Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 1, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh live in glasgow where world leaders are gathering for the cop26 climate summit. as it begins, borisjohnson warns humanity has run down the clock on climate change and says urgent action is needed. very, very urgent. notjust for our country, for the whole world. and if i had to give a comparison, i would say it was a one minute to midnight moment. and the clock is ticking. un scientists warn that extreme weather events are the new normal — and the past seven years are on course to be the hottest on record. but china — one of the world's biggest polluters — will not attend the summit
9:01 am
in glasgow — president xi will address the conference by a written statement instead. welcome back to glasgow. you may be able to tell from your shop that the waters of the clyde are looking choppy behind me. if you hear a rattle, it is the little studio we are sitting on, the structure rattling in the wind, but we feel quite safe here. across the armadillo building behind me, of course, world leaders are gathering in glasgow for the un climate conference. they are being urged to put aside their differences and agree urgent action to limit
9:02 am
dangerous rises in temperature. around 120 heads of state will attend the conference, including the us presidentjoe biden. at the leaders of both china and russia, two of the world's biggest greenhouse gas producers will not be there. the summit is being seen as there. the summit is being seen as the moment when countries must deliver on pledges to limit temperature rises to 1.5 celsius above avoid the worst effects of climate change. the uk prime minister borisjohnson says the world is at one minute to midnight, having run down the clock on waiting to combat climate change, the prince of wales, who is due to address the leaders today, says a warlike footing is needed to deal with the climate crisis. ahead of the event, borisjohnson has been speaking to our climate editorjustin rowlatt. would you say you're now an environmentalist, mrjohnson? i've always been a passionate lover of the natural world. but it was only really on becoming prime minister, seeing the, you know, the upward spike in temperature change.
9:03 am
there is absolutely no doubt about it, we have to fix this thing. i also think it's the way people want to go. the big change in all this is, it's not what governments think any more, it's not what the corporations think, it's what their punters think. and the people watching, they want to change, and they want us to grip this thing. and on the subject of change, we're all thinking about our own carbon footprint. what is, what is the, what is thejohnson household doing... yeah, i know! 0bviously, i've totally abolished commuting since i live above my place of work. but what i used to do is, i used to cycle absolutely everywhere. what about beef, for example? look, i, i, ithink that... i've got to probably stop eating a lot of everything, a lot less, i've got to stop, i've got to start eating a lot less of all kinds of things.
9:04 am
0n the big issue, the cop26 summit, it isn't brexit that in the long term you're going to be remembered. you're going to be remembered for the deal that you bring back from glasgow because that is the one that's going to affect the climate that we all endure or live in for decades, centuries, thousands of years, possibly. that is the tragedy of it. look, i don't think people realise the difference between 1.5, getting it, restraining it to 1.5 degrees, the difference between 1.5 degrees and two degrees is the difference between losing 70% of the world's coral reef at 1.5 degrees and losing all of it at two degrees. that is an appalling prospect. not to mention desertification, storms, heatwaves. all that. and the consequences, to say nothing of the natural disaster, the consequences for humanity, are enormous. but a couple of weeks before the conference starts, you go on holiday in marbella.
9:05 am
is that world leadership? well, i think that on the issue of short—haulflights, the... we've got to do things to, i know that people object to what we did with, with the budget, but actually we're increasing the taxation on long haul flights which account for 96% of the emissions. you reduced it on domestic short—haulflights. ones that there are alternatives for. and increased it on long haul flights, so you did nothing. you did nothing. it's very difficult. i mean, i hearyou, but it's very difficult. but the point is, you are asking developing nations to make really tough decisions about their future. yes. and at the same time, and you're saying you want to turn aspiration into action, aspiration into action. you're not delivering action on short—haulflights in britain, are you? with great respect, everybody knows that it's the uk that's out in front. when i was a kid, 80% of our power came from coal.
9:06 am
when i was mayor of london it was a0%, it's now 1%. let's talk about coal. that's an amazing, that's an amazing... i know everybody asks you this question. but you're going to china, you're going to india, you're going to developing worlds saying, phase out coal. at the same time as not ruling out a new coal mine in britain, a new coal mine in britain. we started the industrial revolution, we should... i just gave you the statistics. but why don't you just say, we're not going to open... i've just given you the statistics, we have no... the chinese will say, we can't take this guy seriously. well, sorry, what absolutely everybody finds absolutely incontrovertible is the progress the uk has already made. i'm sorry to bang on about the coal. but the point is it makes you look... it makes you look a little bit weaselly, not answering the coal question. because they're going to go and you're talking about coal. sorry, i have answered the coal question. directly, directly. let me say to you directly.
9:07 am
yes or no on the coal mine, you personally, what do you reckon? i'm not in favour of more coal, let's be absolutely clear, but it's not a decision for me, it's a decision for local planning authorities. one last thought, you're about to go to glasgow. how confident are you about the outcome? i've told you, i think it's in the balance. i think that we've had a decent outcome at the g20 so far. but everybody�*s got a lot more to do. borisjohnson, boris johnson, speaking to justin rowlatt. over the two week summit in glasgow there will be a series of negotiations to agree steps to limit climate change, to stop global average temperatures rising more than 1.5 celsius above pre—industrial levels. let's take a look at what is expected at the summit today. world leaders are invited to an opening ceremony, hosted by the uk prime minister, to welcome them to the world leaders summit of cop26.
