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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 1, 2022 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the headlines. as england reports another record number of daily coronavirus cases — health officials warn the days ahead will be crucial as hospitalisations continue to rise. the government needs to make a difficult decision if it's can introduce restrictions. but if the number of hospitalisations keep going up at the rate that they are then you can see why they would need to change their mind. new year honours for leading figures in the battle against covid. professors chris whitty and jonathan van tam are knighted. drjenny harries and drjune raine are both made dames. darling, you don't need those, i am
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your mirror. how do i look? fabulous. it's absolutely fabulous forjoanna lumley who is made a dame, whilst the outgoing james bond — daniel craig — is made a cmg. in sport, husband and wife jason and laura kenny are made a knight and a dame for services to cycling. the president of south africa pays tribute to desmond tutu as "the spiritual father of our new nation" and the archbishop's daughter speaks movingly at his funeral. we say, thank you, daddy, for the many ways you showed us love, for the many times you challenged us, for the many times you comforted us. and today is officially the hottest new year's day on record — with temperatures reaching 16.2 degrees in st james�*s park in central london.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a senior health official has warned, that the "next few days are crucial," in the battle against the omicron variant of coronavirus. chris hopson, the chief executive of nhs providers, which represents health trusts, says the government "must be ready to introduce new restrictions — if they're needed." latest figures show hospital admissions in england, have risen to their highest level, since january last year. the health secretary, sajid javid, has warned new restrictions on freedom "must be an absolute last resort." here's our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. a new year and with it, the hope that in 2022 will draw us closer to the end of the pandemic.
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but once again, january is likely to see soaring infection rates. last night restrictions in some places and advice in others meant more subdued celebrations, but some were determined to celebrate. we have our boosters we've done our things, we followed the guidance. it is a funny one this year because we obviously want to stay safe but also in 15 years of living here i've never been and done the london fireworks so boris had a cheese and wine party so why can't i come and see the fireworks? come in and take a seat. some had resolved to get protected for the new year and went for boosters today. this is a third shot, booster, want to make sure that i got all the protection we can get meeting friends and family and living a normal life. the main priority right now is to keep everyone safe, keep spreading the awareness, please get vaccinated, it's so important. whether it is the first,
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second ghost or booster, and to look out for each other and protect one another. the health secretary is hoping vaccines will prevent the need for more restrictions and said additional measures would be a last resort. the debate about whether it is safe to mix or if we need more restrictions will continue but the question is, just how effective might those be? government commissioned modelling from warwick university suggest the window to suppress the peak may already have passed and that the last opportunity to introduce effective restrictions was a week ago, on boxing day. the number of patients in hospital with covid—i9 has increased by about 70% in a week according to nhs providers. they say it is too early to know how this wave will play out. if the evidence shows that we are getting very significant numbers of people coming into hospital with covid, then the government needs to be ready to introduce further
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restrictions at pace. what we are trying to balance this against is the fact that the vaccines have changed the rules of the game. with most days now bringing record numbers of infections and the virus spreads rapidly amongst us, the health secretary in england has warned of a big increase in hospitalisations this month, which is likely to test the limits of the nhs. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. dr bharat pankhania is a senior clinical lecturer at university of exeter medical school. clinical lecturer at university good clinical lecturer at university to have you with us. i hobson good to have you with us. chris hobson seems to be saying there is some time, maybejust hobson seems to be saying there is some time, maybe just a few days but some time, maybe just a few days but some time, maybe just a few days but some time to do something about the impact of omicron on the nhs. do you agree or do you think that particular horse is already left the stable? ~ ., ,., particular horse is already left the stable? ~ ., , ., ., stable? within reason i feel that -ulse stable? within reason i feel that ulse of stable? within reason i feel that pulse of infection _ stable? within reason i feel that pulse of infection that _ stable? within reason i feel that pulse of infection that are - stable? within reason i feel that pulse of infection that are going | stable? within reason i feel that l pulse of infection that are going to come our way has already occurred. because people will have been exposed and now they will be
