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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 18, 2021 4:00am-4:31am BST

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this is bbc news. our top stories: the taliban take centre stage — their leader says the rights of women will be respected as long as they adhere to islamic laws. translation: will be nothing auainst translation: will be nothing against women _ translation: will be nothing against women in _ translation: will be nothing against women in our - translation: will be nothing against women in our ruling. l against women in our ruling. our people accept our women are muslims. they accept islamic rule. if they live according to sharia, we will be happy. the leaders of the g7 nations are to meet to discuss their response to the taliban — and what to do if promises are not kept. half a million children in desperate need of shelter and drinking water in haiti after the earthquake which has left nearly 2,000 dead. and is this the moment to stamp out
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a 2,000—year—old disease? a new vaccine being developed could finally mean the end for the plague. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. we begin in kabul, where taliban leaders have stepped into the public limelight to outline their intentions after sweeping through the country and taking control within a matter of days. they are leaders who have in fact never been seen in public before. and they were quick to send out messages of assurance to both afghan nationals and the international community. they said afghans who assisted international forces would come to no harm, that media freedoms would be protected, and that women would be
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allowed to study and work, albeit adding �*within islamic principles'. with the story of how the taliban claims it will rule, here's our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet. the republic has fallen. its leaders fled. taliban rule is returning, day by day its fighters more visible on the streets of kabul. patrolling with us military vehicles left behind or lost by government forces. taking on tasks to show they're in charge now. and showing the new face of afghanistan to the world. today, the first press conference by a man who's long been a mystery. taliban spokesman zabihullah mujahid showing his face in public for the first time, making their message clear. translation: i reassure| all internationals, the un, all embassies, our neighbours, that we will not be allowing
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the soil of afghanistan to be used against anybody. we have given amnesty to everybody. there is no revenge. all those young people who have talent, who have got an education, we don't want them to leave. day by day, afghans come to terms with the taliban again. waiting, not for words, but for what will change in their lives. let's see what afghanistan brings. i want to stay here, i want to fight for my students. i want to fight for our vision of afghanistan. and i know things are never going to be the same any more. it'sjust...| have to be here. and, so far, some surprises. female presenters are still fronting popular news programmes. a talib taking her questions. but many fear it's just a shiny new show for now. women are already taking to the streets. "we exist," they shout.
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"work, education, political participation, is our right." women make up half of afghan society. "don't upset us," they tell the taliban. "be our voice." today, the taliban also focused on that fear. translation: there will be nothing - against women in our ruling. our people accept our women are muslims, they accept islamic rules. if they continue to live according to sharia, we will be happy, they will be happy. they've said that so many times before. as an afghan woman, i wouldn't trust them because they don't have a very good track record of keeping their promises or something like that. if they were so keen on women's rights, they wouldn't stop herat girls from going to university. they wouldn't stop women
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working in banks in kandahar. these are two different narratives. with fighting finished, time forfun, too — taliban style. not the usual image of austere islamists, but it may be but a brief pause before new rules come into force. look atjust one snapshot of how many people, afghans and foreigners, are fleeing as fast as possible. the evacuation from kabul airport proceeds ever more urgently, including britain's operations. the taliban are promising stability too, and a government that's different this time round. their words have changed, many wait to see what they really mean. lyse doucet, bbc news. the united states says it will be looking to the taliban to make good on its pledge to respect human rights. g7 leaders are to meet remotely next week to discuss a common stance towards the taliban and should the militants fail to honour their pledge to respect the rights of women, and former members of the afghan government,
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the us government says one option is to impose sanctions on the regime. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis, joins us now. i guess they're still working out what they do make of what they _ out what they do make of what they have _ out what they do make of what they have heard?— they have heard? that is right, david, they have heard? that is right, david. and _ they have heard? that is right, david, and they _ they have heard? that is right, david, and they are _ they have heard? that is right, david, and they are fairly - david, and they are fairly sceptical from the get go, the administration adopting a wait—and—see approach in the light of these statements by the taliban, that they will respect the rights of women, a former members of the afghan government, and journalist. the state department spokesman named a price, saying that it all really rested on the follow—through, as far as the taliban is concerned. but of course if sunday's events underlined anything, it was the limits of american power. so, there is very little the united states can do with the taliban does not go through with the promises it made today.
