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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 1, 2021 1:00am-1:31am GMT

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welcome to newsday. reporting lies from singapore. the us climate summit has opened in glasgow with boris johnson warning that pledges made so far by world leaders are inadequate.— far by world leaders are inadequate. there are no compelling _ inadequate. there are no compelling excuses - inadequate. there are no compelling excuses for l inadequate. there are no i compelling excuses for our procrastination. the problem we are already seen first hand, the devastation climate change causes. . , ., ~ causes. leaders of the wild boars richest _ causes. leaders of the wild boars richest nations - causes. leaders of the wild i boars richest nations meeting in rome that make world's richest nations. we have a special report from bangladesh and the impact of rising sea
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levels. also in the programme... australia opens its international borders as flights resume from sydney and melbourne. cheering and applause. and live with day of the dead parades. commemorations return to mexico after a year off due to the pandemic. after a year off due to the pandemic— after a year off due to the andemic. ., ., , ., pandemic. life from our studio in singapore. _ pandemic. life from our studio in singapore, this _ pandemic. life from our studio in singapore, this is _ pandemic. life from our studio in singapore, this is bbc - pandemic. life from our studio| in singapore, this is bbc news. it's newsday. hello and welcome to the programme. the long—awaited climate summit has opened in glasgow. world leaders, prominent scientists and advisers are ready for 12 days of discussion with one principal aim, of discussion with one principalaim, to of discussion with one principal aim, to get the world to reduce carbon emissions and
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avoid a climate catastrophe. and to confirm the urgent need for action, the world media organisation has published its annual global climate report stating that the past seven years have been the hottest on record, with far—reaching repercussions for current and future generations. our science correspondent rebecca morrell has details. a gloomy start to proceedings in glasgow, but there are high hopes for a sunnier outcome. in a socially distanced conference centre, a reminder we're still in a time of covid, as alok sharma formally takes the reins for what some say is the last chance to save the planet. floods, cyclones, wildfires, record temperatures — we know that our shared planet is changing for the worse. and we can only address that together through this international system. the world meteorological organisation warned today that these extremes
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are the new normal. but it's developing countries who are suffering the most, and they say the onus should be on richer nations. malawi, like many countries that are developing, have been at the receiving end of climate change issues, pretty much brought by those developed nations who continue to emit so much carbon. central to these talks is a vital number — 1.5 degrees. if temperatures go above this, we move into dangerous territory. the world, though, is already 1.1 degrees above preindustrial levels, and we are seeing the impacts of that right now. but even if every country does what it's promising, we're on course for 2.7 degrees by the end of the century. activists are demanding more action now, led by greta thunberg, mobbed as she arrived in glasgow, but she says there's still hope.
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if we can't keep the global average temperature rise to below1.5, then we do 1.6, then 1.7 and so on. we can always prevent things from getting worse. it's never too late to do as much as we can. as the meeting gets under way, protesters say the time to tackle climate change is now. but after nearly three decades of talks, there are questions over how much can be achieved. with world leaders soon to arrive, all eyes will be on whether cop26 will succeed. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. well, already there has been a taste of the problems ahead. the world's richest nations, the 620, the world's richest nations, the g20, have been meeting in rome went leaders were accused of failing to make the commitments needed. the british prime minister borisjohnson prime minister boris johnson admitted prime minister borisjohnson admitted the pledges were too vague and not enough. the united nations secretary general said the time for diplomatic niceties was over and that the summit in glasgow was the last hope. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports on events in
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rome. a roman sunday stroll. a stylish canine seems the perfect accessory among the ancient alleys. what conflicts, what epic political struggles have these streets seen? history round every corner. then spot 15 of the most powerful leaders in the world taking in the sights. a coin in the famous fountain to guarantee a wish, but it might take more than tradition to stop the uk and france pulling away. others watch on as the two allies are stuck in a spat over fishing rights in channel waters. even borisjohnson wanted italy to inspire progress ahead of the cop climate meeting getting under way at home. there are no compelling excuses for our procrastination. not only have we acknowledged the problem, we're already seeing first—hand the devastation climate change causes. the science is clear,
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that we need to act now. what chance do you really think you really have of making progress with 200 countries in glasgow when you haven't made enough progress with 20 countries here, and you don't seem able to sort out the question of a few dozen fishing permits with one of your closest allies, with the french? i think that the chances of progress in glasgow are exactly as i said, laura. i think they depend on the will, the courage, the leadership of everybody in the room. on fish, i've got to tell you the position is unchanged. i must say i was puzzled to read a letter from the french prime minister explicitly asking for britain to be punished for leaving the eu. number 10 says it's all up to france to fix and withdraw their threats, but president macron claims it's down to the uk to grant more permits. he speaks french. boris johnson loves france, he said,
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but if the uk continues to act like this there will be retaliation. the irritation on both sides of the channel shows no sign of fading, and for borisjohnson, a rumbling row with an important ally like france is not exactly helpfuljust when he's trying to achieve a farwider, granderaim, persuading all of his counterparts from right around the world that slowing down the changes to the climate is a non—negotiable whose time has come. it's not easy, though. some countries don't want to move as fast. the russians questioning the uk ambition for countries to absorb as much carbon as they emit by 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure? i want an answer, because you're asking the question, being convinced that 2050 is non—negotiable. but the prime minister has regal backing, and for the heir to the throne, it's been a moment long in the making.