9:08 am
the ceremong has been described as being a significant, symbolic and impactful moment. throughout today and tomorrow leaders from across the world will come together in glasgow to give national statements. and taking place this afternoon is the first leaders event, action and solidarity — the critical decade. the leaders will hear the latest scientific reporting and examine the state of progress, hearing success stories, but also what is at stake for countries across the world if action isn't taken. let's talk to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning to you. from princes to politicians, a lot of very powerful language is already being used today as leaders gather for this first day of their part of the summit. boris johnson, normally known for his pretty ebullient style, he is not saying it is a given that, at the
9:09 am
end of this summit, there is going to be the sort of deal that so many people want. so, how are as he about the process here? figs people want. so, how are as he about the process here?— the process here? as you said, he is normally so — the process here? as you said, he is normally so optimistic— the process here? as you said, he is normally so optimistic about - normally so optimistic about everything and is often accused of being too bullish. the reason he is so optimistic is that the conditions that have already been announced, country saying that they will reduce their own carbon emissions, it is nowhere near enough, so far, to limit global temperature rises to the 1.5 degrees celsius which is the most ambitious goal in the paris climate change agreements. so, you could make an argument that already that target has been missed. however, these two weeks in glasgow aren't necessarily about updating those national plans on the way to 1.5. a lot of the negotiations in glasgow are quite technical aspects,
9:10 am
finishing off the paris climate change agreement, where they will look at things like, 0k, how do you actually deliver the next phase of carbon reduction pledges? how do you factor in the international trade in carbon permits as a way of helping countries getting their carbon emissions down? also, how do you start gos auto financing, so you can send funds from the rich world to the less rich world to help those less wealthy countries manage the transition. actually, the outputs from cop are not necessarily the outputs that the headlines that you might actually think would be the outcomes. to guard against the fact it might be a little bit dull, were not very effective, the uk, to staging a leaders summit at the beginning, that will have a lot of side agreements alongside the technical, official cop stuff. things like forestry and the funding for coal plants around the world. so
9:11 am
they can actually get some quick wins from the world leaders and at the start of the process, rather than waiting to see what they end up with at the end. apologies that this is so complicated. but as i have been learning over the last couple of days, this whole cop process is very, very nuanced. isuppose of days, this whole cop process is very, very nuanced. i suppose the danger for the very, very nuanced. i suppose the dangerfor the uk politically is that they are the hosts. it is in the uk. the uk's name is all over this. but actually, cop works on the consensus of the countries that are here. the uk is hosting the event and providing the arena. they are making sure the lights are on and there was an of sandwiches for everyone. but they are not totally in control of what happens. briefly, adam, as hosts, _ in control of what happens. briefly, adam, as hosts, do _ in control of what happens. briefly, adam, as hosts, do you _ in control of what happens. briefly, adam, as hosts, do you expect - in control of what happens. briefly, | adam, as hosts, do you expect that the uk might make any further announcements during cop on its contribution to all of this, in order to set the pace and lead the way? order to set the pace and lead the wa ? ~ �* ., ., , order to set the pace and lead the wa ? ~ �* . ., , ., order to set the pace and lead the wa? �*., way? well, we've already got one this morning- _ way? well, we've already got one this morning. boris _ way? well, we've already got one this morning. boris johnson - way? well, we've already got one| this morning. boris johnson saying this morning. borisjohnson saying that if you look at the uk's pledged
9:12 am
to now return international aid spending, back to the old target of 0.7% of national income, which had been abandoned for a year or two because of the pandemic, he saying in the next two years the uk will be able to spend an extra £1 billion on climate finance, to help other countries make the transition around the world. now, again, there are some new ones there. that is just a logical fact of the fact that the uk's aid spending will be going back up uk's aid spending will be going back up again, rather than some massive change to uk government policy. however, if one of your problems is countries not stumping up enough cash, the host stumping up some more cash, the host stumping up some more cash on the first morning of the summit, maybe it will give everyone else a bit of a bump. the whole point about having everybody here in one place is so they can give each other a bit of a bump.— other a bit of a bump. thank you very much- _ other a bit of a bump. thank you very much. adam _ other a bit of a bump. thank you very much. adam fleming. - it's been called the world s best last chance to get runaway climate change under
9:13 am
control, but what does this actually mean and how did we get here? the bbc�*s science correspondent victoria gill has the details. over the years, we've witnessed and reported the impacts of climate change around the world. we've seen deforestation on a vast scale contribute to carbon emissions. and you no longer have to travel to the deserts to see the impact of global temperature rise. the effects of climate change are playing out everywhere. we've been here 20 years, we've got a beautiful home, and just look at it. but while its impact can be painfully dramatic, the process that brings countries together to tackle the issue can be painfully slow. there have been moments of triumph, though, in this long negotiation. at the cop in 2015 in paris, 196 countries signed a global treaty agreeing to limit global warming to well below two celsius and to aim for 1.5. that's the threshold scientists agree beyond which the most dangerous impacts of global warming play out. so now it comes down
9:14 am
to here in glasgow. to keep that 1.5 celsius target alive, emissions need to halve within the next decade, and to reach net zero, where the world is taking out as much carbon from the atmosphere as it's putting into it, by the middle of the century. so the 200 countries being represented here at cop26 are being asked for their specific plans to meet that goal. the success of this conference will be based partly on countries' willingness to outdo each other when it comes to emission reduction. the uk's net zero strategy has been widely praised. the government has promised to fully decarbonise our electricity supply by 2035, and to phase out the sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2030. but some countries have much more ambitious goals. costa rica, a country that has committed to phasing out fossil fuels completely, is urging richer nations to do more. the fact that costa rica is a small country with limited resources, and yet has been able to put forward very ambitious plans.
9:15 am
if we are doing it, you countries that are larger than us, larger economies, better resources, there is no excuse, you have to do it too. there's a great deal of work to do here. countries' current pledges have us on a path towards a 2.7 degrees temperature increase by the end of the century. if negotiations over the next two weeks can't nudge that down significantly, we'll be facing a very uncertain future. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. let's talk to professor elizabeth robinson from the grantham research institute on climate change and the environment at the london school of economics. professor robinson, go to have you with us on bbc news. what signals are you hoping for from world leaders on closing gaps, closing the delivery gaps in what they have promised and said about dealing with climate change, and what they are actually going to do?
