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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 4, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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this is bbc news, the headlines more than a0 countries have promised to phase out coal power, at the cop26 glasgow climate conference. but china, india and the us — have not signed up. in britain, a conservative mp at the heart of a row over standards in public life has resigned. owen paterson was found to have broken lobbying rules. the government then tried to alter the disciplinary system, prompting a furious backlash. with millions trapped in an escalating conflict in ethiopia — a diplomatic effort is under way — to defuse the war. a us envoy is in the capital, and the us, eu and regional groups — have again called for a ceasefire. controversial rules to push tens of millions of american workers into getting vaccinated will come into effect from january. the mandates affect all healthcare workers and businesses with more than a— hundred employees.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the broadcaster, john stapleton and editor of the politics homes and the house magazine, kate proctor. let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages starting with many papers are leading on the departure of the tory mp owen paterson. the mail lays the blame at the prime minister's door — asking just who is in charge? the i newspaper also points a finger at the pm — saying it's been a day of "chaos" at number ten. another tricky read for boris johnson in the times — which reports on a party "backlash" saying that senior tories are questioning hisjudgement. the guardian says the conservative
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party is in crisis — with "furious" backbenchers claiming the party's handling of the issue has just been an "own goal". there is more on that theme in the splash in the metro — which manages a play on words around the name of the departing mp. for the ft the main story is that decision by the bank of england to keep interest rates unchanged. the express leads on the story about the new covid drug — saying the first doses could be given to patients "within days". and the mirror carries the sad news that the veteran entertainer lionel blair has died at the age of 92 so, let's begin. the times is usually pretty supportive of the government but even they apparently are reporting the levels of incense meant by tory mps and concerned about what is happening in the last couple of days. happening in the last couple of da 5. ., , ., ., .,
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days. compelled to vote for the government _ days. compelled to vote for the government plan _ days. compelled to vote for the government plan to _ days. compelled to vote for the government plan to dig - days. compelled to vote for the government plan to dig the, - days. compelled to vote for the - government plan to dig the, review the system — government plan to dig the, review the system by which mps allegedly broke _ the system by which mps allegedly broke the rules and should be scrutinised. only to find out the next _ scrutinised. only to find out the next day — scrutinised. only to find out the next day that the government have done a _ next day that the government have done a complete u—turn on this issue _ done a complete u—turn on this issue the _ done a complete u—turn on this issue. the nurse said to make both looked _ issue. the nurse said to make both looked stupid and corrupt and i suspect— looked stupid and corrupt and i suspect many of them against their better_ suspect many of them against their betterjudgment support the better judgment support the government betterjudgment support the government only to find out that they've — government only to find out that they've done a complete u—turn on they've done a complete u—turn on the issue — they've done a complete u—turn on the issue. and hardly surprising further— the issue. and hardly surprising further down in that. and also the approvals— further down in that. and also the approvals of dropped and it will be interesting to find out what they thihk_ interesting to find out what they think about the tory government as a consequence of this. it's been an monumental goal and communications disaster_ monumental goal and communications disaster all_ monumental goal and communications disaster all around and apparently, the prime — disaster all around and apparently, the prime minister was seething and he's the _ the prime minister was seething and he's the man in charge and given the
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0kfor— he's the man in charge and given the ok for stepan and i think mps were clear that _ ok for stepan and i think mps were clear that he owes them an apology. how damaging is it? what are you coming from conservative mps in particular? i coming from conservative mps in articular? ~ . coming from conservative mps in particular?— particular? i think that list of conservative _ particular? i think that list of conservative mps _ particular? i think that list of conservative mps have - particular? i think that list of l conservative mps have decided particular? i think that list of - conservative mps have decided not to vote but the government and stood firm and didn't want to do it, i'm thinking generally very loyal conservatives like yorkshire mps and the fact that they did not want to go down that path they stood up against their own party, i think she is a real sign of seriousness. and these are not serial rebels, some of these are not serial rebels, some of these people you would definitely describes loyalists and boris johnson has pushed so many of his own party to the absolute brink here and i think it is really serious for him and i think he flew back from the cop26 climate change summit and went straight to have dinner with