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incubating it and in the next couple of weeks we will see that manifest as cases. having said that, prevention is always good. and we should nevertheless continue to stop further cases from arising. and that would be two mean good infection control measures like where your mask properly and be fully immunised.— mask properly and be fully immunised. �* , . ~ ., , immunised. let's talk a little bit more about _ immunised. let's talk a little bit more about where _ immunised. let's talk a little bit more about where we _ immunised. let's talk a little bit more about where we are - immunised. let's talk a little bit more about where we are at - immunised. let's talk a little bit more about where we are at on | immunised. let's talk a little bit i more about where we are at on the time lag between infections occurring and potential hospital admissions. as a potential, clearly hospital ambitions are at a very high level, what i'm talking specifically about covid, the early data on oma grant pointed towards being less severe than the delta variant. where are we on that time lag between infections and potential hospital admissions? lag between infections and potential hospitaladmissions? == lag between infections and potential hospital admissions?— hospital admissions? -- omicron. once we've _ hospital admissions? -- omicron. once we've seen _ hospital admissions? -- omicron. once we've seen the _ hospital admissions? -- omicron. once we've seen the pulse - hospital admissions? -- omicron. once we've seen the pulse of - once we've seen the pulse of infection there's usually a two to three week lag. before it manifests hospital admissions.
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three week lag. before it manifests hospitaladmissions. so three week lag. before it manifests hospital admissions. so the infections that are about to happen for the christmas festivities, we brace ourselves for a second, third week of january. once we are past the second or third week of january we will be in a better position to know if that big pulse has materialised in a hospital admissions or not. in materialised in a hospital admissions or not. in some ways that's a moot — admissions or not. in some ways that's a moot point _ admissions or not. in some ways that's a moot point because - admissions or not. in some ways that's a moot point because the | that's a moot point because the latest figures do show that hospital admissions in england have risen to the highest level since january of last year. i suppose the question then becomes, at what point can the nhs no longer cope? ifeel that the good people of the nhs, they are by nature co—burgers, they don't want to get to the point where it they say, "we cannot cope any longer to stop". with chris hobson talking about the government must be ready to introduce new restriction and the health secretary setting new restrictions must be introduced as a last resort, at what point do those
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two opinions meet? i last resort, at what point do those two opinions meet?— last resort, at what point do those two opinions meet? i think they are divergent, really. _ two opinions meet? i think they are divergent, really. if— two opinions meet? i think they are divergent, really. if we _ two opinions meet? i think they are divergent, really. if we were - two opinions meet? i think they are divergent, really. if we were to - divergent, really. if we were to prevent further cases from arising that would be a better thing for the national health service. because a national health service. because a national health service. because a national health services not only working at full capacity it is in trouble. the trouble is staff sickness and absences. so the staff absences have gone up dramatically in the last two weeks. furthermore, septic and back to work cannot do so safely because of shortages of pcr and testing. therefore now is the time to act to reduce the rising number of cases if we can do so. the government — number of cases if we can do so. the government is _ number of cases if we can do so. the government is trying to factor in other considerations, the economy, allowing people who have been fully vaccinated and so on and gone through their programme of being vaccinated to be able to go out and
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about and enjoy their life in a relatively normal way. so how do you balance these two things? you are coming from the scientific, the medical point of view, the government is looking at that plus many other perspectives. it's a difficult want to get the balance right, isn't it? difficult want to get the balance right. isn't it?— right, isn't it? whilst it appears difficult i always _ right, isn't it? whilst it appears difficult i always feel _ right, isn't it? whilst it appears difficult i always feel economyl right, isn't it? whilst it appears i difficult i always feel economy and health go together. and we can make it work but together. what we have to do is, wherever possible allow the infection control measures to come into play to reduce the rising number of cases. and for this it isn't really restrictions it is more better infection control measures. therefore, work from home when you can, where a better quality mask where you can, reduce your interactions in public places and get fully immunised was up all of those measures will reduce case numbers and it doesn't harm the economy in any way.—
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numbers and it doesn't harm the economy in any way. thank you very much for your— economy in any way. thank you very much for your thoughts _ economy in any way. thank you very much for your thoughts on _ economy in any way. thank you very much for your thoughts on all- economy in any way. thank you very much for your thoughts on all of - much for your thoughts on all of that this evening. well due to the holiday period, the government's latest coronavirus figures aren't complete and data for scotland, wales and northern ireland have not been published, but there were a record 162,572 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period in england alone, and 154 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. the metropolitan police has released the name of the fifteen year old boy who was killed in a park in south london on thursday evening. zeyean amarblay lina was stabbed in ashburton park in croydon on thursday evening. a 15—year—old boy who was arrested on suspicion of murder has been released on bail.
