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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 2, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with luxmy gopal and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: masks return to classrooms in england. secondary pupils are told to wear face—coverings during lessons to help keep schools open. fears a quarter of workers could be off due to covid — as firms are warned to make contingency plans. can anyone stop manchester city? they're 11 points clear at the top of the premier league after a stoppage time winner at arsenal. and coming to a cinema near you — the latest recruits training to be stunt performers.
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good morning. day two of the new year starts off mild once again fabrizi with a greater chance of a few sharp showers developing today. i will have all the details coming up i will have all the details coming up shortly. it's sunday january 2. our main story. secondary school pupils in england are being told to wear face coverings in classrooms, as they start a new school term. the guidance brings england in line with scotland, wales and northern ireland and is part of a range of measures designed to stop rising covid cases from disrupting education — as james reynolds reports. since march 2020 getting an education has become an obstacle course of home learning, missed exams and regular covid tests. older pupils and are now used to wearing masks and communal areas in schools.
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now the government recommends the pupils in years seven and above their masks on and they are in class as well. removal be reviewed in late january. and then there is the air. taking a deep breath is the kind of thing you need to do before an exam but it is hard to do safely in a poorly ventilated classroom. in order to clear the air than the government is rolling out a further 7000 purifiers. the government is talking to us in trying to work out how to get some support into schools now. we how to get some support into schools now. ~ . , how to get some support into schools now. ~ ., , ., how to get some support into schools now. ~ . , ,., ., ., now. we are disappointed that we are havin: the now. we are disappointed that we are having the conversation _ now. we are disappointed that we are having the conversation this - now. we are disappointed that we are having the conversation this side - now. we are disappointed that we are having the conversation this side of i having the conversation this side of christmas one we could have been making these arrangements earlier on. ., , making these arrangements earlier on. ., _ , ., , making these arrangements earlier on. ., ., , ., on. the government says it wants to minimise disruption _ on. the government says it wants to minimise disruption and _ on. the government says it wants to minimise disruption and keep - on. the government says it wants to minimise disruption and keep pupils| minimise disruption and keep pupils in class but unions warned that if large numbers of teachers get sick or have to quarantine, some classes may have to be sent home for short periods of time. "robust contingency plans" are being developed by government
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ministers, amid warnings that a quarter of public sector workers could soon be off work because of covid. rising case numbers have led to large numbers of employees self—isolating — with absences particularly affecting the nhs and the transport industry. our business correspondent katie prescott has more details. cancelled trains, delayed deliveries, closed restaurants and shut up shop. staff shortages because of the threat of omicron are a real worry in the new year as people return to work after the christmas break. i people return to work after the christmas break.— people return to work after the christmas break. i think it makes sense to try _ christmas break. i think it makes sense to try to — christmas break. i think it makes sense to try to plan _ christmas break. i think it makes sense to try to plan for _ christmas break. i think it makes sense to try to plan for such - sense to try to plan for such events. we know we have a very contagious variant in the uk and we know that many people are catching the virus and naturally there will be absences throughout or businesses, really, the biggest challenge will be on the supply change to make sure that that is still running at the efficiency we are used to.
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still running at the efficiency we are used te— still running at the efficiency we are used to. ~ , , ., are used to. ministers are looking at 'ust are used to. ministers are looking atjust how _ are used to. ministers are looking at just how bad — are used to. ministers are looking atjust how bad things _ are used to. ministers are looking atjust how bad things could - are used to. ministers are looking atjust how bad things could get l are used to. ministers are looking i atjust how bad things could get and drawing up contingency plans to try and protect against any disruption from rising infection. to try and keep school gates open as well as hospitals and other vital services in the public sector, leaders have been asked to look at the worst—case scenarios of having ten, 20 or even 25% of their staff off at any one time. laboursays 25% of their staff off at any one time. labour says that this announcement shows the government is leaving contingency planning to the very last moment. most recent restrictions in england, set out in the government's plan b earlier in december are expected to be reviewed this week. police are appealing for information, after a man was shot in the stomach in liverpool last night. the incident happened in the car park of the netherton pub in litherland just after 7pm and the 33—year—old victim is said to be in a serious condition. merseyside police say they believe
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the shooting was targeted. ajudge in the united states has thrown out prince andrew's attempt to halt proceedings in a civil lawsuit against him. the duke of york's lawyers had argued that virginia giuffre — who has accused him of sexually assaulting her when she was prince andrew has consistently denied the allegations. aruna iyengar has this report. seen here at the age of 17, virginia roberts, now giuffre, with prince andrew on the left. she has accused prince andrew of sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager at the homes ofjeffrey epstein, the convicted child sex offender and ms maxwell. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegations. the civil lawsuit seeks unspecified damages. two efforts to stall the case were blocked on saturday. us federaljudge lewis a kaplan told
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the lawyers for the prince that they must hand over key legal documents before a crucial court hearing in new york on tuesday. he also rejected arguments by the princes lawyer that the lawsuit should be dismissed because giuffre, a us citizen, no longer lives in the us. this comes after maxwell was convicted this week of trafficking young girls. on tuesday, judge kaplan will hear oral arguments to decide whether giuffre's lawsuit against prince andrew will proceed. twenty conservative mps and peers have called on the prime minister to tackle the spiralling cost of living. five former ministers are among the signatories of a letter to the sunday telegraph, which follows huge increases in wholesale gas prices. our political correspondent chris mason reports.
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wholesale gas and electricity prices are rising steeply. the boss of one energy firm is predict king an enormous crisis this year as a consequence. and now, 20 tory parliamentarians are expressing their concerns as well. the letter has been organised by what is called the net zero scrutiny group of conservatives which keeps an eye on the consequences of the government's environmental commitments. we hardly need to point out that high energy prices, whetherfor need to point out that high energy prices, whether for domestic heating orfor prices, whether for domestic heating or for domestic transport have felt most painfully by the lowest paid, the letter says. the government's meeting energy firms and the regulator regularly to work out how to help consumers. this will be, without question, one of the government's most pressing problems in the early weeks and months of the new year. three people are missing and presumed dead,
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after a devastating wildfire in the us state of colorado. the blaze swept through several towns on thursday, destroying hundreds of homes and forcing tens of thousands of people to flee. snowfall helped to bring the fire under control, but is also now hampering the rescue mission. twenty—one people have been rescued after becoming trapped overnight in mountain tram cars, in albuquerque, new mexico. the tramway was stopped because severe ice was affecting the emergency cable. the stranded passengers were eventually rescued after the cars were lowered using a rope system and then evacuated via helicopter. yesterday we told you about max woosey, the 12—year—old boy whose spend 640 nights sleeping in a tent in the garden — raising enough money to hire 16 extra nurses for his local hospice. max was awarded the british empire medal in the new year honours after raising over half a million. well one of max's heroes, rugby legend jonny wilkinson, heard about his amazing efforts and has sent us this message
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just for max. let's take a look. ijust want i just want to say a massive congratulations for being awarded the british empire medalfor everything you have achieved and for being the inspiring person that you are. you have shown us all what can be possible when you follow your passion and that desire to make a difference and you see it through with such immense commitment and dedication. just incredible. good on you, my friend. take care and looking forward to what is next for you. at looking forward to what is next for 0“. �* , looking forward to what is next for ou. ~ , ., ., looking forward to what is next for ou. ~ ., ., ., , you. a message from one of his heroes! max — you. a message from one of his heroes! max said _ you. a message from one of his heroes! max said he _ you. a message from one of his heroes! max said he raised - you. a message from one of his - heroes! max said he raised 680,000 ounds, it heroes! max said he raised 680,000 pounds. it was _ heroes! max said he raised 680,000 pounds, it was undeterred, - heroes! max said he raised 680,000 pounds, it was undeterred, he - heroes! max said he raised 680,000 pounds, it was undeterred, he was . pounds, it was undeterred, he was going to spend even more time out there. no plans to sleep indoors. good on him. ten minutes past six, something entertaining now for sunday morning. when you think of a stunt performer you probably imagine someone jumping
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off tall buildings or taking part in a high—speed car chase. but to make it in the industry, first you have to pass a series of gruelling tests. our reporter talia slack has been to meet a group of aspiring stuntmen during a training session. what do a free runner, personal trainer and a tick—tock star all have in common? trainer and a tick-tock star all have in common?— trainer and a tick-tock star all have in common? let's do the stuntmen _ have in common? let's do the stuntman thing. _ have in common? let's do the stuntman thing. i— have in common? let's do the stuntman thing. i will- have in common? let's do the stuntman thing. i will do - have in common? let's do the | stuntman thing. i will do diving have in common? let's do the i stuntman thing. i will do diving in heels any day- — stuntman thing. i will do diving in heels any day. chuck— stuntman thing. i will do diving in heels any day. chuck a _ stuntman thing. i will do diving in heels any day. chuck a stiletto i stuntman thing. i will do diving in heels any day. chuck a stiletto on me and _ heels any day. chuck a stiletto on me and i— heels any day. chuck a stiletto on me and i will do any of the sports and stunts — me and i will do any of the sports and stunts. | me and i will do any of the sports and stunts-— and stunts. i like to push that boundary- _ and stunts. i like to push that boundary. these _ and stunts. i like to push that boundary. these mineral- and stunts. i like to push that. boundary. these mineraltraining and stunts. i like to push that - boundary. these mineral training to become stuntman. titers; boundary. these mineral training to become stuntman.— become stuntman. very rarely you would diving _ become stuntman. very rarely you would diving speedos. _ become stuntman. very rarely you would diving speedos. you - become stuntman. very rarely you would diving speedos. you will. become stuntman. very rarely you would diving speedos. you will be | would diving speedos. you will be diving in whatever, if you are doubling, whatever the actor would be wearing. doubling, whatever the actor would be wearinu. , ., doubling, whatever the actor would be wearinu. , . ., doubling, whatever the actor would be wearing-— be wearing. they are all in various sta . es be wearing. they are all in various staaes in be wearing. they are all in various stages in their _ be wearing. they are all in various stages in their stuntman - be wearing. they are all in various stages in their stuntman journey. | stages in their stu ntman journey. this stages in their stuntman journey. this is my second session. much of this for me is faith and trust in the coaches. in this for me is faith and trust in the coaches.— this for me is faith and trust in the coaches. ., ., ., , ., the coaches. in order to qualify for the coaches. in order to qualify for the british stunt _ the coaches. in order to qualify for the british stunt register— the coaches. in order to qualify for the british stunt register they - the coaches. in order to qualify for| the british stunt register they need to pass tests in six different
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disciplines. i to pass tests in six different disciplines.— to pass tests in six different discilines. . ., , , disciplines. i am here today because i am training — disciplines. i am here today because i am training the _ disciplines. i am here today because i am training the high _ disciplines. i am here today because i am training the high diving. - i am training the high diving. curtis has already done his martial art. i curtis has already done his martial art. ., ., ., art. i did that one. i have gymnastics _ art. i did that one. i have gymnastics and - art. i did that one. i have - gymnastics and trampolining. i'm doing rock climbing and swimming which is top. doing rock climbing and swimming which is ten-— which is top. louis is 18 and has wanted to _ which is top. louis is 18 and has wanted to be — which is top. louis is 18 and has wanted to be a _ which is top. louis is 18 and has wanted to be a stuntman - which is top. louis is 18 and has wanted to be a stuntman sincel which is top. louis is 18 and has l wanted to be a stuntman since he which is top. louis is 18 and has - wanted to be a stuntman since he was 11. ., , , a, ., wanted to be a stuntman since he was 11. .,, _, ., ., wanted to be a stuntman since he was 11. people my age go to union do the school thing — 11. people my age go to union do the school thing but _ 11. people my age go to union do the school thing but i _ 11. people my age go to union do the school thing but i was _ 11. people my age go to union do the school thing but i was watching - 11. people my age go to union do the school thing but i was watching the l school thing but i was watching the james bond film and i thought wow. i want to do that. the dream is to have fun, do a crazy stuff, travel the world and be paid. he passed is diving skill tests but still needs to train. i have completed all six requirements and i have submitted to the register so it goes to the committee and they decide whether i have made it onto the register or i need to come back and look at other skills. so i am just waiting to find out if i am on the register or not. stuntman have to train in a different way to traditional divers. they just trying to different way to traditional divers. theyjust trying to land on their and passed the skill to qualify to
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be a stuntman whereas when i teach a natural dive you are looking at pretty staff like pointed toes and straight legs, tight tummy and posture. so it is very different in terms of technique. charlie is part of the group because he loves diving. it of the group because he loves divina. , of the group because he loves divin. ,,,,,_ of the group because he loves divina. ,, y of the group because he loves divin. ,, y ., ., diving. it is probably my favourite thing now- _ diving. it is probably my favourite thing now- it _ diving. it is probably my favourite thing now. it is _ diving. it is probably my favourite thing now. it is one _ diving. it is probably my favourite thing now. it is one thing - diving. it is probably my favourite thing now. it is one thing i - diving. it is probably my favourite thing now. it is one thing i am - thing now. it is one thing i am quite passionate about now and i don't know what i would be without it. he don't know what i would be without it. ~ , ., , ., , don't know what i would be without it. he likes to serenade his fellow divers by playing _ it. he likes to serenade his fellow divers by playing the _ it. he likes to serenade his fellow divers by playing the violin. - it. he likes to serenade his fellow divers by playing the violin. when it came to me _ divers by playing the violin. when it came to me for _ divers by playing the violin. when it came to me for the _ divers by playing the violin. when it came to me for the first - divers by playing the violin. when it came to me for the first time i divers by playing the violin. “gunnery it came to me for the first time he was really nervous and distraught a lot so he gave me a piece of paper and he said my name charlie and the new fast forward to now we have good conversations, he plays the violin for me. the group love him. he is such good — for me. the group love him. he is such good energy. _ for me. the group love him. he is such good energy. the _ for me. the group love him. he is such good energy. the crew- for me. the group love him. he is such good energy. the crew hopes to end up in a major blockbusterfilm perhaps stand in for a famous fashion designer. i want to be a stunt double for donatella versace. that is my true goal. just get long hair and walk out. i would love that. that would be the best. that
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is what i would love to do. that looks quite _ is what i would love to do. that looks quite nerve _ is what i would love to do. that looks quite nerve racking. that was talia slack reporting there. 13 minutes past six now. let's have a look at the front pages of the sunday papers this morning. first up new year and new covid measures for england. the lead in the sunday telegraph reports that secondary students once again will have to wear facemasks students once again will have to wearfacemasks in students once again will have to wear facemasks in classrooms when they return for a new term. we wear facemasks in classrooms when they return for a new term.- they return for a new term. we will have a lot more _ they return for a new term. we will have a lot more on _ they return for a new term. we will have a lot more on that _ they return for a new term. we will have a lot more on that later - they return for a new term. we will have a lot more on that later in - they return for a new term. we will have a lot more on that later in the ground. the times focuses on the impact of rising covid cases on nhs staffing levels reporting that more than 110,000 staff were absent on new year's eve. 50,000 of those were covid related. the observer says that the new school term could trigger a huge spike in cases of the omicron variant. the trigger a huge spike in cases of the omicron variant.— trigger a huge spike in cases of the omicron variant. the paper says the government — omicron variant. the paper says the government faces _ omicron variant. the paper says the government faces criticism - omicron variant. the paper says the government faces criticism for - government faces criticism for failing to ensure the availability
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of covid test kits in time for the return of schools and workplaces after christmas. bud return of schools and workplaces after christmas.— after christmas. and there is an extraordinary — after christmas. and there is an extraordinary story _ after christmas. and there is an extraordinary story from - after christmas. and there is an extraordinary story from bbc i after christmas. and there is an - extraordinary story from bbc online about a chinese man who was a ducted over 30 years ago. he was only four years old when he was lowered away from his home but he has finally been reunited with his mother after drawing a map of his childhood village from memory. he shared a hand drawn map which police then matched to a small village and a woman whose son had disappeared. video footage of the reunion show the pair meeting for the first time in over three decades.— in over three decades. absolutely astonishing- _ in over three decades. absolutely astonishing. incredible, - in over three decades. absolutely astonishing. incredible, isn't- it? on the inside, dog stories are seeminal it? on the inside, dog stories are seemingly abundant _ it? on the inside, dog stories are seemingly abundant in _ it? on the inside, dog stories are seemingly abundant in the - it? on the inside, dog stories are | seemingly abundant in the papers today. this story is all about dog treats, the story in the sunday telegraph. this chap looks very happy with what is popping up in
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front of him.— front of him. that is what i look like, first _ front of him. that is what i look like, first being. _ front of him. that is what i look like, first being. this _ front of him. that is what i look like, first being. this is - front of him. that is what i look| like, first being. this is basically sa in: , like, first being. this is basically saying. the _ like, first being. this is basically saying, the kennel— like, first being. this is basically saying, the kennel club - like, first being. this is basically saying, the kennel club have - like, first being. this is basically i saying, the kennel club have said, don't waste your money on expensive treats for your dog. they really don't care for fine dining, as the headline says. it talks about some of the things people might spend their money on, £40 on sausages and caviar flavoured treats. having seen what our dog eat sometimes off the floor, i really don't see the point in spending any money on anything of any value. in spending any money on anything of an value. , ., ., , . any value. dining for dogs! well, from saving _ any value. dining for dogs! well, from saving your _ any value. dining for dogs! well, from saving your pennies - any value. dining for dogs! well, from saving your pennies onto i any value. dining for dogs! well, from saving your pennies onto a | any value. dining for dogs! well, . from saving your pennies onto a dog story about spending a bit more cash. this in the observer says it is a field day for dogs as owners paid by the hourfor a safe is a field day for dogs as owners paid by the hour for a safe green space, so it is about the practice of hiring out patches of land to let people take their pets for a walk, so they pay by the able to have someone to walk their dogs and let their dogs run around.— someone to walk their dogs and let their dogs run around. young people are often at — their dogs run around. young people are often at the _ their dogs run around. young people are often at the forefront _ their dogs run around. young people are often at the forefront of - their dogs run around. young people are often at the forefront of the - are often at the forefront of the climate crisis in terms of trying to change opinions as we probably all
