Skip to main content

tv   Our World  BBC News  August 17, 2021 3:30am-4:01am BST

3:30 am
president biden has strongly defended his decision to withdraw american troops from afghanistan — saying the goals of the us mission had been counter—terrorism, not nation—building. he also said he had made clear to the taliban that any attack on us personnel would be met with devastating force if necessary. the us and britain say they'll send more troops to the afghan capital to help the evacuation of hundreds of people — desperate to escape kabul after the taliban takeover. there have been chaotic scenes at the airport — with people clinging to, and then falling from, planes taking off. a tropical storm has made landfall in haiti — drenching the country with heavy rain as it deals with the aftermath of saturday's powerful earthquak. at least 1,400 people were killed in the quake and almost 7,000 injured. rescuers are still hunting
3:31 am
for survivors in the rubble. a minute's silence has been held to remember the victims of last week's mass shooting in plymouth. five people died in the attack in the keyham area on thursday. the home secretary has called on police forces in england and wales to review the way they consider applications for firearms licences. 0ur correspondent jon kay reports. they gathered in parks and playgrounds across plymouth. it's been really hard. i think we're still all in shock from what's happened, aren't we? at the city's guild hall, some of those who responded to the shootingsjoined community leaders to remember 3—year—old sophie martyn and herfather, lee, shot at random as they walked home. maxine davison, the first victim, who was the mother of the gunman. stephen washington, who was walking his dogs when he was killed, and 66—year—old kate shepherd, who died from her
3:32 am
injuries in hospital. the bell rang for each of them. bell tolls. applause. i grew up in keyham, went to school there. leanne came to remember the neighbours she's lost. just trying to process it all, really. it could have been any of us walking along the street that day. my family, my children, anybody. and it's really hard to sort of realise that it was that close. so, all of these civic things just seem really
3:33 am
important to be here. many people here question how jake davison was allowed to own a gun. but for now they're thinking not about the killer, but about his victims, and how one man's actions have scarred an entire city. jon kay, bbc news, plymouth. now on bbc news: yalda hakim reports from afghanistan, as american and allied forces withdraw. 20 years after 9/11 and the invasion of afghanistan, american troops are finally leaving. but since news of their withdrawal, targeted killings and suicide attacks have increased.— killings and suicide attacks have increased. they are being tar: eted have increased. they are being targeted and — have increased. they are being targeted and they _ have increased. they are being targeted and they are - have increased. they are being targeted and they are being . targeted and they are being killed. . ., . ~ killed. the taliban are back and gaining _ killed. the taliban are back and gaining ground - killed. the taliban are back and gaining ground against| and gaining ground against government forces. many people fear there will be a return to the brutal regime of the 90s.
3:34 am
the taliban leadership say they have changed and want to work alongside the current government.- alongside the current government. . government. that was in the ast government. that was in the past some — government. that was in the past some mistakes - government. that was in the past some mistakes that - government. that was in the past some mistakes that we | government. that was in the - past some mistakes that we have learned from. in this two—part series i will be trying to find out if they are really willing to share power and what is at stake for the people of afghanistan. there is no way i can surrender to the taliban. none. no way. afghanistan, 2021. the us withdrawal has left a power vacuum that the taliban is rushing to fill. i come to the outskirts of kabul to meet someone who is the founder of a
3:35 am
feminist magazine. at 26, she is one of millions of afghan women who've grown with freedoms and opportunities gained in the last 20 years. the climate of fear that groups like the taliban have created in afghanistan has not stopped her.
