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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 21, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with me christian fraser. president biden tells world leaders the united states is moving from " relentless war" to relentless diplomacy. in his speech to the general assembly the president says he will work with congress to double again the united states�* contribution to a un climate fund, that will help developing nations deal with the threat of climate change. the extreme weather events that we have seen in every part of the world and you all know it and feel it, represent what the secretary general has rightly called code red for humanity. the kremlin accuses britain of stirring anti—russian sentiment as prosecutors here name a third man wanted in connection with the salisbury nerve agent attack. a texas doctor who admitted breaking the state's controversial
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new abortion law is the first to be sued. we will speak to the the head of sales force — a tech company that says it will help relocate employees who want to leave the state. and in the canary islands , another village on la palma is evacuated , as lava from the volcano continues to advance. hello and welcome. four years ago donald trump used his address to the un general assembly to deliver a nationalist manifesto, denouncing "globalism" and promoting "patriotism" as the cure for the world's problems. today we got a very different brand of us president. joe biden is promising an era of " relentless diplomacy". the president says only by working together can we deal with what the un secretary general had earlier described "as a cascade of crises".
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on climate change the president says every country will nations need to bring "their highest possible ambitions" to the un summit in glasgow in november. and to that end he is promising to redouble america's contribution. in april, i announced the united states will double our public international financing to help developing nations tackled the climate crisis, and today, i'm proud to announce that we will work with the congress to double that number again, including for adaptation efforts. this will make united states the leader in public climate finance. and with our added support together with increased private capital from other donors, we'll be able to meet the goal of mobilising $100 billion to support climate action in developing nations. that contribution will amount to around ten billion dollars. according to the overseas development institute that is still barely a third
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of what they should be contributing to the 100 billion dollar pot. and that money will not come before 2024 — even if the president can get it through congress. which brings us to the other elephant in the room. there is growing frustration among european allies with the administration's approach to diplomacy. last night the eu council president asked reporters what �*america back�* really means. they are not feeling the love that joe biden speaks of. we are working with our allies to a new strategic concept that will help our alliance better take on the evolving threats of today and tomorrow. we renewed our engagement with the european union, a fundamental partner in tackling a full range of significant issues facing our world today. the submarine deal which the us signed with australia last week — which so angered the french — was the first significant play injoe biden�*s tilt towards the indo pacific region. yesterday, the un secretary general antonio guterres, expressed his fears that the us and china could be heading
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towards a new cold war. there is no need to move from "competition to conflict" said president biden, but the us he said will defend the interests of its allies. the united states will compete and will compete vigorously and lead with our values and our strength. we all stand up for our allies and our friends and oppose attempts by stronger countries to dominate weaker ones whether through changes to territory by force, economic coercion, technical exploitation or disinformation. but we are not seeking, say it again, we are not seeking a new cold war or a world divided into rigid blocks. i'm joined now by sir peter westmacott, former uk ambassador to the us. peter, get to happy with us. i was just thinking about the president of cap 26 there in new york rattling
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the ten. the comments we got from brycejohnson the ten. the comments we got from bryce johnson yesterday, the ten. the comments we got from brycejohnson yesterday, the frustrations he has that they are so many empty promises, and then we get this commitment from joe biden today. a real boom for the british prime minister.— today. a real boom for the british prime minister. thank you for having me on. i prime minister. thank you for having me on- i think— prime minister. thank you for having me on. i think it's _ prime minister. thank you for having me on. i think it's good _ prime minister. thank you for having me on. i think it's good news - prime minister. thank you for having me on. i think it's good news for - me on. i think it's good news for the prime minister. it comes very usefully, i think for him in the back of the announcementjust a couple of days ago that britain and america and australia ever going to be coming together and building a new generation of nuclear powered submarines to help australia deal with some of the security threats that it faces in the south china sea. now, ithink that it faces in the south china sea. now, i think we should keep this in proportion, that is to say that it was the australians initiative on the submarine deal and on climates, yes, it's important for the prime minister because the united kingdom is hosting the cop26 meeting in november, but it is far more important to see this in the context of an international effort to do what is necessary to save the planet and to bring down the risk of global warming and frying assigned
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the years to come. part of that is a lot of money for poor countries to pay for the measures that are necessary to deal with climate change. it is useful for the british prime minister, just like it is useful to have the president of the united states saying that he is lifting the travel restrictions on europeans, including breads, which has been the last few months for coveted reasons. all of this is useful in the prime minister has been looking around for some flash to put on the bones on the concept of global britain rather than the uk and they think they have been looking for some flesh to put on the bones of his own concept of america is back. so in both cases coming think this is useful. this is substance, bases important to us all. ~ ., ., , , ., all. with regard to the submarine deal all. with regard to the submarine deal, he all. with regard to the submarine deal. he said _ all. with regard to the submarine deal, he said today, _ all. with regard to the submarine deal, he said today, clearly - all. with regard to the submarine deal, he said today, clearly therej deal, he said today, clearly there was a nod to the europeans that they
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are a fundamental partner, but there are a fundamental partner, but there are different levels of partnership, and i think the americans have been thinking this way to the fact that the uk is a lot more closely aligned to the united states is regarding the indo pacific region then perhaps they are at the europeans. we have a straight group currently there led by hms queen elizabeth committee aircraft carrier, there where reports today that uk is going to move some of it submarines to australia. so do you get a sense that in a way, from joe biden, there was a cold—hearted pragmatism in this decision? it was a cold-hearted pragmatism in this decision?— this decision? it was an approach from australia _ this decision? it was an approach from australia which _ this decision? it was an approach from australia which had - this decision? it was an approach from australia which had decided that the somewhat obsolete or potentially obsolete diesel electric submarines it was going to buy from france no longer met their needs, and so they came to the united kingdom and america and said, well, what can we do about this, so britain and america together look for ways in which they could reach