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know, and here, a group of young birdwatchers are encouraging all other birdwatchers to only stay local when they are out twitching, basically saying it is better for the environment if they do not travel long distances to pick out and spotted new birds that they have not seen before, rather than staying local, which is better not to make those journeys. local, which is better not to make thosejourneys. but is local, which is better not to make those journeys. but is according to the observer, you should be less travelled. ,, w' travelled. sticking with the observer. _ travelled. sticking with the observer, this _ travelled. sticking with the observer, this article - travelled. sticking with the observer, this article talks i travelled. sticking with the - observer, this article talks about the shift towards chefsvegan restaurants, it says, out meet in with the plants as the top chefs in the world of aveda menus. it mentions one example of a michelin starred chef who used to sell 20 kg of foie gras a week, but now the london—based restaurant has become entirely vegan. a complete change, i know. fin entirely vegan. a complete change, i know. ,., know. on trend. right, so, when yesterday — know. on trend. right, so, when yesterday in _ know. on trend. right, so, when yesterday in terms _ know. on trend. right, so, when yesterday in terms of _ know. on trend. right, so, when yesterday in terms of the - know. on trend. right, so, when| yesterday in terms of the weather that it was the warmest new year's eve on record. even while we were on
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our yesterday, eve on record. even while we were on ouryesterday, i eve on record. even while we were on our yesterday, i think helen also told us it was the warmest new year's day, the record was broken before ten a.m. louise, good morning. so that it's finally when we got to yesterday? yes, another record maker, not a bad way to start the year. 16 record maker, not a bad way to start the ear. ' ~ , , record maker, not a bad way to start the ear. , the year. 16 degrees is probably erfect the year. 16 degrees is probably perfect conditions _ the year. 16 degrees is probably perfect conditions if _ the year. 16 degrees is probably perfect conditions if you - the year. 16 degrees is probably perfect conditions if you are - perfect conditions if you are starting a new year's resolution, going out for a walk or a jog. i tell you what, today you might see a few sharp showers around. we have more cloud that has been spilling it overnight, producing sharp showers around as well. most of those are moving to the east of the pennines, quite quickly. heavier bursts with this area of rain, and sharp showers into the far north—west of scotland. as we go through the day it will be an incredibly mild day, a blustery day, with another batch of more persistent rain. this will be accompanied by gusts of wind in excess of 40 miles an hour in some places. but when the right deadly east, at the same time we keep the
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show was going to scotland and northern ireland. a blustery afternoon, with showers around as well. a subtle change in wind direction, temperature is not quite as impressive as the beginning of the new year. but we are looking at an beginning to be above average for this time of year, 9—13 be high. as we go through the evening, that rain will ease away, but we keep the showers going in the north, this cold front will steadily sink south out of scotland. bringing with it, a change of wind direction and contrast. noticeably colder behind that when the front. that will be the trend as we go through the next few days. so as we move into monday, which is a bank holiday, we've got this from sitting across scotland and northern ireland, but a same time, effort is pushing the channel, which may push through the far south coast. some sunshine around, hear, relatively mild, we keep the temperatures in double figures, but
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behind the front, look at this. noticeable difference to the feel of the weather. a colder afternoon across scotland, 3— five quite widely. it is that cold weather —— cold air which will sink south on monday night into tuesday, you will really notice the difference as we go into tuesday, and it means with that northerly wind and cooler air source, some of those showers will turn increasingly wintry to higher ground into the far north, so it is noticeably colder as we go through the week but it will only be a brief cold snap is the milder air returns a bit through the week. amid rising hospital admissions, boxing fights in the uk are being suspended this month, so the ringside doctors can focus on their nhs jobs. the british boxing board of control says the decision has been made because the fight against covid must take priority. we can speak now to drjamil shah foridi, who works in a&e and is
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also a boxing doctor. good morning to you, jamil, thanks forjoining us this morning. i want to start by asking you to explain what your role as a boxing doctor entails, and how much time it takes up? entails, and how much time it takes u - ? entails, and how much time it takes u . ? , ., ., , ., up? ok, so i was littered into three arts, up? ok, so i was littered into three parts. initially. _ up? ok, so i was littered into three parts, initially. there _ up? ok, so i was littered into three parts, initially. there is— up? ok, so i was littered into three parts, initially. there is the - parts, initially. there is the pre—bout, the bout itself, and then post—bout. pre—bout commute to a medical examination on the boxes, to make sure they are medically to box. during the data you are at ringside and making sure that if any unfortunate events occur, for example, somebody has a laceration thatis example, somebody has a laceration that is affecting their eyes or if they knockout does occur, you have to make sure the boxer is ok. if they need to go to a&e, you make that decision, and if they need any oxygen you put the oxygen mask on, you just have to make sure the boxer
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assay. post—bout, for every other boxer, you have to make sure that there is no long lasting damage that has occurred, there is nothing of concern at all, basically. in terms of the amount of time this takes up, obviously during the bout you are taken for that entire event, but there are events happening every single day. i have probably attended about six or seven in the past year, obviously that is affected by covid, but even without covid, i would be attending once a month or twice a month at most. d0 attending once a month or twice a month at most.— attending once a month or twice a month at most. y ., ., ,y y month at most. do you have sympathy for the decision _ month at most. do you have sympathy for the decision to _ month at most. do you have sympathy for the decision to suspend _ month at most. do you have sympathy for the decision to suspend bouts - month at most. do you have sympathy for the decision to suspend bouts so i for the decision to suspend bouts so that doctors like yourself can focus on fighting covid?— on fighting covid? personally, i don't think— on fighting covid? personally, i don't think it — on fighting covid? personally, i don't think it actually _ on fighting covid? personally, i don't think it actually makes i on fighting covid? personally, i | don't think it actually makes any difference. i work full—time in a&e, and in my spare time i would be doing boxing bouts. the fact boxing bouts are no longer occurring does not mean that i'm spending any more time in a&e. the same amount of time
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is being spent. i'm just not doing boxing bouts anymore. i think that people who are most affected other boxes as opposed to the doctors. —— are the boxers. i don't see an increase in the rise of doctors attending hospitals now. they are already working in the hospitals. the ones that are not, they are not working in hospitals either because they have a clinical practice because they have quit the training pathways. they are not suddenly going to go into the hospitals now either. it is actually the bouts —— it is actually the boxers that are affected. ii it is actually the boxers that are affected. ., ,, , it is actually the boxers that are affected. ., ~ , , . ., affected. if it makes such a marginal— affected. if it makes such a marginal difference, - affected. if it makes such a marginal difference, as - affected. if it makes such aj marginal difference, as you affected. if it makes such a - marginal difference, as you are suggesting, why do you think the decision was made? the suggesting, why do you think the decision was made?— decision was made? the boxing commission _ decision was made? the boxing commission has _ decision was made? the boxing commission has their _ decision was made? the boxing commission has their own - decision was made? the boxing i commission has their own medical panel. at the top of that is a consultant. he has probably decided this is the safest way to approach things, inhibits any further backlash to the boxing community in the future and i can understand why
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the future and i can understand why the decision has been made in the political sense. the decision has been made in the politicalsense. i the decision has been made in the political sense. i don't necessarily think it has any practical purpose, as such. $5 think it has any practical purpose, assuch. a y ., ., as such. as somebody who works in a&e, ou as such. as somebody who works in me. you are _ as such. as somebody who works in me. you are at— as such. as somebody who works in a&e, you are at the _ as such. as somebody who works in a&e, you are at the frontline - as such. as somebody who works in a&e, you are at the frontline of- as such. as somebody who works in a&e, you are at the frontline of the| a&e, you are at the frontline of the fight against covid. i just wanted to ask you about your experience and what you are seeing in terms of patients coming in with covid? 50. patients coming in with covid? so, there is an — patients coming in with covid? srr, there is an increase patients coming in with covid? sp, there is an increase in covid patients now. around 1.5 months ago i would say i wasn't seeing any patients coming into the emergency department with covid symptoms. now thatis department with covid symptoms. now that is generally increasing, i am probably getting around 3— four per day coming into a&e, covid positive. it is not as bad as it was at this point last year. the number is genuinely —— generally increasing because of how covid works and how contagious it is. i could imagine that exponentially increasing over time. y , that exponentially increasing over time. , , , that exponentially increasing over time. , , y ., ., time. just briefly, one of the thins time. just briefly, one of the things we — time. just briefly, one of the things we have _ time. just briefly, one of the things we have been - time. just briefly, one of the things we have been hearingi time. just briefly, one of the i things we have been hearing a time. just briefly, one of the - things we have been hearing a lot about is the impact of staff
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absences, shortages due to start having to go off sick. what are you experiencing? having to go off sick. what are you experiencing?_ experiencing? that is the main concern, experiencing? that is the main concern. i _ experiencing? that is the main concern, ithink. _ experiencing? that is the main concern, ithink. so, _ experiencing? that is the main concern, ithink. so, for- experiencing? that is the main i concern, ithink. so, for example, concern, i think. so, for example, if in your department you have 20 doctors overall, and at any one time, eight of them are working in a&e, now, if four of them are on sick leave because they either have a general illness or because of covid to leave, suddenly your workload has doubled. the amount of patience is, say, three orfour increased to normal, but the workload has actually doubled just because the doctors are off on general wards such as a cardiology ward or renal ward, again, they might have only two to was on at any one point, if one of them is off, the workload has doubled for the other doctor. so the staff shortages is the main issue, really.— is the main issue, really. well, thank you _ is the main issue, really. well, thank you so — is the main issue, really. well, thank you so much _ is the main issue, really. well, thank you so much for- is the main issue, really. well, thank you so much for taking i is the main issue, really. well, i thank you so much for taking the time to speak to us. i hope you are
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able to return to your hobby of being a boxing doctor again soon. thank all around the world, people have been welcoming in the new year in a whole host of different ways. some spent time with family and friends. others headed to the shops hoping to grab a bargain. but a large number decided to see in 2022 by getting rather wet, as tim allman reports. what is it with new year's day and people doing things like this? cheering. here at cavour bridge in rome, for more than half a century, every year, to celebrate the new year, they threw themselves into the tiber. normally, the water is icy cold, although milder weather meant it was perhaps a little less bracing this time around. in the netherlands, a group of hardy souls went for a dip in the north sea. an official event had been cancelled due to covid restrictions, but some just
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couldn't stop themselves. it feels like a refreshment, you know? now, ifeel like all my troubles are gone and i actually feel really energised. not that far away in portugal, their destination was the choppy seas of the north atlantic. the sun was shining, the water was cold. the mood, surprisingly positive. "it's a portuguese tradition on this beach," said this man. "what's nice is the conviviality, socialising with people, hoping to be able to recover our strength for a much better year, and hoping to get out of this pandemic." bagpipes skirl. on the other side of the pond, they have some traditions of their own. in boston, one of america's oldest cold water swimming groups solemnly marched to a nearby beach before they all made a mad dash for it. cheering.
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some called it "crazy," some called it "fun" — it's certainly one way to see in the new year. tim allman, bbc news. what do you think, crazy or fine? it wouldn't be for me. we were sitting here this time to see in the new year, yesterday, so we didn't get the chance. having said that, the geography of this place is such that probably about five metres that way there is a pallister large stretch of water. so if we did feel like going for a of water. so if we did feel like going fora swim... of water. so if we did feel like going for a swim. . ._ of water. so if we did feel like going for a swim... may be today? you're not — going for a swim... may be today? you're not going — going for a swim... may be today? you're not going to _ going for a swim... may be today? you're not going to catch - going for a swim... may be today? you're not going to catch me - going for a swim... may be today? j you're not going to catch me doing that. coming up later in the programme. 20 years after the stars of harry potter first hit our screens, they've reunited for a special anniversary episode. we'll review all the best bits just after 8:30 this morning. one of my kids, i know there are lots of young people who know everything there is to know about harry potter... everything there is to know about harry potter- - -— everything there is to know about
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harry potter...- really? i everything there is to know about harry potter. . .- really? harry potter... guilty. really? yes, i am a harry potter... guilty. really? yes, i am a total— harry potter... guilty. really? yes, i am a total potterhead. _ harry potter... guilty. really? yes, i am a total potterhead. i _ harry potter... guilty. really? yes, i am a total potterhead. i feel - harry potter... guilty. really? yes, i am a total potterhead. i feel a - i am a total potterhead. i feel a bit ashamed admitting that on national tv, bit ashamed admitting that on nationaltv, but bit ashamed admitting that on national tv, but i am. you bit ashamed admitting that on nationaltv, but i am. you can lead to the interview, _ nationaltv, but i am. you can lead to the interview, i _ nationaltv, but i am. you can lead to the interview, i will _ nationaltv, but i am. you can lead to the interview, i will graciously i to the interview, i will graciously step aside and allow you to demonstrate your knowledge. you will have to do step _ demonstrate your knowledge. you will have to do step in _ demonstrate your knowledge. you will have to do step in and _ demonstrate your knowledge. you will have to do step in and stop _ demonstrate your knowledge. you will have to do step in and stop me - demonstrate your knowledge. you will have to do step in and stop me from i have to do step in and stop me from going on, otherwise we will still be going on, otherwise we will still be going out to be 11pm
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all we have been talking about is harry potter so we will be looking forward to that. and now chetan is newly inducted. mr; forward to that. and now chetan is newly inducted.— newly inducted. my nephews are caettin newly inducted. my nephews are getting me _ newly inducted. my nephews are getting me into _ newly inducted. my nephews are getting me into it. _ newly inducted. my nephews are getting me into it. i— newly inducted. my nephews are getting me into it. i avoided - newly inducted. my nephews are getting me into it. i avoided the| getting me into it. i avoided the books and films but my nephews are now onto the second film with me. let's crack on now with the sport. what is happening today? magic and miracles. that is what chelsea and liverpool need. it is the manchester city show at the moment. jurgen klopp is a potential
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covid case. chelsea boss thomas tuchel�*s called city a winning machine. they left it late to get a stoppage time win at arsenal in an incident packed match as patrick geary reports: early kick—off new year's day. tired arsenal the manchester city fans must hope their luck improves in 2022. referees cannot afford to be bleary eyed for soon stuart had a decision to make. no penalty he said and on reflection, va are confirmed. not without question. arsenal did not dwell on that. no time, no need. they extended the new year's celebrations. only the manager missed out, he is in covid isolation. that search was in the second half. a handful of shirt enough to manchester city to get a penalty and thanks to marius, an equaliser. another game into a chaotic fast forward and a mistake somehow cities that can is saved a
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goal and somehow martinelli missed one. second later the other gabriel was sent off. arsenal's party was now a lockout. could they stop city? stoppage time the league leaders advanced and for those who came from manchester it was worth waking up for. they left it late, but tottenham managed to beat watford1—0. davinson sanchez heading home deep into injury time. it means that antonio conte is still unbeaten in the league as spurs boss. his side are nowjust two points off the top four. we were very good to attack and create chances but they lost patience and they lost balance. for sure we had to improve in the last pass because i have seen the stats. 29 crosses. 29 crosses. and zero
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goals. and west ham surived a fightback from crystal palace to win 3—2 at selhurst park. manuel lanzini scored twice for the hammers as they rise to 5th in the table. big game on the weekend sees chelsea take on liverpool. jurgen klopp will not be there after a suspected positive covid place. he is isolating. on friday he said three players tested positive. he already thought that this would be a very tough game today. i expect a really strong chelsea side because with all the studies they have, obviously injury in covid which we don't know about, they still have a proper football team and lester was a good example. when you have some problems in these kind of things, there is always a chance in football and that is what we will try as well. exeter are up to 5th in rugby's premiership after beating bristol by 19—13.
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exeter controlled much of the match and ran in three tries to bristol's one. exeter�*s last from player of the match stuart hogg. bristol picked up a losing bonus point. there was a confidence—boosting win for sale. they ran in 4 tries, beating wasps 26—18. ben curry with the bonus—point—winning fourth try. jonny mcnicholl scored a dramatic late try as scarlets came from behind to beat ospreys 22—19 in the united rugby championship. elsewhere, connacht beat munster 10—8. reigning champion gerwyn price has been knocked out of the pdc world darts championship. price threw a 9—dart finish earlier in the match, but in a tight, tense encounter, smith came from four sets to three down, to take the next two to seal a dramatic victory. he'll playjames wade in the first semi final later today. peter �*snakebite' wright is also through to the semi—finals. he came from 3 sets to one down
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to beat callan rydz 5—4. wright will play gary anderson in the last four. we have seen pictures of people diving into water and blowing away the new year cobwebs. now then, here's a way to blow away the new year cobwebs. it's the relatively new sport of wingfoiling, with the final events of the world championship season in tarifa on spain's atlantic coast. bowien van der linden of the netherlands won the women's surf—freestyle discipline. frenchman titouan galea won two out of the four events to be crowned men's champion. spectacular stuff. it is better to do that in spain with a slightly warmer waters. i would do that, i said no to going through new year's day dip in the sea but that, i would do that. it is similar to kite _ sea but that, i would do that. it is similar to kite surfing where sometimes you see them take off. i have sometimes you see them take off. have been sometimes you see them take off. i have been doing my research this morning it is a different pumping action is what i am told so just a
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different type of mechanism that you have got to get your head around. don't say i don't give you all the details. ., ., ., y don't say i don't give you all the details. ., y details. too many some may say. thank you — details. too many some may say. thank you for— details. too many some may say. thank you for that. _ details. too many some may say. thank you for that. i _ details. too many some may say. thank you for that. i feel - details. too many some may say. thank you for that. i feel quite i thank you for that. i feel quite educated now, thank you. 25 minutes to seven, educated now, thank you. 25 minutes to seven. time _ educated now, thank you. 25 minutes to seven, time for _ educated now, thank you. 25 minutes to seven, time for the _ educated now, thank you. 25 minutes to seven, time for the travel - educated now, thank you. 25 minutes to seven, time for the travel show. i iam amberand i am amber and my husband is frank. we live outside birmingham, alabama.