3:36 am
in the last 20 years, the west has poured trillions into afghanistan's social, political afg hanistan�*s social, political and afghanistan's social, political and economic development. some people have benefited but today these gains seem more fragile than ever. already this year, at least seven journalists have been killed in afghanistan and she is on multiple lists
3:37 am
circulating on social media of people the taliban want to kill. to protect herself and her team, she has moved offices and keeps a low profile. the idea that someone who is just fighting for the basic rights of women is a kill list, she said to me that her mother brings her and says are you alive or not, every day. just absolutely devastating. she is
3:38 am
part of a generation who bet their lives on a promise from their lives on a promise from the west to protect their values. but in february 2020, the us and taliban signed a historic peace deal agreed to withdraw american troops by mid-2021. it withdraw american troops by mid-20n— mid-2021. it is time to end america's _ mid-2021. it is time to end america's longest - mid-2021. it is time to end america's longest war. - mid-2021. it is time to end america's longest war. it l mid-2021. it is time to end| america's longest war. it is time for american troops to come home. time for american troops to come home-— come home. the deal was followed _ come home. the deal was followed by _ come home. the deal was followed by peace - come home. the deal was followed by peace talks i come home. the deal was - followed by peace talks between the afghan government and the taliban. but despite lengthy negotiations, there had been no progress. i travelled to meet with a member of the taliban peace negotiation team. prior to 9/11 and the war on terror he used to live in new york as
3:39 am
the taliban's representative to the taliban's representative to the united nations. tell me about your time the united nations. tell me about yourtime in the united nations. tell me about your time in the united states. what did you think of new york?— states. what did you think of new york? ., . ., ., , new york? related technologies, the cities, the _ new york? related technologies, the cities, the buildings - new york? related technologies, the cities, the buildings and - the cities, the buildings and also — the cities, the buildings and also the _ the cities, the buildings and also the sense of research and hard _ also the sense of research and hard work _ also the sense of research and hard work in the american people _ hard work in the american people. and also the media. 30 people. and also the media. so ou people. and also the media. you could people. and also the media. sr you could see a partnership with them?— you could see a partnership with them? , , �* , with them? yes, sure. because i wanted and _ with them? yes, sure. because i wanted and still _ with them? yes, sure. because i wanted and still want _ with them? yes, sure. because i wanted and still want those - wanted and still want those things— wanted and still want those things to happen to my people, to my— things to happen to my people, to my country. so i think they could — to my country. so i think they could be _ to my country. so i think they could be good partners. for the last 15 years — could be good partners. for the last 15 years him _ could be good partners. for the last 15 years him and _ could be good partners. for the last 15 years him and his - last 15 years him and his family have lived in exile. the
3:40 am
lifestyle he feeds here is miles away from the battlefields of afghanistan. if you were to return how would you were to return how would you govern?— you govern? there was in the ast you govern? there was in the past some — you govern? there was in the past some mistakes - you govern? there was in the past some mistakes that - you govern? there was in the past some mistakes that we | you govern? there was in the - past some mistakes that we have learned _ past some mistakes that we have learned from because at that time — learned from because at that time we _ learned from because at that time we were new to government. the stopped education of women and girls. — the stopped education of women and girls, that is not our goal _ and girls, that is not our goal of_ and girls, that is not our goal. of course, education is goal. of course, education is their— goal. of course, education is their right. and it is much needed _ their right. and it is much needed and when they receive education of course they have a right— education of course they have a right to — education of course they have a right to work. so we want to end — right to work. so we want to end this _ right to work. so we want to end this phase of occupation and bring about another government which is acceptable but the — government which is acceptable but the people of afghanistan. so it— but the people of afghanistan. so it would be one person one vote? ~ ., so it would be one person one vote? ~ . , vote? we have left this
3:41 am