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a deliberately modest state funeral has taken place in south africa for one of the heroes of the struggle against apartheid, archbishop desmond tutu. speaking during the ceremony in cape town, the south african president — cyril ramaphosa — described desemond tutu as the "spiritual father" of the nation. from cape town our correspondent nomsa maseko reports. family friends and politicians bidding farewell to a man who became one of the most important voices of the 20 first century. this was a final sendoff for archbishop desmond tutu following a week of events to honour him. speakers shared memories of the anglican priest who did all he could to expose and to heal the wounds of south africa's brutal past. wounds of south africa's brutal ast. ~., , .,
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wounds of south africa's brutal ast. , ., . past. many of the message received has said, thank _ past. many of the message received has said, thank you _ past. many of the message received has said, thank you for _ past. many of the message received has said, thank you for sharing - past. many of the message received has said, thank you for sharing him | has said, thank you for sharing him with the world. well, it actually is a two way st because we shared him with the world you shared part of the love you held for him with us. south africa's president delivered the main eulogy.— south africa's president delivered themaineulo: . ~. ,, ,, ., the main eulogy. archbishop desmond tutu has been — the main eulogy. archbishop desmond tutu has been our _ the main eulogy. archbishop desmond tutu has been our moral— the main eulogy. archbishop desmond tutu has been our moral compass - the main eulogy. archbishop desmond tutu has been our moral compass but| tutu has been our moral compass but he's also _ tutu has been our moral compass but he's also been our national conscience. it he's also been our national conscience-— he's also been our national conscience. . , ,, ., conscience. it was during south africa's long — conscience. it was during south africa's long and _ conscience. it was during south africa's long and violent - conscience. it was during south | africa's long and violent struggle against the countries brutal regime that he rose to prominence. we will be free! after the country became a democracy he presided over the tumultuous reconciliation process. in accordance with his wishes the archbishop will be acclimated, this is a green alternative to cremation.
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his ashes will be interned beneath the floor at st. george's cathedral. it's the end of it in error, the last of south africa's well—known freedom fighters leaves behind a difficult task of the leaders to rid the country of corruption and racial divisions. and to also forge the way forward in the spirit of the moral compass that many believed was a driving force to desmond to choose leadership. the archbishop of canterbury has urged people today not to despair when it comes to climate change. justin welby, who's head of the worldwide anglican communion, has used his new year's message to reflect on the challenges the issue creates but also the work being done to help solve the problem. new customs rules on goods imported into the uk from the european union have come into force. there will be border checks, and importers will have to make
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a full customs declaration. the checks had been due to take affect six months ago but were delayed because businesses said they needed more time to prepare. in france a new law banning plastic packaging on most fruit and vegetables comes into effect in france today. cucumbers, lemons and oranges are among the 30 varieties banned from being wrapped in plastic. larger packs as well as chopped or processed fruit will be exempt. it's almost a quarter past seven. the latest headlines on bbc news... as england reports another record number of daily coronavirus cases — health officials warn the days ahead will be crucial as hospitalisations continue to rise. new year honours for leading figures in the battle against covid. professors chris whitty and jonathan van tam are knighted. drjenny harries and drjune raine are both made dames. the president of south africa pays tribute to desmond tutu as "the spiritual father
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of our new nation". and the archbishop's daughter also spoke movingly at his funeral. the uk government's chief medical adviser, professor chris whitty, has thanked his fellow scientists and nhs workers — after receiving a knighthood in the new year honours. he said they had worked tirelessly to serve the public. around a fifth of those recognised have been involved in the fight against covid — including england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, who is also knighted. here's our correspondent lizo mzimba. if everything is lighted to for