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we live outside birmingham, alabama. we have four beautiful boys, frankie who is 17, stephen who is 14 and then we have a set of boy twins who are four years old and they are non—verbal autistic. their names are alex and will. we are the ellis family. my husband and i have known each other since grade school and we were friends the whole time. we dated in high school and married in couege dated in high school and married in college and this is because we have some issues with the boys we have not been on a trip in so it takes a lot of intuition to figure out what they need. we have a lot of meltdowns. it's ok. and when there
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are two non— verbal autistic children the behaviours can be exponential as they play off each other. before the twins were born we were just a family of four. and we have the two older brothers who sort of got along but not really. after the twins came the dynamic change. this sweet caretaking dynamic. and especially as the twins got older and they stopped developing. the development was very slow. we all kind of began to understand that the twins were going to need a lot more.
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for a long time we had no support. we did not talk about the twins. pretty much only my closest friends knew that the twins with special needs. and for a long time i thought that we could fix them. it was just a developmental delay, that i could give them the right supplemental the right food or the right therapy and they would catch up. but over the course of last year my husband and i began to realise that this is who there. and is not something that they can fix it is how they were wired. we began to come to terms their special needs, their all to them stop they are so precious. even though they may be different, different, not less. they arejust different, not less. they arejust different, that is all and people need to see the story. people need
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to know that you can make it work, we can make it work. we started talking about taking a trip, how should we do? this is our 20th anniversary. we have come through so much as a family that we wanted to go as a family and just enjoy each other. so we felt like it was time to go on a trip. it has taken us a long time to come to the point where we were ready. we had neverflown with the twins before so we were kind of nervous and excited about getting on a plane. because they are autistic non—verbal they function on about the level of an 18 —month—old. so there are a lot of work. the about the level of an 18 -month-old. so there are a lot of work.— so there are a lot of work. the way our schedules, _ so there are a lot of work. the way our schedules, a _ so there are a lot of work. the way our schedules, a work— so there are a lot of work. the way our schedules, a work schedule, i so there are a lot of work. the way | our schedules, a work schedule, the food schedule for the kids work together, there is not a lot of days every _ together, there is not a lot of days every month where we are all
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together— every month where we are all together at the same time. we have a little bit. _ together at the same time. we have a little hit. an— together at the same time. we have a little bit, an hour or two here at the end — little bit, an hour or two here at the end of— little bit, an hour or two here at the end of the day when were both falling _ the end of the day when were both falling asleep already but holidays do not _ falling asleep already but holidays do not happen very often for us. a few years — do not happen very often for us. a few years ago we went to the beach for a couple of days. a few years ago, we went to the beach for a couple of days together, but they were very small. to break routine for an autistic child is...can be disastrous. so this gives us an opportunity to break routine only for a little while and try it, and see how the boys cope in a different environment, and still have some of their comfortable surroundings — they will have us and the older boys and some of their familiar objects, but be in a different place, and see if we can start taking longer trips. ok, how are we going to do an aeroplane? somebody has always got to take care of one of the twins, another person has to take care of the other one, and then who is going to take
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care of all of the things we take with us? what do we need to take, what snacks are going to have? do we take the blankies, do we take toys, do we take the ipad, things to keep them entertained? we actually got in touch with the airline that we were going to use and talked to a co—ordinator who let us have a trial run through the airport, which was phenomenal. it was the most fabulous idea anyone has ever come up with. i had been pretty fearful, but after that day, i felt much better and i thought, i think we can do this. we can make it work, we can get on a plane and go on a trip. it's gonna be stressful and there's going to be meltdowns. .. cries hey, hey! it's ok! if they melt down, how do we deal with the people around us, how do we let them know that it's really ok, and that we're actually ok with meltdowns, wejust have
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to keep them calm and soothe them as much as possible. because you worry about the people around you, that you're offending people or...and you worry about being judged. look how handsome you are! just to know that somebody understands is so helpful, and you all of a sudden don't feel so crazy. they're autistic, so they come with their own needs, you know? so we're going to take the whole family, for the first time, to a special park called wonderland in san antonio, texas. it's a special needs park and they have lots of fun things for specifically special needs children, very wheelchair accessible. there's a lot of different ways it could go, you know, with their very strict routines
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that they happen to have, going outside of that a little bit will stress them a little bit, and you just kind of have to roll with it, so... i'm looking forward to it primarily because it's i a new thing that we haven't done before, so it's kind i of like, challenge . accepted, let's do it. it is the fun for him is "let's do this, let's see if we can accomplish it." so it'sjust his personality, but...it is a lot of fun! i've played too many strategy games. - everything is pretty ready, we'lljust have a nice, quiet evening, finishing up any last details, and then we will be ready for tomorrow. cries ok...let�*s get your hair all pretty. all handsome. cries
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we are going to go on our trip! and you're gonna be so handsome. can you sit up for me? you are going to be so handsome. he is so upset because he wants to go get in the car. where are we going? are we going on a trip? are you ready? 0k. all ready! i have the food, the boys' clothes, our clothes, ipads, the blankies, we have the wagon. i think that's everything. i think that's everything! ok, let's go. so we went outside to load the car and pull up to the main porch, and i couldn't crank the car, it wouldn't crank. told the husband, can you come and look at the car and try to fix it? and of course he worked his magic and got the car running again.
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i was so nervous up until this point, but we've prepared so much, and we've already seen a little bit of meltdown because he's actually wanting to go, so i think it's gonna be really good. so, we are going to fly out of birmingham and fly to houston. the flight from birmingham to houston is a relatively short flight, it's only two hours. from there, we will rent a truck or some kind of vehicle, and drive the rest of the way to san antonio. ok, i might be getting a little nervous now. we are at the airport and we're pulling into the parking deck, so it's really real, we're going to do it. 0k! frank sr, frankjr, stephen, alex, you and will. yay! look at that lens. got it?
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one more time, look at the lens. ready? it's kind of a healing time for ourfamily. we can go on this trip together. the older boys have such a sweet dynamic with the little boys. ok, ok, thank you. instead of patting them down, they put this little solution on them. cries. i am so sorry, i am so sorry! but two toddlers is difficult. when you add non—verbal autistic, itjust makes it exponential. i always feel this sense to rush and get everything packed. we have plenty of time. i kind of have to emotionally prepare myself. i'm so relieved that part is over! now let's just get to the gate. you kind of carry that anxiety in the back of your mind of, how is it going to go? just kind of be ready to roll with the punches,
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whatever happens, just be ready for anything. travelling for toddlers is difficult. and two toddlers can be really difficult. well, when you add non—verbal autistic, it just makes it exponential. so, it has taken us a long time to come to the point where we were ready. will has noise—cancelling headphones — he has strong sensory issues with hearing. you can tell it's painful. we're probably going to have a meltdown or two. we might have some vomit, we know it might happen. but the flight from birmingham to houston is a relatively short flight — it's only two hours — and the boys do like car travel.
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ok, now we're on the fast part. we're about to go fast. up into the air. are you ready? let's do it. whatever happens, just be ready for anything, and just kind of be ready to roll with the punches. what do you think about this fast plane? ok, it's going to be a little bumpy. you're doing so good. things are going really well. one boy is asleep and the other is almost asleep. naptime is a good time to fly. we like the idea of getting into a truck and driving the rest of the way to san antonio.
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it's about another 2.5 hours' drive, and then we'll go to the park. did you sleep with big brother? you did? what did you think? is it time to go play? it is. time to get some clothes on. he's going to grab my hand and try to walk us out the front door. it's time to go, alex is ready.
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the worst part is over. the anxiety i was experiencing was mostly about the flight. woke up this morning, ready to prepare for the park. then we'll hop in the car and go. he knows we're going somewhere fun. we're headed to morgan's wonderland, which is a theme park in san antonio, texas, for special needs children. lots of fun things for children of all cognitive levels to experience. morgan's wonderland came about when the founder, gordon hartman, sold his construction company and was able to devote all of his time to building this park for his daughter. she was developmentally delayed. and he made this wonderful playground in her honour and for her, and opened
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it up to the world. this beautiful park with a carousel, a ferris wheel, train, with sensory fun things and everything that small children and big kids alike would love to come and have fun. it was almost as if it was built for us. so where do you all recommend we go first? do you like it? oh, my goodness. what do you think? alex is in his happy place because he loves trains so much.
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we will probably ride the train at least five times today. so tell us more about the park and how you came to build morgan's wonderland. well, actually, it occurred many years ago when maggie, my wife, morgan and i were on a trip. and morgan wanted to go swimming. morgan and ijumped in and we were having fun, just splashing around in the water. there were three other kids at the other end of the pool, two of them were throwing a ball back and forth. she wasn't able to verbally communicate and say, "hey, i want to play, can ijoin in with you guys?" so she hit the ball. so they quickly grabbed the ball and got out of the pool because it wasn't a normal way of saying, "hey, i want to play".
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and the look on morgan's face was, "dad, i don't understand — ijust wanted to play". and it saddened me because i just wanted my daughter to be able to play. so where could we go? we couldn't take her to a lot of parks because of certain circumstances of hers, and talking to others, we found the same situation. so how do we develop a place where those who have special needs and those who don't can all come together and play in a fully inclusive environment? and it was those discussions, those chit—chats, those meetings, they turned into what we now have here today at morgan's wonderland. that is so amazing. and since then, people from all over the united states and literally all over the world make special trips to come here. in an environment that is just different than any other environment in the world.
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right. whoa, alex, look! what do you think? this is amazing. alex really likes, you know, ipads and things like that that he can manipulate. so when he came into this room, there's not a lot of extra noise but there's a lot of things he can touch. you did it! i'm so proud of you. we started travelling with him when he was six months old. i before we really knew he was autistic. - so he's very used to it. so by the time we did i have a diagnosis he was so used to travelling. so you just accommodated him to it. ijust met danielle who has a five—year—old boy who is also non—verbal autistic. we had a really fun time catching up. my new friend, we just friended each other on facebook. it was lovely to talk to her, so many similarities, how do you do this?
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it is better if you try to align the flights i with his normal sleeping times. we found that out. yes. other people on the plane, sometimes, to get peoplel who are less understanding... yeah, i was pretty worried about that. but it is pretty. rare, i would say. it's great to find a community, in this setting, where we can talk and make new friends. so, we ran into a mother here, we got to talking and we kind of both had autistic children, she said there was another place really close by that we ought to check out. so i think we're going to head on over now and check that out and see how our kids like it. hold on! i had a lot of fears going into this trip. we have a special needs child, and you can't predict their behaviour, and you especially can't predicted in public around other people.
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and it didn't happen. that park was made for children like them. so we felt safe. that's one thing we really have trouble with sometimes, we don't really feel safe taking them to the normal places where regular children are. to be honest, they are having a lot more fun. than i would've thought. normally to get them to have this much fun is kind of rare, | we have to do the little - things, make weird noises, i that's the only time they'll be. laughing and smiling this much. but this whole place has that effect. - i was literally terrified that we would get into a situation where they'd be melting down, lots of tears, really loud, a complete emotional breakdown for the world to see.
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but it didn't happen, everything was much more calm than i thought it would be. they slept on the plane, they had a lot of fun at the theme parks, theme parks were built for them. they welcomed them with open arms and let them enjoy themselves.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with luxmy gopal and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: masks return to classrooms in england. can anyone stop manchester city ? they're 11 points clear at the top of the premier league
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after a stoppage time winner at arsenal day two of the new year's stance of mild once _ day two of the new year's stance of mild once again but breezy with a greater— mild once again but breezy with a greater chance of a few sharp showers _ greater chance of a few sharp showers developing today. it's sunday january 2 our main story. secondary school pupils in england are being told to wear face coverings in classrooms, as they start a new school term. the guidance brings england in line with scotland, wales and northern ireland and is part of a range of measures designed to stop rising covid cases from disrupting education — as james reynolds reports. since march 2020 getting an education has become an obstacle course of home learning, missed exams and regular covid tests. older pupils have gotten used to wearing
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masks and communal areas in schools. now the government recommends the pupils in years seven and above keep their masks on when they are in class as well. the move will be reviewed in late january. and then there is the air. taking a deep breath is the kind of thing you need to do before an exam but it is hard to do safely in a poorly ventilated classroom. in order to clear the air then, the government is rolling out a further 7000 purifiers. we are pleased the government is talking to us and trying to work out how to get some support into schools now. we are disappointed that we are having the conversation this side of christmas when we could have been making these arrangements earlier on. the government says it wants to minimise disruption and keep pupils in class but unions warned that if large numbers of teachers get sick or have to quarantine, some classes may have to be sent home for short periods of time. "robust contingency plans" are being developed by government ministers, amid warnings that
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a quarter of public sector workers could soon be off work because of covid. rising case numbers have led to large numbers of employees self—isolating — with absences particularly affecting the nhs and the transport industry. our business correspondent katie prescott has more details. cancelled trains, delayed deliveries, closed restaurants and shut—up shops. staff shortages because of the spread of omicron are a real worry in the new year as people return to work after the christmas break. i think it makes sense to try to plan for such events. we know we have a very contagious variant in the uk and we know that many people are catching the virus and naturally there will be absences throughout all businesses, really, the biggest challenge will be on the supply
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change to make sure that that is still running at the efficiency we are used to. ministers are looking atjust how bad things could get and drawing up contingency plans to try and protect against any disruption from rising infection. to try and keep school gates open as well as hospitals and other vital services in the public sector, leaders have been asked to look at the worst—case scenarios of having ten, 20 or even 25% of their staff off at any one time. labour says that this announcement shows the government is leaving contingency planning to the very last moment. the most recent restrictions in england, set out in the government's plan b earlier in december are expected to be reviewed this week. a majorfire has broken out at the parliament building in cape town. local media is reporting that firefighters are currently on scene and the cause of the fire is unknown. video footage shows plumes of smoke above the building and flames coming through the roof.