question _ vote? we have left this question to _ vote? we have left this question to the - vote? we have left this - question to the negotiation to decide — question to the negotiation to decide. we question to the negotiation to decide. ~ ., question to the negotiation to decide. ~ . , ., , decide. we have seen a number of targeted _ decide. we have seen a number of targeted killings _ decide. we have seen a number of targeted killings in _ of targeted killings in afghanistan at the moment. the taliban deny that they are involved so who is behind it? some people who are military people — some people who are military people who are fighting against us, we — people who are fighting against us, we are fighting against them _ us, we are fighting against them. that is clear. but other people — them. that is clear. but other people who were common people, the asset— people who were common people, the asset of this country, it is i the asset of this country, it is i think— the asset of this country, it is i think no reasons, no rationality to kill them. if we kill them _ rationality to kill them. if we kill them that means that would damage — kill them that means that would damage the whole country. would it be unacceptable _ damage the whole country. would it be unacceptable to _ damage the whole country. would it be unacceptable to see - damage the whole country. would it be unacceptable to see a - it be unacceptable to see a public execution in kabul today? i5 public execution in kabul toda ? , ~ , , ., public execution in kabul toda? ,., .,, today? is muslims that would be acceptable- _ today? is muslims that would be acceptable. not _ today? is muslims that would be acceptable. not only _ today? is muslims that would be acceptable. not only for - today? is muslims that would be acceptable. not only for me - today? is muslims that would be acceptable. not only for me but| acceptable. not only for me but also for— acceptable. not only for me but also for you as a muslim. and about— also for you as a muslim. and about stoning. according to my knowledge, although i am not a religious— knowledge, although i am not a religious scholar, it is very difficult _ religious scholar, it is very difficult to find proof to
3:42 am
stone _ difficult to find proof to stone a woman. it is not impossible but it is very, very difficult _ impossible but it is very, very difficult. ~ ., ., ., difficult. would you have a religious — difficult. would you have a religious police _ difficult. would you have a religious police that - difficult. would you have a religious police that would j religious police that would monitor peoples behaviour? there will be but there will be difference. they should have good — difference. they should have good conduct with the people and also _ good conduct with the people and also there will be another department of complex grievances to monitor not only the people but the police themselves. so the people but the police themselves.— the people but the police themselves. ., , ., ., ., themselves. so he was adamant that the mistakes _ themselves. so he was adamant that the mistakes of _ themselves. so he was adamant that the mistakes of the - themselves. so he was adamant that the mistakes of the past - that the mistakes of the past would not be repeated but the reality in afghanistan was different. back in kabul i was meeting a man who would would only talk to me if we concealed his identity. he is one of
3:43 am
80,000 hoping to flee to the united states because of his work with the americans. i was ea . er to work with the americans. i was eager to join — work with the americans. i was eager to join because - work with the americans. i was eager to join because i - work with the americans. i was eager to join because i can - eager tojoin because i can help and they can improve my country. they come to support the people if you had known that this would be how it would end, that the americans would leave and your future would just remain hanging, would you havejoined and become an interpreter? this is our country- — it is estimated more than 50,000 afghans and their
3:44 am
families are waiting for their visas to be processed. according to the us state department, the average processing time for an application is almost two years. are you scared about your future?— years. are you scared about your future? actually, yes. it is clear that. .. _ the taliban said they were not kill interpreters. but there has been at least one assassination. as they continue to advance, the statements made ijy to advance, the statements made by the leadership were becoming increasingly redundant.
3:45 am
that was just a contact who has been communicating with the taliban commander and we're hoping meet him and i'vejust heard that he is ready to speak. but here in kabul. what is surprising about all the dishes quite a well—known commander make his way to the capital and feel quite comfortable being here. it makes you realise just how much they've infiltrated the city. it is very hot. dassey what
3:46 am
water? what do you want? do you want the taliban regime to come back into power or do you think there should be a power—sharing deal with the current government, like the discussions that are being had? if we talk about law and order and justice, if we talk about law and order andjustice, if if we talk about law and order and justice, if someone were to steal or commit adultery, what should happen to them?
3:47 am
what about girls going to school? can girls go to school and up until which age? but in your district and in the villages that you live and fight, do girls go to school and if so, until what age? do you know that members of the taliban are sending their children to school, daughters?