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england's chief deputy man medical adviser. , ., , , england's chief deputy man medical adviser. g . , , , �*, adviser. joanna lumley says she's stunned to _ adviser. joanna lumley says she's stunned to be _ adviser. joanna lumley says she's stunned to be made _ adviser. joanna lumley says she's stunned to be made again. - adviser. joanna lumley says she's - stunned to be made again. patterson- 47. i'll stunned to be made again. patterson- 47- i'll sue! — stunned to be made again. patterson- 47. m sue! and — stunned to be made again. patterson- 47. i'll sue! and for _ stunned to be made again. patterson- 47. i'll sue! and for her _ 47. i'll sue! and for her campaigning _ 47. i'll sue! and for her campaigning work. - 47. i'll sue! and for her i campaigning work. when i 47. i'll sue! and for her - campaigning work. when i saw 47. i'll sue! and for her _ campaigning work. when i saw that sentence saying — campaigning work. when i saw that sentence saying dbe _ campaigning work. when i saw that sentence saying dbe i _ campaigning work. when i saw that sentence saying dbe i burst - sentence saying dbe i burst into tears. it was extraordinary shock, it was such a shock i put my head in my hands and sobbed like a baby. but i thought, how is this happen is it a mistake? iwas i thought, how is this happen is it a mistake? i was completely thrown but i'm thrilled to bits.— but i'm thrilled to bits. james bond actor daniel— but i'm thrilled to bits. james bond actor daniel craig _ but i'm thrilled to bits. james bond actor daniel craig has _ but i'm thrilled to bits. james bond actor daniel craig has been - but i'm thrilled to bits. james bond actor daniel craig has been made i but i'm thrilled to bits. james bond actor daniel craig has been made a| actor daniel craig has been made a cmg. the same honour held by the fictional spy. figs cmg. the same honour held by the fictional spy-— cmg. the same honour held by the fictional spy. as the world watch on another back _ fictional spy. as the world watch on another back live _ fictional spy. as the world watch on another back live gone... _ fictional spy. as the world watch on another back live gone... from i another back live gone... from district diversity _ another back live gone... from district diversity says _ another back live gone... from district diversity says he's i another back live gone... h...” district diversity says he's humbled and proud to become in mbe. black lives matter. jason kenny take the title! several olympians have been
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honoured including jason kenny and laura kennedy, they are thought to be the first couple ever to receive a knighthood and a demoed at the same time. a knighthood and a demoed at the same time-— a knighthood and a demoed at the same time. ~ , my a knighthood and a demoed at the same time. ~ , . ., same time. were very lucky we get to share our careers _ same time. were very lucky we get to share our careers together _ same time. were very lucky we get to share our careers together anyway i same time. were very lucky we get to share our careers together anyway so | share our careers together anyway so yeah, to get to share the honour is very special. yeah, to get to share the honour is very special-— very special. when i opened it, we were together. — very special. when i opened it, we were together, i _ very special. when i opened it, we were together, i was _ very special. when i opened it, we were together, i wasjust - very special. when i opened it, we were together, i wasjust like i were together, i wasjust like because _ were together, i wasjust like because you just never in your childhood _ because you just never in your childhood dreams think you're going to be a _ childhood dreams think you're going to be a game or a server. tom childhood dreams think you're going to be a game or a server.— to be a game or a server. tom daly becomes in — to be a game or a server. tom daly becomes in obe _ to be a game or a server. tom daly becomes in obe for _ to be a game or a server. tom daly becomes in obe for his _ to be a game or a server. tom daly becomes in obe for his diving i to be a game or a server. tom daly becomes in obe for his diving and i becomes in obe for his diving and his work on lgbtq plus rights. swimmer adam beattie has also been made in obe. successful parent olympians recognise including jody conti who becomes a cbe and katina cox is been made in obe. and us open tennis star emma raducanu says she's proud and grateful to be made in