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the journalist and someone who has been described as someone who is a climate sceptic in the past and yes, his former boss. and then the next morning, it's all guns blazing and were going to try to bring up the standard situation. everything feels really rushed in really chaotic and if they were acted on the bit too soon, then it's on the prime minister because of the end of the day, he is the one who wanted to see this happen and maybe the timing has been confused but it all starts at mixed with him so this is all, these things can pass, but i do think in terms of borisjohnson�*s career, i do think this is a small tear in his armour. , .,
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do think this is a small tear in his armour. ,, ., , ., armour. staying in the house and sing there's _ armour. staying in the house and sing there's a _ armour. staying in the house and sing there's a phone _ armour. staying in the house and sing there's a phone in _ armour. staying in the house and sing there's a phone in the - armour. staying in the house and sing there's a phone in the tory l sing there's a phone in the tory lead but the conservatives regain their position quite quickly. this oll is their position quite quickly. this poll is really _ their position quite quickly. this poll is really close _ their position quite quickly. ti 3 poll is really close when they get one point behind the conservatives but i don't know, we will see. for a long period of time, even with some of the major issues that have been with the conservative party, they maintain the lead ahead. sol probably wouldn't read too much into that but it is interesting that labour, the conservatives have dropped and labour have picked up. and what, obviously people won't can't cast a vote in two years' time based on what happens now. but the chaos in downing street, the former head says the book was a very damaging moment and he was taken aback from the angry action from the public and media. the
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aback from the angry action from the public and media.— public and media. the question is wh on public and media. the question is why on earth _ public and media. the question is why on earth did _ public and media. the question is why on earth did they _ public and media. the question is why on earth did they do - public and media. the question is why on earth did they do this. - public and media. the question is| why on earth did they do this. how is this— why on earth did they do this. how is this going to work because quite happily. _ is this going to work because quite happily, they could've let this go ahead, _ happily, they could've let this go ahead, iet — happily, they could've let this go ahead, let it pass and they probably would've _ ahead, let it pass and they probably would've had to face a 30 day suspension and by election but in a few weeks' — suspension and by election but in a few weeks' time, this would've been .one few weeks' time, this would've been gone but _ few weeks' time, this would've been gone but instead of doing that, they decided _ gone but instead of doing that, they decided to— gone but instead of doing that, they decided to use this case as an excuse — decided to use this case as an excuse to— decided to use this case as an excuse to change the system under which _ excuse to change the system under which mps — excuse to change the system under which mps are scrutinised and that was never— which mps are scrutinised and that was never going to work because to do that, _ was never going to work because to do that, we — was never going to work because to do that, we would have to have all party _ do that, we would have to have all party support and i was never going to happen — party support and i was never going to happen. it was a huge misjudgment on the _ to happen. it was a huge misjudgment on the part— to happen. it was a huge misjudgment on the part of boris johnson. on the part of borisjohnson. and number_ on the part of borisjohnson. and number ten — on the part of borisjohnson. and number ten downing st paying the price for— number ten downing st paying the price for it — number ten downing st paying the price for it. notjust number ten downing st paying the price for it. not just from the public— price for it. not just from the public but _ price for it. not just from the public but from the room back bench and peace _ public but from the room back bench and peace. many of whom will have the stench — and peace. many of whom will have the stench of corruption and arrogance for quite a long time over this. ., ., ~' arrogance for quite a long time over this. ., ., 4' ., the front page of the mail. is anybody in charge at number ten. people often ask when these cases
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happen, it's notjust the prime minister but who was actually running downing street and various parties, always pride themselves of having a fantastic number ten operation and blame that when things go wrong. operation and blame that when things to mom. ., ., operation and blame that when things rowronu. ., ., ., ., operation and blame that when things ”owron. ., ., ., ., , go wrong. there are a lot of people who would try _ go wrong. there are a lot of people who would try to — go wrong. there are a lot of people who would try to push _ go wrong. there are a lot of people who would try to push this - go wrong. there are a lot of people who would try to push this through | who would try to push this through in time and so, of course there are advisers were also responsible for what is happened. advocate shows quite poorjudgment of the party mood and a poor understanding of how parliamentarians are feeling but you know, you can have all the advice in the world, if the prime minister has the world, if the prime minister has the political savvy to know when something is going to go down the glib balloon in a borisjohnson is described as being a very instinctive politician and it's really incredible that he got this