3:48 am
they are being educated right through to university? and the schools there are taught by male teachers as well. how do you respond to that. but the values of the taliban should be the same? don't you think there is a double standard there? if the leadership can make their own private decisions in terms of their own children and families, shouldn't the afghan
3:49 am
people be able to make their own decisions here in afghanistan? and if there is not a political resolution to this conflict, are you prepared to take kabul ijy are you prepared to take kabul by force? this is one of the 5000 taliban prisoners released by the government has part of a goodwill gesture. since an interview he has returned to the front lines directing 300 fighters. i had heard two
3:50 am
contradicting views from the taliban. i headed to see the vice president of afghanistan. he had spent his life standing up he had spent his life standing up to the taliban and i wanted to know what he thought about their increasing power. i spoke to one of the members of the taliban and he said i missed kabul in the mountains and provinces. don't you think it is right to them at some point to come back.— to come back. absolutely. tomorrow. _ to come back. absolutely. tomorrow. but _ to come back. absolutely. tomorrow. but not - to come back. absolutely. tomorrow. but not with i to come back. absolutely. . tomorrow. but not with ideas like suicide normal individuals if they want to come and interact with us, run for office, why not. but if they come to dictate, you know, the size of peoples burden their lifestyle, what they cook in the kitchen or what time they wake up, that is not going to
3:51 am
happen. it gave them exposure, legitimacy. without taking anything from them. we have not taken anything from the taliban. , taken anything from the talil>an-_ taken anything from the taliban. , ., . taliban. they said to me that they want — taliban. they said to me that they want to _ taliban. they said to me that they want to come _ taliban. they said to me that they want to come into - taliban. they said to me that they want to come into a - they want to come into a position where they can power share with fellow muslims. this urou - , share with fellow muslims. this grouo. they _ share with fellow muslims. this grouo. they are _ share with fellow muslims. this grouo. they are a _ share with fellow muslims. try 3 group, they are a deceptive facade. of the very dark reality, the taliban. in facade. of the very dark reality, the taliban. in your they changed? _ reality, the taliban. in your they changed? . _ reality, the taliban. in your they changed? . note - reality, the taliban. in your they changed? . note only| reality, the taliban. in your- they changed? . note only have they changed? . note only have the not they changed? . note only have they not changed, _ they changed? . note only have they not changed, they - they changed? . note only have they not changed, they believel they not changed, they believe that their stagnation has brought them a strength. they have become savvier in deceiving. but the reality is not change. i5
3:52 am
deceiving. but the reality is not change-— deceiving. but the reality is not change. is this process a dead end? — not change. is this process a dead end? we _ not change. is this process a dead end? we are _ not change. is this process a dead end? we are not - not change. is this process a - dead end? we are not retreating from the talks. _ dead end? we are not retreating from the talks. we _ dead end? we are not retreating from the talks. we have - dead end? we are not retreating from the talks. we have nothing| from the talks. we have nothing to lose. we represent values of the society. to lose. we represent values of the society-— the society. are you willing to ick u- the society. are you willing to pick op arms _ the society. are you willing to pick up arms again _ the society. are you willing to pick up arms again if - the society. are you willing to pick up arms again if you - the society. are you willing to | pick up arms again if you have to? i pick up arms again if you have to? ., pick up arms again if you have to? . . . , pick up arms again if you have to? . . ., , ., pick up arms again if you have to? . . . , ., ., ., , to? i am already armed against them. to? i am already armed against them- you _ to? i am already armed against them. you have _ to? i am already armed against them. you have got _ to? i am already armed against them. you have got the - to? i am already armed against them. you have got the whole l them. you have got the whole arm . them. you have got the whole army- but _ them. you have got the whole army- but if — them. you have got the whole army. but if you _ them. you have got the whole army. but if you had _ them. you have got the whole army. but if you had to - them. you have got the whole army. but if you had to go - them. you have got the whole l army. but if you had to go head to head. , , , ., to head. yes, yes, no way. there is — to head. yes, yes, no way. there is no _ to head. yes, yes, no way. there is no way _ to head. yes, yes, no way. there is no way i _ to head. yes, yes, no way. there is no way i can - to head. yes, yes, no way. - there is no way i can surrender to the taliban. none. no way. he remains defiant but us intelligence reports suggest the afghan government could fall within months. with an estimated 180,000 soldiers ready to fight for their country, i have come to an army base just outside of cobble to
3:53 am
meet some of the newest recruits. 0ne meet some of the newest recruits. one of the most dangerousjobs recruits. one of the most dangerous jobs to have today is to be part of the afghan army. at such a turbulent time in foreign forces are leaving. in the last month the taliban have made huge advances and claim to now control most of the country. this man is 18 and preparing to be sent to the front line.