9:16 am
professor robinson, can you hear me? i think we are having problems with the line, unfortunately. let's try and sort that out and get back to professor robinson as soon as we can. let's talk our china right now. china is the world's biggest polluter and but president xi jinping, isn't attending. instead he'll address the event in a written statement. let's talk to our correspondent in beijing stephen mcdonell hello to you. so, president xi is not here in glasgow. how much of a difference do you think that will make on the outcomes here? well. make on the outcomes here? well, --eole make on the outcomes here? well, eo - le will make on the outcomes here? well, people will wonder _ make on the outcomes here? well, people will wonder why _ make on the outcomes here? well, people will wonder why xi - make on the outcomes here? -ii people will wonder why xi jinping is not at the conference, why the leader of the country that produces more carbon than anyone else is not
9:17 am
physically at the meeting, providing solutions. but he hasn't been overseas at all for two years, as far as we can see. china's leader has not travelled outside the country since the coronavirus outbreak started, possibly because they didn't want him to get covid. the chinese government would say this is not a snob, he has not gone to this conference because he hasn't been to any conferences. that said, i thinkjust having a written contribution from xi jinping might be interpreted as... i don't know, and all too small offering from china's leader. however, really, what happens at these conferences, the leaders are not actually making the leaders are not actually making the deals. it's all the people on the deals. it's all the people on the sides. in china has people there, they can certainly call through, and if there are agreements to be made, the chinese covenant would argue it is still there, contributing, being part of the discussion. partly because it has no
9:18 am
choice, really. catastrophic climate change is bearing down on this country like everywhere else. there have been these terrible weather events. the government knows this, it has spoken about it. also, the chinese government thinks that it has not a bad story to tell. because even though this is the biggest contributor to the problem, it is also hoping to become the biggest contributor to the solution, with his huge wind farms, huge solar farms, and even here, you know, this is to be a coal—fired power station. now it has been converted to gas. there are no coal—fired power stations in the beijing area. the government says it is moving slowly but surely towards achieving solutions. i guess the debate is the extent to which the speed of it, what the ambition should be for china, is it doing enough? obviously it still relies — china, is it doing enough? obviously
9:19 am
it still relies heavily _ china, is it doing enough? obviously it still relies heavily on _ china, is it doing enough? obviously it still relies heavily on coal, - china, is it doing enough? obviously it still relies heavily on coal, and - it still relies heavily on coal, and it still relies heavily on coal, and it finances a number of coal powered projects in other countries. just tell us a little bit more about exactly where china is on the pathway to try to keep global temperature, globalwarming, below temperature, global warming, below 1.5 temperature, globalwarming, below 1.5 degrees, and also, of course, net zero. ~ u, 1.5 degrees, and also, of course, net zero. ~ _, , 1.5 degrees, and also, of course, net zero. ~ , ., net zero. welcome in terms of financin: net zero. welcome in terms of financing coal _ net zero. welcome in terms of financing coal projects - net zero. welcome in terms of financing coal projects in - net zero. welcome in terms ofj financing coal projects in other countries, the chinese government says it is going to stop doing that. so, again, even though there are big challenges, big problem is that beijing would argue at least it has a plan. unlike the chinese government says other countries, which haven't really got a pathway forward. i mean, if you can believe the chinese government, this country is going to reach peak coal—fired power in just four years. at the moment, they are still furiously building new coal—fired power stations. the reason for that is said to be to replace these
9:20 am
clapped—out, more polluting coal—fired power stations, and then, gas, afterfour years it will start to taper off and they will rely on other technologies. there are still much coal—fired power in power, so much coal—fired power in power, so much carbon being omitted. you know, there is a lot to be done, especially in storage. if they can get enough of the renewable energy onto stream and into the mix of the power that this enormous country is using right now. thank you, stephen mcdonald in beijing. decisions made at cop26 in scotland will affect countries that may lack the infrastructure to make the transition to green energy. that means they could struggle to commit to key targets to reduce carbon emissions. nigeria is africa's biggest oil producer and its economy is almost entirely reliant on fossil
9:21 am
fuels. 0ur correspondencejoins me from lagos. iwas fuels. 0ur correspondencejoins me from lagos. i was struck by something the un commission said about how the world is not all in the same boat, some countries are hanging onto the sides of the boat with perhaps just a life jacket, hanging onto the sides of the boat with perhapsjust a life jacket, if they are lucky. so, how difficult is it going to be for a country like nigeria to make meaningful pledges at cop26? it's nigeria to make meaningful pledges at com? a ., a, , ., nigeria to make meaningful pledges atcop26? ., ., nigeria to make meaningful pledges atcop26? ., at cop26? it's already going to be very challenging- _ at cop26? it's already going to be very challenging. nigeria - at cop26? it's already going to be very challenging. nigeria has - very challenging. nigeria has committed to reducing its emissions by 20%. it aims to do that by taking up by 20%. it aims to do that by taking up a solar power and reducing gas flaring, which is a by—product of its massive oil industry. 0ver flaring, which is a by—product of its massive oil industry. over the weekend, the president wrote an opinion piece in newsweek, wary highlighted the fact that many renewable energy technologies are not yet at the level where they can be used in africa are without
9:22 am
back—up diesel generators. he says the use of fossil fuels are still going to be necessary here, particularly when it comes to generating enough electricity to fuel development in this country off 200 million people. it is thought to be the third most populous country in the world by the end of the century. so the authorities here are very concerned about how to develop the country enough, turn it into an industrialised nation, to provide enough employment for these people. they say transitioning to renewables to quick will not allow them to do this. �* , , , ., ., this. briefly, this question of climate finance, _ this. briefly, this question of climate finance, how - this. briefly, this question of. climate finance, how important this. briefly, this question of- climate finance, how important is it to nigeria with that wealthier countries honour their promises to give other countries, developing nations, the sort of finance they need to change their infrastructure and go green? it’s need to change their infrastructure and go green?— and go green? it's absolutely crucial. and go green? it's absolutely crucial- l— and go green? it's absolutely crucial. i mean, _ and go green? it's absolutely crucial. i mean, they - and go green? it's absolutely crucial. i mean, they are - and go green? it's absolutely i crucial. i mean, they are putting pressure, nigeria and the other
9:23 am
african countries, will be putting pressure on the developed nations of the to develop red deliver on their promise of delivering 20 billion a year to developing nations. they will also be asking for alternatives, such as debt reduction to be offered as a swap for any african countries that take up climate mitigating initiatives. there are lots of initiative ways of raising money for the climate, they will be advocating for these to be permitted over the next few days. thank you very much for that. let's return to professor elizabeth robinson from the grantham research institute on climate change on the environment, from the london school of economics. hopefully everything a sound with the line now. i was asking you when we tried to speak a little while ago, what would you be looking for in terms of signals from world leaders over the next couple of days about closing delivery gaps, closing those gaps between the fine words and promises previously made and what they are going to do in
9:24 am
terms of concrete action? exactly, i think there — terms of concrete action? exactly, i think there are _ terms of concrete action? exactly, i think there are three _ terms of concrete action? exactly, i think there are three broad - terms of concrete action? exactly, i think there are three broad areas. | think there are three broad areas. as you have alluded to, the first is countries doubling down and increasing their commitments as to what extent they are going to reduce emissions. that is particularly higher income countries. the second thing, and wejust heard higher income countries. the second thing, and we just heard about that, increasing sustainable finance for lower—income countries. we need to enable low income countries to see a rapid transition to low carbon, resilient economies, where poverty reduction occurs, prosperity occurs, but on a different develop and pathway from what i've seen ourselves. it is great to hear commitments, net zero by 2050, but we need to see critical actions in the next eight years. and we need action across the board. it is too late to say, you know, we need to do one thing or another. we need to see rapid transition to renewable energy, we need to see more protection of our forest, more replanting where we can. we need to see more sustainable diets. so, we need to see action across the board.