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the answer yes to the request for help. so i think, you know, that is a plus. a plus. the carrierfleet and so on going to the east is also and so on going to the east is also an indication of the united kingdom showing that it's got a global security presence. i think all of thatis security presence. i think all of that is true. does it mean that the uk is that much closer to the united states than the others? well, it depends on what is going on at any particular moment. i think right now, yes, it does, and of course, remember that britain also has a very close intelligence relationship with america and with the other members of what we codify the eyes, that have a degree of intractability in its armed forces equipment, and the soldiers say this and so on, which no other country enjoys with the united states. and we have got an extraordinary strong trade and investment relationship as well as the cultural links that come from sharing the same language, if you like. so the relationship at the moment, the substance of it is looking pretty good. let's not get
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carried away, because they happen some tricky moments in the early months of the relationship between prime ministerjohnson and president biden over brexit and the implications for the withdrawal agreement of the solidity if you like of the good friday agreement in northern ireland. we know that president biden doesn't really think that brexit was a brilliant idea from america's prospective or indeed from america's prospective or indeed from that of europe. and there are some bits of history and bits of baggage which need to be addressed, and written was one of the first —— britain was one of the first countries a few months back to say that they didn't feel they had been properly consulted by the united states over the decision to withdraw from afghanistan in the way that we all ended up getting at the end of last month. so there is good, there is bad, but i think overall, this partnership looks to me to have plenty of substance, and i'm sure this evening the prime minister and president biden will have an awful lot of things to talk about where they will find that they are on the
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same page. they will find that they are on the same page-— they will find that they are on the same-nae. . �* ,~ same page. asked him a bryce johnson exected in same page. asked him a bryce johnson exnected in the — same page. asked him a bryce johnson expected in the next _ same page. asked him a bryce johnson expected in the next hour, _ same page. asked him a bryce johnson expected in the next hour, we - same page. asked him a bryce johnson expected in the next hour, we will - expected in the next hour, we will bring you those pictures as and when we get them. sir peter, for the moment, thank you very much. you're welcome. three years on from the nerve agent poisoning of the russian dissidents sergei and yulia skripal in salisbury, british police have accused a third russian agent of involvement. denis sergeyev was in britain at the time working alongside two other members of russian military intelligence, the gru. sergeyev has also been linked to other covid activity across europe. meanwhile, the european court of human rights today ruled that russia was responsible for the 2006 killing of alexander litvinenko — the former spy who died of polonium poisoning here in london. gordon corera reports. it was march, 2018 when deadly nerve agent was deployed on the streets of salisbury. the target, former russian spy sergei skripal fell ill along with his daughter and a police officer after novichok was smeared on his door handle. a local woman, dawn sturgess, died months later when she came into contact with the novichok
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in a perfume bottle. now a third suspect has been charged — this man, denis sergeev, said to be a member of russian military intelligence. police have released this image of him arriving at heathrow two days before the poisoning. the other two suspects arrived on a different flight and were captured on cctv heading to salisbury and in the town. sergeev stayed in london, but police believe the three met on multiple occasions and he is thought to have been be on the ground commander. he left on the day of the attack from heathrow. the kremlin has consistently denied any involvement. they've got a doctrine of masking, denying everything and then throwing blame bombs out to other people and they will continue to do that. there is always a hope that if there is a change of government in russia at some stage that they will comply with the more rules—based approach of the rest of the free world.
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sergeev is believed to be a member of the gru, russian military intelligence, and a unit involved in sabotage and assassination across europe. the unit was involved in this explosion at an arms depot in the czech countryside in 2014 and the poisoning in bulgaria of an arms dealer in 2015, again using a deadly nerve agent, with sergeev alleged to be present on the ground. since salisbury, security services across europe have been tracking the past movements of the unit and trying to expose the work of the unit. this whole unit that i think, for decades, they have spent creating and polishing security algorithms and training people for this clandestine unit. they will have to scrap it and start from scratch, train new people, look for alternative methods. and in a separate development, russia has been accused today by the european court of human rights has been responsible for the killing
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of alexander litvinenko. that was carried out back in 2006 using radioactive polonium but russia has denied all these accusations. gordon corera, bbc news. an american intelligence agent who was travelling with cia director william burns to india this month has reported symptoms consistent with havana syndrome — this mysterious illness that has struck scores american diplomats and spies. the victim has not been identified but reportedly has had to receive medical attention. it comes after two similar incidents last month in vietnam. the syndrome was first identified in cuba?in 2016, and no one quite knows what causes it but some wonder if it is a new, secret form of surveillance. warren strobel, is national security reporter with the wall streetjournal in annapolis, maryland. you broke the story that the cia so concerned about that as they now
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have a task force looking for specifically venice. they believe it's real. it's no a myth.- it's real. it's no a myth. that's correct _ it's real. it's no a myth. that's correct i _ it's real. it's no a myth. that's correct. i would _ it's real. it's no a myth. that's correct. i would ink— it's real. it's no a myth. that's correct. i would ink most - it's real. it's no a myth. that's l correct. i would ink most people would say it's no longer met, when they first went to 2016, there was a sense that maybe this is made up or imagined by people, but the number of cases now is well north of 200. there has been a systematic study of people's brains and the symptoms that they have, and i think it's fair to say that this is a real thing, indeed ongoing. did fair to say that this is a real thing, indeed ongoing. did they have an hunch thing, indeed ongoing. did they have any hunch whatsoever _ thing, indeed ongoing. did they have any hunch whatsoever about - thing, indeed ongoing. did they have any hunch whatsoever about what . thing, indeed ongoing. did they have any hunch whatsoever about what is | any hunch whatsoever about what is causing it or how it's being done? janik they do have hunch is, but i'm afraid on the hunch is. as a special task force that involves both intelligence analysts and scientific experts in this country and presumably overseas. they believe it is some sort of by their directed energy weapon or an acoustic weapon thatis energy weapon or an acoustic weapon that is being deployed. and as he
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said in the lead and it's possible it's actually a surveillance device that has the side effect of causing neurological severe neurological damage. it could be a coincidence, but obviously the ci way travel is a closely guarded sees it that next he could so one imagines that if they need to see i was going to be on the ground in they were targeting one of the agents that will be a serious concern to the agency, it would suggest that they would know the directors movements. unlike the secretary of state are prime minister borisjohnson, the director of the cia when he travels that's not announced, it's not even acknowledged usually afterwards, then we need we don't know precisely what happened in this case, it could be a coincidence are theyjust happened to target new delhi in india and didn't know that was burns they find him and his team, i'm very wary there could be an operational preacher, they got very close to the