3:54 am
the hopes that people had for someone like him that's 20 years are not 18 years on this would be a very different
3:55 am
nation and to think that they have gone back to square one what is most disturbing about all of this. the people i met all of this. the people i met all tell me that they refused to surrender the rights and opportunities that the last 20 years have opened up for them. none of them want to flee. but despite what i heard, the tell a on a campaign to bring back their brutal regime. with the government adamant to defy a new era in the taliban making significant gains, afghans are caught up in a savage war that has taken on a life of its own.
3:56 am
hello there. we're looking at a pretty benign week of weather. we've got high—pressure fairly nearby, but a lot of cloud streaming in off the north atlantic, bringing us rather cool and cloudy conditions throughout the week. a little bit of sunshine here and there, but there will also be some patchy rain, too. these weather fronts bringing the patchy rain through this morning. generally, though, we've got this airflow coming in from the north atlantic, and it's moisture—laden air, hence all the cloud. so, rather grey skies this morning, that patchy rain eventually clearing away from the eastern side of england. there will be further patchy rain for northern and western hills, but many places will turn drier, and we could see some sunshine breaking through eastern scotland, eastern england, perhaps across south wales and the southwest. a breezy day to come, those winds quite fresh from the northwest, and temperatures pretty disappointing for mid—august, generally 15—21 degrees in the sunnier spots
3:57 am
further south. and we hold onto the cloud and the breeze through tuesday night, as well. most places will be dry, further spots of drizzle, though, across some western hills, especially, especially northern and western scotland. but with all the cloud cover and the breeze, temperatures no lower than around 11—15 degrees. so then, for wednesday, very little change — it looks similar, rather grey and breezy once again, further patchy drizzle across some northern and western hills. but again, with some shelter from the breeze, from the higher ground further west, we should see some sunny spells, again, eastern england, perhaps across the south of wales and southwest. again, that pushes temperatures up to 21 degrees — otherwise for most, mid—to—high teens. into thursday, some subtle changes. this weather front�*s a bit more active, it'll start to wriggle into parts of england and wales. the winds will be lighter on thursday, too, coming
3:58 am
pushing into england and wales — thanks to that weather front, some of these could be on the heavy side. a bit of sunshine again towards the southwest, highs of 20—21 degrees, otherwise, again, mid—to—high teens. as we move out of thursday into friday, we start to see this more substantial area of low pressure sweeping up very slowly from the southwest. so, that'll change the wind direction to a south—westerly for many of us, it will be light with breeze. again, quite a bit of cloud around, a few sunny spells here and there, the more substantial rain pushing into northern ireland and later, western england and wales. and again, those temperatures range from 15—20 celsius.
3:59 am
4:00 am
this is bbc news. our top stories: the defiance of an american president — joe biden stands by the us pullout from afghanistan, but accepts the speed of the taliban's takeover caught them by surprise. i stand squarely behind my decision. after 20 years i have learned the hard way that there was never a good time to withdraw us forces. desperate and chaotic scenes at kabul airport — people cling to moving planes in their attempt to flee the country. taliban militants patrol the streets of kabul — how repressive will they be as the regime takes root? more than 1,400 people
4:01 am
are known to have died in haiti's earthquake — now a tropical storm is bearing

30 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on