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now, after i suppose very nearly 50 years of trying to raise awareness of the growing climate and environmental crisis, i'm at last sensing a change in attitudes. when cop26 begins in glasgow tomorrow, quite literally it's the last—chance saloon. as the diplomatic caravan moves from rome's streets to scottish streets, borisjohnson still has a lot of arm twisting to do. do you like roma? i love rome. in glasgow, nobody is under estimating that challenge ahead. as we were telling you, the world meteorological organisation has just published a report stating that the last seven years have been the hottest on record with far—reaching repercussions for
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current and future generations, reinforcing, frankly, the need for urgent action now. well, helen mountford �*s vice president for climate and economics at the world resources institute and spoke to my college christian fraser was at the cop26 in glasgow about the devastating impact of climate change. we have been seeing this, flood events, fire, wiping out communities and towns. we are seeing that already at 1.1 celsius was a people get so much worse for each action of a degree we go up and the pressure really is on now, here in glasgow, to keep local warming at levels of no more than 1.5 celsius or at least put forward a trajectory which will keep us there, we'll get us there. will keep us there, we'll get us there-— us there. your organisation looks both _ us there. your organisation looks both at _ us there. your organisation looks both at the _ us there. your organisation looks both at the climate . looks both at the climate science and also the mitigation, how we put new
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technologies in place to stop the rise in emissions. when you look at what goes into the exploration and extraction of fossil fuels and you compare that to what goes into renewables, it's it's depressing. how do we correct the balance? it depressing. how do we correct the balance?— the balance? it is indeed and we saw this _ the balance? it is indeed and we saw this even _ the balance? it is indeed and we saw this even under- the balance? it is indeed and we saw this even under the l we saw this even under the credit crisis. governments were pumping in money, a lot more money than we have seen to renewables, clean energy, nature —based solutions, public transport. so we saw that but the amount they pumped into fossil fuels the amount they pumped into fossilfuels production the amount they pumped into fossil fuels production and consumption was still even greater so even under covid as we knew that we needed to go to a new clean economy, it is going to be morejobs rich, if you go to clean energy and nature —based solutions, even with that they were still pumping and a lot of from —— fossilfuel subsidies. i think fossil fuel subsidies. i think one fossilfuel subsidies. i think one of the things we are seeing is that there is this movement of both the youth movement, activists, what we're seeing in
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voting public. the voting public �*s are starting to say, look, we cannot do this anymore, we have to shift tak and i think the exciting examples we are seeing are from some countries that are starting to look at how do you manage adjust transition for the fossilfuel manage adjust transition for the fossil fuel industries, for the fossil fuel industries, for the there. in scotland they have had a just transition commission that is trying to do this. in south africa, really importantly, they are embedding just transition is what —— in what is a very ambitious covered approach to reducing emissions to 2030, and i think thatis emissions to 2030, and i think that is got to be the way forward. recognising that it is going to be a big shift and how do we manage it well. helen mountford there, vice president for climate and economics at the world resources institute, speaking met my colleague christian fraser a little earlier. well, the effects of climate change are already clear and for some countries it is far more serious than for others. anglo dashis serious than for others. anglo dash is among the most vulnerable. oursized dash is among the most vulnerable. our sized editor david shukman looks at one village there and what it
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needs. —— science editor. in a village on the coast of bangladesh, people are using mud to try to hold back the sea. it's all they've got. the rising level of the ocean means they're getting flooded more often. and we saw the same villagers struggling in the same way, back in 2009. the people who've done least to cause climate change suffering the most from it. if the forecasts of climate scientists are right and the sea rises even more, maybe by a metre by the end of the century, well, how on earth are these millions of people going to cope? with life so precarious, this community has long been desperate for international help. that's why this woman wanted to share her story at the climate summit in copenhagen 12 years ago. she told me she was pleased
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to be there and believed that world leaders would do something. they didn't. and now her life is tougher than ever. extreme weather is striking more often, and there's still very little assistance. translation: we have no idea what we can do. - if people can help us, then something can change. we don't have the money to move to other places. i have nothing that i can give to my children. along some stretches of coast, there are now rows of sandbags to try to keep the sea at bay. and a new school provides shelter during cyclones. but, fresh water is harder to find. most supplies are contaminated by the rising sea. more than a decade ago, developing countries were given a promise that by now they'd be getting $100 billion a year in climate aid. well, here we are at the glasgow summit, and that promise still