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director of the us cia. is getting closer to the top, because it's a second time in a month, because the trip that, harris took to the far east, there was a delay on the people might remember herflight east, there was a delay on the people might remember her flight was delayed, and then it was consistent with havana syndrome. if it's getting this close you can see a concern that soon it may be the leaders themselves. there is a concern, and they are gathering at the un general assembly in new york city this week. not only a concern about city this week. not only a concern abou. ., ., city this week. not only a concern aboui ., ., , city this week. not only a concern abou. ., ., , ., city this week. not only a concern abou. ., ., ,., , about about going up a rising level of leadership _ about about going up a rising level of leadership one _ about about going up a rising level of leadership one is _ about about going up a rising level of leadership one is that _ about about going up a rising level of leadership one is that it - about about going up a rising level of leadership one is that it is - of leadership one is that it is spreading. the wall streetjournal reported about a series of attacks in germany. there had been attacks in germany. there had been attacks in austria as well. it is spreading that way. there's also been or two
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incidents in the continental united states itself. so it's a concern. the last thing i would say quickly as i have talked to people, there is as i have talked to people, there is a lot of both in the state department but also within the cia and us intelligence service, if my family and i are going to be deployed overseas, are we addressing of this being attacked? what is my agency? what is the us government deigned to respond?— deigned to respond? extraordinary. thank ou deigned to respond? extraordinary. thank you very _ deigned to respond? extraordinary. thank you very much _ deigned to respond? extraordinary. thank you very much for _ deigned to respond? extraordinary. thank you very much for coming . deigned to respond? extraordinary. | thank you very much for coming on. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: we speak to marc benioff — ceo of the american softwear company sales force on why he's offering to hlp his employees leave. the prime minister has welcomed president biden�*s pledge to double the us contribution to a 100 billion dollar a year fund to help developing countries adapt to climate change. but he said there was still more to be done. borisjohnson was speaking ahead
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of his meeting withjoe biden at the white house tonight. this is very good news in the sense that the united states has stepped up to the plate with a massive contribution, a very substantial contribution, 11.2 billion dollars, i think it is, and that's a very, very good start. it means we are a long way towards the goal that we need to achieve, but there is still further to go. and there are still countries around the world that will be looking to us in the developing world to support them as they make the transition to low carbon technologies, to fight climate change, but there's no question that this american action today has been a big lift and will really help us to get there. a texas doctor who has admitted breaking the state's new six week abortion law is being sued, in what would be the first test of the legislation.
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both plaintiffs describe themselves as pro—choice but neither of them live in the state. one of them is 0scar stilley who describes himself as a �*disbarred and disgraced�* former lawyer. who seems part what motivated by a $10,000 bounty he could win for himself if damages are awarded. the anti—abortion group — texas right to life — called the lawsuits "self serving stunts". the new texas laws bans abortions from as early as six weeks there are no exemptions for rape or incest. but there is at least one business in texas offering to help relocate employees if they are unduly concerned or affected by the new law. that company is sales force, earlier this month their ceo marc benioff tweeted 0hana if you want to move we�*ll help you exit. your choice." 0hana is the hawaiian term forfamily. and we can talk to marc benioff now live from san francisco.
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great heavy on the programme. we talked about the story and number of times on the programme. flush out for us what your offer is for those who are concerned about this new line texas, what are you offering to do? ~ , ., �* line texas, what are you offering to do? �* do? wild, christian, i'm actually here at our— do? wild, christian, i'm actually here at our dream _ do? wild, christian, i'm actually here at our dream forest - do? wild, christian, i'm actually- here at our dream forest conference live in san francisco right now, and you are right, you know, this is kind of a continuous problem that we deal with. kind of a continuous problem that we dealwith. mcl kind of a continuous problem that we deal with. mcl of a company called sales force. with 75,000 employees all over the world and we have parade of governors or presidents or other types of local administrators who consistently want to discriminate against our employees, and we will not tolerate discrimination against the lgbt q community or nd gender or any race or anyone. and this has been consistent, and here in the united states, of course, you have seen we have had those types of discrimination laws occur in
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indiana, north carolina, georgia, now in texas, and one of the things that we can say is if you don�*t like it, we will move you. we that we can say is if you don't like it, we will move you.— that we can say is if you don't like it, we will move you. we should tell our audience. _ it, we will move you. we should tell our audience, you _ it, we will move you. we should tell our audience, you significantly - our audience, you significantly scaled back your investment in indiana because of state laws that discriminated against lgbt q people. so you have taken a public stand before. i was interested whether you�*d be so blunt about it because on the lgbt q issue, a lot of people would expect you to stand up, but of course abortion is a more divisive issue there in the united states. you are comfortable as a ceo taking what some would consider a political stunt? �* ., ., ., , stunt? i'm going to have my employees _ stunt? i'm going to have my employees back. _ stunt? i'm going to have my employees back. that's - stunt? i'm going to have my - employees back. that's the number employees back. that�*s the number one thing. they are doing greatjobs for us. they are doing high—performancejobs for us. they are doing high—performance jobs they are doing engineering jobs, sales, high—performance jobs they are doing engineeringjobs, sales, marketing, we help companies connect with their customers here at this conference we have a lot of amazing companies
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doing incredible things. many european companies, the ceo of mercedes is here, for example. we have the ceo of ibm here. our response to our employees is don�*t worry. you do yourjob. and if somebody is coming after you are if someone is discriminating against you we will help you. we will support you. that�*s ourjob. 0urjob is to have your back. now in a fourth—generation san franciscan, so it�*s easy for me to say no discrimination, this is the city of love here, you know, this is the home of gay rights. this is how we live here, we live in freedom here in san francisco and our message to our employees as if you don�*t like it where you are we will move you stop by there has been a lot written about the move from silicon valley to texas, to austin coming to dallas, a lot of tech companies relocate and i wonderjust generally whether you think the type of employee that the tech industry attacked —— attracts, young, socially liberal, mobile, whether those sort of people are going to be put off by some of the southern