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ajudge in the united states has thrown out prince andrew's attempt to halt proceedings in a civil lawsuit against him. the duke of york's lawyers had argued that virginia giuffre — who has accused him of sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager — lives in australia, so is not a us resident. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegations. aruna iyengar has this report. seen here at the age of 17, virginia roberts, now giuffre, with prince andrew on the left. and ghislaine maxwell in the background. ms giuffre has accused prince andrew of sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager at the homes ofjeffrey epstein, the convicted child sex offender and ms maxwell. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegations. the civil lawsuit seeks unspecified damages. two efforts to stall the case were blocked on saturday. us federaljudge lewis a kaplan told the lawyers for the prince
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that they must hand over key legal documents before a crucial court hearing in new york on tuesday. he also rejected arguments by the prince's lawyer that the lawsuit should be dismissed because ms giuffre, a us citizen, no longer lives in the us. this comes after ghislaine maxwell was convicted this week of recruiting and trafficking young girls to be abused by her boyfriend. on tuesday, judge kaplan will hear oral arguments to decide whether giuffre's lawsuit against prince andrew will proceed. a group of conservative mps and peers are calling on the prime minister to tackle the spiralling cost of living by scrapping the vat on energy bills — and cutting environmental levies. five former ministers are among those calling for action in a letter to the sunday telegraph. it comes amid soaring wholesale gas
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prices and fears that household energy bills could double by april this year. three people are missing and presumed dead, after a devastating wildfire in the us state of colorado. the blaze swept through several towns on thursday, destroying hundreds of homes and forcing tens of thousands of people to flee. snowfall helped to bring the fire under control, but is also now hampering the rescue mission. 21 people have been rescued after becoming trapped overnight. the tramway was stopped because severe ice was affecting the emergency cable. the stranded passengers were eventually rescued after the cars were lowered using a rope system and then evacuated via helicopter. yesterday we told you about max woosey, the 12—year—old boy who's spent 640 nights sleeping in a tent — raising enough money to hire 16
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extra nurses for his local hospice. max was awarded the british empire medal in the new year honours list after raising over half a million. well, one of max's heroes — rugby legend jonny wilkinson, heard about his amazing efforts and has sent us this message just for max. i just want to say a massive congratulations for being awarded the british empire medal for everything you have achieved and for being the inspiring person that you are. you have shown us all what can be possible when you follow your passion and that desire to make a difference and you see it through with such immense commitment and dedication. just incredible. good on you, my friend. take care and looking forward to what is next for you. what a lovely personal message. max's mother told us yesterday that he has no intent to head back into
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the house to sleep. good morning louise. a record—breaking day? incredible, wasn't it? for those of us who wanted to get outside yesterday and walk off some of the indulgence of the last few days it was perfect. 16 degrees recorded in london, the warmest start to the new year on record. the mild weather stays with us for another day but there is a change to come, turning mostly colder and more seasonable, if that is what you like. looking at the satellite picture you can see a fair amount of cloud bringing showers around over the last few hours and though showers moved to the east of the pennines as we speak. then they will clear away and we will see another pulse of wet weather arriving. sharp showers to the north—west of scotland as well at the moment but it is this pulse of rain that moves into wales on the south—west england accompanied by a gust of wind is in excess of 40 miles an houran gust of wind is in excess of 40 miles an hour an exposed coast there that will gradually drive its way
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eastwards and some of that heavy with hail maybe even funder through the day. we keep the showers going into north—west england, scotland and northern ireland as well. a blustery afternoon for all of us and as a consequence, perhaps not quite as a consequence, perhaps not quite as warm but, still, the temperatures arejust as warm but, still, the temperatures are just above where they should be for the time of year. we're at 9— 13 degrees the high. as we move through sunday evening and into the early hours of monday we will start to see a line of more organised showers sinking southwards through scotland. this is a cold front and marks the change. we still have milder down towards the south and the northerly wind is starting to dragon some cool so temperatures around three degrees first thing on monday morning. it is to the north of this frontal system where the colder air is going to start to arrive and to the south on monday, not a bad day. maybe the weather front through the channel may bring more cloud and maybe some rain across the channel facing coast but generally speaking for england and wales on monday and the public holiday there will be sunshine around. there is our cold front
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sitting there to the north and that means that behind it we really will start to feel the difference to the weather. top temperatures on monday afternoon in scotland are 3—5. weather. top temperatures on monday afternoon in scotland are 3—5 . that colder air will push its way steadily southwards through monday night into tuesday so we won't start to see a return to —— we might see a return to night—time frost. still the northerly flow and still turning showers increasingly wintry as they move down from the northern isles across from the north—west. sunshine elsewhere but not particularly warm. it is in and back to you in studio. thank you and will speak to you later. as we've been hearing this morning, secondary school pupils in england are being told to wear face coverings in classrooms this term — to try to slow the spread of the omicron variant. we're joined now by the shadow health secretary, wes streeting. grateful and good morning to you, mist streeton. we are grateful to you. this brings england in line
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with other parts of the uk regarding children being asked to where it masks at least until the end of the month in classrooms. what do you think? i month in classrooms. what do you think? ., �* ~ ., y ., , think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon _ think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon about _ think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon about it _ think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon about it but - think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon about it but if - think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon about it but if it. think? i don't think anyone will be over the moon about it but if it is| over the moon about it but if it is a choice between pupils wearing a mask to go to school or people not being at school at all because they are either knocked out by the virus themselves all staff in schools and knocked out in sufficient numbers that it knocked out in sufficient numbers thatitis knocked out in sufficient numbers that it is hard to manage a classroom, well, keeping children learning has got to be the priority because we know that they have lost so much education during the pandemic. i think the key thing, however, the government need to go further on two key measures. the first is testing and this applies more broadly than schools but specifically in schools and at the moment pupils are meant to be testing twice a week but we know in the vast majority of cases it is just not happening to the degree that it should. testing is a crucial tool to keep pupils learning, to prevent the need for further restrictions so we have got together testing up and that means the
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government has to make sure that there are tests available.— government has to make sure that there are tests available. excuse me for interrupting _ there are tests available. excuse me for interrupting but _ there are tests available. excuse me for interrupting but the _ there are tests available. excuse me for interrupting but the supply - there are tests available. excuse me for interrupting but the supply of- for interrupting but the supply of tests is the issue? if the government is asking them to test twice a week and schools are being given the kids to do it and there is some responsibility on the schools to ensure that their pupils take those tests. as we have seen over the christmas and new year period there is a real challenge with testing availability at the moment. i am angry and frustrated at this. i raise the issue of testing supply with the hills secretary three weeks ago only to be told in front of the whole house of commons that supply of tests was not an issue. clearly it is and it causes real challenges for parents who are getting their kids back to school this week, for critical frontline workers in the nhs and other critical infrastructure and, of course, people wanting to go about their daily lives. my message to the government today is to get a grip on testing because this is the key tool to enable people to go about their
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work learning and their lives safely. it is the key to what will prevent further restrictions going into january and february. the people, as we have seen over christmas, actually, when people did the right thing and tested before going to see their families, people do the right thing but we have got to make sure the tests are available for them when they need them and where they need them. you for them when they need them and where they need them.— for them when they need them and where they need them. you said that there were two _ where they need them. you said that there were two things _ where they need them. you said that there were two things you _ where they need them. you said that there were two things you thought i where they need them. you said that| there were two things you thought we needed _ there were two things you thought we needed to— there were two things you thought we needed to do. there were two things you thought we needed to do-— needed to do. what is the other one? the second thing _ needed to do. what is the other one? the second thing is _ needed to do. what is the other one? the second thing is on _ needed to do. what is the other one? the second thing is on air _ needed to do. what is the other one? the second thing is on air quality - the second thing is on air quality and ventilation at schools. again, ventilation is one of the key ways to mitigate against over 19 which is an airborne virus. the government today have made an announcement on air purifier is... it looks to me that that will only reach one in four schools in england. the vast majority are not catered for. also not clear whether that is one purifier perth school or one system per school because there is a very big difference between the two. we have been urging the government to do more on ventilation for months
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and months and months and i am afraid that this announcement looks very much like appearing to be busy, days before the start of the school term and i must say, as ever, we were in this position last year. there are head teachers, other staff in schools who are preparing the return to school this week, to drop these sorts of measures on schools at the 11th hour makes their lives really difficult, much more difficult than they would need to be. , . difficult than they would need to be. y ., ., , ., ., ., difficult than they would need to be. they have to plan ahead. isn't the case they _ be. they have to plan ahead. isn't the case they having _ be. they have to plan ahead. isn't the case they having to _ be. they have to plan ahead. isn't the case they having to wait - be. they have to plan ahead. isn't the case they having to wait for. be. they have to plan ahead. isn'tl the case they having to wait for the situation, you know, it is still more than a week before many schools go back so it gives them a little bit of notice but we did not know when the schools broke up, for example, what the situation was going to be at the start of the new term. we know the failure to plan ahead has been a consistent problem with this government. it ahead has been a consistent problem with this government.— with this government. it makes everybody _ with this government. it makes everybody else's _ with this government. it makes everybody else's live _ with this government. it makes everybody else's live cider. - with this government. it makes| everybody else's live cider. one
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with this government. it makes i everybody else's live cider. one of the key ways to make sure that parents and pupils are equipped to do the right thing, know what they need to do at the start of term, is through communication via the school. now, lots of schools will now no doubt be hurriedly texting parents, getting messages out via email and so parents, getting messages out via emailand so on, parents, getting messages out via email and so on, but that is really no substitute for good planning ahead, making sure that parents, but schools can send letters to parents. there are practical issues that teachers have faced through the pandemic and thejob has been made harder by the government's failure to plan ahead. my big message today, get a grip on testing, make sure the supplies available, because testing is going to be a key way to avoid the need for further restrictions in england and the big challenge for 2022, actually, is to equip our country to live well alongside the virus. coronavirus isn't going away. new variants are likely to be less harmful, but there are a number of steps we need to take to make sure
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that we can live well with the virus without having to impact on people's lives. testing is a key way to do that. ~ ., , ., ., ., , that. we hope that new variants will be less harmful. _ that. we hope that new variants will be less harmful. such _ that. we hope that new variants will be less harmful. such a _ that. we hope that new variants will be less harmful. such a job - that. we hope that new variants will be less harmful. such a job at - that. we hope that new variants will be less harmful. such a job at said i be less harmful. such a job at said that the supply of lateral flow trusts has been tripled. —— sajid javid. so hopefully testing will be in place. do you think on a broader point, greater restrictions are required in england now but there are again different restrictions in place in different parts of the uk? i hope not. we are watching the situation closely, we have been meeting regularly with some of the country's leading scientific minds in recent days to get a sense from them about what the challenge in january or february will look like, i am listening closely to what nhs leaders are saying about current nhs pressures. ultimately, those are the key factors. is the virus working its way through start in significant numbers that means services are not going to be viable? that is a big challenge in the nhs. and looking into january and february, beekeeping we have to keep an eye on
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is what is happening to children and young people, what is happening with schools, how can we make sure we keep children learning, and the second is that there are some signs from the data. we are beginning to see an uptick now in the numbers of older people getting the new variant, and we know that for all sorts of reasons they will be more vulnerable to the virus, even with the boosterjab which will help reduce the risk. so we have to keep an eye on what is going on in care homes in particular as well. those are the things we are keeping an eye on, we've got to follow the data and follow the scientific advice. the labour party stands ready to do whatever is necessary. we have made it clear we will not pay party politics with those in house of commons but we are a close eye on it. i hope that the government gets testing right we will not get further restrictions in england. therefore, do you think the administration in wales, run by labour, has gone too far? because restrictions are greater in wales already. i restrictions are greater in wales alread . ., �* y restrictions are greater in wales alread. ., �* y ., already. i wouldn't say they have one too already. i wouldn't say they have gone too far. _ already. i wouldn't say they have gone too far, scotland _ already. i wouldn't say they have gone too far, scotland and - already. i wouldn't say they have | gone too far, scotland and wales already. i wouldn't say they have - gone too far, scotland and wales and northern ireland, i think they have
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taken a more cautious approach and time will tell whether that has been more sensible of an approach than we have seen in england. i think as you have seen in england. i think as you have probably seen from the correspondence labour has been sending to government before the christmas period started, more recently, some of the comments we have made, we have been nervous and cautious that the government in england is doing the right thing for the right reasons. we know boris johnson is under huge political pressure within his own party from a minority who are opposed to any new measures, including the sensible plan b measures, which i think have really helped our country enjoy christmas safety and enjoy christmas without restrictions. but we just got to keep an eye on this. that is what labour is doing it we will be responsible about how we approach votes in the house of commons, so the government can be confident that regardless of the swivel eyed backbenchers they have hussein are restrictions under any circumstances, if the government needs to take further action the labour party will be there to do the right thing. fiiq labour party will be there to do the riaht thin. ~ �*
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right thing. ok, well, i think we're t in: to right thing. ok, well, i think we're trying to raise _ right thing. ok, well, i think we're trying to raise the _ right thing. ok, well, i think we're trying to raise the tone, _ right thing. ok, well, i think we're trying to raise the tone, i - right thing. ok, well, i think we're trying to raise the tone, i am - right thing. ok, well, i think we're trying to raise the tone, i am not i trying to raise the tone, i am not sure that swivel—eyed is a complimentary term. let me ask you about former labourfrom complimentary term. let me ask you about former labour from mr tony blair, what a night of yesterday in the new year's honours. i was watching the petition online this morning with people calling for that to be rescinded, because of the iraq war. you have been critical of tony blair about iraq. 114 thousand people have now signed this petition in less than 40 —— 24 hours. what do you think of him being given a knighthood? i you think of him being given a knighthood?— you think of him being given a knirhthood? ~ ., y �* ., .,, ., knighthood? i think tony blair as a eer made knighthood? i think tony blair as a peer made an _ knighthood? i think tony blair as a peer made an outstanding - peer made an outstanding contribution to this country, actually, and you are right, i didn't support the iraq war and i was very critical of the labour party which i was a member about the time as a student. —— tony blair as a pm. iam time as a student. —— tony blair as a pm. i am afraid the right legacy will always hang over the record of the last labour government and of tony blair. —— iraq legacy. to be fair, tony blair has never shirk responsibility adductor accountability for it. he stands by
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what he did. i have no doubt that despite our disagreements he and other people in the government at the time thought they were doing the right thing for the right reasons. i think you've got to look all the other record of the last labour government, which delivered enormous transformation for our country in terms of public services, delivered an unprecedented period of economic growth for our country that's saw wages rise, and i say this for all of ourformer prime ministers, actually, one of our labour or conservative, it is the hardestjob in politics. it carries with it enormous weight of responsibility. i think it is right to recognise public service. the debate about tony blair and his premiership and iraq will be one that will continue for decades, if not centuries, through the history books. i think overall we can look at the record of that last labour government and be enormously proud and thank tony blairfor the enormously proud and thank tony blair for the contribution he enormously proud and thank tony blairfor the contribution he made us the premise of our country. thank ou for us the premise of our country. thank you for your — us the premise of our country. thank you for your time. _ us the premise of our country. thank you for your time. thank _ us the premise of our country. thank you for your time. thank you. - as the pandemic continues into the new year, there will be more tough decisions
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for politicians. let's discuss some of the issues facing parliament in 2022 with lucy fisher — the deputy political editor for the telegraph, and george parker — the political editor at the financial times. good morning to you both. thank you for talking to us this morning. we will continue first, lucy. ladies first, happy new year to you both. what do you think of the big issues facing the government as we go into the new year?— the new year? well, there are robabl the new year? well, there are probably three _ the new year? well, there are probably three categories. - the new year? well, there are - probably three categories. political challenges for boris johnson probably three categories. political challenges for borisjohnson and his administration, policy challenges, and economic challenges that present the backdrop to that. i think there is a hangover from the end of last year on the political front, is a hangover from the end of last year on the politicalfront, a lot of his backbenchers very unhappy at the handling of the owen paterson affair, unhappy at the shock loss of the north shops are seated in the by—election in december, and also a lot of concern about the allegations about parties having taken place,
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allegedly against coronavirus rules in downing street and across the government estates in 2020. so i think we need to see the outcome of that investigation in the early part of this year, and there are lots of questions over covid restrictions. borisjohnson questions over covid restrictions. boris johnson obviously suffered the worst revolt of his career from backbenchers in the week before the parliament broke for christmas. again, ithink parliament broke for christmas. again, i think he faces a tricky time ahead if he wants to push ahead with tougher measures and has to rely on the opposition, potentially, to get those through. on the policy front there is another tricky area up front there is another tricky area up ahead. lots of interest in particular in seeing what is made of the levelling up a paper that was delayed before christmas. it is key to what borisjohnson has tried to shake —— shape as what borisjohnson is. i think critics have said it is an empty slogan, he needs to prove that a substantial measures in place to try to level up the north midlands, that isn't easy, because
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it is against a very difficult backdrop of public finances with inflation of 5.1%, huge public debt, you know, growth is rather sluggish. there is not a lot of spending room to spend on data and other policy areas, and i think finally, there is this cost of living squeeze coming for voters with rising taxes, with the national insurance hike coming in april, and of course they are facing difficulties with rising energy bills, inflation means, spending power is plunging. it is a difficult part of the year for the prime minister. bud difficult part of the year for the prime minister.— difficult part of the year for the prime minister. �* ., , ., ., prime minister. and as we heard from lu , prime minister. and as we heard from lucy. george. — prime minister. and as we heard from lucy. george. the _ prime minister. and as we heard from lucy, george, the list _ prime minister. and as we heard from lucy, george, the list is _ prime minister. and as we heard from lucy, george, the list is not _ prime minister. and as we heard from lucy, george, the list is not short. - lucy, george, the list is not short. do you think are the biggest challenges ahead for boris this year? i challenges ahead for boris this ear? ~ . , challenges ahead for boris this ear? ~' . y ., , challenges ahead for boris this ear? ~ . y ., , , year? i think lucy has listed them ve well year? i think lucy has listed them very well there. _ year? i think lucy has listed them very well there. there _ year? i think lucy has listed them very well there. there are - year? i think lucy has listed them very well there. there are huge i very well there. there are huge problems— very well there. there are huge problems piling up in the first four months _ problems piling up in the first four months this year for boris johnson, first of— months this year for boris johnson, first of all. — months this year for boris johnson, first of all, we have to get out of the current — first of all, we have to get out of the current covid crisis and hope that in_ the current covid crisis and hope that in england, at least, the decisions _ that in england, at least, the decisions that the prime minister