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sanctions, of course, is one possibility raised today by the national security adviser and the biden administration has also made clear that it has frozen the assets in the united states of the afghan government, including more than $1 billion of gold reserves, which have been kept in a bank in new york. which have been kept in a bank in new york-— in new york. right, i suppose also, in new york. right, i suppose also. david. _ in new york. right, i suppose also, david, given _ in new york. right, i suppose also, david, given the - in new york. right, i suppose i also, david, given the response we have seen internationally to the way in which the us has pulled out and the taliban have swept in, all the more important for the united states, above all, to hold rank with the other allied countries, supportive, sympathetic countries, and this g7 meeting could be pretty significant?— g7 meeting could be pretty significant? absolutely. and that remote, _ significant? absolutely. and that remote, or— significant? absolutely. and that remote, or envisioned l that remote, or envisioned summit of the g7 next week, all really to do with forging some sort of common approach. the
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last thing thatjoe biden and borisjohnson want is some uncoordinated, messy response to questions such as whether the taliban government should be recognised and how to deal with a possible humanitarian or refugee crisis that could possibly occur. they want to keep the richest nations of the world together on this, especially since russia and china have already been in talks with the taliban. david, thank you _ talks with the taliban. david, thank you very _ talks with the taliban. david, thank you very much - talks with the taliban. david, thank you very much indeed. | thank you very much indeed. david willettsjoining thank you very much indeed. david willetts joining us from los angeles. a tropical storm has hampered efforts to help the survivors of saturday's powerful earthquake in haiti. —— willis. almost 2,000 people are known to have died. tens of thousands forced into temporary shelters are now having to deal with flooding, heavy winds and rain. unicef says half a million children have been left with limited or no access to shelter and safe water. 0ur correspondent, james clayton reports now from the town of les cayes, one
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of the worst affected areas. at times, it feels like haiti is being hit from all directions on multiple fronts. first, the earthquake. then, the storm. it hit just after dark. violent winds and horizontal rain. misery loaded on top of misery. all across this town people have been left with a stark choice: do they either sleep in unsafe structures or do they decide to sleep on the streets in the wet and the cold? this is the biggest camp in the area. people seeking refuge on a football field. they were told they'd be safe here, but as the rains poured, they were soaked, their tents ripped apart by the winds. the people here are desperate and angry. translation: we have problems here. - just look at the conditions. and where are the government? they're not here. there are injured people here, too. this woman's foot has a deep
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laceration, but she's had no medical attention. and another woman tells me she has not eaten since saturday. the other option here is to sleep in homes already badly damaged. joshua runs the local lottery shop. he and his family were lucky the house didn't totally collapse, but they've had to make a difficult decision. and did you sleep here last night? translation: yes, i slept here in this broken - house last night. there was wind and rain. but the other people in the tent city had to sleep outside on chairs. there are simply no good options in this situation. these are desperate times and the storm has meant that the help that is needed by air and road simply hasn't arrived. james clayton, bbc news, les cayes. we can now speak to brooke barisich, who's a child physical therapist at hope health action in haiti.