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mbe. separately from the main new year honours, buckingham palace has announced that tony blair will receive a knighthood from the order of the garter, in appointment within the gift of the queen. most of those being honoured are in the public eyes of the people like young fundraiser tobias who was raised over £150,000 from a series of walking and cycling challenges. i never thought in my wildest dreams that i'd get an appointment from the queen. i'm so excited. i'm actually gonna get to meet her. 11-year-old tobias who — gonna get to meet her. 11-year-old tobias who receives _ gonna get to meet her. 11-year-old tobias who receives the _ gonna get to meet her. 11-year-old tobias who receives the british i tobias who receives the british empire metal is thought to be the youngest ever recipient of the honour. separately from the main new year honours list, the former prime minister, tony blair, said he was "deeply grateful" to the queen after he was appointed a knight companion of the most noble order of the garter. this is the oldest and most senior british order of chivalry. joining him, as the first black
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member of the order, is lady amos — who served in his cabinet. our political correspondent chris mason gave us some background to the title of knight companion of the most noble order of the garter which has been awarded to tony blair. there is a kind of souped up, turbo—charge knighthood. we get this water fall of the alphabet on days like this with the honours and announcements. cbe, obm, obe, b em, you name it. and then there's this additional category which is separate and the direct gift of the queen, as you imagine, tony blair becoming a knight companion of the most noble order of the garter. this is existed since 1348 when edward the third was around. and his idea was to have disassembly of aristocratic blokes, they were both of those things and only those things at the time. to kind of advise him. since then it is moulded into something that is meant to mark the most distinguished public
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service. there are very few of them at anyone time. a maximum of 24 and you hold the title other than the exceptional circumstances until their death. there now 21 occupants given the rise of tony blair and baroness amos was up every other get was for something of a shoe ending at windsor castle and involves them wearing a lot of velvet and indeed some ostrich feathers. they proceed through windsor and they have a lunch as well yes, it is the most senior title that can be offered by the queen. former prime minister tony blair having to wait 15 years almost sense standing down in 2007. his predecessors did have to wait around eight years. often people are kept waiting although few as long as tony blair. now, park lane stables is a facility in london which helps children with disabilities.
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2021 was a year full of ups and downs — starting with it being under threat of closure, only to survive after a huge fundraising effort led by natalie o'rourke. all all her hard work has now been acknowledged with an mbe. fiona lamdin has been to see natalie and herfamily. guy's, i have got something to tell you. i have got this letter, and i can't quite believe i'm saying this, but i have got a special award from the queen. are you proud of mummy? yes. do you want to have a look at the letter? yes. there you go. it has been quite some yearfor natalie and the stables she has saved. an mbe from the queen for her outstanding service to the community. is it good?
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good, yes. she is kind and she is caring - and she doesn't get angry too much. thrilled, thrilled. she has had a hell of a year, as most people have, of course, but apart from nearly losing the stables, all the work she has done with the disadvantaged has been rewarding and i am so proud. but a year ago, things looked very, very different. but now the landlord wants to sell up, so the community has only one week left to raise £1 million. they are desperate for any help. 350 disabled people are relying on us, so i absolutely have to do it for them. we all want the best _ for our children, but when you get some one like dominic, - just seeing the joy and what that activity can give him, i like nothing else can do, that's why it is so important. there are big smiles at the stables. what a difference of 24 hours makes!