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took for— decisions that the prime minister took for christmas about not imposing new restrictions over christmas _ imposing new restrictions over christmas and new year are vindicated. if there is a search hospital— vindicated. if there is a search hospital in— vindicated. if there is a search hospital in mid—january and the hospitals — hospital in mid—january and the hospitals are overwhelmed, obviously that will— hospitals are overwhelmed, obviously that will be a huge problem for boris _ that will be a huge problem for borisjohnson. i think if we get through— borisjohnson. i think if we get through this wave of covid we will be into— through this wave of covid we will be into this economic problem that lucy was— be into this economic problem that lucy wasjust be into this economic problem that lucy was just describing, which be into this economic problem that lucy wasjust describing, which i think— lucy wasjust describing, which i think lot — lucy wasjust describing, which i think lot of— lucy wasjust describing, which i think lot of families is going to be really— think lot of families is going to be really painful. it will come to a head _ really painful. it will come to a head in— really painful. it will come to a head in april, which is when energy bills are _ head in april, which is when energy bills are likely to go up, there are some _ bills are likely to go up, there are some predictions they could go up by £500 per— some predictions they could go up by £500 per year. then comes exactly the same _ £500 per year. then comes exactly the same time when the government puts up— the same time when the government puts up taxes on households as well, the national— puts up taxes on households as well, the national insurance rise to fund health— the national insurance rise to fund health and — the national insurance rise to fund health and social care which will add about— health and social care which will add about £500 to the tax bill of the average household. put those two together, _ the average household. put those two together, along with inflation, possibly— together, along with inflation, possibly running up 5% or 6%, income tax thresholds being frozen, it sounds — tax thresholds being frozen, it sounds to— tax thresholds being frozen, it sounds to cool but it means a lot of people _ sounds to cool but it means a lot of people will— sounds to cool but it means a lot of people will be paying higher rates of income tax next year. it is going to be _ of income tax next year. it is going to be a _ of income tax next year. it is going to be a real— of income tax next year. it is going to be a real crunch in april, that is important _ to be a real crunch in april, that is important for boris johnson,
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because — is important for boris johnson, because a _ is important for boris johnson, because a few weeks later there are crucial— because a few weeks later there are crucial local — because a few weeks later there are crucial local elections in may, and if the _ crucial local elections in may, and if the conservative party does poorly — if the conservative party does poorly in _ if the conservative party does poorly in those elections i think boris _ poorly in those elections i think borisjohnson should be in significant trouble with his own party — significant trouble with his own -a . ,, a significant trouble with his own party. sticking with that issue, as ou party. sticking with that issue, as you mention. _ party. sticking with that issue, as you mention, lucy, _ party. sticking with that issue, as you mention, lucy, there - party. sticking with that issue, as you mention, lucy, there was - party. sticking with that issue, as you mention, lucy, there was a i party. sticking with that issue, as i you mention, lucy, there was a big rebellion against borisjohnson's recent measures, only got through because of labour's support, how much do you think that in the long—term that will present a threat to his leadership, given the covid issue behind it has not gone away? well i think it really depends on what happens next. in a sense, it has been quite difficult in the past week or ten days or so, because the data seems to be fragmenting in some ways we have had negative data about rising numbers of hospitalisations, and other senses that has been positive data suggesting that omicron is indeed less severe, milder than delta before it. so in the absence of a very straightforward trend that rings are getting worse or getting better, it
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is difficult or more difficult for the prime minister to put forward tougher restrictions, if that is what he feels he needs to do, if thatis what he feels he needs to do, if that is what the medical and scientific advisers urge him to do, and to really try to convince his backbenchers. i think he is in tricky territory, he does try to do that, because of that lack of consensus around what the data is showing us at present, and of course always be difficulty in covid which we have seen right through the pandemic that there is a lie between spiralling case numbers and hospitalisations of around two weeks to really understand, when we are seeing a record numbers of infection daily, what that translates to in terms of hospitalisation when we do have a level immunity, we do have suggestions that it is milder, and we had the vaccine programme. but it has been a source of huge anguish among his backbenchers. it alleged that revolt. it led to an uptick in intrigue about essential leadership challenges around the idea of rival
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campaigns potentially beginning to mmp campaigns potentially beginning to ramp up the seeds of that. so it will be a difficult start to beer yet if we see such measures brought forward in coming weeks.— forward in coming weeks. george, if we think about _ forward in coming weeks. george, if we think about labour, _ forward in coming weeks. george, if we think about labour, there - forward in coming weeks. george, if we think about labour, there was i forward in coming weeks. george, if we think about labour, there was a l we think about labour, there was a pole before christmas suggesting that if there was a general election, some modelling that was done suggested labour would win back all of the redwall that they lost in 2019, borisjohnson was at the peak of the problems over partygate and everything else at that point. as he weathered that sonnet has labour done everything? we could be a couple of years from the general election, would you stand any chance of anyone? election, would you stand any chance of an one? , ., ,., of anyone? there is a pole in the mail on sunday _ of anyone? there is a pole in the mail on sunday today _ of anyone? there is a pole in the mail on sunday today which - of anyone? there is a pole in the mail on sunday today which i - of anyone? there is a pole in the - mail on sunday today which i suspect will cause _ mail on sunday today which i suspect will cause ripples in the conservative party. it shows that in the redwall seeds, especially in the north of— the redwall seeds, especially in the north of england and the midlands, but the _ north of england and the midlands, but the labor party are 16 points ahead _ but the labor party are 16 points ahead. and on the projections on the basis _ ahead. and on the projections on the basis of— ahead. and on the projections on the basis of that — ahead. and on the projections on the basis of that politics adjusts the conservative party could 100 seats, boris _ conservative party could 100 seats, borisjohnson conservative party could 100 seats, boris johnson could lose conservative party could 100 seats, borisjohnson could lose his majority _ borisjohnson could lose his majority. those sorts of polls under
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backdrop, _ majority. those sorts of polls under backdrop, really, to the problems boris _ backdrop, really, to the problems borisjohnson faces, we have, as lucy— borisjohnson faces, we have, as lucy mentioned, the threat a leadership challenge. it is important to say that this is largely— important to say that this is largely down, as far as i can tell, to self—inflicted mistakes in the political— to self—inflicted mistakes in the political environment facing boris johnson _ political environment facing boris johnson rather than any huge increase _ johnson rather than any huge increase in public affection or interest— increase in public affection or interest in the labour party or in particular— interest in the labour party or in particular in _ interest in the labour party or in particular in keir starmer. there christmas, whether labour party made very limited inroads into the tory vote _ very limited inroads into the tory vote so — very limited inroads into the tory vote so i — very limited inroads into the tory vote. so i think keir starmer goes into 2022— vote. so i think keir starmer goes into 2022 in— vote. so i think keir starmer goes into 2022 in a good position, he is ahead _ into 2022 in a good position, he is ahead in— into 2022 in a good position, he is ahead in the — into 2022 in a good position, he is ahead in the polls, that is something to be held on to, but he needs— something to be held on to, but he needs to _ something to be held on to, but he needs to do — something to be held on to, but he needs to do more, and i was speaking to kisser— needs to do more, and i was speaking to kisser kyle who is a member of the labour— to kisser kyle who is a member of the labour frontbench is set in 2022 they need _ the labour frontbench is set in 2022 they need to light the fire, in other— they need to light the fire, in other words, they need to light the fire, in otherwords, don'tjust they need to light the fire, in other words, don'tjust be a beneficiary of tory mistakes, but actually — beneficiary of tory mistakes, but actually infuse people with a labour programme as well. but it's keir starmer— programme as well. but it's keir starmer plasma challenge. well, geora e starmer plasma challenge. well, george parker — starmer plasma challenge. well, george parker from _ starmer plasma challenge. well, george parker from the - starmer plasma challenge. -ii george parker from the financial george parkerfrom the financial times and fisherfrom george parkerfrom the financial times and fisher from the telegraph, thank you both for talking through
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some of the political issues it is approaching 7:30am. let's catch up with the sport. we were talking about political polling at one party being ahead of the other. well, in the premier league at least, one team is streets ahead at the moment?— the moment? miles ahead at the moment. the moment? miles ahead at the moment- it _ the moment? miles ahead at the moment. it feels _ the moment? miles ahead at the moment. it feels like _ the moment? miles ahead at the moment. it feels like a _ the moment? miles ahead at the moment. it feels like a big - the moment? miles ahead at the moment. it feels like a big table| moment. it feels like a big table chelsea playing liverpool, the two teams which can realistically catch city. but they are a winning machine at the moment, and they did it again at the moment, and they did it again at arsenal. how good were arsenal in the first half? despite a performance, despite being 1—0 up, city did what they do and they came back to win it. thomas turkel called city a winning machine. they left it until stoppage time and then they got the win they needed at arsenal. it was an incident packed match, as patrick geary now reports. earir;r patrick geary now reports. early kick-off on _ patrick geary now reports. early kick-off on new _ patrick geary now reports. early kick-off on new year's - patrick geary now reports. early kick-off on new year's day. - patrick geary now reports. early kick—off on new year's day. tired arsenal and city fans must hope that improves in 2022. referees of course cannot afford to be bleary eyed. stuart also had a decision to make.
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no arsenal penalty, he said. on reflection, dar confirmed, not without question. arsenal did not dwell on that. no time, no need. kyo sucker extended new year celebrations. only the manager missed out. he is in covid isolation. in the second half can be had. a handful of bernardo silva's shirt, enough for a manchester city penalty. and thanks to re— admirers, an equaliser as well. now the game hurtled into a chaotic fast forward. a mistake. somehow city's make in saved a goal. somehow arsenal's w martinelli missed one. seconds later, arsenal's other gabriel, already booked, got himself sent off. arsenal's party was now a lockout. they stop city? stoppage time, the league leaders advised, and rhodri won it. but those who came from manchester, worth waking up came from manchester, worth waking up for. patrick geary, bbc news. afterwards the arsenal assistant
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coach felt he did not get.- coach felt he did not get. there were moments _ coach felt he did not get. there were moments in _ coach felt he did not get. there were moments in the _ coach felt he did not get. there were moments in the game - coach felt he did not get. there| were moments in the game that decided the game. we had a first moment without a guard in the first half which i think is a clear penalty. but at least a moment for the referee to check and that happened in the second half with their penalty which is not really consistent. aha, their penalty which is not really consistent-— consistent. a late when for tottenham _ consistent. a late when for tottenham who _ consistent. a late when for tottenham who defeated i consistent. a late when for - tottenham who defeated watford consistent. a late when for _ tottenham who defeated watford 1-0. tottenham who defeated watford 1—0. and that means that antonio conte is still unbeaten in the league. they are nowjust two points from the top four. and west ham survived a fightback from crystal palace. they warm in the end. landini scored twice for them as they rise to fifth in the table. exeter is up to fifth. they controlled much of the match
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running in three tries to one from this that make bristol. they picked up this that make bristol. they picked up a losing bonus point. a confident boosting wind for sale as they defeated wasps. johnny mcnicol scored a late try as the scholars came from behind to defeat the ospreys. there i say the ashes resume on tuesday evening uk time and it has been confirmed that english had coast — my coach has tested positive for covid—19 and he has been isolating in melbourne since december 30 following a positive test from this family members. he will remain in isolation until saturday. this fully vaccinated and asymptomatic. england have undergone another round of routine pcr testing a local bowler tested positive covid in sydney
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where the fourth test will be played. england are 3—0 down. gavin price has been knocked out of the pvc world darts championship. he had a nine dart finish early in the match and it was a tight tense encounter. taking what was a dramatic wind. he will play in the first semi—final later today. and snakebite is also through to the semifinals. he will play gary anderson in the last four. he has great air. you cannot go wrong with neon pink and yellow.— great air. you cannot go wrong with neon pink and yellow. absolutely. is that our neon pink and yellow. absolutely. is that your new— neon pink and yellow. absolutely. is that your new look _ neon pink and yellow. absolutely. is that your new look for _ neon pink and yellow. absolutely. is that your new look for the _ neon pink and yellow. absolutely. is that your new look for the next - that your new look for the next hour? i that your new look for the next hour? , . , that your new look for the next hour?_ keep i hour? i will phase it in. keep watching- — hour? i will phase it in. keep watching. definitely, - hour? i will phase it in. keep watching. definitely, we - hour? i will phase it in. keepj watching. definitely, we will. approaching 735 now. we will be back with the headlines at eight o'clock but for the next 30 minutes or so we will look back on a year that are
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seen both raging fires and catastrophic floods is the effect of global warming continues to be felt around the world. in global warming continues to be felt around the world.— global warming continues to be felt around the world. in this programme, our science — around the world. in this programme, our science editor _ around the world. in this programme, our science editor explores _ around the world. in this programme, our science editor explores how - around the world. in this programme, our science editor explores how we i our science editor explores how we got here and what it means for the future. it's now beyond doubt that the arctic is changing dramatically. i've had a unique position for nearly 20 years as a witness for the bbc to the greatest challenge of our time. how we're damaging the planet so profoundly that we're turning the climate against us. it's a job that has taken me to the farthest corners of the world. i've felt despair as extreme weather strikes people least able to resist it. i've been attacked for
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highlighting the risks of global warming. and i've also experienced hope that clever ideas and a rising generation will help us to find a way through. so, this is my story, reporting from the climate front lines. the thames barrier in london, a giant defence against the sea. it was built long before anyone worried about global warming, but things are very different now. the job of the barrier is to keep london safe from flooding, and right now, it's coming up to high tide, and the great steel gates
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are holding back a phenomenal volume of sea water that would otherwise enter the city and potentially cause disaster, which is why climate change matters so much here. they're constantly watching the projections for how much the sea is going to rise. it's also why we'll probably need a bigger barrier by 2070. and this was what first hit me about climate change. while some countries can afford gleaming steel structures like this, most others can't. on the coast of bangladesh back in 2009, we saw sea water pouring into this village. the flood was so deep,
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a boat was the only way for us to get around. and the only defence was a wall of mud that was broken. people were struggling to repair it. a human chain passing handfuls of mud to fill the gaps to try to hold back the sea. the big worry here, of course, is if the forecasts of climate scientists are right and the sea rises even more, maybe by a metre by the end of the century, well, how on earth are these millions of people going to cope? while london is secure, the only refuge here was a narrow ridge. the people who've done least to cause climate change were suffering most from it. life was far more precarious than i'd ever expected, and it was getting worse.
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all over the world, i was seeing that children were feeling the impact. remembering this school in vietnam always brings a lump to my throat. the class was drawing pictures of flooding, and it was like seeing into nightmares of drowning, homes destroyed, disasters that these young minds are dreading. the people scream out, "help." whether it's too much water or too little, i was finding that the climate risks are similar. it doesn't take much of a change in temperature or rainfall or sea level
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to make life almost impossible. a drought in kenya in 2006 really brought this home. many of the cattle were dying. they're important to the maasai people. so at a school, i asked how many families had lost animals. almost all of them. my family were very frightened that all our cattle would be cleared off by the drought, and we were very sad. more than a century ago, scientists first started warning that we're heading for trouble. the more we burn fossil fuels, the more heat is trapped
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in the atmosphere. and despite knowing all this, we're still living in ways that put us on course for dangerously high temperatures. ok, so we're on our way down. i'm starting to feel the air pressure in my ears now. over the years, i've filmed at the heart of the fossil fuel industry. this coal mine is in poland. when the business is digging up carbon, it's like visiting a different planet. no—one seems to worry about climate change. even shifts in the rock don't bother the miners. this is a way of life and a mainstay of the economy.
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coal is the dirtiest fuel, but there's still demand for it. this is a reality of life for thousands of miners in poland, and because the coal—mining industry is so important to the economy here, it looks set to last for decades, whatever climate scientists and environmental activists want to see happen. oil is also driving up global temperatures and it's also booming. global demand keeps rising. the company running these pumps in california refused to let us in, so we took to the air. this field has been producing for more than a century, and whenever anyone thinks it might run dry, someone comes along and eitherfinds more oil or comes up with a new way of getting at it. the result, as in many parts of the world, there's more oil than previously thought. and if oil's in your blood, you're not going to like global warming.
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in fact, the oil industry knew about the risks from its own research, but deliberately created doubt. when i visited this well in texas 12 years ago, the owner used a classic line from climate deniers — that any change is natural. the question is — how much difference does co2 really make in our atmosphere? and that question should be debated. there are a lot of climate drivers. you can see the sun shining on my face right now. the sun, obviously, is one of the biggest climate drivers, it goes through many cycles. that view, that climate change is perfectly natural, that fossil fuels have nothing to do with it, has been very strongly held, and it's led to some vicious attacks on scientists and onjournalists like me. i felt pretty exposed at times, accused of being a lobbyist for green industries, of being a hypocrite for using fossilfuels. but i've also watched how the research has evolved, how the scientists have become
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more confidence as they've gained new knowledge to answer their critics. but it's been quite a job to get to that point. all over the world, i've joined expeditions as scientists have investigated the climate. counting individual grains of sand to see how faster winds will expand the deserts. needing an armoured vehicle in siberia to reach remote corners of permafrost. enduring the toughest conditions. watch what happens to this weather balloon in a polar storm. understanding how the world is changing is a complicated challenge.
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for me, it began with a descent into antarctica. i'm climbing down into a crevasse, and it's by getting down into the ice and drilling into it that scientists are able to build up a picture of the greenhouse gases that have been building up in our atmosphere. they find bubbles like this trapped in the ice and analyse the air inside them. the ice holds a record of the climate, trapping carbon dioxide year after year, so we can see how it's risen and fallen. but the next step is working out our role in that, the human fingerprint on global warming, and that involves more recent data. getting to it took a long journey to hawaii and up an old volcano.
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at the summit lies a forest of instruments. one of them has measured carbon dioxide since 1958. by coincidence, that's the year i was born. so, during my lifetime, levels of this key gas have just kept rising. the most striking thing that i see in the co2 records since 1958 is that the concentration in the atmosphere has gone up every single year. so, where would this lead us? the early computer models couldn't be sure. there were lots of uncertainties, but the scenarios were already looking scary. the arctic was the hot spot, heating up much faster than the rest of the planet, and i was to return to it many times. it was greenland that really unnerved me. it may be remote, but there's enough ice here to raise
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the global sea level by 7 metres. i could see for myself a frightening pace of change. our helicopter seemed tiny against the edge of the vast ice sheet. this massive wall of ice behind me... and since i first filmed there, temperatures have just kept rising. and ice that had seemed permanent has retreated. back in 2004, it would have been 100 metres thicker that's like having a 30—storey building sitting on top. it's alljust going at an incredible speed. the ice was vanishing beneath my feet faster than anyone believed possible, and i immediately thought of bangladesh, and the fact that millions of people on coastlines around the world threatened by streams of meltwater heading
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for the oceans. gradually, the projections for the future climate were becoming more reliable. the models were more accurate. supercomputers were handling vast amounts of data, so the un's climate science panel has now overcome years of doubt and denial to reach its most definitive conclusion — that it's us forcing up temperatures. there are natural features that are on our side. the great tropical forests. they're home to abundant and diverse wildlife, and they store carbon that would otherwise be heating the air. so, the habitats these animals depend on act as a buffer against climate change. but we're hacking those trees down. we caught this moment in ghana.