9:25 am
what sort of improvement do you think the transition to green jobs can bring, to green infrastructure? lots of people compare the quality ofjobs, the level of wages of traditionaljobs in traditional fuel. but if we move to green energy, other green related jobs, can that really deliver meaningful work, especially in lower income countries? i work, especially in lower income countries?— countries? i think what you are sa in: is countries? i think what you are saying is absolute _ countries? i think what you are saying is absolute critical. - countries? i think what you are | saying is absolute critical. what countries? i think what you are - saying is absolute critical. what we need to see is a just transition. that means high levels of investment, that means the $100 billion a year invested into exactly these areas. so, yes, green technology, green energy, green jobs, green growth, these are exciting areas and these are areas with growth and high impact in the future. so, ithink with growth and high impact in the future. so, i think the question is how to do that transition in a just way, so that the lowest income, the
9:26 am
poorest are not left behind. that is where it's going to be difficult. but actually, if we invest in green energy, for example, if we invest in healthy lifestyles, if we... professor, i'm sorry, i must interrupt you, as we have to say goodbye to our viewers on bbc world for the moment and we will be back with them very soon. professor elizabeth robinson, thank you very much for bearing with us. let's continue. sorry to interrupt you mid—flow, you are talking about the transition to green jobs, please continue. i transition to green “obs, please continue. ~' ., transition to green “obs, please continue. ~ ., ., continue. i think one of the important _ continue. i think one of the important things _ continue. i think one of the important things to - continue. i think one of the important things to think . continue. i think one of the - important things to think about is that this is a very positive change for society. that this is a very positive change forsociety. for that this is a very positive change for society. for example, if that this is a very positive change forsociety. for example, if we transition to cleaner energy, we are going to see a tremendous benefit in terms of reduction in air pollution. so, that is going to benefit the lowest income, the poorest. at the moment, about 7 million people are estimated, about 7 million deaths per year due to estimated, about 7 million deaths peryear due to air estimated, about 7 million deaths per year due to air pollution. we know the costs of inaction are very high, because of the impacts of climate change that we are already
9:27 am
feeling. so when we think of the costs of action, these are investments in healthier futures, these are investments and reducing inequality, whether that is within the country or across countries. i think we know we need to reduce emissions, we need to do that in a way that does not harm low—income countries. but it actually enables them to reduce poverty and increase prosperity, and increase health. professor, thank you very much for your time today. professor elizabeth robinson from the grantham institute. we can bring you some live pictures from just across the other side of the clyde, where world leaders are gathering. the uk prime minister borisjohnson, along with the secretary general of the united nations, tony gutierrez. around 120 leaders are here for the next two days of cop26, known as the leaders summit. we are going to be hearing
9:28 am
lots of speeches from those leaders later today. as we were reflecting at the beginning of the hour, boris johnson, as hosts, the uk wants to get a positive outcome, not a woolly declaration at the end of the two weeks of discussion. borisjohnson, striking a cautious, perhaps slightly gloomy note about the possibility of that, getting meaningful action towards keeping a cap on global warming, and that movement towards net zero, the balancing out between greenhouse gas emissions being released, and those being removed from the atmosphere, saying the world is at one minute to midnight. antonio guterres as well absolutely emphasising the urgency neededin absolutely emphasising the urgency needed in all of this. we are of course going to bring you all the key moments from this first day of the leaders summit here at cop26 on
9:29 am
bbc news, and bbc world, throughout the day. right now, let's look at the day. right now, let's look at the weather forecast with carol kirkwood. hello again. as we enter a new working week and, indeed, a new month, temperature—wise quite different this week compared to last week. it's going to be much cooler. today we've got a band of rain across parts of england and wales, turning more showery. and for many, the focus today is one of sunshine and showers. persistent rain across the north of scotland, and the gusty winds across the north and west easing, except for northern scotland. the top temperatures are 944 degrees. through this evening and overnight, they will be some clear skies. there will still be some showers, and it's still going to be wet and windy across the far north of scotland. but in sheltered parts of england, wales and south—east scotland, temperatures will fall away low enough for a touch of frost. so tomorrow it's going to be a chilly start the day. but many of us will start off with some sunshine. but you can see a fair
9:30 am
few showers, especially in northern and western areas. they can be heavy, with some thunder and hail. many of us will miss them. temperatures, 9—12 degrees. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: world leaders gather in glasgow for the cop26 climate change summit. its host, borisjohnson, warns humanity has run down the clock on climate change and says urgent action is needed. this is very, very urgent. notjust for our country, for the whole world. and if i had to give a comparison, i would say it was a one minute to midnight moment. and the clock is ticking. un scientists warn that extreme weather events are the new normal — and the past seven years are on course to be the hottest on record. but the leader of china — one of the world's biggest polluters — will not attend the summit in glasgow — president xi will address the conference
9:31 am
by a written statement instead. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. the future of the tottenham manager nuno espirito santo remains in the balance this morning afterjust 17 matches in charge. the club's chairman daniel levy held talks with the club's director of football yesterday following saturday's 3—0 home defeat to manchester united. he arrived at training this morning as usual. he was only appointed asjose mouirnho's successor four months ago, after the club gave up on several other candidates. it seems a long time ago that things weren't working out for david moyes at manchester united. now at west ham, his side strengthened their grip on fourth spot in the premier league with a 4—1win over ten—man aston villa and that came after they knocked manchester city out of the league cup. we'd done enough today. i am
9:32 am
thrilled but i think our performances could be better. i have told the players i think they can play better. we have played ten games and we are in a decent late position in their effort and what they have done is fantastic. they have been so good. we have got to keep it going. there will be an all—london women's fa cup final next month. arsenal will take on chelsea after beating brighton 3—0. after a tight first half, beth mead set up kim little for arsenal's opener, before scoring one herself. it'll be their first fa cup final appearance since they lost in the 2018 final to chelsea, who knocked out defending champions manchester city to make it through. england's women celebrated their biggest ever win over rugby union world champions new zealand and in doing so maintained their place at the top of the world rankings. 43 points to 12 it finished in exeter as they ran in seven tries, the last from player of the match zoe harrison. the black ferns were meant to be