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states were introducing these kinds of lies. we have thousands of employees in texas and we are the largest employer here in san francisco with over 10,000 employees in san francisco. where the largest employer in indiana, another state that we just mentioned tech company, and i canjust tell you right now that we just mentioned tech company, and i can just tell you right now is that on certain issues, it divides them. some of them believe in something, maybe they don�*t believe that another thing, and in those employees, we are not asking them to make any type of statement, we are just saying if you need to move if you are uncomfortable, you need mobility, you want to change where you are going, we will give you the ability to do yourjob exactly the samejob, exactly the ability to do yourjob exactly the same job, exactly the same pay that you have somewhere else, and it�*s notjust in the united states, this happens in all kinds of countries all over the world, and we are a global company so, you know, we are a big world. there are a lot of things happening, and one of the great things about being the ceo of
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a global company as i have the freedom to say, look, i want to keep you on my team, so if i can do something to help you, i�*m going to do it. i something to help you, i'm going to do it. ., ., ., ,, ., , do it. i want to talk to my generally _ do it. i want to talk to my generally if— do it. i want to talk to my generally if i _ do it. i want to talk to my generally if i could - do it. i want to talk to my generally if i could about| do it. i want to talk to my - generally if i could about work. you said post pandemic that you expect a lot of your employees will spend more and more time working from home. you bring companies and customs together, that is your business. how do you think the world of work is going to change post pandemic?— of work is going to change post andemic? ., �* ., ., ., pandemic? you're going to have --eole pandemic? you're going to have people working _ pandemic? you're going to have people working at _ pandemic? you're going to have people working at home, - pandemic? you're going to have people working at home, you're| pandemic? you're going to have - people working at home, you're going people working at home, you�*re going to have people working in the office, at events like this as well, we are building a big ranch as a big training centre, and you are going to have digital headquarters. i think may be a digital headquarters todayis think may be a digital headquarters today is more important than your physical headquarters, which is why wejust bought a physical headquarters, which is why we just bought a company called slack to help companies build their digital headquarters. and i will tell you we also have something called a health cloud, and the health cloud has a conference certificate for he had probably been
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to a bunch of conferences can be with us around your neck, when i got tested that a covered test and i�*m negative, it gets put into our health cloud and then there is a qr code right here that says that i can come into the conference. this is what keeps us safe, so i think at the end of the day, choose where you want to wear, but let�*s do it safely, whether you�*re going to go into your office or you�*re going to go into an event are ready you�*re going to come into our ranch, we are going to come into our ranch, we are going to come into our ranch, we are going to make sure you are tested and that you�*re going to come in, you don�*t have code that, and everyone can work together safely. that is number one. just everyone can work together safely. that is number one.— that is number one. just very cuickl , that is number one. just very quickly. only _ that is number one. just very quickly, only about _ that is number one. just very quickly, only about 40 - that is number one. just very i quickly, only about 40 seconds that is number one. just very - quickly, only about 40 seconds left, but the travel ban has been eased. you are a global company. hejust talked about the importance of digitally putting your vaccine status. are you pleased with the decision biden has taken? i am leased decision biden has taken? i am pleased the _ decision biden has taken? i am pleased the decision _ decision biden has taken? i —n pleased the decision that the president has taken. i hope that other presidents will take that same decision. look, i ran a
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billion—dollar company injapan, i billion—dollar company in japan, i cannot billion—dollar company injapan, i cannot go. i run a billion—dollar company in australia, i cannot go. 0key—dokey, we have to leave it there, but thank you very much. more to come. good evening. some parts of the uk had temperatures up above 22 degrees today. there�*s some more warmth in the forecast for the next couple of days, especially across the south of the uk. some spells of sunshine, it will stay mostly dry. further north, a little bit of rain in the forecast, quite windy across northern areas just at the moment and briefly turning a little bit cooler, at least for a time. now, on the earlier satellite picture, you can see quite a lot of cloud that�*s been toppling in from the west, but much of this cloud has just been wispy, high cloud turning to sunshine a little bit hazy. we have got some thicker cloud pushing down across scotland, northern ireland, into northern england. that could give the odd spot of drizzle, and more cloud returning from the far north west with some outbreaks of rain. still quite windy here through the night as well, but mild where we have the cloud and the outbreaks of rain. whereas further south,
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with clear skies, we�*ll see the odd mist patch and temperatures as low as 7—8 degrees. but it does mean that across a good part of england and wales, we�*ll see sunny spells again tomorrow, albeit with a bit more in the way of cloud and maybe even the odd spot of rain for north west england, north wales. for scotland and northern ireland, we will see this band of cloud and increasingly light and patchy rain staggering southwards, with a mix of sunny spells and showers following into the far north. still quite blustery across northern areas, especially windy, i think, to the east of the pennines, the eastern side of scotland. temperatures in the far north struggling a little bit, 13—14 degrees, whereas further south, highs of 20—22 degrees. through wednesday evening, this band of cloud and patchy rain staggers a little further southwards. lots of showers getting going, you�*ll notice, in the far north of scotland as this frontal system passes through. a spell of quite windy weather with gusts potentially up to 60 mph in the far north, and for thursday, this tongue of cold air trying to work its way in. not making much progress. that cold weather only really affecting the northern isles,
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the north of the mainland. some sunny spells developing here. bit of cloud for southern scotland, northern ireland, northern england with the odd spot of rain. to the south of that, some sunshine and some warmth. but look up towards the north. lerwickjust ten degrees the top temperature on thursday. but that brief cold interlude won�*t last long. as we head into the weekend, the winds eventually go back around to southerly winds, bringing some warmer air in ourdirection. temperatures typically in the high teens or low 20s, a lot of dry weather, just a bit of rain at times.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the president says he will work with dong double again the united states contribution to a un climate fund that will help developing nations deal with the threat of climate change. deal with the threat of climate chan i e. ., deal with the threat of climate chan i e. . , change. the extreme weather vents we have seen in — change. the extreme weather vents we have seen in every _ change. the extreme weather vents we have seen in every part _ change. the extreme weather vents we have seen in every part of _ change. the extreme weather vents we have seen in every part of the - change. the extreme weather vents we have seen in every part of the world - have seen in every part of the world and you all know and feel it represent what the secretary—general has rightly called code red for humanity. the british prime minister has arrived at the white house.
