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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  August 17, 2021 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. with mineral reserves estimated to be worth several trillion and opium production booming, what is the outlook for afghanistan's economy under taliban rule? the uk government is set to push low carbon hydrogen energy as it seeks to persuade sectors to switch away from fossil fuels. the pandemic impact on mental health stacks up in the workplace, and at home in australia as repeated lockdowns takes its toll on wellbeing. and why dating apps are turning to "friendship only" — we investigate the new dating scene that is proving
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to be big business. more now on afghanistan, where the taliban are back in control of the country. in the last 20 years after the regime was driven from power billions of dollars have been spent rebuilding afghanistan. many parts of the country are now vastly different, in terms of infrastructure and commerce as well as social attitudes and lifestyle. but afghanistan's economy is shaped by fragility and aid dependence — that was the conclusion of the world bank in march. plus much opportunity was missed due to corruption with an economy largely fuelled by illicit activity including opium production, smuggling and illegal mining. so how will the afghan economy be shaped now?
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joining me now is dr vali aslam — associate professor in asian security studies at the university of bath. a warm welcome to the programme. i've done a lot of reading and had a look at what the world bank has said, what the world bank has said, what the imf has said and others about the outlook for the afghan economy. it's very gloomy, isn't it? give us your picture. gloomy, isn't it? give us your icture. gloomy, isn't it? give us your icture, ., gloomy, isn't it? give us your icture. ., , ., picture. the outlook is not very positive. _ picture. the outlook is not very positive. in _ picture. the outlook is not very positive. in the - picture. the outlook is not very positive. in the last i picture. the outlook is notl very positive. in the last 20 years the afghan economy has primarily relied on the goodwill of the international community and the presence of international forces in the country. for example the main activity has primarily focused on construction in the field of security spending, transportation spending, and you can see that these fields are basically quite closely
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related to the presence of international forces in the country, so going forward we will see how that economic picture changes now that international forces have left the country. international forces have left the country-— the country. and with the taliban in _ the country. and with the taliban in control, - the country. and with the taliban in control, of - the country. and with the taliban in control, of the | taliban in control, of the country, of the economy, what does that mean in terms of foreign aid, which is vital for afghanistan, but also foreign direct investment? it's very hard to predict who will choose to work with the taliban going forward, isn't it?— forward, isn't it? when the taliban took— forward, isn't it? when the taliban took over - forward, isn't it? when the taliban took over the - forward, isn't it? when the taliban took over the last l forward, isn't it? when the - taliban took over the last time in afghanistan in 1996 and 1997, one key factor that they were being assessed against was whether they would be able to bring some kind of security and stability to afghanistan at that time, but now, as we are seeing on our tv screens every minute, the single most important factor that they're going to be assessed against is theissue going to be assessed against is the issue of human rights, and women's rights especially, so the taliban are aware of that as well so the answer to your
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question depends on how good are in delivering their promises that they have made so far on the basis, on the issue of fundamental human rights, and of course, if they fulfil some of their promises, we don't know if they will, but if they do that, then there are already some positive signs that international community is keen to engage with the taliban and that will also bring in more authority to the government and foreign direct investment, so the issue of human rights is critical. what about the _ human rights is critical. what about the illicit _ human rights is critical. what about the illicit trade - human rights is critical. what about the illicit trade of - about the illicit trade of opium? 0pium production has been booming in recent years, and this has financed the taliban to be great degree, with illegal smuggling across borders. ~ , with illegal smuggling across borders. , ., . borders. absolutely. now we are seeinu borders. absolutely. now we are seeing that _ borders. absolutely. now we are seeing that the _ borders. absolutely. now we are seeing that the militia _ borders. absolutely. now we are seeing that the militia group - seeing that the militia group has become the government, and the asset to declare the islamic emirate of afghanistan, and now eckley area to look up will be whether they will use that to fund themselves or they will try to become a part of
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the legitimate international community, and of course, if they try to do that it makes they try to do that it makes the taliban want to do that and if they had paid attention to the matters of running the state in the last 20 years, they will probably try to reduce their dependence on the illicit sources and more on the legitimate sources so we will have to see. 50 legitimate sources so we will have to see.— legitimate sources so we will have to see. ., , , ., , have to see. so many questions about the _ have to see. so many questions about the future _ have to see. so many questions about the future and _ have to see. so many questions about the future and what - have to see. so many questions| about the future and what might happen there, thank you so much for your time and your expertise this morning. my pleasure. _ expertise this morning. ij�*i pleasure, thank expertise this morning. m: pleasure, thank you expertise this morning. m; pleasure, thank you for having me. cleaner and greener — investment in low carbon hydrogen energy will create thousands of newjobs and power vehicles and heat homes, the uk government says. it's unveiling a strategy today for kick—starting a hydrogen industry, which ministers say could attract billions of pounds in investment and help uk efforts to reach net zero emissions. critics argue hydrogen is being over—hyped and question boris johnson's backing of certain production methods. joining me now is russ mould, investment director, aj bell.