9:33 am
hosting the world cup this month, pushed back because of covid, and reminded here of the challenge ahead if they're to retain their title. the sides meet again next weekend. we know in ourselves what we can do when we're firing. and i think we showed at times some real excellence, some real clinicalness. 0bviously, we'll celebrate that win. like you say, it's the highest points scored over new zealand that we've ever had. and you've got to enjoy these moments. two years ago we lost to new zealand, four years ago, we lost in the world cup final. so, you know, these moments are very precious. england will look to contiue their brilliant run at the t20 world cup this afternoon. they face sri lanka, having won all three of their games so far. india's hopes of making the semifinals hang by a thread after they lost to new zealand by 8 wickets. chasing 111, the black caps made it with more than 5 overs remaining. that's a second crushing defeat for the pre tournament favourites, who must beat
9:34 am
afghanistan on wednesday to have any chance of making the semifinals. over 50 olympic and paralympic athletes from more than a0 countries have recorded a message urging world leaders to show ambition and courage at the cop26 summit in glasgow. entitled dear leaders of the world the video is due to be shown to those attending the conference, and members of the public. jane dougall reports they are leaders of the wild duck a message designed to hit home. 0lympians like andy murray, tom daley and hannah cockroft have joined with global athletes to send this message. the environment has become a concern for many athletes, who see the impact first hand. double 0lympic who see the impact first hand. double olympic gold medallist hannah mel started campaigning after the rio 0lympics mel started campaigning after the rio olympics in 2016.— mel started campaigning after the rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much — rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much as _ rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much as rio _ rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much as rio had _ rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much as rio had in _ rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much as rio had in terms - rio olympics in 2016. nowhere struck me as much as rio had in terms of. me as much as rio had in terms of the pollution problem and there was
9:35 am
a number of reasons it was so stark and so apparent in rio and it got to me. ~ , , ., and so apparent in rio and it got to me. ~, ,. me. cop26 build stage discussions on how sort me. cop26 build stage discussions on how sport could _ me. cop26 build stage discussions on how sport could rest _ me. cop26 build stage discussions on how sport could rest its _ me. cop26 build stage discussions on how sport could rest its own - me. cop26 build stage discussions on how sport could rest its own carbon i how sport could rest its own carbon footprint. had i wanted to do more. a month ago she and melissa billson came up with the idea for the video. we were sat in a caf in poole and throwing some ideas around and we thought what could be more direct than a video with athletes speaking directly to world leaders to be shown just ahead of cop26 to say this is when we really need ambition and that is what we showed in the summer and that is what is really needed no. we have athletes from nearly 50 different countries and we have an athlete from saudi arabia, qatar, australia, the us, really important nations, every nation is important nations, every nation is important but these are really important but these are really important nations in this climate context, so i think it does feel like a real moment to have these
9:36 am
athletes come together and look at the camera and say this is what needs to happen. it the camera and say this is what needs to happen.— the camera and say this is what needsto hauen. , , ., , needs to happen. it gives us so many incredible moments _ needs to happen. it gives us so many incredible moments because - needs to happen. it gives us so manyj incredible moments because athletes dedicate themselves completely. we hope that sentiment balanced by global leaders to commit to preserving and protecting the planet. asign of a sign of how sports men and women are playing their part in the conference. that's all the sport for now. rail accident investigators are examining the scene of a collision between two trains in salisbury, which left 17 people needing hospital treatment. officials say the line could be closed for some time while inquiries continue. jon kay reports. one mile from the centre of salisbury. it was here, just before 7pm last night, that a great western railways train hit an object inside the fisherton tunnel. it's believed part
9:37 am
of the train derailed, knocking out the signalling. a few minutes later, a south western train, travelling from london to devon, collided with the first. just this massive impact and i fell across the table and then the table came off the wall, i ended up underneath another table. there was just suddenly a lot ofjostling, possessions being thrown around. i think a few people went forward and hit their heads. firefighters have carried out a thorough search i of the train carriages i and we've assisted with the evacuation of - approximately 100 people. we do not believe there i were any further casualties on board the train and we can confirm there are _ no fatalities. the more seriously injured passengers were taken to nearby hospitals. as well as one of the drivers who had to be freed from their train. the walking wounded were treated at a church close to the crash site. i could tell that some people were a little bit shaken and some obviously had some minor injuries
9:38 am
and i think probably theyjust appreciated a space to be able to pause, really, and to reflect on what had happened to them. after the initial emergency response, things will now move to the investigation phase. the question, what caused this sequence of events? what caused these trains to collide? and how will they be removed from the tunnel? one possibility is that heavy rain might have caused some kind of slippage onto the track. serious questions remain. but the overriding sense here is relief. this could've been much, much worse. jon kay, bbc news, salisbury. we can speak now to gareth dennis, who's a rail engineer and writer. good morning. iam good morning. i am assuming you are no clearer as to what happened then john or anybody else but this was clearly serious incident. what is
9:39 am
