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tv   Newsday  BBC News  September 22, 2021 12:00am-12:31am BST

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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... president biden makes his debut in front of world leaders at the un, promising a new era of �*relentless diplomacy�* to replace relentless war. we will stand up for our allies and ourfriends and oppose attempts by stronger countries that dominate weaker ones, but we're not seeking — i'll say it again — we are not seeking a new cold war. a busy day for president biden. while hosting the british prime minister at the white house, he outlined the importance of ireland's peace accord. i would not at all like to see, nor would many of my republican colleagues like to see a change
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in the irish courts, having a closed border again. pakistan's prime minister, imran khan, has been speaking to the bbc about afghanistan, laying out what the taliban need to do before he'll recognize their government. and in the canary islands, another village on la palma is evacuated as the volcano destroys a new area. there's ash falling on my clothes — i can taste it in the air — and the whole time, there's the thunderous rumble of the volcano in the background. live from our studio in singapore... this is bbc news. it's newsday. it's seven in the morning in singapore and seven in the evening in new york where more than a hundred world leaders are attending this year's un general assembly.
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in his first address to the body as president, joe biden called for countries to work together as never before. but the secretary general of the un used the gathering to highlight the issues that currently face the world — superpowers are at odds with each other, there's been a spike in violent seizures of power, and there is an unrelenting climate crisis. the bbc�*s barbara plett usher has been following the day's events and starts our coverage. his excellency, joseph r bidenjunior, president of the united states... this was president biden�*s chance to show that america is back at the table. we stand, in my view, at an inflection point in history. he called for unity to face growing global threats at a time when many allies are sceptical about america's leadership, especially after his largely unilateral decision to withdraw from afghanistan. we've ended 20 years of conflict in afghanistan, and as we close this period of relentless war, we're opening a new era of relentless diplomacy. a constant theme was us
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tensions with china, framed as a defensive democracy versus autocracy, although he never called beijing out by name. we are not seeking a new cold war or a world divided in the rigid blocks. the united states is ready to work with any nation that steps up and pursues peaceful resolution to shared challenges, even if we have intense disagreement in other areas, because we'll all suffer the consequences of ourfailure. mr biden�*s debut was seen as a test of american credibility after the confrontational years of donald trump, and by that standard, he offered reassurance. as we look ahead, we will lead. we will lead on all the greatest challenges of our time, from covid to climate, peace and security, human dignity and human rights, but we will not go alone. this is an opportunity for a reset, but us action on covid and climate change
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will be crucial for convincing the world that america really is back. barbara plett usher, bbc news, new york. the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has arrived at the white house for his meeting with president biden. the two men briefly spoke in front of the media. they were asked about a number of things, but what grabbed our attention was when president biden was asked what he thought about the ongoing row between the uk and the european union over customs checks for goods going in and out of northern ireland, and the potential for it to lead to the reimposition of a hard border on the island of ireland. take a listen. on the protocols, ifeel very strongly about those. we spent an enormous amount of time and effort in the united states. it was a major bipartisan effort made, and i would not at all like to see, nor, i might add, would many of my republican colleagues like
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to see a change in the irish courts with the end result having a closed border again. that is absolutely right. and on that point, joe, we are completely at one, and i think nobody wants to see anything that interrupts or unbalances the belfast good friday accord — that's the belfast good friday agreement. our north america correspondent gary o'donoghue has the latest. i think it's interesting, joe biden_ i think it's interesting, joe biden chose _ i think it's interesting, joe biden chose that - i think it's interesting, joe biden chose that moment| i think it's interesting, joe l biden chose that moment in i think it's interesting, joe - biden chose that moment in the oval_ biden chose that moment in the oval office _ biden chose that