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the family of paul rusesabagina say his trial was a sham. the hotel manager whose story was made into a hollywood film hotel rwanda was sentenced to 25 years yesterday. we�*ll hear from his daughter anais. and another village is evacuated as lava for the vancouver continues to advance. speaking to a much smaller audience than usual mr biden calling for an area of global unity. the president was speaking on the
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day america�*s death toll from covid extended beyond the death toll of the 1918 pandemic, the president said that shared grief was a poignant reminder that our collective future will hinge on our ability to act together. we will work together to save live, defeat covid—19 and take the necessary steps to prepare ourselves for the next pandemic, for there will be another one. or we will fail to harness the tools at our disposal. and a more virulent and dangerous variants take hold. will we meet the threat of challenging climate, theness championing climate we are all feeling, already ravaging every part of the world, with extreme weather. 0r, every part of the world, with extreme weather. or, will we suffer the merciless march of worsening droughts and floods, more intense fires and hurricanes, longer heat waves, and rising seas. most of the focus this afternoon was
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on president biden but he wasn�*t the only one addressing climate change. the brazilian president was also in manhattan, still unvan vaccinated and banned from the cafes and restaurants of new york o new york yet seemingly still allowed to address a full room of global leaders but he is a key component when it comes to climate change debate. he is the current coast toadian of the world�*s most precious resource, the rainforest. he is doing little to protect it. sets an example for other countries to follow. it is the very foundation of civilisation, to 2050 our goal of achieving climate neutrality net zero. human are sources and funding allocated to strengthen environmental institution have been
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doubled with a view to totally i eliminating illegal deforestation. in a statement the brazilian climate on sir trihad this to say. bolsonaro administration has no all all indicators have got worse, in his administration the rates have grown for two consecutive year, forest fires broke records and today at the un bolsonaro once again delivered a speech that address lies. let us speak to our correspondent there for us. president biden said today we are moving towards relentless diplomacy, there would be some this side, who would think his diplomacy needs a bit of work. would think his diplomacy needs a bit of work-— would think his diplomacy needs a bit of work. ., ., , bit of work. indeed, and who better for us to discuss _ bit of work. indeed, and who better for us to discuss this _ bit of work. indeed, and who better for us to discuss this with _ bit of work. indeed, and who better for us to discuss this with than - for us to discuss this with than america�*s chief diplomat here at the united nations, that is the us
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ambassador to the un linda thomas green field who has a busy week and she is in in new york and shejoins us now. welcome to the programme, and, president biden is calling for this new era of relentless diplomacy, is item one on the agenda repairing relations with the french who have accused america of stabbing them in the back because of your deal with the australians over submarines? the president was very clear in his speech to the un, that we will be focussing on rallyling all of our allies and partners and all of our allies and partners and all of our allies and partners and all of the institutions of the un system to deal with the most challenged, most difficult challenges of our time, and as it relates to france we have a strong relationship —— relationship where the french, they are our oldest allies and that relationship will
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continue to grow stronger, as with all friends, friends have disagreements, but they can always be dealt with in a relationship as strong as the one that we currently have with the french government. but ambassador would you accept that that hasty and rather chaotic us exit from afghanistan has left america�*s allies in nato with real questions about american leadership, especially as president biden has pledged to work with allies and partners but nato allies feel that they were told what to do by america?— they were told what to do by america? ., «' ., , america? you know the president announced _ america? you know the president announced in _ america? you know the president announced in his _ america? you know the president announced in his speech - america? you know the president announced in his speech that - america? you know the president announced in his speech that for i america? you know the president i announced in his speech that for the first time in 20 years, the united states stands before the world not at war and the decision to move towards a more normal diplomatic approach to dealing with issues of the world is one that i think all
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countrieses have accepted, and want to see us do. the president wants to lead with diplomacy, not with our military, and we are continuing to engage with the people of afghanistan, we are the largest contributor of humanitarian assistance to this country, we have made clear to the taliban that we willjudge them on their actions, and not on their words, and not on any commitments they have written down on paper. and we will continue to provide needed humanitarian assistance through ngos, through the un systems, to support the people of afghanistan. you un systems, to support the people of afihanistan. ., ., ., «i ., afghanistan. you are talking about how the president _ afghanistan. you are talking about how the president is _ afghanistan. you are talking about how the president is underlining i how the president is underlining diplomacy, we are seeing very much that vaccines are coming into play as an instrument of diplomacy, and china�*s president xi reiterated that