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she is on call waiting to recieve injured persons from the earthquake sent by air ambulance. she joins us from cap—haitien. thank you forjoining us. can i ask, what will you do? you are on call now as a child physical therapist. what do you bring to therapist. what do you bring to the children who come to you? yes, so we are based in cap—haitien in the north are not directly affected by the earthquakes that we are on standby preparing to receive anyone with injury if and when the time comes that it has passed. the time comes that it has assed. ~ ., ,., the time comes that it has assed. ~ ., ., , passed. what sort of in'uries would you i passed. what sort of in'uries would you be i passed. what sort of in'uries would you be dealing h passed. what sort of injuries would you be dealing with i would you be dealing with because obviously off the back of an earthquake, there will be all sorts? . of an earthquake, there will be all sorts? , ,., of an earthquake, there will be all sorts? , . ~ ::' :: all sorts? yes, so back in 2010 we started _ all sorts? yes, so back in 2010 we started the _ all sorts? yes, so back in 2010 we started the adult _ all sorts? yes, so back in 2010 we started the adult and - we started the adult and rehabilitation unit. specifically designed for spinal cord injuries and that is a major issue with
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earthquake but we can authenticate orthopaedic and other neurological injuries as well in terms of numbers, what can you deal with?— can you deal with? you are there and _ can you deal with? you are there and well-established can you deal with? you are - there and well-established but there and well—established but we are talking about many thousands of people injured. half a million children now in need of help of one sort or another. need of help of one sort or another-— need of help of one sort or another. ~ ., ., ., another. we have ale regular rehabilitation _ another. we have ale regular rehabilitation unit _ another. we have ale regular rehabilitation unit and - another. we have ale regular rehabilitation unit and are . rehabilitation unit and are preparing our bed to take on additional 15—20 patients if needed with additional staff and beds if needed at this hospital. in and beds if needed at this heapital-_ hospital. in terms of your facilities, _ hospital. in terms of your facilities, you _ hospital. in terms of your facilities, you are - hospital. in terms of your facilities, you are fine? . hospital. in terms of your l facilities, you are fine? you are untouched by the disaster that has hit haiti?— that has hit haiti? yes, the epicentre _ that has hit haiti? yes, the epicentre was _ that has hit haiti? yes, the epicentre was pretty - that has hit haiti? yes, the epicentre was pretty far - that has hit haiti? yes, the i epicentre was pretty far south so we just felt a bit of grumbling and very thankful we are farfrom grumbling and very thankful we are far from that. i’m grumbling and very thankful we are far from that.— are far from that. i'm sure you have seen _ are far from that. i'm sure you have seen the _ are far from that. i'm sure you have seen the pictures - are far from that. i'm sure you have seen the pictures from i are far from that. i'm sure you l have seen the pictures from les cayes, for example, where really it is a disaster and some dreadful scenes, post the earthquake of nowhere for people to go. they dare not go
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back into the hospital. i suppose your messages to get them to you as quickly as possible?— them to you as quickly as ossible? ~ ., , possible? we are definitely devastated _ possible? we are definitely devastated for _ possible? we are definitely devastated for everyone . possible? we are definitely i devastated for everyone south and wanting to collectively help as much as we can so we have partnered with haiti ambulance to provide the transportation north to ask from where they come from. thank you so much. that is from hope, health action. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: art for all the senses — the dutch museum that is catering for people who are visually impaired. the big crowds became bigger as the time of the funeral approached. as the lines of fans became longer, the police prepared for a huge job of crowd control.
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idi amin, uganda's brutal former dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's been buried in saudi arabia, where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979. two billion people around the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun to take place in this millennium. it began its journey off the coast of canada, ending three hours later, when the sun set over the bay of bengal. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: taliban leaders vow to respect the rights of women in theirfirst public comments since re—taking control of afghanistan.