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hasn't been fulfilled. the 100 billion wasjust a promise that has not been kept, and its importance is that leaders who made the promise are not keeping their promise and therefore, these leaders have no credibility. back in bangladesh, shorbanuu says she doesn't want her children and grandchildren to suffer more than she has. but they are facing a hotter and more hostile climate, so there's real pressure for the talks in glasgow to get somewhere. david shukman, bbc news. well, there is lots more coverage from the climate change conference on our website, including a look behind the scenes as delegates from almost 200 countries discuss how to cut carbon emissions. that is all@bbc.com/news. well, you can also download the bbc news app stop if you want to get in touch with me on any of the stories you have seen on newsday so far, your hopes and ambitions perhaps for the
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cop26, i'd love to hearfrom you. i'm on twitter. well, you are watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme... australia opens up to international travel after imposing some of the world's strictest border controls. the israeli prime minister, yitzhak rabin, the architect of the middle east peace process, has been assassinated. a 27—year—old jewish man has been arrested and an extremist jewish organisation has claimed responsibility for the killing. at polling booths throughout the country, they voted on an historic day for australia. as the results came in, it was clear — the monarchy would survive. of the american hostages, there was no sign. they are being held somewhere inside the compound. and student leaders have threatened that, should the americans attempt rescue, they will all die. this mission has surpassed all expectations.
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voyager one and is now the most distant man—made object anywhere in the universe — and itjust seems to keep on going. tonight, we prove once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals. this is a new day tuesday on the bbc. in a stark illustration of the challenges facing the cop26 summit in glasgow, temperatures have reached a new record high. earlier in rome at the g20, the world's largest economies pledged to become carbon neutral by or around the mid
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century. japan's governing liberal democrat party as hung onto a stable majority. it was considered a test for the new prime minister fumio kushida who won the ldp contest in december. he emerged —— september. he emerged with fewer seats but the ldp has maintained its single party majority in an election which has defied expectations, it's fair to say. we can cross live now to our tokyo correspondent hayes. to have your newsday. so a pass than for fumio kushida in his first major test? it a pass than for fumio kushida in his first major test?- in his first ma'or test? if you had lost the — in his first major test? if you had lost the overall - in his first major test? if you had lost the overall majority| had lost the overall majority for the ldp by itself in parliament and he had to rely on the ldp�*s smaller coalition
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partner, the kumeto party, it would have smelled a blow for fumio kushida and spilt a short—term to him as prime minister and limited his ability to do anything. so the fact that he scraped through with the 14-15 fact that he scraped through with the 111—15 seat majority for the ldp, that is a relief to him in the party elders who backed him in the leadership election insert number but it says a lot about the way japanese politics works that we are here the prime minister who is not charismatic, even his friends say he is not very interesting to listen to. and that he has won, and what it shows is, the ldp has a huge incumbency advantage. he did not inspire voters here. and many voters would have averted different candidate in the ldp's different candidate in the ldp�*s leadership election back in september but he is a compromise candidate who was backed by the party elders and who they believe will do their
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bidding as prime minister now that he has a majority. that he has a ma'ority. rupert, notwithstanding — that he has a majority. rupert, notwithstanding some - that he has a majority. rupert, notwithstanding some of - that he has a majority. rupert, notwithstanding some of his i notwithstanding some of his lack of charisma as you pointed out, he has been campaigning on the back of improved access to hospital beds for covid patients. it also talked a stimulus plan to help his mrs and people recoverfrom the pandemic. how important are theseissues pandemic. how important are these issues forjapanese these issues for japanese voters? these issues forjapanese voters? labourwell, these issues forjapanese voters? labour well, they certainly care about the lack of hospital beds during the covid crisis this summer, which is predecessor, yoshihide suga, looked like he was fumbling the response to the covid crisis, and the party has done worse than in any election since 2009. but i don't think it's the specific policies that he is put forward that have really had much to do with this election outcome stop it