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good morning to you. lovely to see you again. you have had a look through some of these ideas on the part of the uk government. your thoughts? history graduate so i will not get too involved in the chemistry, but if you look at the potential positives behind hydrogen, it's abundant in the air and hydrogen, it's abundant in the airand in hydrogen, it's abundant in the air and in the water, is potentially very very green, the emissions at the end is just water and it can be used for multiple different applications, heating, transportation, but the downside is you would expect of a gas, is it can be awfully tricky to store, it doesn't give as much bang for your buck, so it's potentially relatively expensive, and we are still coming back the stumbling block of infrastructure and how we can get the fuel cells and electrolytes is out there but there is clearly enormous potential and the target of five gigawatts of energy by
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2030, that will be a fifth of the uk's current energy generation output. taste the uk's current energy generation output. we know to have radical— generation output. we know to have radical ideas _ generation output. we know to have radical ideas and - generation output. we know to have radical ideas and big - have radical ideas and big plans, big thinking on this when it comes to meeting emissions targets, which are hard and tough to reach in the timeframe that we have given ourselves in the uk.— ourselves in the uk. they are in the uk _ ourselves in the uk. they are in the uk is — ourselves in the uk. they are in the uk is making _ ourselves in the uk. they are j in the uk is making progress, and just before we came on year i looked at sheffield university's energy dashboard in the uk is generating one fifth of its total fuel requirements from fossil fuels that capacity for fairness is a global average, so we are making progress, but yes, there is an awful lot more to do and i'm sure we will find out a lot more at the conference in glasgow at the end of the year. that is on the run run up to the international event and it is seen as one of the most critical events when it comes to climate change since the paris agreement. hydrogen is an interesting. _ paris agreement. hydrogen is an interesting, notjust _ paris agreement. hydrogen is an interesting, notjust a _ paris agreement. hydrogen is an interesting, notjust a popular. interesting, notjust a popular thing at the moment. germany
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has put aside a multibillion euro deposit of money towards this, and it has a summit coming up on the 31st of august looking to develop a plan to drive down the cost of hydrogen by 80% over the next ten years so there are lots of initiatives in these areas. thank you so much for giving us some insight into that story, and they will be a lot more from the government on that later today from the business secretary. us road safety regulators are investigating tesla's self—driving autopilot system. the national highway traffic safety administration says it has identified 11 crashes in the last three years in which teslas on autopilot have hit emergency vehicles. the investigation will cover roughly 765,000 cars — all tesla models made since 2014. samira hussain reports from new york
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the worry for officials here in america is tesla's autopilot situation's ability to detect emergency vehicles are. in the ii emergency vehicles are. in the 11 crashes, there were instances in which tesla's using the autopilot system and hit ambulances and other first responders, despite using flashing lights, flares or cones warning of any hazards. the investigation will focus on how the autopilot system ensures that tesla drivers are in fact paying attention to the road. the only�*s manuals instruct tesla drivers to keep their hands on the steering wheel at all times, but the autopilot function will still work, even if the driver only lightly tap the wheel. news of the investigation rattled wall street where shares of tesla fell by more than 4% in trading. injune of this year,
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china announced that it would recall over 285,000 model three and model by cars in the country because of a software glitch that could enable passengers to accidentally activate the autopilot system. let's get some of the day's other news. jeff bezos�*s space firm blue 0rigin is suing nasa over a decision to award a near $3 billion contract to elon musk�*s spacex. the former amazon boss's firm said there were "fundamental issues" with the deal, calling it unfair. nasa is yet to comment, but it has the backing of a federal watchdog. facebook has told the bbc that it is actively removing accounts maintained by or on behalf of the taliban, which is sanctioned as a terrorist entity under us law. the firm says it has a team of afghan experts to help identify emerging issues on the platform, as the situation evolves.