your first thought?— clearly serious incident. what is your first thought? absolutely. my first thought _ your first thought? absolutely. my first thought was _ your first thought? absolutely. my first thought was the _ your first thought? absolutely. my first thought was the same - your first thought? absolutely. my first thought was the same as - your first thought? absolutely. my i first thought was the same as anyone in the rail industry, as soon as you hear about a collision between two trains you fear the worst. we do not know how serious some of those injuries are but it sounds like they are not too serious and i am very grateful nobody has been seriously injured or worse. then the thoughts of what has happened or why has this happened? of what has happened or why has this ha ened? ~ ., ., of what has happened or why has this ha- -ened? ~ ., ., i. of what has happened or why has this hauened? ~ . ., ., , happened? what are your thoughts in terms of the — happened? what are your thoughts in terms of the first _ happened? what are your thoughts in terms of the first train? _ happened? what are your thoughts in terms of the first train? can - happened? what are your thoughts in terms of the first train? can we - happened? what are your thoughts in terms of the first train? can we say . terms of the first train? can we say for certain that it struck something on the track? hat for certain that it struck something on the track?— on the track? not really at this oint. on the track? not really at this point- the _ on the track? not really at this point. the official _ on the track? not really at this point. the official report - on the track? not really at this| point. the official report talked about something causing that train or part of that train to derail that i actually particularly given it is such a constraint site with the tunnel and the two tracks meeting it is very difficult to know what the sequence of events was. hopefully today or tomorrow we will have an official statement which will set out the chronology, the order, of what happened and what caused the
9:40 am
derailment, but what we can do is be aware of the increase in risk we have got. your piece alluded to landslides, the risk from debris falling onto the track as a result of, often as a result of extreme weather events. these are the sort of events happening more frequently. whether that is related to the shining is to be seen but we know we are dealing with an increasing number of these sorts of events because of climate change, more extreme weather events, more extreme rainfall, and in the summer more extreme droughts that increase the risk when you have damage the earthwork, so the soil around the railway can slip and cause a development. it is something we have to think about. $1150 development. it is something we have to think about.— to think about. also thinking about the second train _ to think about. also thinking about the second train at _ to think about. also thinking about the second train at the _ to think about. also thinking about the second train at the lack- to think about. also thinking about the second train at the lack of- the second train at the lack of warning given to that. rather than speaking about the specific case, if we speak more generally, in normal circumstances of the trendy rails how much warning is given to other
9:41 am
trains and how does that work? there are a few different _ trains and how does that work? there are a few different ways _ trains and how does that work? there are a few different ways in _ trains and how does that work? ii—ii” are a few different ways in which are a few different ways in which signalling systems monitor. if the signalling systems monitor. if the signalling equipment next to the track, cables, is damaged, meaning that... generally if signals feel they turn red immediately so that as a fail—safe but even if power is cut to the signals so they turn off and there is no light drivers are trained to treat that as a red light so if they are expecting to see green, amber or red and they do not see anything they tree that has read. there are other systems, if the driver has the ability to have control of the vehicle there is a pattern they can press that puts out a big beat and all of the drivers will apply the emergency brakes when they see that warming. there are a few systems available. why we have had this collision remains to be seen. i do not understand exactly but that has happened but it is worth reiterating that the signalling systems that protect our railway are generally fail—safe. irate
9:42 am
railway are generally fail-safe. we must railway are generally fail—safe. we must leave it there. really good to talk together. i want to bring you some live pictures from glasgow where world leaders are gathering. you can see the prime minister borisjohnson and he isjoined on the the prime minister borisjohnson and he is joined on the stage the prime minister borisjohnson and he isjoined on the stage by the prime minister borisjohnson and he is joined on the stage by antonio ca the secretary general of the united nations and they are welcoming other world leaders. coming to glasgow for the next two days. this is an opening ceremony which is hosted by borisjohnson to welcome them to the summit and the ceremony has been described as a significant, symbolic and impactful moment and throughout today and tomorrow all these world leaders will come together in glasgow to
9:43 am
give national statements and we will of course bring you all the key moments from the conference. the boss of barclastess staley has stepped down over an investigation by uk regulators into alleged links with the disgraced financier and sex offenderjeffrey epstein. a statement from the bank said it should be noted that the investigation makes no findings that mr staley saw, or was aware of, any of mr epstein's alleged crimes. epstein was first convicted and jailed for sex offences in 2008, then arrested again in 2019, and died in his cell two months later. mr staley has said that his relationship with epstein this ended in late 2015. let's get more on this from our business presenter, ben thompson. is good to see you. what is being
9:44 am
said by the bank? you is good to see you. what is being said by the bank?— said by the bank? you are quite riuht. said by the bank? you are quite right- that— said by the bank? you are quite right. that line _ said by the bank? you are quite right. that line from _ said by the bank? you are quite right. that line from the - said by the bank? you are quite right. that line from the bank i said by the bank? you are quitej right. that line from the bank is the most crucial part of the statement, suggesting that mr steely knew nothing of the offences. this comes out after an investigation by the bank of england and the financial regulator into the nature of that relationship which dates back many years to when he was the boss ofjpmorgan's bank and jeffrey epstein was a client. the bank very keen to point out that he knew nothing of the offences but they question the evidence that he gave to the bank and the regulator over the nature of that relationship. there are big questions because it is not the first time thatjes
9:45 am
staley has been in trouble. in 2018 he was fined £640,000, barclays was fined £15 million, over the pursuit of a whistle—blower within the bank it had raised some concerns about the running of barclays. then it was seen to be a major offence but it was given a reprieve and he was able to stay at the bank. now we are told in the light of this latest investigation he will leave the bank. we are told it is at his request. he has chosen to step down. he has not been fired but nonetheless he will receive 12 month stay which totals about 2.4 million, it will get a pension allowance of 120,000 pens and other benefits, so this marks the end of an era forjes staley at the bank. the market investors are not too thrilled. he was seen as a good force within the bank at restructuring and changing it and changing the investment bank
9:46 am
from the private retail banking division and delivering some good returns within the bank, but nonetheless it seems that this latest investigation is enough to prompt him to step down and he will leave with immediate effect and he will be replaced by a candidate who will be replaced by a candidate who will step up and there is clearly a lot for him to do. the bank pointing out thatjes staley do nothing of the offences ofjeffrey epstein. the foreign secretary, liz truss, has told the bbc that the uk is prepared to take legal action against the eu because of the row with france about fishing rights. ms truss said the french had behaved unfairly, and the uk would not roll over in the face of unwarranted threats. let's have a listen to what she said earlier on bbc breakfast.