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so, another massive tree taken away to be used for timber. this process is going on not just in ghana, but in tropical rainforests right around the world. the worst devastation is in the amazon. it's heartbreaking, like walking through a graveyard, a once thriving habitat suddenly silent. and for scientists like erika berenguer, dedicated to researching the trees, the losses so, another massive tree taken away to be used for timber. this process is going on not just in ghana, but in tropical rainforests right around the world. the worst devastation is in the amazon. it's heartbreaking, like walking through a graveyard, a once thriving habitat suddenly silent. and for scientists
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like erika berenguer, dedicated to researching the trees, the losses are profoundly depressing, and they affect them personally. for me, it's really important, because the amazon cannot speak up, the trees cannot speak up, they cannot say that they are worth it. and they have a value, they are really important, so i have made this my life. the deforestation happens for a reason — it's big business. the trees are cleared to grow soya for animal feed and to raise cattle for beef. the products are then traded all over the world to consumers who may never realise where they're from. so, there's a good chance that i've eaten food that originated in the amazon.
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as with a lot of people, i'm finding that the penny is now dropping about the impact of the choices we all make. for example, with food, where it's grown, how the ingredients are transported, and in particular, what happened to the packaging after we've finished with it. and i get the sense that people are becoming more aware of climate change partly because of other environmental problems. plastic provokes the biggest reaction because it's right in yourface. i filmed this mess in turkey. and it forces us to ask what we do with our own waste, because the plastic items are so recognisable... ..like the plastic hook in the beak of this albatross
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chick. we were on midway atoll in the pacific, and ifelt real shame at the harm we're causing. a wildlife expert tried to save the young bird. any idea yet what it might be? yeah. i just want to make sure there's nothing sharp. there could be a hook on the end of something? yeah, it looks like we're going to be able to get it out, there we go. and now, we can release the chick. it was a small net for fruit or nuts, used just once and then thrown out without any thought of the consequences. the scale of the damage is so staggering that the tide may now be turning. in indonesia, we filmed these soldiers trying to clear
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a riverjammed with plastic. that seemed pretty futile. butjust up the road, a village was trying to be more positive, using plastic waste to create artistic products. a sign that people are resisting environmental damage. there's the same kind of public resistance to filthy air. when we filmed in china, we wore masks, long before anyone had heard of covid. this family were careful to protect themselves, not against a virus, but against air pollution. the chinese people themselves forced the authorities to shut down or move the dirtiest industries. we're starting to get a little lost. and there's now a similar impatience with climate change. year after year, i've seen the lack of progress in international negotiations.
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it's why greta thunberg has made a stand, gathering the support of millions, fed up with endless talk. "build back better, blah blah blah. "green economy, blah blah blah. "net zero by 2050, blah blah blah." when i met greta, i was struck by her determination. she was getting ready to protest at the next climate summit. by going there with many other young activists, i hope that, together,
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we can help spread the message, and to make people listen to the united science. so, how do we get out of this crisis? i've had a front—row seat at the emergence of forms of new clean power. the biggest investments are in china. we filmed this team throwing up one or even two wind turbines every day, a breakneck pace that was driving down prices. at this solar power station in spain, giant mirrors focus the sun's rays on a boiler. i can feel the temperature rising just in the metal of this ladder. and all of the sunlight is reflected up here to the top of this tower. it's incredibly bright and hot. the temperature here can reach more than 400 centigrade, enough to power a boiler here, which goes on to generate huge amounts of electricity. the project looks incredible,
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but since our visit, it has struggled financially. not every new technology will succeed. instead, a concept that once seemed impossible — planting wind farms out at sea — is now taking off. and the turbines are getting bigger, far bigger. this is the next one to be lifted. hoisting this huge structure up off the quayside and onto a ship is an incredibly painstaking and difficult task. it has to be repeated thousands of times, if the government's energy targets are to be fulfilled. and since we filmed, offshore wind has gone from strength to strength. the costs are far lower than predicted. it's a green technology that's booming.
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whatever we do, we are going to have to adapt to a hotter planet. in namibia, amid a dusty landscape baked by drought, there's a vivid patch of green where a class is being taught how to cope without rain. we know now, maybe in the next two to three years to come, we don't know if we will get even a single drop of rain. and therefore, we have to come up with something, which is going to help the children. other ideas seem obvious —
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shades over the windows to keep the sun off, planting more trees to soak up carbon dioxide — billions will be needed. and maybe our food will come in new low—carbon ways. i was stunned to enter this vertical farm. there are fields in layers. a young researcher here, beth campbell, was bursting with enthusiasm. this is the future. if you can grow stuff that's supposed to grow in italy here in the uk, you can grow it anywhere in the world, you can grow it in the middle east, in africa, and then you cut out all of the transportation, so you're saving money, time and resources.
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and carbon, i reckon. and carbon, a lot of carbon. you're not flying basil all over the world. so, what lies ahead? well, i've turned repeatedly to everyone's favourite guide, david attenborough. the warnings have been proved true, he tells me. what climate scientists have been saying for 20 years, and that we have been reporting upon, you and i both, is the case. we were not causing false alarm. it is the case, and every day that goes by in which we don't do something about it is a day wasted, and things are being made worse. i'm now preparing to leave the bbc, but for the sake of my children and their future children, i want to keep explaining what's in store for us, and how there's so much
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we can do about it. covid has shown us that, when governments have the will and get behind the science, it can make a difference. and, as with the pandemic, everyone's at risk, and everyone can help, which means that we're all on the climate front lines.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with luxmy gopal and rogerjohnson. our headlines today... masks return to classrooms in england. secondary pupils are told to wear face—coverings during lessons to help keep schools open. fears a quarter of public sector workers could be off due to covid as firms are warned to make contingency plans. fans will be allowed to stand to watch chelsea play liverpool for the first time in 30 years as a safe—standing trial begins in england. all aboard the hogwarts express — 20 years after the films first hit our screens the harry potter cast are reunited. day two of the new year starts off
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incredibly mild once again, but rather breezy, and there is a greater chance of a few sharp showers developing today. i will have all the details coming up shortly. you are just waking you arejust waking up, welcome you are just waking up, welcome to bbc breakfast. it's sunday the 2nd of january. our main story. secondary school pupils in england are being told to wear face coverings in classrooms, as they start a new school term. the guidance brings england in line with scotland, wales and northern ireland and is part of a range of measures designed to stop rising covid cases from disrupting education — as james reynolds reports. since march 2020, getting an education has become an obstacle course of home learning, missed exams and regular covid tests. older pupils have got used to wearing masks and communal areas in schools. now the government recommends the pupils in years seven and above keep their masks on when they are in class as well. the move will be reviewed
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in late january. if it is a choice between pupils wearing masks to go to school or pupils not being at school at all because they are either knocked out by the virus themselves or staff in school and knocked out in sufficient numbers that it is hard to manage classes, keeping children learning has got to be the priority, because they have lost so much education during the pandemic. and then there is the air. taking a deep breath is the kind of thing you need to do before an exam but it is hard to do safely in a poorly ventilated classroom. in order to clear the air, then, the government is rolling out a further 7,000 purifiers. we are pleased the government is talking to us and trying to work out how to get some support into schools now. we are disappointed that we are having the conversation this side of christmas when we could have been making these arrangements earlier on. the government says it wants to minimise disruption and keep
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pupils in class, but unions warn that if large numbers of teachers get sick or have to quarantine, some classes may have to be sent home for short periods of time. james reynolds, bbc news. "robust contingency plans" are being developed by government ministers, amid warnings that a quarter of public sector workers could soon be off work because of covid. rising case numbers have led to large numbers of employees self—isolating, with absences particularly affecting the nhs and the transport industry. our business correspondent katie prescott has more details. cancelled trains, delayed deliveries, closed restaurants and shut—up shops. staff shortages because of the spread of omicron are a real worry in the new year as people return to work after the christmas break. i think it makes sense to try to plan for such events. we know we have a very contagious variant in the uk and we know that lots of people are catching the virus and naturally there will be absences throughout all businesses, really.
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from a retail perspective, the biggest challenge will be on the supply chain to make sure that that is still running at the efficiency we are used to. empty workplaces of a nightmare for government. ministers are looking atjust how bad things could get and drawing up contingency plans to try and protect against any disruption from rising infection. to try and keep school gates open as well as hospitals and other vital services, in the public sector leaders have been asked to look at the worst—case scenarios of having ten, 20 or even 25% of their staff off at any one time. labour says that this announcement shows the government is leaving contingency planning to the very last moment. the most recent restrictions in england, set out in the government's plan b earlier in december, are expected to be reviewed this week. katie prescott, bbc news.
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a large fire has damaged south africa's parliament building in cape town. we arejust going we are just going to show you a live shot from there now. a column of smoke can be seen rising from the building. around 40 firefighters have spent more than four hours trying to get the flames under control, after they spread from a third floor office to the national assembly chamber. you can see there are still fire engines there. the cause of the blaze is currently unknown, but it's believed to have started in an office and spread towards the gym. ajudge in the united states has thrown out prince andrew's attempt to halt proceedings in a civil lawsuit against him. the duke of york's lawyers had argued that virginia giuffre — who has accused him of sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager — lives in australia, so is not a us resident. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegations. aruna iyengar has this report.
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seen here at the age of 17, virginia roberts, now giuffre, with prince andrew on the left and ghislaine maxwell in the background. miss giuffre has accused prince andrew of sexually assaulting her when she was a teenager at the homes ofjeffrey epstein, the convicted child sex offender, and ghislaine maxwell. prince andrew has consistently denied the allegations. the civil lawsuit seeks unspecified damages. two efforts to stall the case were blocked on saturday. us federaljudge lewis kaplan told the prince's lawyers they must hand over key legal documents before a crucial court hearing in new york on tuesday. he also rejected arguments by the prince's lawyer, andrew brettler, that the lawsuit should be dismissed because miss giuffre, a us citizen, no longer lives in the us. this comes after ghislaine maxwell was convicted this week of recruiting and trafficking young girls to be sexually abused by her boyfriend, the late american financier jeffrey epstein,
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between 1994 and 2004. on tuesday, judge kaplan will hear oral arguments to decide whether virginia giuffre's lawsuit against prince andrew will proceed. aruna iyengar, bbc news. a group of conservative mps and peers are calling on the prime minister to tackle the spiralling cost of living by scrapping the vat on energy bills — and cutting environmental levies. five former ministers are among those calling for action in a letter to the sunday telegraph. it comes amid soaring wholesale gas prices and fears that household energy bills could double by april this year. yesterday, we told you about max woosey, the 12—year—old boy who's spent 640 nights sleeping in a tent — raising enough money to hire 16 extra nurses for his local hospice. max was awarded the british empire medal in the new year honours list after raising over half
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a million pounds. he told us on the programme yesterday it is £680,000. well, one of max's heroes, rugby legend jonny wilkinson, heard about his amazing efforts and has sent us this messagejust for max. hi max, i just want to say a massive congratulations for being awarded the british empire medal for everything that you've achieved, and for being the inspiring person you are. you've shown us all what can be possible when you follow your passion and that desire to make a difference, and you see it through with such immense commitment and dedication. just incredible. good on you, my friend. take care. and looking forward to what's next for you. a new year honour from the queen and a message from rugby royalty! it is almost ten past eight. as we've been hearing this morning, secondary school pupils in england will now be advised to wear face coverings when they return
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to the classroom after the christmas break. the policy change is part of a range of measures being introduced, to try to stop the rise in covid cases from disupting learning. let's speak to chair of the education select committee, robert halfon. good morning, and happy new year if it is not too late to say that. thank you forjoining us this morning. thank you for “oining us this morning.— thank you for “oining us this i morning._ first thank you for “oining us this morninu. . , , . first of morning. happy new year. first of all, morning. happy new year. first of all. masks — morning. happy new year. first of all. masks are _ morning. happy new year. first of all, masks are already _ morning. happy new year. first of all, masks are already in _ morning. happy new year. first of all, masks are already in place i morning. happy new year. first of all, masks are already in place in i all, masks are already in place in classrooms in the rest of the uk. do you think they should have been brought in to england sooner? the first thin i brought in to england sooner? tie: first thing i want to do if you don't mind as to thank all the teachers and support staff for everything they're trying to do to keep children learning, and i welcome the efforts of the secretary of the state, nadhim zahawi, fir saying that schools will be open for children at the beginning of term. i do have worries about the mask policy. the children's minister came to my committee and said that there
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was no evidence of the efficacy of mask wearing, and there are other studies all around the world that suggest that masks for young children can have a big impact on their mental health, their well—being and anxiety, and we know that mental health problems among children have already rocketed by 60% in terms of an increase in referrals. only this morning, the national children's deaf society said that they are worried that children with impairments will suffer disproportionately under the new mask policy, so i think it is absolutely vital that the secretary of state, when he makes a statement in parliament, which i suspect will be on tuesday, sets out the reasons for the mask policy, the evidence and also what assessment the government is taking a look at the impact on children's mental health, well—being, anxiety and education. experts in education unions have
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been saying that while it is not an ideal solution, actually masks are an important part of covid measures in schools, and in fact the joint general secretary of the national education union says that she feels that mask wearing should be mandatory in classrooms. well, a . ain, mandatory in classrooms. well, arain, i mandatory in classrooms. well, again. iwant— mandatory in classrooms. well, again, i want to _ mandatory in classrooms. well, again, i want to see _ mandatory in classrooms. well, again, i want to see the - mandatory in classrooms. well, i again, i want to see the evidence. i have significant reservations about that. you mention to the unions. jeff barton, the general secretary of the association of school and couege of the association of school and college leaders, said last year that mask wearing is not conducive to educational standards. i already mentioned to you the view of the national children's deaf society, take jonathan national children's deaf society, takejonathan van—tam, hugely respected, he says, and i can quote, i could see they could be quite inhibitory to the natural expressions of learning in children. i think it is difficult for children in schools with facemasks. as i say, the children's minister came to my committee and said there was no evidence to the efficacy of masks. we are in a very different situation
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to where we were last year, thank goodness, and interestingly, last year, it was said that mask wearing in classrooms in the early part of last year was not necessary. now people have been vaccinated, teachers and support staff will have had vaccinations, and many will have had vaccinations, and many will have had the booster vaccination. we know that covid thickness is very low risk to children. i will listen to what the government says, but i am wary about masks in schools because i worry about their well—being, anxiety and mental health which has already suffered because of school closures during lockdown. just already suffered because of school closures during lockdown.- closures during lockdown. just for fairness, closures during lockdown. just for fairness. you _ closures during lockdown. just for fairness, you mentioned - closures during lockdown. just for fairness, you mentioned geoff- closures during lockdown. just for i fairness, you mentioned geoff barton from the association of school and couege from the association of school and college leaders and what he said here a year ago. more recently he said that the government's decision on masks was a recognition that the sprinter will be extremely challenging, and while there are obvious drawbacks to using face coverings, it is clear that the omicron variant poses and additional
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significant risk. if you are opposed or sceptical about mask wearing, what would you like to see as covid measures to ensure that children can return to school safely? i’m return to school safely? i'm cautious — return to school safely? i'm cautious about _ return to school safely? tn cautious about mask wearing. there are studies from all over the world, studies from academics in england, canada, belgium, from respected doctors that talk about the effect that mask wearing has on children's mental health and well—being. i would argue it is not a hobson's choice here. it is not either wear masks or the school is open. i think what the government is doing in terms of supplying 7000 extra ventilators is a good thing. i think the vaccination programme for teachers and support staff and the booster programme, now we know that 56% of adults have now had the booster, is a good thing. other protective measures in the classroom, i welcome that 99% of schools before the christmas holidays were open, but unfortunately we had 230,000 children are not in school, and what i would like the government to do is
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to have a database of schools the around country where there are problems, have a task force that works with the local authority, the school commissioners, the school academies, to help with supply teachers, to help get teachers and the volunteer army that i called for for over a year implemented by the secretary of state over christmas of retired christmas and ofsted inspectors to help the schools, help with public health measures, and then i think we can keep our children in school, because the priority must be to keep our children in school. during lockdown, these children lost their education for a very long time, damage their educational attainment, for a very long time, damage their educationalattainment, damage for a very long time, damage their educational attainment, damage their mental health... i think many people would agree about the importance of keeping children an education. if you are keen to keep children in schools, why did you vote against the plan be coronavirus measures given measures
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to restrict the spread of the omicron variant would enable children to stay in school? i don't acce -t children to stay in school? i don't accept that _ children to stay in school? i don't accept that for _ children to stay in school? i don't accept that for one _ children to stay in school? i don't accept that for one moment. i children to stay in school? i don'tl accept that for one moment. what children to stay in school? i don't i accept that for one moment. what i voted against was the idea of semi—mandatory covid vaccination passports. i think the best way to get people to take a vaccine is to persuade and educate people. i thought it led down to a slippery road. we know most teachers and support staff, thank goodness, have had the vaccination. children over 12, many of them had been vaccinated. teaching support staff, many of them will have had the booster. it is nothing to do with whether schools will remain open or closed. i whether schools will remain open or closed. ., ., . ., whether schools will remain open or closed. ., ., .., . ,, whether schools will remain open or closed. ., ., ., closed. i want to come back to the covid measures _ closed. i want to come back to the covid measures that _ closed. i want to come back to the covid measures that are _ closed. i want to come back to the covid measures that are being i covid measures that are being brought in, which is about the air purifiers. 7000 of them had been
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announced. how far does it go in terms of serving all the schools? i think it is a very welcome step. there is also an additional 1000 in terms of provision for schools, schools for children with special educational needs. that is why i am suggesting the government works individually with schools that needs good ventilation. 99% of schools now have carbon dioxide monitors which helps in terms of health provision in the schools. the government has made a step within it should be recognised for that. {we made a step within it should be recognised for that.— made a step within it should be recognised for that. one issue we had mentioned _ recognised for that. one issue we had mentioned earlier _ recognised for that. one issue we had mentioned earlier was i recognised for that. one issue we had mentioned earlier was the i had mentioned earlier was the shortage of testing and of course we know about their staff absences as well being a major issue. how do you think that can be tackled, giving you say you want to ensure that children can stay in classrooms and there are enough teachers to provide
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their education? it is there are enough teachers to provide their education?— their education? it is very important _ their education? it is very important it _ their education? it is very important it is _ their education? it is very important it is not i their education? it is very i important it is not hobson's their education? it is very - important it is not hobson's choice. the policy of the government will be from the secretary of state. the education secretary has written all the testing that schools need will be provided. we know that in december we will be doing millions of tests per head than any other country. there has been some strain because of the omicron variant but the government is ordering millions more on the secretary of state has made back guarantee. it is vital those tests are provided to schools and i know millions have been sent to the schools during december. robert, ijust want to the schools during december. robert, i just want to talk about a slightly different topic now, just because you are one of 20 conservative mps and peers who have written to the sunday telegraph demanding the prime minister intervened to address the cost of living crisis by scrapping the vat on energy bills. living crisis by scrapping the vat
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on energy bills-— on energy bills. yes, i really welcome — on energy bills. yes, i really welcome what _ on energy bills. yes, i really welcome what the _ on energy bills. yes, i really i welcome what the government has on energy bills. yes, i really _ welcome what the government has done in terms of helping the cost of living, raising the living wage and cutting tax for low earners and the freeze on fuel duty. i had huge concerns about rising energy costs for hard—working people across the country. it will rise even more. it is not the fault of the government, it is because of the international price of energy. i strongly believe given the price gap will go this yearin given the price gap will go this year in the spring that the government should look at other measures and one of those could be, as suggested by the head of the major energy company, suspending the green leathers which are 25% on everybody�*s energy bill. —— levies. that is 25% of our energy bills. i'm not saying get rid of them for ever but suspend the matter time and people really struggle if energy bills go up to £1800 to £2000 a
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month. that will be unaffordable to millions of people across the country and the government should take special measures to try and help, given the particular circumstances we face. . ,, , ., ., circumstances we face. thank you for our circumstances we face. thank you for your thoughts — circumstances we face. thank you for your thoughts on _ circumstances we face. thank you for your thoughts on that _ circumstances we face. thank you for your thoughts on that and _ circumstances we face. thank you for your thoughts on that and on - circumstances we face. thank you for your thoughts on that and on covid i your thoughts on that and on covid schools as well. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. this is lovely, a tranquil start to the morning and parts of northamptonshire. it has rained through the night. some of the quite heavy. many of us waking up to glimpses of sunshine. another mile morning and not bad at all. all set to change as we go through the next few days. over to the east of the pennines it is clearing up into the north sea. another batch of wet weather will develop. becoming more extensive into wales in the south—west as we go through the day. plenty frequent showers in the far north—west of scotland as well.