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one just so wrong because he really did look like a favour for a mate. was a trying to protect a friend who lost their wife under tragic circumstances and the rules with the complex, are they? he circumstances and the rules with the complex, are they?— complex, are they? he has lost his wife and has _ complex, are they? he has lost his wife and has gone _ complex, are they? he has lost his wife and has gone through - complex, are they? he has lost his wife and has gone through a - complex, are they? he has lost his wife and has gone through a lot - complex, are they? he has lost his wife and has gone through a lot of| wife and has gone through a lot of personal pain and has been given some very moving intervals and there was an inquiry into some of the activity that he was doing for quite activity that he was doing for quite a long time previous to her passing away and this lobbying was found to break rules. the rules that mps all signed up to, to abide by. so, it goes quite a bit further and i don't think anyone really would think that you can protect a friend in this way because itjust is a breach of the rules that you're supposed to stick baez and p. and i believe many mps
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in parliament do like him a lot but you still have rules to stick by and when they've been broken, you can't just write and barged in and try to move them around. find just write and barged in and try to move them around. and certainly not the case for — move them around. and certainly not the case for the _ move them around. and certainly not the case for the last _ move them around. and certainly not the case for the last few _ move them around. and certainly not the case for the last few weeks - move them around. and certainly not the case for the last few weeks and l the case for the last few weeks and months. _ the case for the last few weeks and months, the headline like that. the daily mail. — months, the headline like that. the daily mail, yesterday's headline was shambles. _ daily mail, yesterday's headline was shambles, shameless mps sinking into sleeves _ shambles, shameless mps sinking into sleeves again. for the daily mills headlines— sleeves again. for the daily mills headlines and inside, the whole of articles— headlines and inside, the whole of articles condemning the actions of the prime — articles condemning the actions of the prime minister and the way they did this _ the prime minister and the way they did this and they're taking a on this and — did this and they're taking a on this and let's not forget, yes, this poor— this and let's not forget, yes, this poor mama — this and let's not forget, yes, this poor mama through a terrible two years _ poor mama through a terrible two years he — poor mama through a terrible two years he lost his wife and the inquiry— years he lost his wife and the inquiry into his activities was allegedly one of the reasons why she took her— allegedly one of the reasons why she took her own life. a terrible time
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but at _ took her own life. a terrible time but at the — took her own life. a terrible time but at the end of the day, an independent committee, mps across the house. _ independent committee, mps across the house, members found out that he was guilty— the house, members found out that he was guilty of _ the house, members found out that he was guilty of breaching the rules on 14 different occasions but taking over 100,000 pounds a year of these companies _ over 100,000 pounds a year of these companies for five years. you can't let that _ companies for five years. you can't let that go — companies for five years. you can't let that go by without some kind of, you can _ let that go by without some kind of, you can expect that and have mps to say don't _ you can expect that and have mps to say don't worry about it, go away. that _ say don't worry about it, go away. that is _ say don't worry about it, go away. that is a _ say don't worry about it, go away. that is a very— say don't worry about it, go away. that is a very serious breach and undermining the democratic process. hardly— undermining the democratic process. hardly surprising that the papers said. _ hardly surprising that the papers said, papers like the daily mail that's— said, papers like the daily mail that's one _ said, papers like the daily mail that's one of the reasons why the government did that you turned this morning _ government did that you turned this morning. and government did that you turned this morninu. �* ., , ., morning. and there have been more critical headlines _ morning. and there have been more critical headlines from _ critical headlines from traditionally conservative press in recent times. but is it safe to do that if they're still supporting conservatives because we are 18