moment in the oval office. he'll— biden chose that moment in the oval office. he'll know- biden chose that moment in the oval office. he'll know that - oval office. he'll know that will have _ oval office. he'll know that will have gotten _ oval office. he'll know that will have gotten a - oval office. he'll know that will have gotten a lot - oval office. he'll know that will have gotten a lot of - oval office. he'll know that . will have gotten a lot of focus and that — will have gotten a lot of focus and that is _ will have gotten a lot of focus and that is an _ will have gotten a lot of focus and that is an issue _ will have gotten a lot of focus and that is an issue on- will have gotten a lot of focus and that is an issue on whichl and that is an issue on which boris — and that is an issue on which borisjohnson _ and that is an issue on which borisjohnson is _ and that is an issue on which borisjohnson is having - and that is an issue on which|
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borisjohnson is having some difficulty— borisjohnson is having some difficulty with _ borisjohnson is having some difficulty with the _ borisjohnson is having some difficulty with the european l difficulty with the european union — difficulty with the european union over_ difficulty with the european union over the _ difficulty with the european union over the border- difficulty with the european | union over the border down difficulty with the european - union over the border down the irisn— union over the border down the irish sea — union over the border down the irish sea. joe _ union over the border down the irish sea. joe biden— union over the border down the irish sea. joe biden does- union over the border down the irish sea. joe biden does care l irish sea. joe biden does care very— irish sea. joe biden does care very much— irish sea. joe biden does care very much about _ irish sea. joe biden does care very much about this. - irish sea. joe biden does care very much about this. he's i very much about this. he's often — very much about this. he's often described _ very much about this. he's often described himself. very much about this. he's often described himself as| often described himself as irish. _ often described himself as irish. and _ often described himself as irish, and he— often described himself as irish, and he said - often described himself as irish, and he said he'd - often described himself as irish, and he said he'd bel often described himself as - irish, and he said he'd be very upset — irish, and he said he'd be very upset if— irish, and he said he'd be very upset if anything _ irish, and he said he'd be very upset if anything that - irish, and he said he'd be very upset if anything that was - irish, and he said he'd be veryl upset if anything that was done that could _ upset if anything that was done that could disrupt _ upset if anything that was done that could disrupt the - upset if anything that was done that could disrupt the peace . that could disrupt the peace agreement— that could disrupt the peace agreement and— that could disrupt the peace agreement and lead - that could disrupt the peace agreement and lead to - that could disrupt the peace agreement and lead to a - that could disrupt the peace i agreement and lead to a hard borden — agreement and lead to a hard borden so— agreement and lead to a hard border. so i'm _ agreement and lead to a hard border. so i'm not _ agreement and lead to a hard border. so i'm not surprised i border. so i'm not surprised he's — border. so i'm not surprised has raised _ border. so i'm not surprised he's raised it. _ border. so i'm not surprised he's raised it. it _ border. so i'm not surprised he's raised it. it is _ border. so i'm not surprised he's raised it. it is one - border. so i'm not surprised he's raised it. it is one of. he's raised it. it is one of those _ he's raised it. it is one of those things— he's raised it. it is one of those things where - he's raised it. it is one of those things where the l he's raised it. it is one of- those things where the british will listen _ those things where the british will listen to— those things where the british will listen to what _ those things where the british will listen to what the - will listen to what the americans— will listen to what the americans say, - will listen to what the americans say, and l will listen to what the i americans say, and they will listen to what the - americans say, and they know that— americans say, and they know that he — americans say, and they know that he means _ americans say, and they know that he means it— americans say, and they know that he means it in— americans say, and they know that he means it in this - that he means it in this particular— that he means it in this particular case. - that he means it in this particular case. having | that he means it in this - particular case. having said all that, _ particular case. having said all that, there _ particular case. having said all that, there are - particular case. having said all that, there are a - particular case. having said| all that, there are a number particular case. having said i all that, there are a number of wins— all that, there are a number of wins boris _ all that, there are a