9:47 am
france has made completely unacceptable threats to our fishermen and to the channel islands in terms of their energy supply and we need them to withdraw those threats. if they do not withdraw those threats we are prepared to use the dispute resolution mechanism in the dispute resolution mechanism in the trade deal we signed with the eu to take action against the french. they have behaved unfairly. the fishing licences were awarded entirely in accordance with the trade deal be negotiated and we need them to withdraw those and reasonable threats they have made. the final seven countries on the uk's red travel list have now this been removed. travellers arriving into england from any part of the world will no longer have to quarantine in a hotel. the transport secretary said the red list category will remain in place however as a "precautionary measure" and will be brought back if needed. we can speak now to danny callaghan, the chief executive of the latin american
9:48 am
travel association. iam assuming i am assuming you are welcome listeners because those latin american countries have stayed on the red list for a while. absolutely. you can imagine our frustration three or four weeks ago when the red list was reduced to seven countries and all seven were in or around latin america and there was a genuine concern they might just be stranded on that red list but what we have seen is really strong engagement from the latin american embassies with the uk, led by the pan— am ambassador and engagement from the government and they were truly hard together to overcome the outstanding issues and i am delighted to see the red list were just 20 countries. i am delighted to see the red list werejust 20 countries. what i am delighted to see the red list were just 20 countries. what were those outstanding _ were just 20 countries. what were those outstanding issues? - were just 20 countries. what were those outstanding issues? i - were just 20 countries. what were those outstanding issues? i am i those outstanding issues? i am wondering by the seven countries
9:49 am
were kept on as long as they were, was it low vaccination rates? ida. was it low vaccination rates? no, vaccination _ was it low vaccination rates? no, vaccination rates _ was it low vaccination rates? no, vaccination rates are _ was it low vaccination rates? lifr, vaccination rates are actually really good and much higher than many parts of the world. italy came down to the concern about the lack data about whether the vaccines negative are resilient to the variant but there was data in latin america and the sharing of that data are reassure the uk health authorities and that is why we were able to get the last seven of the list. ~ ., ., , able to get the last seven of the list. . . ., , ., , able to get the last seven of the list. . 'f~ able to get the last seven of the list. . . (w ., , list. what has the last 18 months been like for _ list. what has the last 18 months been like for your _ list. what has the last 18 months been like for your members? - list. what has the last 18 months| been like for your members? like eve one been like for your members? like everyone in _ been like for your members? like everyone in travel— been like for your members? l age: everyone in travel and tourism, pretty torrid. we have members based in the uk and in latin america so our uk members are the companies that sell holidays and a lot of those are latin american specialists so they only sell latin america and many of them have not sent a single client on holiday since march 2020 and our members in latin america who
9:50 am
fulfilled the trips, the same sort of thing. some have had a little bit of thing. some have had a little bit of tourism from north america, people who would normally have gone to europe, from north america, who have gone to latin america instead, so that is some business, but overall it has been a really, really tough time and it is very welcome opening for the region. irate tough time and it is very welcome opening for the region.— opening for the region. we must leave it there. _ i want to bring you some live pictures from the conference in glasgow. world leaders are gathering. the prime minister boris johnson their hosting the ceremony, this opening ceremony, where he has welcoming world leaders. you can also see him on stage with the un secretary general antonio guterres. they have been welcoming world
9:51 am
leaders during the course of the morning, around 120 of them there for the next two days, and taking place this afternoon as the first actual leaders event called action in solidarity the critical decade and that is where the leaders will hear the latest scientific reporting and examine that. we will of course bring you all the key moments from the conference. the oxford english dictionary has released its word of the year for 2021. past winners include youthquake, selfie, omnishambles and even a laughing emoji but this year's word is vax used as both the verb to vaccinate and the noun meaning vaccination. fiona mcpherson is the senior editor of the oxford english dictionary and shejoins me now.
