. today, somewhere in the south—east could see similar. we've got sunny spells and feeling pleasantly warm in that sunshine. but in the north and west, a weather front is bringing rain and also some breezy conditions. and here it is here, all attached to this area of low pressure in the atlantic. high pressure just clinging on by the skin of its teeth as we push further south. so all this rain in western areas is going to continue to journey eastwards through the course of the day with cloud building ahead of it. eventually, it will clear western scotland and northern ireland so it will brighten up for you, but you can see the extent of the rain all the way down towards the isles of scilly. ahead of it, the cloud building. you can see the odd shower, some sunshine hanging on across the far south—east. and it is in the far south—east we could hit 23 or 2a or maybe 25 today. whereas under the cloud and rain, temperatures will be that bit lower. through this evening and overnight, our weatherfront is to push southwards and eastwards as a weakening band of cloud and rain. behind it, under clear skies, there will be some patchy mist and fog forming and temperatures a bit lower in the north compared to last night. in sheltered glens, they could fall as
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low as three or a degrees. breezy, though, in western areas, pulling in some showers across western scotland and northern ireland. so here is our weak weather front tomorrow. and here is the low pressure coming closer to us, taking further outbreaks of rain with it. many of us starting off on a dry note, there will still be the remnants of the cloud and some spots of rain in the south east and that will break up and it will brighten up, but the rain comes in from the west accompanied by brisk winds, touching gale force gusts across the western isles. temperatures, 15 to about 2a, but, again, we could just see 25 somewhere in the south—east. on friday, our low pressure is right across us, so some further showers, brisk winds across the board and we still do have the remnants of a weather front in southern areas, producing some cloud and, again, the odd spot of rain. in between these two areas, we are looking at some dry conditions and some sunshine. but temperatures down a touch, 15 to about 23 degrees will be the order of the day, north to south. then, as we head into the weekend, there's a wee bit of uncertainty about the forecast.
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we think on saturday there will be rain in the south, dry in the north and the opposite on sunday.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. thousands of civilians flee major afghan cities, as the taliban continue to gain ground, but president biden says he doesn't regret withdrawing us troops from the country. afghan leaders have to come together. we lost thousands through death and injury, thousands of american personnel. they've got to fight for themselves. at least a2 people are killed as wildfires erupt across algeria, including 25 soldiers fighting the fires. after the gap between private and state school a—level results
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grows in england, the government insists it's committed to supporting students of all backgrounds.

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