number of wins borisjohnson _ all that, there are a number of wins boris johnson can - all that, there are a number of wins boris johnson can take i wins boris johnson can take away— wins boris johnson can take away from _ wins boris johnson can take away from this. _ wins boris johnson can take away from this. we've - wins boris johnson can take away from this. we've seeni wins boris johnson can take - away from this. we've seen the extra _ away from this. we've seen the extra money— away from this. we've seen the extra money on— away from this. we've seen the extra money on climate - away from this. we've seen the extra money on climate changei extra money on climate change but he's — extra money on climate change but he's got _ extra money on climate change but he's got out _ extra money on climate change but he's got out of _ extra money on climate change but he's got out of the - but he's got out of the president _ but he's got out of the president. we've - but he's got out of the president. we've seeni but he's got out of the - president. we've seen the change _ president. we've seen the change to— president. we've seen the change to the _ president. we've seen the change to the travel- president. we've seen the| change to the travel bands president. we've seen the - change to the travel bands and we've — change to the travel bands and we've seen— change to the travel bands and we've seen britain— change to the travel bands and we've seen britain becoming . we've seen britain becoming part— we've seen britain becoming part of— we've seen britain becoming part of this _ we've seen britain becoming part of this nuclear- we've seen britain becoming part of this nuclear powered| part of this nuclear powered submarine _ part of this nuclear powered submarine deal— part of this nuclear powered submarine deal with- part of this nuclear powered i submarine deal with australia and the — submarine deal with australia and the united _ submarine deal with australia and the united states, - submarine deal with australia and the united states, which| submarine deal with australia i and the united states, which is also _ and the united states, which is also a — and the united states, which is also a prestige _ and the united states, which is also a prestige project - and the united states, which is also a prestige project for - and the united states, which is also a prestige project for the i also a prestige project for the british as _ also a prestige project for the british as well. _ also a prestige project for the british as well. so _ also a prestige project for the british as well. so i— also a prestige project for the british as well. so i think - british as well. so i think boris _ british as well. so i think borisjohnson _ british as well. so i think borisjohnson will- british as well. so i think boris johnson will be - british as well. so i think . boris johnson will be pretty content, _ boris johnson will be pretty content, even _ boris johnson will be pretty content, even though - boris johnson will be prettyj content, even though there boris johnson will be pretty- content, even though there was definitely— content, even though there was definitely a _ content, even though there was definitely a warning _ content, even though there was
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definitely a warning shot - content, even though there was definitely a warning shot there i definitely a warning shot there over— definitely a warning shot there over the — definitely a warning shot there over the northern _ definitely a warning shot there over the northern ireland - over the northern ireland situation, _ over the northern ireland situation, and _ over the northern ireland situation, and the - over the northern ireland situation, and the other. over the northern ireland . situation, and the other big thing — situation, and the other big thing where _ situation, and the other big thing where he _ situation, and the other big thing where he didn't- situation, and the other big thing where he didn't get. situation, and the other big i thing where he didn't get any movement— thing where he didn't get any movement was— thing where he didn't get any movement was the _ thing where he didn't get any movement was the questionl movement was the question tong-term _ movement was the question long—term trade _ movement was the question long—term trade deal- movement was the question long—term trade deal with l movement was the question i long—term trade deal with the us, atways _ long—term trade deal with the us, always is _ long—term trade deal with the us, always is essential- long—term trade deal with the us, always is essential for. us, always is essential for britain _ us, always is essential for britain outside _ us, always is essential for britain outside the - us, always is essential for britain outside the eu - us, always is essential for britain outside the eu —— i us, always is essential for- britain outside the eu —— which is essentiat~ _ carbon emissions are of course going to be a big part of the debate at the forthcoming cop26 summit in october and november in glasgow. and you can read much more about that summit in a special section on our website. just log on to bbc.com/news. or download the bbc news app. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the united nations has expressed deep concern over mass deportations of haitian migrants from the united states, warning they could go against international law. the head of the un refugee agency filippo grandi said he was "shocked" by images of the conditions beneath the concrete highway overpass in texas. more than ia,000 people have gathered there in recent days. both the us and the un have condemned an attempted coup