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through the day there will be sunshine around but the rain will turn quite heavy with hail and thunder mixed in by the end of the afternoon. blustery wind is quite widely across the country, particularly unexposed west facing coast. temperatures will be a bit down on where we saw them yesterday, highs of 9013 degrees. through this evening and overnight we need to joy your attention to the showers across the far north of scotland. still the south—westerly flow further south of the showers. an northerly flow starts to kick in. an indication of what is to come as we go through the next couple of days. the weather front will continue to bring some showers across scotland. at the same time this weather front is brushing with the far south, damaging between the two, not a bad day on bank holiday monday. driver sunshine coming through. noticeably colder scotland. —— dry with sunshine. ten
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to 12 degrees ahead of the front and much colder behind it. the colder air will win much colder behind it. the colder airwillwin out into much colder behind it. the colder air will win out into tuesday. definitely a different feel for all of us. back to you. definitely all change from yesterday. the start of the new year also sees the start of dry january but hospitality bosses are urging people not to abandon pubs, even if they've abandoned alcohol. as venues struggle with debt caused by the pandemic, there are concerns that this month could be "the nail in the coffin," unless customers continue to visit. we're joined now by lucy holmes from the charity alcohol change uk, who started the dry january campaign and tom bott — the founder of a brewery. thank you both forjoining us. happy new year although it is a day too late. we are very grateful to you for being with us. i guess the thing for being with us. i guess the thing for a brewery, everybody understands the point that it has been an
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incredibly tough year and a half, two years almost, for the industry. trying to find creative ways to get people and is the challenge. yes. absolutely- _ people and is the challenge. yes. absolutely. at _ people and is the challenge. yes. absolutely. at the _ people and is the challenge. yes. absolutely. at the best _ people and is the challenge. yes. absolutely. at the best of i people and is the challenge. iezs absolutely. at the best of times, when pubs are able to operate normally, we are playing catch up for the last 18 months, two years, which had been extremely difficult for the industry. we are falling further behind. the pub sector is extremely resilient and does remarkable work to make sure we are operating in the best possible conditions for the local community around us and that might be safety measures already made a the right offering to attract the right people at the right time. haifa offering to attract the right people at the right time.— offering to attract the right people at the right time. how on the edge are ubs? at the right time. how on the edge are pubs? you _ at the right time. how on the edge are pubs? you are _ at the right time. how on the edge are pubs? you are involved i at the right time. how on the edge are pubs? you are involved in i at the right time. how on the edge i are pubs? you are involved in some. after everything that has happened, now people start the new year, maybe have had a good time ever christmas
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with covid and everything else, they might stay away. —— over christmas. how on edge are your businesses? difficult to say in terms of the industry widely. the difficulty we face going into january, which is different to usual, we have not had december, which is normal. usually the busiest month of the year, filled with regulars who go to the pub throughout the year but also people who tend to enjoy themselves around that time, christmas parties, seeing old friends and seeing family. that has not happened. we enterjanuary and are far worse position than normal. absolutely desperate to see people coming through the door and supporting those businesses. if it does not happen now, and some of their favourite venues, whether the local pub, restaurant, cafe, music venue, they may not be there in the summer when you want to go to them. do they may not be there in the summer when you want to go to them.- when you want to go to them. do you have sympathy _
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when you want to go to them. do you have sympathy with _ when you want to go to them. do you have sympathy with the _ when you want to go to them. do you have sympathy with the consent i when you want to go to them. do you| have sympathy with the consent some of the businesses have about dry january, given the difficult situation hospitality has been having some of the points mentioned by tom? ll having some of the points mentioned b tom? a, , , a, having some of the points mentioned btom? a, a _ by tom? it has been an incredibly touch by tom? it has been an incredibly tough coume _ by tom? it has been an incredibly tough coume of — by tom? it has been an incredibly tough couple of years. _ by tom? it has been an incredibly tough couple of years. my - by tom? it has been an incredibly tough couple of years. my heart l by tom? it has been an incredibly - tough couple of years. my heart goes out to _ tough couple of years. my heart goes out to businesses who had been struggling. dryjanuary is no reason to stay— struggling. dryjanuary is no reason to stay at_ struggling. dryjanuary is no reason to stay at home. anything besides covid _ to stay at home. anything besides covid and — to stay at home. anything besides covid and people's decisions around that and _ covid and people's decisions around that and ordinarily we would be encouraging people to get out and socialise _ encouraging people to get out and socialise while they are doing dry january. — socialise while they are doing dry january. it — socialise while they are doing dry january. it is about living your normal — january. it is about living your normal life and seeing how that is without _ normal life and seeing how that is without alcohol in it. it means going — without alcohol in it. it means going to — without alcohol in it. it means going to the restaurant, the pub, seeing _ going to the restaurant, the pub, seeing live — going to the restaurant, the pub, seeing live music, comedy or cannery which _ seeing live music, comedy or cannery which -- _ seeing live music, comedy or cannery which —— cabaret with your friends. dryjanuary— which —— cabaret with your friends. dryjanuary is — which —— cabaret with your friends. dryjanuary is no reason to stay—at—home. do dry january is no reason to stay-at-home._ dry january is no reason to stay-at-home. do you think businesses _ stay-at-home. do you think businesses can _ stay-at-home. do you think businesses can do _ stay-at-home. do you think businesses can do more - stay-at-home. do you think businesses can do more to i stay-at-home. do you think i businesses can do more to be inclusive for people who are choosing not to drink to make it more appealing?—
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choosing not to drink to make it more appealing? there is loads we can all do to _ more appealing? there is loads we can all do to help _ more appealing? there is loads we can all do to help people _ more appealing? there is loads we can all do to help people feel- can all do to help people feel included when they are not drinking, whether— included when they are not drinking, whether going out with your mates are not— whether going out with your mates are not making it a big deal, from pubs _ are not making it a big deal, from pubs and — are not making it a big deal, from pubs and restaurants stocking a broad _ pubs and restaurants stocking a broad range of good quality adult sophisticated drinks when you are not drinking. i went on a pub crawl injanuary— not drinking. i went on a pub crawl injanuary with a not drinking. i went on a pub crawl in january with a couple of friends and was _ in january with a couple of friends and was not drinking. some pubs would _ and was not drinking. some pubs would say— and was not drinking. some pubs would say we have orange juice or lime _ would say we have orange juice or lime and — would say we have orange juice or lime and soda but this will give you an entire _ lime and soda but this will give you an entire menu of nonalcoholic drinks, — an entire menu of nonalcoholic drinks, which is great. that is what i drinks, which is great. that is what lwant~ _ drinks, which is great. that is what lwant~ dry— drinks, which is great. that is what i want. dryjanuary is a time for people — i want. dryjanuary is a time for people to — i want. dryjanuary is a time for people to sample their drinks and .et people to sample their drinks and get a _ people to sample their drinks and get a taste for it. you people to sample their drinks and get a taste for it.— get a taste for it. you said in your first answer. _ get a taste for it. you said in your first answer, leaving _ get a taste for it. you said in your first answer, leaving aside - get a taste for it. you said in your first answer, leaving aside covid i first answer, leaving aside covid and everything else, that is one thing sadly we cannot do at the moment. many are worried about it. your appeal to them, you havejust said with the actually, safety, pubs have done everything they can to make sure they are safe and comply with everything, people are socially distanced, table service if
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appropriate, get out and still support your local pub. l appropriate, get out and still support your local pub. i cannot seak support your local pub. i cannot speak about _ support your local pub. i cannot speak about covid _ support your local pub. i cannot speak about covid safety. - support your local pub. i cannot | speak about covid safety. within restrictions and a people feel confident to go out and about in a dryjanuary— confident to go out and about in a dryjanuary is no reason not to do that _ dryjanuary is no reason not to do that if_ dryjanuary is no reason not to do that if you — dryjanuary is no reason not to do that. if you need extra support there _ that. if you need extra support there is— that. if you need extra support there is an _ that. if you need extra support there is an app and coaching e—mails with loads _ there is an app and coaching e—mails with loads of — there is an app and coaching e—mails with loads of hints and tips. encouragement to enjoy your normal night _ encouragement to enjoy your normal night get— encouragement to enjoy your normal night. get your saturday morning hanlt _ night. get your saturday morning hanlt you — night. get your saturday morning bank. you might start feeling hetter~ — bank. you might start feeling hetter~ it _ bank. you might start feeling better. it will give you confidence for the _ better. it will give you confidence for the rest of the year to get control— for the rest of the year to get control of— for the rest of the year to get control of your drinking so it is not controlling you. do control of your drinking so it is not controlling you.— control of your drinking so it is not controlling you. do you need more support — not controlling you. do you need more support from _ not controlling you. do you need more support from the - not controlling you. do you need - more support from the government? it is a situation where you are saying, please don't do dry january, please keep coming out and supporting the hospitality sector. do you need more support from the government? 0h, we have lost tom! that was a shame, wasn't it? a final thought from you, lucy. have we got you, lucy? that is
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a relief. l lucy. have we got you, lucy? that is a relief. ~ lucy. have we got you, lucy? that is a relief. ,, , , ,, , ., a relief. i think businesses are doinu a a relief. i think businesses are doing a huge _ a relief. i think businesses are doing a huge amount. - a relief. i think businesses are doing a huge amount. i- a relief. i think businesses are doing a huge amount. i know| a relief. i think businesses are - doing a huge amount. i know tom's brewery— doing a huge amount. i know tom's brewery started producing alcohol free beer— brewery started producing alcohol free beer last year which is brilliant _ free beer last year which is brilliant. there are loads for pubs and restaurants to do. alcohol free beers. _ and restaurants to do. alcohol free beers, ciders, sparkling white wines, — beers, ciders, sparkling white wines, a— beers, ciders, sparkling white wines, a particular favourite of mine _ wines, a particular favourite of mine and — wines, a particular favourite of mine and welcome people and whether or not— mine and welcome people and whether or not they— mine and welcome people and whether or not they are drinking alcohol. i was or not they are drinking alcohol. was on or not they are drinking alcohol. i was on alcohol free beer on new year's eve and it was fine, it was great. there is a better range of it now. far more choice available. and jayne and chris echo and wine. you have set him off. —— chris echo. a further thought from the government if you think it is needed. 0h, he has gone. thank you both for that.