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months, a year off from this and things could change during the bye election and they have a lot of support. whether the newspapers feel comfortable overall supporting the government, there is room for the political, there is political space for them to still run critical headlines?— for them to still run critical headhnes? for them to still run critical headlines? ., , �* ., , headlines? fairpoint but i've really seen such a _ headlines? fairpoint but i've really seen such a volume _ headlines? fairpoint but i've really seen such a volume of— headlines? fairpoint but i've really seen such a volume of headlines i headlines? fairpoint but i've really i seen such a volume of headlines that hitherto— seen such a volume of headlines that hitherto supported the conservative party _ hitherto supported the conservative party and — hitherto supported the conservative party. and that was one of the reasons— party. and that was one of the reasons why we got up in the house this morning and i spoke he did. the chaotic— this morning and i spoke he did. the chaotic nature of the events of the past 24 _ chaotic nature of the events of the past 24 hours, watching this, will he found — past 24 hours, watching this, will he found out about this from a colleague _ he found out about this from a colleague in the bbc, he was going around _ colleague in the bbc, he was going around the supermarket and he goes and he _ around the supermarket and he goes and he says — around the supermarket and he goes and he says there's been this u—turn which _ and he says there's been this u—turn which effectively ditched him. that
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is astonishing. they didn't have the courtesy— is astonishing. they didn't have the courtesy to — is astonishing. they didn't have the courtesy to tell him about this before — courtesy to tell him about this before they announced it in the house — before they announced it in the house. �* . before they announced it in the house. �* , , , before they announced it in the house. �*, ., ., before they announced it in the house. �*, ,, ,,. ., ., ., house. there's less speculation over what's gone — house. there's less speculation over what's gone on _ house. there's less speculation over what's gone on the _ house. there's less speculation over what's gone on the last _ house. there's less speculation over what's gone on the last 24 _ house. there's less speculation over what's gone on the last 24 and - house. there's less speculation over what's gone on the last 24 and 48 i what's gone on the last 24 and 48 hours believe that there for now we're going to move on to the yorkshire post because they are talking about the racism scandal at yorkshire county cricket club which has escalated today, hasn't it? yes, the cricket club. — escalated today, hasn't it? yes, the cricket club, they _ escalated today, hasn't it? yes, the cricket club, they say _ escalated today, hasn't it? yes, the cricket club, they say that _ escalated today, hasn't it? yes, the cricket club, they say that it - escalated today, hasn't it? yes, the cricket club, they say that it had - cricket club, they say that it had been announced that they're going to been announced that they're going to be suspending international matches and this comes after the club lost sponsorship and major sports labels like nike and this is all to deal with recent scandals surrounding blair azeem rafiq who said that during his time there he had suffered incidents of racist abuse and an investigation by the club looked at this and found that
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someone would have been used but there was not any further action to take its that report in the decision not to take any further action that is seen this blow up into a really huge story but, for yorkshire cricket club, and the fact that they won't be able to host international matches, that is pretty severe sanction and it shows that there's quite a lot of work to do to get the cricket clubs house in order and come out and maybe be a bit more transparent about things or try to tackle some of these problems head—on. so, that is quite a punishment until they try to get things sorted out in more detail and i think a sister real shame for the region for cricket fans and for the people who want to enjoy the game and support yorkshire, they're not going to feel proud of their club right now and it's just not a good time for the sport and john, i would
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imagine we have more to say on this because you follow cricket much more. �* ., ., because you follow cricket much more. ., ., , , because you follow cricket much more. �* ., ., , , , more. i'm a football fan but this is a bi loss more. i'm a football fan but this is a big loss for _ more. i'm a football fan but this is a big loss for yorkshire _ more. i'm a football fan but this is a big loss for yorkshire cricket - a big loss for yorkshire cricket club _ a big loss for yorkshire cricket club and — a big loss for yorkshire cricket club and i_ a big loss for yorkshire cricket club and i know how the sponsor deal works— club and i know how the sponsor deal works when— club and i know how the sponsor deal works when they make a lot of money. the test _ works when they make a lot of money. the test matches in new zealand, i heard _ the test matches in new zealand, i heard it _ the test matches in new zealand, i heard it in _ the test matches in new zealand, i heard it in the piece this morning was around — heard it in the piece this morning was around £10 million, that's a lot of money— was around £10 million, that's a lot of money for a club to lose, not that— of money for a club to lose, not that many— of money for a club to lose, not that many people watch county cricket. — that many people watch county cricket, they go to test matches more _ cricket, they go to test matches more. county cricket brought them about _ more. county cricket brought them about 5 _ more. county cricket brought them about £3 million a year and test cricket — about £3 million a year and test cricket is — about £3 million a year and test cricket is £10 million. and unless they get— cricket is £10 million. and unless they get their act together, they won't _ they get their act together, they won't be — they get their act together, they won't be able to stage those matches. it's not definitive yet but it is looking that way and i have to say that _ it is looking that way and i have to say that cricket isn't the only sport— say that cricket isn't the only sport for— say that cricket isn't the only sport for this kind of thing goes on. sport for this kind of thing goes on this — sport for this kind of thing goes on. this endless evidence that