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china's state administration for market regulation has issued draft rules banning unfair competition in the internet sector. according to a document published on the regulator's website, business operators should not use data, algorithms or other technical means to hijack traffic or influence users' choices. before the pandemic, vinyl records had been enjoying a spectacular revival, notching up 13 consecutive years of growth. but now a shortage in the supply of pvc is threatening the market. pressing a vinyl record used to take around three weeks, but now its taking up to 9 months to do the same job. pvc is in great demand particularly from the car sector, keen to use the lightweight material to help cut carbon emissions. lets talk to karen emanuel about this, the chief executive
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officer of he production, a company that services the music industries. welcome to the programme. just explain in more detail what the problem has been. , ., , , ., been. yes, there has been a ulobal been. yes, there has been a global worldwide _ been. yes, there has been a global worldwide shortage . been. yes, there has been a | global worldwide shortage of pvc, partly due to really bad weather situations in the oil fields, partly due to the pandemic, with workers not being able to work, ports that have been shut so that pvc can't move from place to place, theissue can't move from place to place, the issue in the panama canal caused a lot of supply chain shortages, and obviously the demand hasjust shortages, and obviously the demand has just grown and grown over the past couple of years, but particularly this year. i think during the pandemic, people may had a bit of extra money to spend, they weren't going out to see shows, were going out to see shows, were going to festivals, and they wanted to connect with the
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artist, knowing that buying physical product also gives the artist more of an income than downloading, and so, more and more vinyl was being bought and is still being bored, and that is still being bored, and that is also along with lots more catalogue reissues of older products, and people building up products, and people building up their collections, so a perfect storm really of loads of demand and not enough supplies. of demand and not enough sunplies-— of demand and not enough su lies. �* , , ., supplies. and i presume that means higher _ supplies. and i presume that means higher prices, - supplies. and i presume that means higher prices, so - supplies. and i presume that| means higher prices, so does that mean vinyl will be unrealistic for a lot of people who our fans?— unrealistic for a lot of people who our fans? the prices have one u- who our fans? the prices have gone up certainly _ who our fans? the prices have gone up certainly in _ who our fans? the prices have gone up certainly in the - who our fans? the prices have| gone up certainly in the supply chain, and the end price of the user will go up a bit, but i think that they will still be affordable. may be as time goes on when people start going back on when people start going back on spending more money, and shows, on tours, they might buy a bit less vinyl which means
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that maybe the supply will even out, but i still think there will be a realistic price that people were still want to purchase product that they can connect with.— connect with. and why is vinyl preferred?. — connect with. and why is vinyl preferred?, say _ connect with. and why is vinyl preferred? , say to _ connect with. and why is vinyl| preferred?, say to streaming? my preferred?, say to streaming? my gosh, well when you get a piece of vinyl, it's a beautiful thing. as humans, we really love product, to touch and feel things, and when you look at the artwork, it is a piece of art, you can read all about it, you know who produces it, there is a whole ritual i think of playing a record, and you get to hear the record as the artist wants you to hear it, in order that you play it, and then you have to get up and turnit and then you have to get up and turn it over, and there isjust so much more connection than with something that you just play through your computer. karen what is your favourite, come on?—
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come on? that is the worst question — come on? that is the worst question anyone _ come on? that is the worst question anyone could - come on? that is the worst question anyone could ask| come on? that is the worst - question anyone could ask me. i really love too many things. as soon as i start thinking of something that i like i think of 20 other things,... i’m something that i like i think of 20 other things, . .. i'm 'ust auoin to of 20 other things, . .. i'm 'ust going to have i of 20 other things, . .. i'm 'ust going to have to i of 20 other things, . .. i'm 'ust going to have to come i of 20 other things, . .. i'm just going to have to come around and listen. that's the thing. you will have to tell me all you know, i can sense your enthusiasm. thanks for being on the programme, i really appreciate it. stay with us here, we still had more to come, including why dating apps are turning to plutonic relationships, we investigate the friendship only dating scene. the big crowds became bigger as the time of the funeral approached. as the lines of fans became longer, the police prepared for a huge job of crowd control.