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all day, the moneyjust kept coming in, by phone, in person, and online. thank you so much. that is so kind of you. they had just seven days to raise the rest of the money, and unbelievably, by mid morning they had done it. so i've got something to tell you. i got this letter, and i have got an award from the queen. in the new year's honours. so when you got the letter and you opened it up, what was your first reaction? well, to be honest, i thought it was may be a joke. i thought it might be a wind up from one of my friends, so i called the number on the letter to check that it was real because i couldn't actually believe it. and then when you realised it wasn't a joke? ijust feel really proud,
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i feel really humbled. i'm a very, very ordinary girl from birmingham. i feel like there's always an invisible army of people behind me, supporting me, and really they should all have it as well, and we should all go to the palace. with an award from the queen, and the stables now theres for ever, 2022 is certainly getting off to an incredible start. well deserved, natalie. a runner who set himself the challenge to run at least 5 kilometres every day for a year to raise awareness of knife crime has completed his mission. david fitzgerald — who's from liverpool — was inspired to do it after a family friend was stabbed to death in 2017. samantha nanda reports. david has run almost 2500 kilometres. that is more than 1500 miles over
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the last 365 days, with no days off. it has been amazing, a hell of a journey that i have been on. the highlight was running with jamie carragher, one of my heroes. every type of weather you can think of. snow, rain, storms. christmas day? yes, it was really good and i deserved my christmas dinner afterwards. he started his running challenge after hearing adam ellison's family talk about the devastating impact of knife crime. adam was fatally stabbed in the neck in 2017, and a foundation was set up in his memory. just so proud of him and what he is doing. he really is wonderful. in all weathers, he has been ill as well and still gone out. i am just so pleased that he is on with us, our adam foundation. we are in awe. it takes some doing, you know? you think, "could i do something like that? i no." he's amazing, what he has achieved over the last 365 days.
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we are super, super proud of him. there is still more to do because it is still happening in this city and other cities around the country, so there's still a lot of work to do. it's been four years since adam was killed, and all his family want for 2022 is to find those responsible. no—one should be taking a knife out with them. it needs to stop. it has taken too many innocent lives and they are still out there. we need justice for adam. well done, daddy! what are you going to do after this? either rest on the couch, orjust keep going and try to get to 500 or 1000. today is officially the hottest new year's day on record. the met office say temperatures have reached 16.2 degrees in stjames's park in central london. the previous record was set in bude,
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cornwall in 1916 when it reached 15.6 celcius. they've also confirmed that scotland has just recorded its hottest new years day temperature. achnagart hit 15.9c this morning — breaking the pervious record of 14.5c at inverurie from 1992. let's get the lastest weather now with ben rich. hello there. the warmest new year's eve on record has been followed provisionally by the warmest new year's day on record with temperatures in the capital hitting above 16 celsius. all because we've had a feed of southerly winds bringing some very, very warm air in our direction. those southerly winds are up and around this area of low pressure which has brought some very windy weather today across the northwest of the uk. the wind direction shifts subtly as we get into tomorrow. we lose the southerly winds and pick up the westerly winds. that will start to cool things off a little.
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a slightly cooler night tonight than last night was. we will see clear spells but some hefty downpours of rain also pushing in from the west. the winds easing a little across those northwestern parts but it will stay quite blustery and temperatures between six and 12 degrees. still very, very mild just not quite as mild as it has been. into sunday this lump of wet weather will clear away then we will see some sunshine and then more rain swing across wales, the southwest of england towards the midlands, parts of northwest england. also showers into northern ireland and scotland with some sunny spells in between. top temperatures yes, down a little bit on where they have been today, nine to 13 degrees. that is a process that will continue. as we go through sunday night you can see further showers potentially longer showers at time some clear spells and staying quite blustery. low pressure still firmly in charge of our weather for monday.
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a couple of frontal system to talk about, this one down towards the south threatens to bring some outbreaks of rain to potentially some quite strong winds towards the general islands, may be england as well. this frontal system will bring southwards northern island into northern england and behind us we start to see a more significant change in the feel of the weather. just five or six degrees in northern scotland on monday afternoon. 11 or 12 further south. as we move out of money into tuesday, we all get into this northerly wind and some much, much colder air. low pressure still close by and it is likely that that will feed some wintry showers into northern parts especially on quite a brisk wind. the forecast for the coming week is a significantly colder won, although temperatures are only going back to where they should be for this of year.
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this is bbc news, the headlines. as england reports another record number of daily coronavirus cases — health officials warn the days ahead will be crucial as hospitalisations continue to rise. the government needs to make a difficult decision if it's can introduce restrictions. but if the number of hospitalisations keep going up
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at the rate that they are then you can see why they would need

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