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european leaders say they're working quickly to try to evacuate afghans who worked with western forces as interpreters and in other support roles during the 20—year military operation. but the eu is worried the situation could lead to a large—scale migrant crisis on the continent. protests have been held across europe, calling on governments to do more to help afghans. courtney bembridge reports. thousands of protesters gathered to ask the government to do more. translation: it is shameful what _ to do more. translation: it is shameful what is _ to do more. translation: it 3 shameful what is happening. people have been left in the lurch and will continue to be left in trouble. translation: we are here — left in trouble. translation: we are here because - left in trouble. translation: we are here because the - we are here because the government has failed. we demand an immediate airlift right now, right here from
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afghanistan to germany to bring people who are in danger to safety. people who are in danger to safe . . �* ., people who are in danger to safe . , ~ ., safety. this afghan refugee was amono safety. this afghan refugee was among the _ safety. this afghan refugee was among the crowd. _ safety. this afghan refugee was among the crowd. he _ safety. this afghan refugee was among the crowd. he settled i safety. this afghan refugee was among the crowd. he settled in | among the crowd. he settled in germany but there is little relief with very real fear for his family. translation: i have not been able _ his family. translation: i have not been able to _ his family. translation: i have not been able to sleep _ his family. translation: i have not been able to sleep for- not been able to sleep for three or four days. not been able to sleep for three orfour days. it not been able to sleep for three or four days. it is like i have gone mad. i do not know what is happening with my family, where my family are. i heard they are somewhere between coble and pakistan and at the moment all the borders are close to.— are close to. there have been rotests are close to. there have been protests in — are close to. there have been protests in switzerland i are close to. there have been protests in switzerland as i protests in switzerland as well. this is outside the united nations headquarters in geneva. we are here to ask for international help to come to the rescue of civilians who are still there and who are in serious danger of death because, for the most part, they have worked for the west and they find themselves trapped in the middle of the taliban. european leaders met on tuesday and say their objectives are twofold. we
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cannot objectives are twofold. , cannot abandon them and we will do what we are doing everything we can in order to bring them and offer them shelter in the eu member states. second we have to ensure that the political situation in afghanistan and the return of the taliban does not lead to a large scale migratory movement. these are some of the evacuees who have made it out of afghanistan. they were taken to uzbekistan on german army planes. germany's foreign minister says that more evacuation flights are planned by the taliban now controls all access points to the airport and is only allowing access to foreign nationals. british mps will return to westminster as parliament is
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recalled to debate the crisis in afghanistan. that will be in a few hours time. the prime minister, borisjohnson, will minister, boris johnson, will address minister, borisjohnson, will address the house of commons on the work that the uk is doing to help avert a humanitarian catastrophe in the country and is expected to request an immediate increase in aid. the international organisation for migration says at least 47 migrants have died at sea off west africa while their boat drifted for two weeks. they are reported to have died of thirst and starvation after the boats motor failed as they were attempting to cross from morocco to the canary islands. seven survivors were picked up by the coastguard in mauritania. the latest wildfire to break out around the mediterranean sea has forced thousands of locals and tourists to flee france's southern coast. 0fficials tourists to flee france's southern coast. officials say the blaze broke out on monday and so far has consumed more than three square kilometres of forest and scrubland to the west of st tropez. the american r&b singer r kelly goes on trial
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in new york on wednesday, accused of racketeering, sexual abuse, and bribery. currently held without bail, he denies the charges, some of which date back as far as two decades. from new york, the bbc�*s samira hussain reports. r kelly is one of the most successful artists of all time. sometime called the king of r&b he has been credited with redefining r&b music. but for the last two years the embattled musician has been behind bars. r kelly and members of his entourage are accused of recruiting women and girls to engage in illegal sexual activity with the r&b singer. he is also accused of paying victims and witnesses to cover up as alleged crimes. in a now infamous interview with an american network, kelly fervently denied any wrongdoing. i fervently denied any wrongdoing.- fervently denied any wrongdoing. fervently denied any wronaodoin. ., ., , wrongdoing. i did not do this stuff! this — wrongdoing. i did not do this stuff! this is _ wrongdoing. i did not do this stuff! this is not _ wrongdoing. i did not do this stuff! this is not me! - wrongdoing. i did not do this stuff! this is not me! i i wrongdoing. i did not do this stuff! this is not me! i fightl stuff! this is not me! ifight for my (bleep) life. he