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idi amin, uganda's brutalformer dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's been buried in saudi arabia, where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979. 2 billion people around the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun take place in this millennium. it began itsjourney off the coast of canada, ending three hours later, when the sun set over the bay of bengal. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: president biden defends his decision to withdraw troops from afghanistan, saying the mission is counter—terrorism, not nation—building.
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more than 60 countries issue a joint statement calling on the taliban to allow people to leave afghanistan. mental health charities say the impact of more covid—19 lockdowns in australia will last for years. many businesses have closed and millions of workers have been forced to stay at home as delta variant infections continue to rise in sydney. the city has been in lockdown since latejune, along with regions to the north, south and west. from sydney, phil mercer reports. just another day stuck in the house, sucking on a bottle feeling sorry for myself... lockdowns for some can feel like a form of house arrest. the one car could's new single with his band charts the heavy drinking and despair he felt at home in sydney with his girlfriend.—
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home in sydney with his girlfriend. home in sydney with his airlfriend. ~ ., ., ., girlfriend. we had no “ob and no money * girlfriend. we had no “ob and no money coming _ girlfriend. we had no “ob and no money coming in. h girlfriend. we had no job and no money coming in. it - girlfriend. we had no job and no money coming in. it does| no money coming in. it does make you feel hopeless. the drinking came in due to boredom, we would wake up and you arejust sitting boredom, we would wake up and you are just sitting around, you are just sitting around, you are just sitting around, you are not allowed to leave the house, a bit of cabin fever and wejust the house, a bit of cabin fever and we just felt like it was something to do, just to sort of numb yourself. something to do, 'ust to sort of numb yourself.- something to do, 'ust to sort of numb yourself. covid-19 is causina of numb yourself. covid-19 is causing untold _ of numb yourself. covid-19 is causing untold levels - of numb yourself. covid-19 is causing untold levels of- causing untold levels of anxiety, loneliness and frustration. absenteeism affects businesses, and there are calls for workers to be allowed to take mental health days to help them cope. rho, allowed to take mental health days to help them cope. a lack of motivation _ days to help them cope. a lack of motivation that _ days to help them cope. a lack of motivation that comes - days to help them cope. a lack of motivation that comes up i days to help them cope. a lack| of motivation that comes up for me, when there is a lot of stress and i feel really overwhelmed and i think people think about mental healthcare day is taking bubble bath or watching netflix all day which might be really great for some people but i think the important thing is to really have the meantime, and to seek out professional help. lockdowns can exacerbate the impacts of economic hardship,
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job insecurity, and tensions at home. younger australians up to deliver vulnerable, and some support services have never been busier. but that might not been busier. but that might not be a bad thing, as people who are feeling the pressure are seeking help, although resources are being stretched. 0fficial resources are being stretched. official figures have shown that one in five australians have suffered high levels of psychological distress. the longer term consequences could be dire. indie longer term consequences could be dire. ~ ., longer term consequences could be dire. ~ . , be dire. we have been saying since the _ be dire. we have been saying since the pandemic— be dire. we have been saying since the pandemic started i be dire. we have been saying i since the pandemic started here in australia that the after—shocks and the long tail of mental health impact will be notjust of mental health impact will be not just long, of mental health impact will be notjust long, but actually really deep. notjust long, but actually really deep-— really deep. despite the uncertainty, _ really deep. despite the uncertainty, duan - really deep. despite the uncertainty, duan is - really deep. despite the - uncertainty, duan is beginning to feel more upbeat. i uncertainty, duan is beginning to feel more upbeat.— to feel more upbeat. i think that is exactly _ to feel more upbeat. i think that is exactly what - to feel more upbeat. i think that is exactly what we - to feel more upbeat. i think| that is exactly what we need to feel more upbeat. i think i that is exactly what we need to do now, we've sort of gone through the dark side of things last year but i think people have seen enough of the darkness and now they want to see light. darkness and now they want to see li . ht. �* ., darkness and now they want to see liaht. �* ., ., ., , see light. but that gloom is persisting. _ see light. but that gloom is persisting, and _ see light. but that gloom is persisting, and there - see light. but that gloom is persisting, and there is - see light. but that gloom is persisting, and there is nol persisting, and there is no clear path out of lockdown for