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similar— on. this endless evidence that similar incidents in football and any other— similar incidents in football and any other sports too and it sat in the standish that this continues to be a problem, especially for young people. _ be a problem, especially for young people, like you said your own son is playing — people, like you said your own son is playing cricket and a hope that some _ is playing cricket and a hope that some of— is playing cricket and a hope that some of his, and hope he never witnesses — some of his, and hope he never witnesses this kind of abuse. it�*s witnesses this kind of abuse. it's the witnesses this kind of abuse. it�*s the insidious subtle moments of racism that are still present in many areas of life. if i can just mention the photo on the telegraph who absolutely firmly denied allegations that he made a racist remark during a match in 2009. he wrote a whole piece on it saying that he doesn't remember saying these remarks at all.— these remarks at all. yes, categorically _ these remarks at all. yes, categorically denying - these remarks at all. yes, | categorically denying those allegations.
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moving to the ft. they focus on the interest rates being kept on hold by the bank of england, confounding the markets and the piece ends with people saying there's a degree of wariness about the bank england communications.— wariness about the bank england communications. well, the interest rates are going _ communications. well, the interest rates are going to _ communications. well, the interest rates are going to remain _ communications. well, the interest rates are going to remain at - communications. well, the interest rates are going to remain at this . rates are going to remain at this historic low at 0.1% and is an expectation that would rise and that is because with one measure that the bank of england can take to try and mitigate against him the impacts of rising inflation which is supposed to hit 5% by next spring, there was a huge amount of expectations that they would go up and the policy committee met and kept it at the same level, however the expectation is and they've kind of given out the sign that further down the track, you should expect a rate rise, it's just that were not doing it right
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now. and perhaps, that begs the question, when this rate rise does to men, would be a bigger leap than a smaller, more incremental one at the moment and what could impact will that have. it's confounded the markets, upset investors and it wasn't really the expected outcome today and personally, i am quite pleased, but...— today and personally, i am quite pleased, but... anyone was worried about borrowing. _ pleased, but... anyone was worried about borrowing. that _ pleased, but... anyone was worried about borrowing. that is _ pleased, but... anyone was worried about borrowing. that is my - pleased, but... anyone was worried about borrowing. that is my basic i about borrowing. that is my basic economic lesson for the night. john, very quickly, if you don't mind. can i ask you about lionel blair. he died at age 92 and i'm told that you knew him a bit these are the front pages. knew him a bit these are the front “aes. i, . ~' knew him a bit these are the front “aes. " ~::, pages. back in the 1960s allows local newspaper _ pages. back in the 1960s allows local newspaper reporter, - pages. back in the 1960s allows local newspaper reporter, i - pages. back in the 1960s allows| local newspaper reporter, i went pages. back in the 1960s allows . local newspaper reporter, i went to the studios — local newspaper reporter, i went to the studios on the weekend the recorded — the studios on the weekend the recorded entertainment shows and
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their showing them in a whole host of stars. _ their showing them in a whole host of stars, and i did feature on him and i_ of stars, and i did feature on him and i would — of stars, and i did feature on him and i would see genius, all the time — and i would see genius, all the time he — and i would see genius, all the time. he was absolutely lovely, full of wonderful anecdotes and he introduced me to all the stars in the show— introduced me to all the stars in the show and eve, what it what a guy _ the show and eve, what it what a guy a _ the show and eve, what it what a guy. a dancer, singer. urban all around — guy. a dancer, singer. urban all around and _ guy. a dancer, singer. urban all around and detain. mister entertainment. ? all—around entertainer. my condolences to his wife and _ entertainer. my condolences to his wife and family. that's it for the papers this tonight. my thanks to our reviewers tonight, john stapleton and kate proctor and of course to you for watching. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening. dojoin us then if you can. but for now, goodnight.