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china�*s president xi reiterated that china will give two billion doses of the coronavirus vaccine to the world ljy the coronavirus vaccine to the world by end of the year, are the americans going to match that? we are americans going to match that? - are taking a strong leadership role on covid, the president has made clear that we can�*t address this pandemic alone, that every country has engage and i am happy the see that the cheese are engaging but i will stress what the president stressed. 0ur vaccines are being donated, they are being donated without strings, and they are being donated to countries all over the world who are in need. the president will be hosting and i will be joining him tomorrow, a covid summit where we will bring together all of the nations of the, of the world, the nations of the, of the world, the ngos, the private sector, to see how we can work together, to address this pandemic, and china�*s donations are certainly welcome, and we would
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encourage them to continue to make those donations without strings. ambassador linda thomas green field, thank you forjoining us. well, so there you have it christian, there is going to be that big summit that president biden will host virtually from the white house tomorrow on how to encourage more countries to give vaccines to the world, and the us ambassador the un saying that while china maybe giving two billion bowses by the end of the year she says it comes with strings add attached, hundred like the americans. there you go. laura, thank you for that. a hotel manager portrayed in a hollywood film as a hero down the rwandan genocide has been sentenced to 25 years for terrorism in a court. paul rusesabagina was handed a 25—year sentence for terror—related charges. mr rusesabagina who�*s, now a prominent opposition activist,
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was arrested in rwanda last year. his family have called the trial a sham. the us says it is concerned by the conviction. i�*m nowjoined by mr. rusesabagina�*s daughter, anais kanimba who�*s in washington. take us back to his arrest, because he was as i understand it he was in dubai when he was arrested. tell us how he was caught.— how he was caught. thank you for havini how he was caught. thank you for having me — how he was caught. thank you for having me on _ how he was caught. thank you for having me on the _ how he was caught. thank you for having me on the show. _ how he was caught. thank you for having me on the show. my - how he was caught. thank you for having me on the show. my dad i how he was caught. thank you for i having me on the show. my dad was caught, was taken by kidnapped by the rwandan government last year, in august 2020. he was on his way to bar run diand he was tricked by a priest who was working as a special agent of the government and who lured him to go on this trip and my father was intending to go to speak to a church community which which he has been talking about for several years and so they tricked him and board him on the plane. 0n years and so they tricked him and board him on the plane. on his arrival they took him into what we
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believe was a slaughterhouse and tortured him for three days and paraded him in front top of world on august 31st. the paraded him in front top of world on august list-— august 31st. the government allege from outside — august 31st. the government allege from outside the _ august 31st. the government allege from outside the country _ august 31st. the government allege from outside the country he - august 31st. the government allege from outside the country he was - from outside the country he was funding and supporting an armed wing of the rwandan movement for democratic change. which did accept responsibility, the group that is, for a number of the terrorist attacks in rwanda, did he fund—raise for them? attacks in rwanda, did he fund—raise forthem? mr; attacks in rwanda, did he fund-raise for them? i, ., attacks in rwanda, did he fund-raise for them? i , . ., for them? my father did not fund-raise, _ for them? my father did not fund-raise, or— for them? my father did not fund-raise, or fund - for them? my father did not fund-raise, or fund any - for them? my father did not - fund-raise, or fund any terrorist fund—raise, or fund any terrorist movement. my father has been speaking against that in rwanda for the last 20 year, and by doing that, he has been a dissident and critic of the rwandan regime. when you become a critic of the regime you become a critic of the regime you become a critic of the regime you become a terrorist, a funder, my father is not the only one, many other critics have been in a similar situation, what we have seen in this trial and the testament, it is the testament of what is happening, is that, had he participated in this thing they would not have kidnapped
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him, they would not have taken away his lawyer, taken away his access to documentation, and put on a sham trial and show trial, so, he will never been involved in financial activity of terrorism groups. maw; activity of terrorism groups. many i-eole activity of terrorism groups. many ieo i le will activity of terrorism groups. many people will remember _ activity of terrorism groups. many people will remember the - activity of terrorism groups. many people will remember the film hotel rwanda and the role don cheadle played mr and we should remind people he was a hotel manager, in rwanda, his wife was tutsi and he she was at risk he sheltered people. his port supporters would say it is out of character he risked his thrive save people during the genocide, why would he be involved in terrorism? that genocide, why would he be involved in terrorism?— in terrorism? that is a good question. — in terrorism? that is a good question, that _ in terrorism? that is a good question, that is _ in terrorism? that is a good question, that is why - in terrorism? that is a good question, that is why he - in terrorism? that is a good| question, that is why he has in terrorism? that is a good - question, that is why he has never been involved in terrorism and that is why they are lies and they have been lies for the last 20 years ago since the movie came out. my father has used his platform to speak about
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the injustices in rwanda, he wanted truth and reconciliation, in fact he, i am the victim of the genocide. i lost two of my parents for my father and dad because they were tutsi, my father raised my until today and so for anybody to say that this man it would be a terrorist, which is what the rwandan authorities, called him is a lie and so my father is a man of principle who would never get involved in terrorist activity. we have seen the testament of the way they have treatmented him in prison, where he is illegally detained. but a treatmented him in prison, where he is illegally detained.— is illegally detained. but a fierce credit oik the _ is illegally detained. but a fierce credit oik the president - is illegally detained. but a fierce credit oik the president which i is illegally detained. but a fierce l credit oik the president which may be behind, i don�*t know, behind the charges he faced or part of the reason. the justice charges he faced or part of the reason. thejustice minister who was overseeing this has been appointed, in fact he has been removed from his position atjustice minister and been appointed as the ambassador here in britain. i wonder what you make of that, and what you think the