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in sudan which was thwarted at dawn on tuesday. the un special envoy, volker perthes, called for everyone in the country to commit to the transitional process. the sudanese prime minister, abdalla hamdok, said the coup attempt was aimed at derailing the transition to civilian rule. the german chancellor, angela merkel, has been out on the campaign trail for herfirst election campaign appearance beside armin laschet, the man she hopes will succeed her. opinion polls suggest the conservatives are gaining ground on the social democrats, but are still trailing by three points ahead of voting on sunday. pakistan's prime minister, imran khan, has said preventing women from accessing education in neighbouring afghanistan would be un—islamic. he called for the leadership to be inclusive and to respect human rights. in an interview with our world affairs editor, john simpson, mr khan laid out
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the conditions that would need to be met for pakistan to formally recognise the new taliban government. in peshawar, on pakistan's north west frontier, afghanistan feels very close. the streets are thronged with afghan refugees. in the 1990s, the taliban had their origins in the afghan refugee camps here, and pakistan has always been accused of setting up the taliban and helping them take power in afghanistan — something pakistan denies. but when the taliban were thrown out in 2001, pakistan's influence in afghanistan fizzled out for 20 years. in our interview, imran khan clearly didn't want to seem to be too close to the taliban, but he was careful not to be too critical of them either, over the question of the rights of afghan women, for instance. the women are very strong.
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i feel, give them time. they will assert their rights. how much time? years? a year, two years, three years. three years? but at the moment, john, it's just too early to say anything, because it has barely been a month. after 20 years of civil war, they have come back into power. the taliban — the word just means islamic students — originally owed their existence as a movement to religious schools in pakistan like this one, the zuberia in peshawar, where they were recruited and radicalised. the main teacher, sheikh rahimullah, even helped the taliban to distribute the weapons they captured from american soldiers. "the previous taliban government didn't understand the system," he says. "this time, they do understand politics "and international relations.
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"they're not as harsh now as they were before." the new taliban leaders in afghanistan are certainly trying to give the outside world the impression that they've changed. imran khan hopes they have. it's very encouraging. they have said they will have an inclusive government. they have said that women can work, can have education. they will give amnesty to everyone. the soil won't be used for terrorism by anyone. you know, these are encouraging statements. so, you are approving the way the taliban are operating? no, i'm approving of what they have said. no one can tell where afghanistan goes from here, but what we hope and pray, that finally, after a0 years, the people of afghanistan will have peace and stability. but the taliban didn't bring
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peace and stability before and there's no evidence they can do it this time. in that case, it wouldn'tjust be afghanistan that suffered, it would be pakistan as well. john simpson, bbc news, islamabad. if you want to get in touch with me about any of these stories, that interview with pakistan's prime minister, for instance, i'm on twitter. i'm looking forward to hearing from you. still to come in on the programme... the un's stark warning that the world must improve the way food is produced, processed and consumed if mankind is going to survive. benjohnson, the fastest man on earth, is flying home to canada in disgrace. all athletes should be clean
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going into the games. i'm just happy that justice is served. it is a simple fact that this morning, these people were in their homes. tonight, those homes have been burnt down by serbian soldiers and police. all the taliban positions alongj here have been strengthened, presumably in case i the americans invade. it's no use having a secret service which cannot preserve its own secrets against the world, and so the british government has no option but to continue this action, even after any adverse judgment in australia. concorde had crossed the atlantic faster than any plane ever before, breaking the record by six minutes.