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millions of australians. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. let's stay on the subject of the impact the pandemic has had on our mental health. for some, this has presented a business opportunity. for many people coming out of long—term lockdown, friendships are becoming just as important as dating. and the dating apps have spotted an opportunity. tinder and bumble are launching or acquiring new services focused entirely on making and maintaining platonic friends. the major dating firm match group, owner of tinder and hinge, has paid $1.7 billion this year for south korean social media firm hyperconnect, whose apps let people chat from across the world using real—time translation. so why are people turning to dating apps for friendship and how big is the business opportunity? joining me now is haifa barbari, a dating coach founder of dating coach app be. welcome to the programme. so, tender, bumble, moving into this whole area of using their app this whole area of using their app to find friends. —— tinder. what's going on? app to find friends. -- tinder. what's going on?— what's going on? right, exactly- _ what's going on? right, exactly- i _ what's going on? right, exactly. i think - what's going on? right, exactly. i think they - what's going on? right, | exactly. i think they have capitalised on a fantastic
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opportunity, especially during the pandemic, the loneliness statistics have been on the rise for years, but it has been exacerbated by the pandemic and unfortunately, the other online platforms out there are incredibly time—consuming. so looking online to find new friends is nothing new, but with bumble and tinder, the hyper easy functionality of swiping and directly focusing on meeting like—minded people has saved people a lot of time, and has actually been a saviour during the pandemic, and there has been an increase in both men and women using them. 83%, i believe, of men, are up taking bumble, and 40% of women in the last year alone. to taking bumble, and 4096 of women in the last year alone.— in the last year alone. to what extent do _ in the last year alone. to what extent do we _ in the last year alone. to what extent do we know _ in the last year alone. to what extent do we know how - in the last year alone. to what extent do we know how many| in the last year alone. to what i extent do we know how many of those are looking for friendship and how many are looking for love?— looking for love? that is the direct link, _ looking for love? that is the direct link, people - looking for love? that is the direct link, people looking l looking for love? that is the l direct link, people looking for
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friendships, but that is a great point. the challenge with dating ups and what people often come to me about is the fact that it alienates half of the population, because by the very nature of it being dating ups, people who are in relationships are avoiding using them, but life doesn't stop because you are in a relationship. so i think that in the future there is a huge opportunity for this, and it will be integrated in other platforms where people have shared interests and already know that they are aligned on beliefs and values, which really connect relationships, and the same with friendships. and just explain what men look for, and why they use these apps to a great degree? it was quite interesting, i was reading some of your analysis on men and how they find making friends quite tricky. absolutely. so, with men, and women, we want the same things, friendships, connections, they ourfundamental human friendships, connections, they our fundamental human needs. however, we approach things differently. more than lurk in
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the shadows, and i notice directly because more men have signed up to my coaching up prior to launch, and downloaded all the coaching guides, and 83%, so double the amount of men, have beenjoining the dating apps to meet friends, and there is of bravado. when i coachman there is a sense of bravado, needing to feel like they have to have to have it all together. there is a lot of pressure. so lurking in the shadows and going online is something that they feel more comfortable with, but i sincerely hope we have news like this that we can encourage people to come out of the shadows, men and women, regardless of sexual orientation or age, loneliness and love does not discriminate. so let's put ourselves out of air. ~ , ., , , ., air. well, we put ourselves out there, air. well, we put ourselves out there. and _ air. well, we put ourselves out there. and in — air. well, we put ourselves out there, and in the _ air. well, we put ourselves out there, and in the meantime . there, and in the meantime companies are making a heck of a lot of money. just reading about match group, which owns