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reaction of the uk government should be? ~ ,, reaction of the uk government should be? ~ ii reaction of the uk government should be? ~ «i ,., be? well, we think the uk government should take a — be? well, we think the uk government should take a stand _ be? well, we think the uk government should take a stand and _ be? well, we think the uk government should take a stand and not _ be? well, we think the uk government should take a stand and not accept - should take a stand and not accept this nomination because the uk stands for the rule of law, in human rights and justice, and the minister did not do that in the case of my father, he is the one who let the activity in the kidnapping of my father, he add mid to the authorities for breaking international laws and paying for a plane to bring my father to rwanda, so i don�*t think the united kingdom should accept somebody to represent rwanda in their country like this, it is an opportunity for the united kingdom to show where it stands in terms of human rights but also to show to the rule of law, to know that rwanda is about to be head of the commonwealth in the next couple of months so again this is an indication if the united kingdom and other countries in the commonwealth want to respect the world, the last thing is to bring a minister of justice who breaks the law as an ambassador.— justice who breaks the law as an ambassador. ., «i , ., , . ., ambassador. thank you very much for that. the
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ambassador. thank you very much for that- the bbc — ambassador. thank you very much for that. the bbc did — ambassador. thank you very much for that. the bbc did a _ ambassador. thank you very much for that. the bbc did a approach - ambassador. thank you very much for that. the bbc did a approach the - that. the bbc did a approach the rwandan delegation at the un general assembly for comment. they gave us a statement. this is what it says. as you just heard his supporters strongly deny those charges. stay with us on bbc news, still to come. president biden is due to meet boris johnson shortly we will discuss what might be on their agenda. ministers have struck a deal which they hope will re—start production of carbon dioxide — which is vital to the food industry
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— at two of the uk�*s main plants. soaring wholesale gas prices had forced them to shut down. our business editor simonjack has been speaking to the chief executive of the industry regulator 0fgem and asked whether consumers should expect a difficult winter ahead. we are seeing an increase in prices that is coming in in october, so i know how difficult that is for many households to manage. and what we say to any household that is worrying about paying their bills, is do get access to the help and support that is available. do get in touch with your energy company and make sure that you get all the support you need, including some of the schemes that 0fgem and government run, like the warm home discount, which gives you about £140 discount on your bill. 0k, and i�*lljust say finally again, you presided over a market in which smaller players made price promises they could never keep in a situation like this. you should have regulated for an instance like this. well, no—one could have predicted the change we have seen in gas prices, and one thing i do want to emphasise, this is not a distinction between small
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suppliers or big suppliers. the secretary of state and i met with small suppliers this afternoon, and what they wanted to emphasise is there will be some small suppliers that do get through this, and it is important we have that diverse market because we do want a competitive framework, and we do want people offering different offers to customers in the market. this has not come straight out of the blue, this was obvious to anyone who could look at what the price promises that some were making. people will say that the regulator here was asleep at the wheel, were you? no, we have always protected customer�*s interests and we have worked very closely with the customers, and the companies. when you look at the change in costs there�*s been incurred, particularly in that august period you mentioned, costs went up by 70%, of course there will be a change in circumstances. but we work closely with all companies to assess their financial position, and if they need to exit the market, we have well rehearsed systems in processes to manage that.
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more people have been forced to flee their homes after the eruption of a volcano on the spanish island of la palma. there are fears that lava flows could trigger toxic gases and explosions when they reach the sea. the volcano began erupting on sunday, shooting lava hundreds of metres into the air. danjohnson sent this update from la palma. 0n la palma�*s volcanic hillsides it is time to move. more families and more communities are packing up and getting out. "i don�*t even know where to take my things," this woman says. we were allowed to drive the road to a village evacuated on sunday, now being cleared by its residents in a last dash to grab whatever they can before the lava consumes their homes. and at times there is a sense of panic here. this man is desperately trying to help his dad pack up. antonio has lived here over 40
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years, and he told me he can�*t believe it�*s ending like this. translation: i am angry with the authorities. - we could have done this without so much stress, without running. i don�*t know where i�*m going to live. and now what? this is the slow motion menace of molten lava, inching relentlessly downhill. it�*s a live geology lesson of nature�*s unstoppable force. the flames and the lava are really close, that�*s why there�*s such a risk to these properties, and why people are making every effort to get out. being here forjust a couple of minutes, you get a sense of the risk, because there is ash falling on my clothes, i can taste it in the air, and the whole time, there is the thunderous rumble of the volcano in the background, so that is why people are loading up and going. because here�*s what�*s to come. villages are being lost, and others will have to be abandoned. so far, people are safe, but leaving is painful. because it�*s notjust buildings.