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this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. our headlines... president biden makes his debut in front of world leaders at the un, promising a new era of �*relentless diplomacy�* to replace relentless war. a busy day for president biden. while hosting the british prime minister at the white house, he outlined the importance of ireland�*s peace accord. the way we produce, process and consume food has to change if the world is to survive. that�*s the message from the united nations secretary general, antonio guterres. one in three people in the world are malnourished — either because they don�*t eat enough food or they eat too much. to find some answers to how food can feed the world better, the first ever united nations food systems summit is taking place this week. here�*s us presidentjoe biden speaking a little earlier. at a time when nearly one in three people globally do not
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have access to adequate food, adequate food just last year, the united states is committing to rally in our partners to address immediate malnutrition and to ensure that we can sustainably feed the world for the decades to come. to that end, the united states is making a $10 billion commitment to end hunger and invest in food systems at home and abroad. one expert taking part is dr lawrence haddad, executive director of the global alliance for improved nutrition. he�*s also the recipient of the 2018 world food prize. great to have you on the programme, lawrence. just outline for us how big a programme is malnutrition? thanks, great to be here. malnutrition is massive problem. one in three people are malnourished. everybody in
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the world knows somebody that�*s malnourished and it has serious consequences of their development, their health. it�*s responsible for half of all child deaths under the age of three. it�*s a massive problem. why are we in this situation when surely, there is enough food in the developed world to solve so many of these problems?— solve so many of these roblems? ~ , ., , , problems? well, the problem is that where _ problems? well, the problem is that where food _ problems? well, the problem is that where food needs - problems? well, the problem is that where food needs to - problems? well, the problem is that where food needs to be - that where food needs to be grown, it�*s not grown well enough. it�*s either grown in a way that it wrecks the environment or its grown that it doesn�*t generate enough income or the food that is grown doesn�*t have enough nutrients, so it doesn�*t nourish people properly. it�*s about the choices we all make about the choices we all make about what to grow, what to process and what to eat. what specifically _ process and what to eat. what specifically is _ process and what to eat. what specifically is new _ process and what to eat. what specifically is new about - process and what to eat. what specifically is new about this l specifically is new about this summit? i know there have been
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global efforts before to address this issue. what is the new thing this summit is hoping to achieve? the new thing this summit is hoping to achieve?— new thing this summit is hoping to achieve? the new thing about this summit _ to achieve? the new thing about this summit is _ to achieve? the new thing about this summit is a _ to achieve? the new thing about this summit is a brings - to achieve? the new thing about this summit is a brings all- this summit is a brings all these different groups together. the groups that care about hunger, malnutrition, climate change, biodiversity, jobs and resilience to things like covid—i9. it says to all of those groups, you have to talk together, you have to come up talk together, you have to come up with solutions that end malnutrition while reducing greenhouse gas emissions while generating jobs. greenhouse gas emissions while generatingjobs. so greenhouse gas emissions while generating jobs. so that a tall order, but we�*ve been doing it. we�*ve gotten ideas from all over the world, we�*ve had thousands of people, hundreds of thousands, involved in the summit, and we got some great priorities, great ideas and solutions and hopefully on thursday, we�*ll get some great commitments. thursday, we'll get some great commitments.— thursday, we'll get some great commitments. lawrence, not to sound like — commitments. lawrence, not to sound like a — commitments. lawrence, not to sound like a cynic, _ commitments. lawrence, not to sound like a cynic, but - commitments. lawrence, not to sound like a cynic, but there - sound like a cynic, but there have been efforts to talk
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before, there have been organisations that bring people from all over the world together before, and yet we�*re still in this situation today. what can be done to solve this problem? what can be done to solve this roblem? ~ what can be done to solve this problem?— problem? well, i think we've not a problem? well, i think we've got a really _ problem? well, i think we've got a really interesting - problem? well, i think we've got a really interesting and i got a really interesting and good opportunity to change things. covid—i9 is a massive wake—up call for everybody who wa ke—up call for everybody who thinks wake—up call for everybody who thinks and works and acts on food. it has wrecked our food system and showed us where all the weaknesses are, and it�*s given us a really good idea of how to build forward better. it's how to build forward better. it�*s raised the number of kids that are malnourished, through the roof. 20% higher this year than they were last year, and thatis than they were last year, and that is a massive wake—up call. you saw that with president biden�*s 10 billion announced today. that�*s great, but not enough. we need europe, china, 620 to enough. we need europe, china, g20 to do the same. enough. we need europe, china, 620 to do the same.— 620 to do the same. doctor lawrence — 620 to do the same. doctor lawrence haddad, -