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stuff! this is not me! i fight for my (bleep) life. he shouts the are for my (bleep) life. he shouts they are all— for my (bleep) life. he shouts they are all trying _ for my (bleep) life. he shouts they are all trying to _ for my (bleep) life. he shouts they are all trying to kill - for my (bleep) life. he shouts they are all trying to kill me. i they are all trying to kill me. allegations of sexual abuse are not new for mr kelly. he has faced them for more than two decades. but the only time he faced liminal charges are back into thousand and eight, he was acquitted. these new allegations against kelly are far more serious. if found guilty he could spend the next several decades in prison. four new cases of covid—19 have been confirmed in new zealand is the country has gone into a nationwide lockdown again after reporting its first community case of covid—19 in six months. the prime minister said all cases have been confirmed as the delta variant. fiur
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the delta variant. our hospitals _ the delta variant. our hospitals kicked i the delta variant. our i hospitals kicked straight the delta variant. oi" hospitals kicked straight into gear, identifying people they work with patients they work with, getting on with testing straightaway, making sure they are putting in the protocols to lockdown within the hospital. so, look, they are well—versed in that and unfortunately, to jog in that and unfortunately, to jog people's memories, from time to time we did have healthcare workers who became affected with covid—19, they are our front line and they are exposed and that has happened previously. 0ur hospitals are well—versed in managing these things are moving quickly on them. scientists in oxford have begun trials of a new vaccine against the plague. forty british volunteers will receive the treatment, designed by the same labs that created the 0xford—astrazeneca covid jab. our medical editor, fergus walsh reports. protection from an ancient killer — a vaccine against plague. larissa is one of the first volunteers to receive it as part of a trial in oxford which will assess the vaccine's safety and whether it induces a good immune response. i am lucky enough to live
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in a time where vaccines are being developed, and so when i saw that there was a study in the developing of a vaccine against a disease that's been around for thousands of years and has killed millions of people... ijust thought i'd do my bit. plague is caused by bacteria found in fleas and rodents and can be spread by humans whose lungs have been infected. the deadliest pandemic in history, the black death in the 14th century, this killed around 15 million people, half of europe's population. plague is thankfully now rare and treatable with antibiotics, but an outbreak in madagascar in 2017 killed around 200 people, and there are cases each year in rural parts of africa and the united states. current vaccines are only partially effective, so if the oxford jab works, it could help protect vulnerable communities.
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there's no danger that the vaccines stored in this freezer can cause plague. it contains just a tiny amount of its genetic material, which has been inserted into a disabled common cold virus — the same virus that's been used to create the oxford astrazeneca covid vaccine. we've already done clinical trials using similar technology against a bacterium, meningitis b, and in virus zika, but we're also looking to develop vaccines against new and emerging diseases such as lassa fever or the marburg virus. if the plague study goes well, then scientists aim to conduct further vaccine trials in africa in the hope of curbing one of the biggest killers in history. fergus walsh, bbc news, 0xford. a museum in the netherlands has opened a new exhibition aimed at people who are visually impaired. called �*the blind spot�* — and based in the city
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of utrecht — it recreates existing artworks — but adds extra dimensions — including sounds and smells. the bbc�*s tim allman has more. art tends to be, by its very nature, a visual medium. a, nature, a visual medium. a display of colour and light, texture and contrast. but calories like this have long struggled to cater for those whose vision is impaired. so, here at the central museum in utrecht they are moving beyond two dimensions, transforming paintings into sculptures inspired by 1—woman's interaction with 3d artistic it helps to touch the painting when you are blind and you can she had a lot of emotions, she was touched.— she had a lot of emotions, she was touched. and then i called leon and _ was touched. and then i called leon and we — was touched. and then i called leon and we thought _ was touched. and then i called leon and we thought we i was touched. and then i called leon and we thought we had . leon and we thought we had