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the eruption is shaking everything — communities, families and lives. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. let us speak to gary who is monitoring events for us in america. he travelled from general assembly by train, which i think is a less stressful way to get from new york, but probably is the only leader who has made that trip. i suppose he has to because he is banging the drum for climate change. he to because he is banging the drum for climate change.— to because he is banging the drum for climate change. he is doing that and he gives — for climate change. he is doing that and he gives himself _ for climate change. he is doing that and he gives himself something - for climate change. he is doing that and he gives himself something to l and he gives himself something to talk to joe and he gives himself something to talk tojoe biden about. ejoe biden spent his whole career travelling up
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that line back to union station in washington so they will have to swap stories about the train on the east coast of america, boris arrived here about five or six minutes away, drove past us where i am standing talking to you know, in a black suv. he went straight into the west wing with the british ambassador and we are waiting to see the pictures now, but i think as he arrives here at the west wing of the white house he can be pretty pleased he has ticked off a number of things on a lengthy shopping list that he came to america leaguing for. not least things like the travel ban but also that extra money thatjoe biden pledged on climate change, also being part of that nuclear submarine deal, with australia. and of course, you know, a sort of warmth if you like in the relations that wasn�*t necessarily there up until now, given that borisjohnson had to play ball with donald trump beforehand, so, there is, i think if you are the british delegation you are feeling pretty pleased with yourself. a,
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pretty pleased with yourself. a string of successes, it is odd because on the way over he said the relationship with washington is better than it has been in decades and that on the back of all the fairly vitriolic things said in the house of commons about the withdrawal from afghanistan, what a difference a couple of weeks makes yes, and he has gone out of his way here to mention the sacrifice of us troops, at kabul airport, as well, so he�*s notjust sort of glossed over that, so he�*s notjust sort of glossed overthat, he so he�*s notjust sort of glossed over that, he has positively reached out on afghanistan as well, and you will have heard the things that were said in the house of commons a few weeks ago, they were vitriolic about american behaviour, i think that is something he is prepared to give a bit on. i think it is worth bearing in mind, the one thing that british prime ministers have known really since the second world war, is that this relationship with washington is the cornerstone of the national interest and at times it is going to
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be incomfortable and distant at times it is not going to work properly but it is essential top british foreign policy and sometimes that means you take a hit but sometimes you can cash in, and i think today borisjohnson will feel think today boris johnson will feel he has cashed in. he said on the way over that he wasn�*t going to raise the issue of the trade deal becausejoe, he said, has a lot of fish to fry. that is an understatement, we are myopic here in the uk but when you look atjoe biden�*s domestic agenda in congress at the moment, he has a vote on the infrastructure bill coming up on monday, that is in peril because they can�*t get an agreement on the budget deal, the bigger budget deal and then there is an argument about the debt ceiling which might mean america defaults on debts. there isn�*t the band width in washington for any trail deal. i isn't the band width in washington for any trail deal.— for any trail deal. i think that is riiht. i for any trail deal. i think that is right. i think—
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for any trail deal. i think that is right. i think this _ for any trail deal. i think that is right. i think this will _ for any trail deal. i think that is right. i think this will be - for any trail deal. i think that is right. i think this will be a - for any trail deal. i think that is l right. i think this will be a brutal monetary policy in some ways for the white house, particularly with that debt ceiling negotiation and the question of the two big bills being in the balance, notjust dealing with republicans but also, the moderates and the progressives in their own party, particularly, you know, threatening to torpedo the various, you know permutation of the various, you know permutation of the various bills, so there is a lot to do borisjohnson did mention the question of trade very very briefly when he mitt kamala harris saying thank you for i forgot the phrase but he said thank you for allowing us to import beef or your curious resistance to importing our beef previously, so some movement on trade but a huge overarching trade deal, doesn�*t seem any deer nearen and of course in economic terms, and in the medium term that is a massive problem for britain, it has to find terms with the united states, outside the eu, if it is going to be able to make its way in the world
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and prove that brexit can work. plenty to discuss, more to come on the bbc, stay with us for that. hello there. wednesday marks the autumn equinox, the beginning of the astronomical season of autumn. but as far as the weather is concerned, well, especially across southern parts of the uk it is going to feel more like late summer, with warm sunshine. however, further north, some rain in the forecast, quite windy, and briefly a little bit cooler. now this is the position of the jet stream over the next couple of days. most of us staying to the south of the jet stream in this relatively warm air, but notice as the jet digs a little further southwards it allows some colder air into north east scotland during thursday. in the shorter term, wednesday shapes up like this, another day of sunny spells across much of england and wales, but with a band of cloud and rain sinking southwards across scotland,
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into northern ireland. a mix of bright spells and showers following on into the far north—west, quite a windy day, particularly across the northern half of the uk, quite blustery to the eastern side of the pennines, to the eastern side of scotland. further south, that is where we will see the highest temperatures, 21, 22 degrees across parts of england and wales. now through wednesday evening, this first band of cloud and patchy rain sinks a little further southwards, see the showers starting to reallyjoin together in northern scotland. it is going to turn wet and blustery through wednesday night into thursday across the far north, we could see gusts of round 60mph. the main body of wet weather will tend to clear away by thursday morning, the winds will ease a little as well but we will see a legacy of cold air left behind across north east scotland for thirties, so temperatures in lerwick may be no hiring than ten degrees, 144 aberdeen, come further south we are sill hiring than ten degrees, 14 for aberdeen, come further south we are sill
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in the warm air, 21 for cardiff. 22 for london, and where we see that brief taste of something chilly in north east scotland it doesn�*t last, we move out of thursday into friday. this warm front pushes through, we see a feed of warmer air returning from the west. with that, some areas of cloud, some patchy rain in western scotland, northern ireland, maybe north—west england, further east and south we will see spells of sunshine, but by this stage, temperatures down to the south of the uk could be all the way up at 23 or 24 degrees. now as we head into the start of the weekend high pressure is just about in charge, we have this little weather disturbance across the bay of biscay, we will have to keep an eye on that because that may introduce showery rain in the channel islands. maybe southern england later in the day. elsewhere some areas of cloud, the odd spot of rain or drizzle but most places through saturday dry with sunshine, the winds coming up from the south by this stage, so, relatively warm weather for all of us, 18—23 degrees. we look ahead to sunday, again we should see spells of sunshine, chance of showery rain close to the south—east, and we may see some of this wet weather to northern ireland late in the day.
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a bit of uncertainty about that. but again, temperatures 17—23 degrees so a fairly warm weekend for the time of year, however into next week things start to change, because it looks like we will see this dip in the jet stream, working its way down across the uk, allowing some much chillier conditions and also allowing low pressure to really take charge of our weather so things turning pressure to really take charge of our weather, so things turning much more unsettled as we head into next week. and also turning quite a lot cooler, the temperatures will be lower by this stage, it will be windier as well, we will see some outbreaks of rain, always with drier interludes but i expect it will feel more like autumn by then.
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tonight at ten, ministers strike a deal to avoid possible food shortages because of the startling rise in energy costs. food production needs carbon dioxide, but high gas prices shut down the biggest supplier, leaving some manufacturers on the brink. we are now pretty empty on our stocks and we are living hand to mouth. it�*s still unclear what incentives the government offered to get carbon dioxide manufacture back up and running. financial support for the biggest producer in the new deal would only last three weeks, though. also tonight... borisjohnson, in america for talks with the biden administration, plays down talk of an energy crisis back home. children with mental health problems
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in england are facing long waits for treatment.

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