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620 to do the same. doctor lawrence haddad, thank . 620 to do the same. doctor| lawrence haddad, thank you 620 to do the same. doctor - lawrence haddad, thank you for joining us on news days —— newsday. joining us on news days -- newsday-— we�*ve been hearing in the programme about what the world�*s two superpowers, china and america, have committed to do to fight global warming. but will these pledges help the countries that are literally on the front line of climate change? tuvalu is an island nation in the pacific ocean that has suffered due to increased temperatures and rising sea levels. samuelu laloniu is tuvalu�*s ambassador to the united nations. i spoke to him a little earlier and asked how urgent is the situation in tuvalu in regards to climate change. i have to say that tuvalu is the — i have to say that tuvalu is the most _ i have to say that tuvalu is the most vulnerable country to climate — the most vulnerable country to climate change, and i say that with _ climate change, and i say that with conviction because for one, — with conviction because for one. we _ with conviction because for one, we are already living the impact — one, we are already living the impact of— one, we are already living the impact of climate change as we speai
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fact that _ speak. secondly, it's the very fact that our vulnerability to sea level rise will mean that we have _ sea level rise will mean that we have in the very near future to ask— we have in the very near future to ask very— we have in the very near future to ask very difficult questions on our— to ask very difficult questions on our sovereignty, our statehood, our rights. so, these _ statehood, our rights. so, these are— statehood, our rights. so, these are issues that we havem _ these are issues that we have- - -_ these are issues that we have... ~ ., ,, ., have... when you talk about those sorts _ have. .. when you talk about those sorts of— have... when you talk about those sorts of issues, - have... when you talk about | those sorts of issues, they're those sorts of issues, they�*re now being summit addressed by that new climate pledge we�*ve just heard from president biden. does that go far enough to helping developing countries like yours? it will help, but international community has committed $100 billion by 2020, in the us will help in that direction, but we need a lot more assistance to our developing states. i think our adaptations cost much, much more
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than 100 billion that's been committed to. ambassador, what is the risk, or what�*s at stake if these countries that have pledged to put money into this fund don�*t end up sticking to their promises? paint us a picture of what that means for countries like yours. for countries like ours, we really very much depend on global solidarity because we need every hand on board. if the $100 billion is not met, that means we will not be able to carry out our adaptations needs and like i said before, we are already living the future impact of climate change as we speak. my country is one of the top nations in the world, no more than two metres
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above sea level. the last report estimated that we will be submerged in 100 years. so, if we cannot adapt to climate change or countries are not able to commit, then we are talking about our statehood. we are mass climate diplacement. just briefly, we�*ve heard from china today as well. to their commitments go far enough to help? the assembly's hope, we take
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whatever— the assembly's hope, we take whatever is pledged, committed, but we _ whatever is pledged, committed, but we hope that these things are transform into real actions. _ are transform into real actions, that we can see things on the — actions, that we can see things on the table, really committed to developing countries because one thing — to developing countries because one thing is about pledging funds, _ one thing is about pledging funds, and the other challenge that we — funds, and the other challenge that we have always continued to face — that we have always continued to face is— that we have always continued to face is accessing those funds _ to face is accessing those funds. it's a very complicated process _ funds. it's a very complicated rocess. ., ., ., ., process. tuvalu ambassador to the united _ process. tuvalu ambassador to the united nations. _ more people have been forced to flee their homes after the eruption of a volcano on the spanish island of la palma. there are fears that lava flows could trigger toxic gases and explosions when they reach the sea. the volcano began erupting on sunday, shooting lava hundreds of metres into the air. danjohnson has the latest from la palma. this amazing natural fireworks show for three days and three nights now. it is absolutely mesmerising. it�*s hard to take your eyes off it, but of course,