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something. it leon and we thought we had something-— something. it is based on a theme of— something. it is based on a theme of inclusivity. i something. it is based on a theme of inclusivity. that l something. it is based on a i theme of inclusivity. that was a starting _ theme of inclusivity. that was a starting point to create this exhibition.— a starting point to create this exhibition. you do not look at this art, exhibition. you do not look at this art. you _ exhibition. you do not look at this art, you touch _ exhibition. you do not look at this art, you touch it. - exhibition. you do not look at this art, you touch it. you i this art, you touch it. you smell it, you listen to it. visual becomes physical. spectacle is replaced by something much more tactile. translation: the something much more tactile. translation:— translation: the second painting. _ translation: the second painting, from _ translation: the second painting, from what i i translation: the second painting, from what i felt, | painting, from what i felt, that was just a regular painting. from what i felt there were all kinds of blocks. 0ne there were all kinds of blocks. one can feel very well the kinds of shapes those blocks are. ,, , ., , ., are. sighted visitors are encouraged _ are. sighted visitors are encouraged to - are. sighted visitors are encouraged to cover- are. sighted visitors are i encouraged to cover their eyes so they too can experience the exhibition and a new way. it has been described as a first experiment. but for everyone. it triggers all the senses. let mejust let me just close with those pictures once again of the taliban and's first press conference. some of these are people who are simply not
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familiar in a public forum at all but they are out and offering reassurances to both afghans and the international community about what lies ahead. you are watching bbc news. hello there. sunshine was limited across the country on tuesday. but we did see some good spells of sunshine for central—southeastern scotland, where temperatures reached close to the mid—20s celsius. for the next few days, though, we hold onto the largely cloudy skies and it's going to feel pretty cool for the time of year. we maintain these west—northwest winds across the uk. moisture laden air rolling in off the atlantic will bring a lot of cloud, thickest of it across northern and western fringes, where we could see some light rain or drizzle. but, again, like tuesday, with some shelter to central eastern scotland, east of the pennines, southeast wales, southwest england, will see some good spells of sunshine. the winds quite brisk again particularly across northern and western coastal areas.
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and those temperatures pretty much where they've been the last few days, high teens for most, but in the sunnier spots, the low 20s once again. now, as we head through wednesday night, it stays rather benign, pretty cloudy for most. there will be the odd spot of light rain and drizzle across northern and western hills. the odd clear spell, too. temperatures no lower than 11—15 celsius, pretty much where they have been the last few nights. so, as we head on into thursday, again, it's a similar story, a lot of cloud around, the odd spit, spot of light rain here and there. a weather front will be pushing into wales and then spreading across parts of england through the day. that will bring some showery bursts of rain. but behind it, skies will tend to brighten for southwest england and wales, and again that could lift temperatures into the low 20s celsius, otherwise, again, it's the high teens. that weather front spreads across eastern england during the first part of friday. and then, we've got the new area of low pressure starting to work its way into western areas. that'll bring some cloudy, wet, breezy weather to northern ireland and maybe western fringes of britain. for most, i think it's another rather cloudy day, but i'm hopeful later in the day, we start to see some sunny spells increasing across the south.
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that will lift temperatures up into the low to mid 20s celsius, otherwise, again, the high teens for most. this new area of low pressure will slowly work its way in during the start of the weekend, but we start to pick up southerly winds, and that will tap into something much warmer across france into central, southern and eastern parts of england. so, we'll see a brief warm spell to start this weekend with some sunshine around, could see up to 26 celsius or so in the south. that weather front, though, will continue to push its way eastwards bringing some showers, some of which could be heavy and thundery. and many places will see that showers during the course of sunday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: in his first news conference, the taliban spokesman zabihullah mujahid tried to reassure the rest of the world afghanistan won't be used as a base forforeign fighters to spread terrorism. he also insisted women would be able to work, study and be actively involved in society. the us says it will be looking to the taliban to make good on its pledge to respect human rights. g—7 leaders are to meet remotely next week to discuss a common stance towards the taliban. sanctions could be imposed if the taliban fail to honour their promises. the authorities in haiti now say nearly 2,000 people are known to have died in saturday's powerful earthquake — an increase of 500 on the previous figure. the united nations children's fund estimates that around 1.2 million people in haiti have been affected, including half a million children.

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