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tinder and makings, about match group, which owns tinderand makings, it paid $1.7 million this year for a south korean social media firm called hyperconnect. they see it has big business going forward, and it is, isn't it? absolutely. facebook has integrated data, it's not going to belong to friendships as well. people have a lack of time, and with work always being on, burnout is on the rise. people want to use their time efficiently, and i think with investing in technologies and platforms where people can meet online and cut through the clutter, and although on one hand it is really nice to leave things to chance, with the pandemic he decided to meet people in person, these are great new solutions to solve old problems, and something that i have noticed as well, there is still a stigma about using online platforms, but with anything new, particularly these new functionalities, there will be a judgement, but once you try it, once you do
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it, more people will do it. we're running out of time. thanks for coming on the programme. and thanks for your company. have a lovely day, and see you soon. hello there. we're looking at a pretty benign week of weather. we've got high—pressure fairly nearby, but a lot of cloud streaming in off the north atlantic, bringing us rather cool and cloudy conditions throughout the week. a little bit of sunshine here and there, but there will also be some patchy rain, too. these weather fronts bringing the patchy rain through this morning. generally, though, we've got this airflow coming in from the north atlantic, and it's moisture—laden air, hence all the cloud. so, rather grey skies this morning, that patchy rain eventually clearing away from the eastern side of england. there will be further patchy rain for northern and western hills, but many places will turn drier, and we could see some sunshine breaking through eastern scotland, eastern england, perhaps across south wales and the southwest.
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a breezy day to come, those winds quite fresh from the northwest, and temperatures pretty disappointing for mid—august, generally 15—21 degrees in the sunnier spots further south. and we hold onto the cloud and the breeze through tuesday night, as well. most places will be dry, further spots of drizzle, though, across some western hills, especially, especially northern and western scotland. but with all the cloud cover and the breeze, temperatures no lower than around 11—15 degrees. so then, for wednesday, very little change — it looks similar, rather grey and breezy once again, further patchy drizzle across some northern and western hills. but again, with some shelter from the breeze, from the higher ground further west, we should see some sunny spells, again, eastern england, perhaps across the south of wales and southwest. again, that pushes temperatures up to 21 degrees — otherwise for most, mid—to—high teens. into thursday, some subtle changes. this weather front�*s a bit more active, it'll start to wriggle into parts of england and wales. the winds will be lighter on thursday, too, coming in from a more west—southwest direction. again, a lot of cloud around, but we'll have these showers pushing into england and wales — thanks to that weatherfront, some of these could be on the heavy side. a bit of sunshine again towards the southwest, highs of 20—21
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degrees, otherwise, again, mid—to—high teens. as we move out of thursday into friday, we start to see this more substantial area of low pressure sweeping up very slowly from the southwest. so, that'll change the wind direction to a south—westerly for many of us, it will be light with breeze. again, quite a bit of cloud around, a few sunny spells here and there, the more substantial rain pushing into northern ireland and later, western england and wales. and again, those temperatures range from 15—20 celsius.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today. a defiantjoe biden defends his decision to pull us troops out of afghanistan, after the taliban seized power. i stand squarely behind my decision. after 20 years, i've learned the hard way that there was never a good time to withdraw us forces. more british troops are sent to help with the evacuation from kabul airport, after chaotic scenes yesterday. the heartbreak of afghan families here in the uk, as they appeal for help from the international community.
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