9:52 am
why did vax stand out as this year's winner? irate why did vax stand out as this year's winner? ~ ., why did vax stand out as this year's winner? ~ . , ., . ., , winner? we have seen an increase in or words to — winner? we have seen an increase in or words to do _ winner? we have seen an increase in or words to do with _ winner? we have seen an increase in or words to do with vaccination - winner? we have seen an increase in or words to do with vaccination this l or words to do with vaccination this year but vax was a standout because up year but vax was a standout because up until the last year it was relatively rare used in our corpus and we have seen something like a 70 times increase over the last year. speaking as the lexicographer, we like the fact that it can be used in combination with other elements to make no words, —— a new word, so it stood out four hours is a word that could encompass lots of words in a single word. could encompass lots of words in a single word-— single word. there are lots of spin off words is _ single word. there are lots of spin off words is what _ single word. there are lots of spin off words is what saying? - single word. there are lots of spin off words is what saying? yeah, . single word. there are lots of spin j off words is what saying? yeah, in m “ob as off words is what saying? yeah, in my job as a _ off words is what saying? yeah, in my job as a language _ off words is what saying? yeah, in my job as a language researcher. off words is what saying? yeah, in i my job as a language researcher that myjob as a language researcher that is obviously always fascinating for
9:53 am
us and it is a further indicator that they word is significant. you are even seeing it and things like passport, vax hesitancy, so that is usually a good indicator that they were distilling a little bit more than just standing for the meaning vaccination or the verb to vax. it is actually quite an old word, isn't it? , ., , ., is actually quite an old word, isn't it? , ., ., , it? doing this “ob, all words, even what ou it? doing this job, all words, even what you think _ it? doing this job, all words, even what you think are _ it? doing this job, all words, even what you think are new, _ it? doing this job, all words, even what you think are new, tend - it? doing this job, all words, even what you think are new, tend to l it? doing this job, all words, even| what you think are new, tend to be older. it goes back as a name to at least the 1980s when it was short for the name of particular vaccines. the verb is a little bit more recent, going back to the net to thousands which is not that surprising either. it has a longer history than i think, certainly when we started our research, we would have thought. it we started our research, we would have thought-—
9:54 am
we started our research, we would have thought. it comes from a latin word. vaccinated _ have thought. it comes from a latin word. vaccinated vaccination - have thought. it comes from a latin word. vaccinated vaccination does l have thought. it comes from a latinl word. vaccinated vaccination does as well and it was _ word. vaccinated vaccination does as well and it was all _ word. vaccinated vaccination does as well and it was all to _ word. vaccinated vaccination does as well and it was all to do _ word. vaccinated vaccination does as well and it was all to do with - word. vaccinated vaccination does as well and it was all to do with the - well and it was all to do with the work done by vaccinating pioneers, i suppose, like edward jenner, and yes, it is to do with the latin for how. vax itself has a slightly different etymology and it is seen as being short for that, so it itself has not come from the latin but obviously it is all related because without vaccinate and vaccination you would not have had vax. i5 vaccination you would not have had vax. , ., ., , , vax. is the word vax being used around the _ vax. is the word vax being used around the world _ vax. is the word vax being used around the world are _ vax. is the word vax being used around the world are just - vax. is the word vax being used around the world are just in - vax. is the word vax being used around the world are just in thej vax. is the word vax being used - around the world are just in the uk? it is being used around the world. it is being used around the world. it is being used around the world. it is more common in north america and southeast asia and australia, so i think it has that global potential. it is especially bitter because it probably appeals the media commentators as well because it is short, punchy, the eggs at the
9:55 am
end is a bit more attention grabbing than longer variants. it is definitely being used around the world, notjust in the uk. hour definitely being used around the world, notjust in the uk. world, not 'ust in the uk. how do ou to world, notjust in the uk. how do you go about _ world, notjust in the uk. how do you go about choosing _ world, notjust in the uk. how do you go about choosing the - world, notjust in the uk. how do you go about choosing the words| world, notjust in the uk. how do l you go about choosing the words of the year? is it looking at bigger stage and how much that increased orders at more sophisticated than that? in orders at more sophisticated than that? ,., ._ , ., orders at more sophisticated than that? ., , ., that? in some ways that is quite a sophisticated _ that? in some ways that is quite a sophisticated process _ that? in some ways that is quite a sophisticated process because - that? in some ways that is quite a sophisticated process because we| that? in some ways that is quite a . sophisticated process because we are notjust sophisticated process because we are not just using sophisticated process because we are notjust using words that we like. it is about doing the language research and finding out which words we are seeing made a significant impact. there are lots of words that are used a lot during the year but because we have seen a conversation around the pandemic change towards, vaccines and vaccinations going from the idea being developed to the uptake and then all the processes it was obvious to us quite early on it was obvious to us quite early on it was probably going to be one of these types of words but because vax had seen such a significant impact
9:56 am
going from almost zero usage to a massive amount of usage around the world it was really about that. it says something about the last year and that will —— is what we are hoping the word of the year candle. let's leave you with these pictures from the capital of iceland, reyjkavik. a huge solar flare unleashed the green sparkling waves of the northern lights — known as the aurora borealis — onto the skies above iceland. just in time for halloween. this now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. this weekend is set to be blustery, windy at times, cool by day. the low
9:57 am
ressure windy at times, cool by day. the low pressure that _ windy at times, cool by day. the low pressure that brought _ windy at times, cool by day. the low pressure that brought all _ windy at times, cool by day. the low pressure that brought all the - windy at times, cool by day. the low pressure that brought all the heavy l pressure that brought all the heavy rain and strong winds yesterday, you can see it is still pretty windy especially in the north and west. we have this band of rain fragmenting a england and wales. persistent rain continuing across northern scotland. stronger winds prevailing as well. across northern ireland, north of the gun, when is easing through the afternoon and we are looking at sunshine and showers. same can be said for the rest of england and wales, sunshine and showers, some of then heavy with and thunder. temperatures today ten to 14 degrees. through this evening and overnight we see a return to some clear skies. also some showers. the rain persisting across the far north of scotland where it will be windy but when we have clear skies and shelter parts we could see temperatures low enough for a touch
9:58 am
of frost. it will be a chilly start to the day tomorrow but for many of us it is going to be a day of sunny spells and showers. a lot of the showers will be in the north and west. some of them will drift over towards the east as well and like today some of them could be heavy but by the end of the day we are looking at some of those turning wintry on hills and mountains in the north of scotland. enter wednesday we have a straight northerly which is going to make it feel cool but once again there will be a lot of dry weather, still some showers coming in on the exposed areas to the northerly wind and temperature seven to 13 degrees north to south. enter thirsty high pressure tries to build than from the atlantic. a northerly component but a lot of high weather with a bit work like moving on from the ras western sinking south through the course of the day. temperatures eight to 12. as we move on through friday and into saturday we hang on to high
9:59 am
pressure for a time. there will still be some showers around. it will be windy at times but sandy is looking more unsettled and windy.
10:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh, live in glasgow, where world leaders are gathering for the cop26 climate summit. as it begins, borisjohnson warns humanity has run down the clock on climate change and says urgent action is needed. this is very, very urgent. notjust for our country, for the whole world. and if i had to give a comparison, i would say it was a one minute to midnight moment. and the clock is ticking. un scientists warn that extreme weather events are the new normal — and the past seven years are on course to be the hottest on record. but the leader of china — the world's biggest polluter — will not attend the summit in glasgow — president xi
10:01 am
will address the conference by a written statement instead.

22 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on