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good evening i'm tt and this is your sports news where we start with football. new tottenham manager antonio conte started his reign by overseeing a nervy 3—2 win at home to dutch side vitesse arnhem in the europa conference league. son heung min opened the scoring early on in a frenetic start as lucas moura also picked up a goal and the stadium was bouncing when a jacob rasmussen own goal went in with less than half an hour played it was turning into a night where records may be broken. but two goals from vitesse saw the teams head up the tunnel withjust the minimum gap separating them. after the break three red cards were handed out, two for the dutch after this one
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to tottenham's cristian romero for a second yellow but conte's side held on to move second in the group with two matches remaining. there were also four british clubs in europa league action tonight. david moyes's one thousandth match as a manager ended in a 2—2 draw in belgium. west ham fell behind to an early goal at genk, but fought back to lead with less than ten minutes to go thanks to two excellent strikes by said benrahma. but all their hard work was undone just five minutes later when tomas soucek found his own net. west ham top group h. leicester came from behind to draw 1—1 with spartak moscow. they equalised from ryan bertrand's corner — daniel amartey got on the end of an ayoze perez flick—on. jamie vardy missed a penalty with 15 minutes remaining and that result means they're third in group c. rangers needed substitute ianis hagi to secure them a precious point
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as they came from behind to draw one all against brondby in denmark. the result leaves the scottish champions third in group a behind sparta prague and they face the czech side next. celtic were 3—2 winners away to hungarian's ferencevaros in group g. after both sides traded early goals it wasjota who put the hoops ahead with this clinical finish and a third from 20 year old israeli international liel abada on the hour mark was enough to keep ange postecoglou's side in the hunt despite conceding a late second. bbc sport understands an agreement is close with eddie howe to succeed steve bruce as newcastle utd manager and its hoped he will be in charge for saturdays match at brighton. the magpies have been managerless since steve bruce parted company with the club just over two weeks ago. unai emery opted not to leave villareall and the former bournemouth manager is now favourite to take the job at st james's park.
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former england captain michael vaughan says he was named in yorkshire's azeem rafiq report but "totally denies any allegation of racism". an investigation found rafiq had been a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" while at the club. meanwhile sponsors and partners continue to cut their ties withthe county over their handling of the racism allegations. this afternoon harrogate spring water became the latest company to withdraw their sponsorship, while nike have said they will no longer be their kit supplier. yorkshire's board will meet tomorrow to discuss the fallout, having previously said it would take no disciplinary action against its employees, players or executives and has been called to give evidence to government ministers. it's been clear over the course of this investigation we have had concerns of the manner in which decisions have been made and it's very clear, given the conclusion of the investigation and subsequent action that has been taken in respect of disciplinary action to those implicated, it is very clear that
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there's been a lack of realisation of the seriousness of the issue and the implications for the wider games. again the board are compelled to take these actions. on to cricket and at the t20 men's world cup, australia are up to second in group 1 after a comfortable victory over bangladesh. looking to bounce back after their defeat to england at the weekend, aaron finch's side gave bangladesh no chance at all, bowling them out for just 73. adam zampa getting five wickets. finch then starred with the bat, top scoring with 40 off 20 balls to help them reach the target in just over six overs. they now go above south africa in the table and play the west indies in theirfinal match. and talking of west indies. they are out — their defence ended with defeat to sri lanka in abu dhabi. sri lanka set them a target of 190 and took regular wickets to stifle their chase, this stunning catch from bhanuka rajapaksa one of the highlights. despite shimron hetmyer�*s 80, which included a late flurry of sixes, the west indies ultimately fell 20 runs short.