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something to do with the enormous incumbency advantage the ldp has, the way the political system skews towards rural and older voters, the very low voter turnout and really, the lacklustre performance of the opposition. fumio kushida has come in on a promise to double defence spending and to lessen the gap between the rich and the poor here. basically coming on a policy but form of criticising his predecessor in the party has belonged to the past ten years. rupert wingfield hayes they're keeping us up—to—date with all the latest developments injapan. in a very happy birthday, rupert. not many know that you join us on your birthday, so thank you for that. meanwhile, moving on to other stories, i had to do that, i had to say happy birthday. after imposing some of the
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strictest border controls in the world, australia's opening to international travel. fully vaccinated citizens will no longer leave need permission to leave. our correspondent has been at sydney airport all day and a bit earlier she told me more about the move there. a very emotional day here at sydney airport, i'm here at one of the arrival gates and we're just at families now arriving. this is one of the flights, people are just making their way back. welcome back. how do you feel? pretty good, good to be home. some have said that after waiting for such a long time, it doesn't seem to feel real. people have arrived here to embraces, to cheers and tearful reunions. fully vaccinated australians and australian residents have now been able to come home from overseas, quarantine free for the first time in nearly two years.
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the first time in nearly two ears. ., . ., , years. one of the lucky ones who actually _ years. one of the lucky ones who actually got _ years. one of the lucky ones who actually got permission| years. one of the lucky ones l who actually got permission to go because with my mother died, it was taking that long to get out of the country to sort out her affairs. out of the country to sort out her affairs-— her affairs. very emotional, it's good — her affairs. very emotional, it's good to _ her affairs. very emotional, it's good to be _ her affairs. very emotional, it's good to be home - her affairs. very emotional, it's good to be home and i her affairs. very emotional, | it's good to be home and it's been — it's good to be home and it's been very— it's good to be home and it's been very tough not to be able to get— been very tough not to be able to get a — been very tough not to be able to get a plane whenever you want — to get a plane whenever you want to _ to get a plane whenever you want to see your family. something happens to them, you can't _ something happens to them, you can't easily make it home or if something was to happen to me, i'd something was to happen to me, i'd have — something was to happen to me, i'd have no—one over there in the _ i'd have no—one over there in the uk — i'd have no—one over there in the uk to— i'd have no—one over there in the uk to support me stopjust relief. — the uk to support me stopjust relief. so — the uk to support me stopjust relief, so much relief. i the uk to support me stop 'ust relief, so much relieffi relief, so much relief. i have a small ten-year-old - relief, so much relief. i have a small ten-year-old son, i relief, so much relief. i have i a small ten-year-old son, and a small ten—year—old son, and the thought— a small ten—year—old son, and the thought of— a small ten—year—old son, and the thought of having - a small ten—year—old son, and the thought of having to - the thought of having to quarantine, _ the thought of having to quarantine, the - the thought of having to quarantine, the three i the thought of having to quarantine, the three of the thought of having to i quarantine, the three of us in a hotel— quarantine, the three of us in a hotel for— quarantine, the three of us in a hotel for two— quarantine, the three of us in a hotel for two weeks - quarantine, the three of us in a hotel for two weeks is i quarantine, the three of us in a hotel for two weeks is a i a hotel for two weeks is a nightmare _ a hotel for two weeks is a nightmare. we _ a hotel for two weeks is a nightmare. we were i a hotel for two weeks is a l nightmare. we were willing a hotel for two weeks is a i nightmare. we were willing to do it— nightmare. we were willing to do it but— nightmare. we were willing to do it but it's _ nightmare. we were willing to do it but it'sjust_ nightmare. we were willing to do it but it'sjust amazing. i do it but it'sjust amazing. many— do it but it'sjust amazing. many have _ do it but it'sjust amazing. many have been _ do it but it'sjust amazing. | many have been overcome do it but it'sjust amazing. i many have been overcome with emotion while some have stopped to talk to us telling us how happy they were but many were actually lost for words. i was speaking to a woman and i looked at her and said, how does it feel to be back home after all these months and she just looked at me with tears in
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her eyes and said, there are no words. this has been a huge day here at sydney airport, another very big day in melbourne because new south wales and the courier have been the two states, and the act, the three states, and the act, the three states to open up. been a longer wait for millions of others as other states and territories have yet to open. it will be a longer wait for people but here, people are still quite happy that they are able to come home, able to travel overseas and not have to worry about quarantine. shaima khalil there at sydney airport. the publishers of the oxford dictionary have chosen the word vax as there were 2021. the english word vaccine was recorded more than 100 years ago but use of the shortfall vax has spiked this year by itself or in