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it is destructive, because you can see the lava flowing downhill there. that has scarred landscape and it�*s torched everything in its path, and there have been more earth tremors and further lava flows, which suggest this spectacular show won�*t be over any time soon. today, we were in the village of todoque, which is right down at the head of the lava, just before that village got smothered. on la palma�*s volcanic hillsides, it�*s time to move. more families and more communities are packing up and getting out. "i don�*t even know where to take my things," this woman says. the village is being cleared in a last dash for people to grab whatever they can. the flames and the lava are really close. that�*s why they�*re such a risk to these properties, and why people are making every effort to get out. being here forjust a couple of minutes, you get a sense of the risk, because there�*s ash falling on my clothes — i can taste it in the air — and the whole time,
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there�*s the thunderous rumble of the volcano in the background, so that is why people are loading up and going. but leaving is painful, and there�*s a sense of panic here at times. this man desperately helping his dad, antonio, who�*s lived here for over a0 years, who can�*t believe it�*s ending like this. translation: i am angry with the authorities. - we could have done this without so much stress, without running. i don�*t know where i�*m going to live, and now what? this is what — more homes destroyed, more communities that will have to be abandoned. and here�*s the molten lava that�*s on the move, a slow—motion menace inching relentlessly downhill. this is a live geology lesson in nature�*s unstoppable forces. it�*s not just property. everything here is being shaken. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. that�*s all that we have time
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forfor that�*s all that we have time for for this that�*s all that we have time forfor this hour of that�*s all that we have time for for this hour of newsday. thanks so much forjoining us. stay with bbc world news. hello there. it will be another warm day in the offing for many with spells of sunshine once the early mist and patchy, dense fog clears away. however, further north we do have a different complexion to the weather for the day ahead. some cloudy skies with some rain, heavy to start and the risk of an autumnal gales just on cue for the autumn equinox. that�*s all being brought by this advancing area of clouds, it�*s a low pressure system. we do have a weaker weather front ahead of it. so, in contrast, it will be quite a mild start in the north whilst it could be a little bit chilly down to seven or eight in the south. it is here we will see the best of the sunshine once that mist and fog clears away, particularly for the far south. a little bit more cloud for england and wales and the odd spot of drizzle first thing, but that clears away. this is the main rain
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player through the day, the northwest highlands and the islands initially. it will tend to turn a little bit lighter as it pushes southward, some brightness ahead of it and some brighter weather with showers following behind. but a breezy day even in the south as well, and the winds to escalate towards the evening. so, temperature wise, a cooler day, we are into cooler air behind that weather front but as recent days, 22 to possibly 23 in the spots in the south and east. through the evening overnight look at those showers packing in, the winds really strengthen, there is a risk of gales across the far north and west and a cooler field. while further south, our weather front starts to introduce a bit more cloud, so it will be milder here as we start our thursday morning. a little bit of mistiness around and the odd patch of fog. we still got that high—pressure close by, but you can see that deep area of low pressure whisking away toward scandinavia. behind it is just introducing that cooler air for a time. but it is just a brief incursion of chilly airfor the far north. i think you will notice a temperature dip a little bit in southern areas as well with some cloud coming
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and going but still plenty of dry and bright weather. our weather front, however, just bringing the increased risk of drizzly, cloudy weather into northern and western areas. so, temperaturesjust a degree or so down on those that we are going to see through the day ahead. but then, the wind turns back to the southwest. in fact, by the weekend it�*s turning towards the south actually. so, dragging that warmer air back to all parts. and some fairly settled weather, but always the risk of some showery rain out towards the west. as ever, there�*s more on our website. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and all the main news stories at the top of the hour as newsday continues straight after hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk. i�*m stephen sackur. the golden age of the explorer is inextricably linked with the golden age of empire. people inspired to travel where none had travelled before, charting territory and encountering peoples who were subsequently often subjugated and exploited. well, my guest is one of the world�*s great
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modern—day explorers.

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