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cameron norrie has lost in straight sets to the american taylor fritz in the paris masters. the world number 13 had been hoping to get through the third round, and qualify for the atp tour finals in turin — which is still mathematically possible, but 24 year old fritz was too strong for him. taking norrie 6—3 in the first set and then 7—6 in the second. so it's the american who advances to the quarter finals and will face the favourite novak djokovic. defending champion and world number onejudd trump eased through to the quarter—finals of the english open earlier this evening with a 4 frames to 1 win over scotland's ross muir. the 32 year old was in imperious form with this century in the 4th frame taking him to the brink and he finished the job shortly after to set up a last eight match with english compatriot mark king. and that's all the sport for now.
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hello there. after the rather chilly conditions of the last few days, things are going to feel a little bit different as we head towards the weekend. some milder weather in the forecast, but with that quite a lot of cloud feeding and from the west. and for some of us through the weekend there is some wet and windy weather on the way. this one front has been working its way south and east and is introducing more in the way of cloud, but also introducing a westerly wind, so that is bringing a milder feel. a milder start to friday for many. the coldest conditions down towards the south and the east where the skies have remained clear. and that's where we will see the best of any sunshine through the morning. for many other places there is going to be a lot of cloud. that cloud, at times, producing some spots of light rain and drizzle. especially over high ground in western scotland. we will hold onto a little bit of brightness at times
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across eastern scotland, northeast england, parts of east wales, the midlands and down towards the southeast. and the temperatures a little higher than they have been. double digits for almost all of us. ten to 13 degrees at best. as we head through friday night bonfire night of course, expect mild conditions. a lot of cloud, some spots of rain and drizzle, and then through the early hours of saturday expect some heavier rain starting to push and towards the western side of scotland. it will be quite a mild start to the weekend. seven, eight, nine, 10 degrees. but for saturday, well high pressure will hold on down towards the south, low pressure is pushing close to the north of the uk and this frontal system here will bring some outbreaks of quite heavy rain southwards and eastwards across scotland, and northern ireland. some of that rain eventually getting down into northwest england and north wales. ahead of that southern and eastern parts of england largely dry, but quite cloudy. brightening up eventually towards the northwest where it will also be turning very windy. but we stick with that milder theme. 12 to 14 degrees. now through saturday night as this area of low pressure passes close
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to northern scotland, notice the white lines, the isobars squeezing together. there will be a swathe of really strong winds. quite widely it will be windy, but wind gusts could get up to 70 mph. even a touch more in the most exposed spots in northern scotland. but for sunday, we can expect more in the way of sunshine. showers continuing in the far north where we keep a fairly brisk breeze. it will feel a little cooler by this stage, but still top temperatures of ten to 13 degrees.
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welcome to newsday — reporting live from singapore — i'm mariko oi. the headlines. consigning coal to history. more than 40 countries pledge to end its use — but major producers — including the us, india and china are not signed up. but could china also be the key to getting green technologies into less developed countries — quickly and cheaply? in britain, a conservative mp who broke lobbying rules resigns — following an angry backlash after the government sought to change the disciplinary system. owen paterson announced he was leaving what he called the "cruel world of politics". also on the programme.
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a year on from the start of the war in ethiopia,

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