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combinations like unvaxxed, double—vaxxed and anti—vaxxer. sunday has marked the beginning of a two day holiday observed a catholic or the day of the dead, celebration of the lives of the departed. in mexico city where tradition runs deep, decorations have gone up all over town. dia de los muertos, the day of the dead, a mexican tradition marked by celebrating departed loved ones with joy. marked by celebrating departed loved ones withjoy. pandemic has brought a heightened to this holiday. it has brought a heightened to this holiday.— this holiday. if you put it in the context _ this holiday. if you put it in the context of _ this holiday. if you put it in the context of all _ this holiday. if you put it in the context of all the i this holiday. if you put it inj the context of all the debts that happened, it means even more because it gives people even more comfort. i really like it, i really is very colourful because you are commemorating death but at the same time you are celebrating life stop for catholics, the first two days of november means a reunion with the souls of lost loved ones, a celebration with offerings, altars and marigold flowers. the aztecs believed to the
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ancestors followed the scent to find their way back. what colour is sky, mi amor, mi amor. the traditions were brought to the screen in recent years in the animated film coco. this year, 16 altars have gone up in mexico city, a welcome scene of liberty and the capital of a country that's lost only 300,000 people to covid—19. lost only 300,000 people to covid-19-_ lost only 300,000 people to covid-19. �* ,, �* �* covid-19. translation: after all we've lived _ covid-19. translation: after all we've lived through - covid-19. translation: after all we've lived through other. all we've lived through other people who have passed away, we now see a boom after being locked up. these exhibits of mexican culture bring joy to the city. in mexican culture bring 'oy to the ci . ., ., the city. in a world where masks are _ the city. in a world where masks are now _ the city. in a world where masks are now the i the city. in a world where| masks are now the norm, the city. in a world where i masks are now the norm, in mexico city, they are much more pretty. that's all that time we have you on newsday this hour. thank you on newsday this hour. thank you so much forjoining us. to
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stay with bbc news for much more global news headlines up her. morning. a change of month brings with it a change of the weather. we'll start the week with sunny spells and scattered showers. by the middle part of the week, it gets noticeably quieter, cooler for all of us, and some frost and fog overnight, so plenty to pack in there. so on that monday morning, then, it looks somewhat like this — with low pressure easing away, and as we go through the week, high pressure will build in which will quieten things down. but ahead of it, we can trace those isobars all the way back to the north — and that means a cold or wind direction, with that northerly wind and driving the blue tones, the cooler air, a little bit further south, you really will notice the difference with the feel of the weather if you are out and about this week.
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so sunny spells and blustery showers from the word go, most of the showers to the north but some will push further south as we go into the afternoon, and it looks as if those temperatures will peak between 9—11; celsius. now the showers will tend to fade away as we move through the night, and we will have some clear skies, perhaps a few frequent showers continuing into the far north of scotland. but where skies clear away, temperatures will fall away and we could see low single figures to greet us first thing on tuesday morning, and that gives us the potential for some frost to form, and maybe some patchy fog. so first thing on tuesday morning, it'll be a bit of a chilly start, lots of sunshine, some showers around, most frequent ones
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along the exposed north coasts of scotland and northern ireland, and some running down through the irish sea. now, as we move out of tuesday into wednesday, still the risk of some showers, but as the high desperately tries to squeeze in along the west, but again, we are likely to see sunny spells and scattered showers as we go through the day on wednesday. it will be quite a cool feel to the day with those temperatures really struggling — in some areas not getting into double figures by the middle part of the afternoon, out of wednesday into thursday, the high pressure finally builds in, the winds will ease, we will see a good deal of quiet weather — that will kill off the showers, so that means on thursday, there is a greater chance of seeing more in the way of sunshine, but as you can see those temperatures are still set to struggle even for this time of year.
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this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and all the main news stories at the top of the hours straight after this programme. —— at the top of the hour, straight after this programme. what exactly happened at the start of this pandemic? where did this virus come from? what happened that brought us into this situation? this is the million dollar question.
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almost two years since the first cases were reported,

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