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lots more to come on bbc breakfast, including if you are a harry potter fan. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast
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with luxmy gopal and rogerjohnson. it is just approaching 8:30am. after almost three decades, football fans will now be allowed to stand while watching some english top division games, as clubs trial a new safe standing policy. all—seater stadiums became the law following the 1989 hillsborough disaster, which killed 97 liverpool supporters. but in the last few years, campaigners have been calling for a change to that policy. we're nowjoined now by chief constable mark roberts — the national police chief council's lead for football policing, and lou brookes, whose brother andrew died at the hillsborough stadium. ifi if i start with you, mark, first of all. the government says that this is a special moment for football. do you see it that way? i is a special moment for football. do you see it that way?— you see it that way? i think it's a significant _ you see it that way? i think it's a significant moment _ you see it that way? i think it's a significant moment for _ you see it that way? i think it's a significant moment for football. | significant moment for football. these were part of the measures
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brought in after that hillsborough tragedy and the taylor report, and those measures have served us well to keep football say for 30 years, so i think anything we do to alter those measures is really significant. i think we are saying it is the start of the pilot today, thatis it is the start of the pilot today, that is a misnomer. that has been in since the start of the season, because the clubs had to put the engineering works in a we have seen some positive experiences but also some positive experiences but also some challenges. so from our perspective in policing, we think there is an opportunity to implement this but do it in a way that is really safe, meet the needs of the fans, but equally keeps everyone safe, and unfortunately some of the recommendations we made have not been implemented as part of this pilot. been implemented as part of this ilot. ~ ., ., g been implemented as part of this pilot-_ some - been implemented as part of this pilot._ some of. been implemented as part of this | pilot._ some of the pilot. what are they? some of the concerns we _ pilot. what are they? some of the concerns we have _ pilot. what are they? some of the concerns we have is _ pilot. what are they? some of the concerns we have is if _ pilot. what are they? some of the concerns we have is if crowds - pilot. what are they? some of the concerns we have is if crowds are l concerns we have is if crowds are stood up, it is easy to throw missiles, engaging hate chanting, racism, sneaking in alcohol. and obviously in modern stadiums, things
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can migrate around the stadium, and it becomes quite an exclusionary crowd, because families may not want to go in there. but crowd, because families may not want to go in there-— to go in there. but what you don't want his people — to go in there. but what you don't want his people to _ to go in there. but what you don't want his people to move - to go in there. but what you don't want his people to move around. | want his people to move around. people will still have a seat with a seat back, and they will be expected to remain in that bit of area. absolutely, and if that goes to plan, this is fine and it could work. the problem is the expectation, and what we wanted were sensible measures to try and make sure that happens, because we already see it where groups will come in, they will want to stand with their friends, that is easy if you are stood up regardless of any marking on seats, they will squeeze other fans out and then you get too many people. these things can all be readily dealt with as part of the recommendations, and that is why it is disappointing they have not taken them on, and some of those are simple as cctv, proper stewarding to make sure that people can't migrate into part of the ground, it can't become overloaded in a particular area, so these are things that can be readily done. let's not forget
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these clubs in the pilots have vast wealth. these are the things that could be done alongside the introduction which meets everyone's objectives and keep people safe, so ijust objectives and keep people safe, so i just hope as objectives and keep people safe, so ijust hope as we go forward the government genuinely listen and implement the sensible measures. i would like to bring in lou if i may. this has been a really difficult subject who to talk about. how are you feeling about today? hat subject who to talk about. how are you feeling about today?— subject who to talk about. how are you feeling about today? not at all. it is not difficult _ you feeling about today? not at all. it is not difficult at _ you feeling about today? not at all. it is not difficult at all. _ you feeling about today? not at all. it is not difficult at all. i _ it is not difficult at all. i campaign from the very beginning. i didn't— campaign from the very beginning. i didn't agree with all—seater stadiums. my late father was absolutely livid after hillsborough. he strongly believed that our 96 at the time, _ he strongly believed that our 96 at the time, 97 now, were being used for financial — the time, 97 now, were being used for financial gain by the fa, and sky really— for financial gain by the fa, and sky really is well, and the government for playing politics. so i am government for playing politics. so i am really — government for playing politics. so
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i am really pleased. i have campaigned for this for years and years— campaigned for this for years and years and — campaigned for this for years and years and years. i've met mark, i met— years and years. i've met mark, i met mark— years and years. i've met mark, i met mark in _ years and years. i've met mark, i met mark in 2019 to discuss this topic, _ met mark in 2019 to discuss this topic, and — met mark in 2019 to discuss this topic, and since then, mark and i have _ topic, and since then, mark and i have had — topic, and since then, mark and i have had many zoo meetings on this topic _ have had many zoo meetings on this topic -- _ have had many zoo meetings on this topic. —— zoom meetings. we didn't always— topic. —— zoom meetings. we didn't always agree, but i appreciate when mark is— always agree, but i appreciate when mark is coming from and he appreciates where i am coming from. there _ appreciates where i am coming from. there are _ appreciates where i am coming from. there are a _ appreciates where i am coming from. there are a few issues that i'm not happy— there are a few issues that i'm not happy with. — there are a few issues that i'm not happy with, and i have really tried to have _ happy with, and i have really tried to have a — happy with, and i have really tried to have a discussion with ken scott from _ to have a discussion with ken scott from the _ to have a discussion with ken scott from the sg essay, and for some reason, — from the sg essay, and for some reason, l'm — from the sg essay, and for some reason, i'm not having contact with him _ reason, i'm not having contact with him. ~ . ., reason, i'm not having contact with him. . . . , , , reason, i'm not having contact with him. .. ,, , ., him. which are the issues that ou're him. which are the issues that you're rrot _ him. which are the issues that you're rrot happy _ him. which are the issues that you're not happy with? - him. which are the issues that you're not happy with? i - him. which are the issues that you're not happy with? i don't| him. which are the issues that - you're not happy with? i don't think that fans should _ you're not happy with? i don't think that fans should be _ you're not happy with? i don't think that fans should be able _ you're not happy with? i don't think that fans should be able to - you're not happy with? i don't think that fans should be able to stand i you're not happy with? i don't think that fans should be able to stand inj that fans should be able to stand in the away _ that fans should be able to stand in the away area. i feel that the
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seating — the away area. i feel that the seating at the moment isn't what i hoped _ seating at the moment isn't what i hoped for~ — seating at the moment isn't what i hoped for~ i— seating at the moment isn't what i hoped for. i really hoped it would be hoped for. i really hoped it would he the _ hoped for. i really hoped it would be the exact same seating as at celtic. — be the exact same seating as at celtic. and _ be the exact same seating as at celtic, and i have believed that seats— celtic, and i have believed that seats should be able to be in a locked — seats should be able to be in a locked down and locked up position. ithink— locked down and locked up position. i think there should be sanctions if fans do— i think there should be sanctions if fans do misbehave. i don't agree with fans do misbehave. idon't agree with mark— fans do misbehave. i don't agree with mark where he is on about sneaking — with mark where he is on about sneaking alcohol in, because you can do that— sneaking alcohol in, because you can do that anyway, so standing isn't going _ do that anyway, so standing isn't going to — do that anyway, so standing isn't going to make a difference to that. but, you _ going to make a difference to that. but, you know... as going to make a difference to that. but, you know...— but, you know... as you say, lou, sor to but, you know... as you say, lou, sorry to cut— but, you know... as you say, lou, sorry to cut you — but, you know... as you say, lou, sorry to cut you off. _ but, you know... as you say, lou, sorry to cut you off. you _ but, you know... as you say, lou, sorry to cut you off. you have - but, you know... as you say, lou, | sorry to cut you off. you have been campaigning about this for awhile. i just want to ask, how much does the memory of andrew help you with that and you on?— and you on? every day, because andrew wouldn't _ and you on? every day, because andrew wouldn't have _ and you on? every day, because andrew wouldn't have wanted i and you on? every day, because | andrew wouldn't have wanted it. and you on? every day, because - andrew wouldn't have wanted it. this is how— andrew wouldn't have wanted it. this is how i_ andrew wouldn't have wanted it. this is how i look— andrew wouldn't have wanted it. this is how i look at it, is my brother
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didn't— is how i look at it, is my brother didn't die — is how i look at it, is my brother didn't die because he was stood up. my lrrother— didn't die because he was stood up. my brother died because of police negligence, and that is on record. he didn't — negligence, and that is on record. he didn't die because he was stood up. unfortunately he was stood up, but that _ up. unfortunately he was stood up, but that isn't the reason why he was stood _ but that isn't the reason why he was stood up _ but that isn't the reason why he was stood up if— but that isn't the reason why he was stood up. if you are going to go down _ stood up. if you are going to go down that— stood up. if you are going to go down that route, you'd be banning cars because sadly people die in car accidents _ cars because sadly people die in car accidents. you don't ban cars. i just— accidents. you don't ban cars. i just feel— accidents. you don't ban cars. i just feel that the football fans have — just feel that the football fans have been used by politicians as an excuse, _ have been used by politicians as an excuse, and — have been used by politicians as an excuse, and also, if standing was so unsafe, _ excuse, and also, if standing was so unsafe, then — excuse, and also, if standing was so unsafe, then why didn't they ban standing — unsafe, then why didn't they ban standing at lower level football games, — standing at lower level football games, donington, for instance, i used _ games, donington, for instance, i used to— games, donington, for instance, i used to go— games, donington, for instance, i used to go to donington park in my younger— used to go to donington park in my younger years, used to go to donington park in my youngeryears, standing in used to go to donington park in my younger years, standing in crowds of hundreds— younger years, standing in crowds of hundreds of— younger years, standing in crowds of hundreds of thousands, basically. and also, — hundreds of thousands, basically. and also, glastonbury. it's as if
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the government picked it out, but what _ the government picked it out, but what i _ the government picked it out, but what i don't like at the moment is i think. _ what i don't like at the moment is i think. don't— what i don't like at the moment is i think, don't forget this is exactly the same — think, don't forget this is exactly the same government who have got it in their— the same government who have got it in their manifesto who want to bring it back _ in their manifesto who want to bring it back this — in their manifesto who want to bring it back. this is exactly the same, not the _ it back. this is exactly the same, not the exact same government but the party. _ not the exact same government but the party, the conservatives, who wanted _ the party, the conservatives, who wanted to— the party, the conservatives, who wanted to ban it in the beginning. and i_ wanted to ban it in the beginning. and i feel— wanted to ban it in the beginning. and i feel again, football fans are being _ and i feel again, football fans are being used so they can get more votes. _ being used so they can get more votes. and — being used so they can get more votes, and i hope every football fan in this— votes, and i hope every football fan in this country doesn't just vote for conservative based on standing, and being _ for conservative based on standing, and being able to stand in a foothall— and being able to stand in a football ground. lou and being able to stand in a football ground.— and being able to stand in a football ground. lou, thank you. mark, a football ground. lou, thank you. mark. a final _ football ground. lou, thank you. mark, a final thought _ football ground. lou, thank you. mark, a final thought from - football ground. lou, thank you. mark, a final thought from you. | mark, a final thought from you. anyone who has been in a football ground, is often a different dynamic for home supporters and away supporters. but i guess this is there as a safety measure, because quite often people just stand anyway, and having the rail in front and behind prevents that kind of
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surging that you used to see back in the day in football grounds. the first thing is. — the day in football grounds. the first thing is. i _ the day in football grounds. inez first thing is, i do speak the day in football grounds. ii9: first thing is, i do speak to lou the day in football grounds. ii9 first thing is, i do speak to lou, and it is always really powerful, and it is always really powerful, and police officers in positions should speak to people because it reminds us what we are here for, which is to keep people safe, so everything we do is underwritten with that. i think the point about the rail seats in this country, there is no documented example since seating was introduced of progressive crowd collapse. the example cited in report from south africa in 2001, and in 2017, didn't correlate. if it makes fans safer, absolutely, even if it is only a theoretical risk. but let's do it in a way that mitigates the other risks. people leaning into it. one of the things we were keen to avoid were standing up either side of the segregation line, because that is where you get the animosity. so i think these are all things that could be done and give the fans what they want, but it reduces the risk of safety, because ultimately the
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responsibility on all of us is to keep the fans safe.— responsibility on all of us is to keep the fans safe. thank you very much indeed _ keep the fans safe. thank you very much indeed for _ keep the fans safe. thank you very much indeed for outlining - keep the fans safe. thank you very much indeed for outlining that. - keep the fans safe. thank you very | much indeed for outlining that. and thank you, lou, for speaking so passionately about it, it was a really great to hear from you. thank ou so really great to hear from you. thank you so much- _ really great to hear from you. thank you so much. the _ really great to hear from you. thank you so much. the sports _ really great to hear from you. thank you so much. the sports minister, l you so much. the sports minister, niel you so much. the sports minister, nigel huddleston, _ you so much. the sports minister, nigel huddleston, said _ you so much. the sports minister, nigel huddleston, said we - you so much. the sports minister, nigel huddleston, said we are - you so much. the sports minister, nigel huddleston, said we are not| nigel huddleston, said we are not going back to the old days of terraces, he says this is very different. everybody has a seat with bars in front and behind, and that is really good because it will stop the surges as mark said either forwards or backwards, although as mark said, the evidence of that is limited, but particularly in those heightened moments when a goal is scored, so hopefully the trial will go well and it will be a success. we wait and see. you like you are watching bbc breakfast. it is just coming up to 8:40am. two decades after the world's most famous boy wizard first hit our screens, the cast of harry potter have returned to hogwarts, where the magic began. in a special anniversary episode which aired last night, the stars were reunited to share all the behind the scenes
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secrets and reminisce on their time together. let's take a look. we were described as astronauts, because no one else has experienced this on this scale and we will be forever bonded by that. if this on this scale and we will be forever bonded by that.- this on this scale and we will be forever bonded by that. if we were doinu a forever bonded by that. if we were doing a stunt. _ forever bonded by that. if we were doing a stunt. l— forever bonded by that. if we were doing a stunt, i trusted _ forever bonded by that. if we were doing a stunt, i trusted that - forever bonded by that. if we were doing a stunt, i trusted that one . forever bonded by that. if we were doing a stunt, i trusted that one if| doing a stunt, i trusted that one if you would — doing a stunt, i trusted that one if you would catch me.— doing a stunt, i trusted that one if you would catch me. there are very few working — you would catch me. there are very few working environments - you would catch me. there are very few working environments where i you would catch me. there are very i few working environments where you get the time to build that up. it was nonverbal, the three of us could communicate without even having to say anything full stop we were each very strong — say anything full stop we were each very strong for each other. you're the big potterhead, as you called it earlier.— called it earlier. that is what it is called! let's _ called it earlier. that is what it is called! let's discuss - called it earlier. that is what it is called! let's discuss that - is called! let's discuss that special episode now. we have a superfan here, even more of a fan than me, suzy reynolds. i love the
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hogwarts image behind you. you can tell you are a potterhead. so first of all, 20 years on, what did you make of that reunion? i of all, 20 years on, what did you make of that reunion?— of all, 20 years on, what did you make of that reunion? you and me both. it was insane, absolutely _ you and me both. it was insane, absolutely amazing, _ you and me both. it was insane, absolutely amazing, watching i you and me both. it was insane, i absolutely amazing, watching them all getting together again, they are all getting together again, they are all grown _ all getting together again, they are all grown up, and it's weird because i am all grown up, and it's weird because i am the _ all grown up, and it's weird because i am the same age as them, so when they were _ i am the same age as them, so when they were showing back to the philosopher's stone, i was that age when _ philosopher's stone, i was that age when it— philosopher's stone, i was that age when it first came out, and it was weird _ when it first came out, and it was weird watching them grow up again, andl weird watching them grow up again, and i felt _ weird watching them grow up again, and i felt like i fell in love with the visiting world all over again. and you — the visiting world all over again. and you felt like you grow up with them, so you see them go from childhood to adulthood together with you. where there any surprise moments for you?— you. where there any surprise moments for you? no, ithink... i don't know— moments for you? no, ithink... i don't know what _ moments for you? no, ithink... i don't know what my _ moments for you? no, ithink... i don't know what my expectations|
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don't know what my expectations were, _ don't know what my expectations were, we — don't know what my expectations were, we knew it was a reunion, but it was— were, we knew it was a reunion, but it was not— were, we knew it was a reunion, but it was not better than i expected, i knew— it was not better than i expected, i knew it _ it was not better than i expected, i knew it was — it was not better than i expected, i knew it was going to be good. but it wasjust— knew it was going to be good. but it wasjust amazing how knew it was going to be good. but it was just amazing how they put everything together. it was amazing listening _ everything together. it was amazing listening to emma, daniel and rupert talking _ listening to emma, daniel and rupert talking about their time on the set. there _ talking about their time on the set. there were — talking about their time on the set. there were a few things i didn't know— there were a few things i didn't know about when they were on set about _ know about when they were on set about them sleeping because they were so— about them sleeping because they were so tired on each other, and emma _ were so tired on each other, and emma was— were so tired on each other, and emma was talking about the first click when — emma was talking about the first click when all three of them got together— click when all three of them got together for the first time to do something together, they got them together, and she said i remember feeling _ together, and she said i remember feeling that click, and it wasjust so nice. — feeling that click, and it wasjust so nice. it — feeling that click, and it wasjust so nice, it wasjust so nice to hear — so nice, it was 'ust so nice to hear. : :, , so nice, it was 'ust so nice to hear. : ., ,, so nice, it was 'ust so nice to hear. : so nice, it was 'ust so nice to hear.�* ,, , so nice, it was 'ust so nice to hear. : ,, , ., hear. and as you say, suzy, it made ou fall hear. and as you say, suzy, it made you fall in — hear. and as you say, suzy, it made you fall in love _ hear. and as you say, suzy, it made you fall in love with _ hear. and as you say, suzy, it made you fall in love with the _ hear. and as you say, suzy, it made you fall in love with the harry - you fall in love with the harry potter stories all over again. so tell me, what is the most fanatical bit of merchandise, the most harry potter superfan thing about yourself? potter superfan thing about ourself? :, , , potter superfan thing about yourself?— potter superfan thing about ourself? :, , , , , g potter superfan thing about ourself? , , , g ., yourself? probably the diys. my dad
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and i made the _ yourself? probably the diys. my dad and i made the weasley _ yourself? probably the diys. my dad and i made the weasley clock, - yourself? probably the diys. my dad and i made the weasley clock, and i | and i made the weasley clock, and i have a _ and i made the weasley clock, and i have a youtube channel. i get really creative. _ have a youtube channel. i get really creative. and — have a youtube channel. i get really creative, and me and my husband wanted _ creative, and me and my husband wanted to— creative, and me and my husband wanted to make our house harry potter, — wanted to make our house harry potter, and my husband said, start a youtube _ potter, and my husband said, start a youtube channel and let's get creative — youtube channel and let's get creative. you can show people what you're _ creative. you can show people what you're doing. i do other things on there _ you're doing. i do other things on there as — you're doing. i do other things on there as well, but that is where the superfan _ there as well, but that is where the superfan comes in it for me, just getting _ superfan comes in it for me, just getting creative, and the passion of the stories— getting creative, and the passion of the stories for me goes into the work— the stories for me goes into the work that— the stories for me goes into the work that i_ the stories for me goes into the work that i do.— the stories for me goes into the work that i do. so, suzy, what is our work that i do. so, suzy, what is your preferred — work that i do. so, suzy, what is your preferred medium. - work that i do. so, suzy, what is your preferred medium. to - work that i do. so, suzy, what is| your preferred medium. to prefer work that i do. so, suzy, what is- your preferred medium. to prefer the books or the films? i’m your preferred medium. to prefer the books or the films?— books or the films? i'm going to be honest. i books or the films? i'm going to be honest- i only _ books or the films? i'm going to be honest. i only read _ books or the films? i'm going to be honest. i only read the _ books or the films? i'm going to be honest. i only read the books - books or the films? i'm going to be honest. i only read the books for. honest. i only read the books for the first— honest. i only read the books for the first time about four years ago. that's— the first time about four years ago. that's because, don't hate me, that is because _ that's because, don't hate me, that is because when i was a child, i couldn't— is because when i was a child, i couldn't sit _ is because when i was a child, i couldn't sit still, and i couldn't read _ couldn't sit still, and i couldn't read a — couldn't sit still, and i couldn't read a page of a book, no way. i like the — read a page of a book, no way. i like the idea _ read a page of a book, no way. i like the idea of reading, but it 'ust like the idea of reading, but it just wasn't going to happen with me, so i just wasn't going to happen with me, so i waited _ just wasn't going to happen with me, so i waited for the films, and yes, i so i waited for the films, and yes, i read _ so i waited for the films, and yes, i read the — so i waited for the films, and yes, i read the books four years ago, but i read the books four years ago, but i still— i read the books four years ago, but i still can't _ i read the books four years ago, but i still can't sit still, i am quite an energetic person. i struggled to read them, — an energetic person. i struggled to read them, they were really good,
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don't _ read them, they were really good, don't get _ read them, they were really good, don't get me wrong, but i think... the books — don't get me wrong, but i think... the books have more detail. i think i do the books have more detail. i think i do prefer— the books have more detail. i think i do prefer the films, but that is because — i do prefer the films, but that is because i— i do prefer the films, but that is because i started with them, i think — because i started with them, i think. ,, , ., ,, because i started with them, i think. ,, , ., . :, think. suzy, thank you so much for talkin: to think. suzy, thank you so much for talking to us. _ think. suzy, thank you so much for talking to us, i'm _ think. suzy, thank you so much for talking to us, i'm glad _ think. suzy, thank you so much for talking to us, i'm glad you - think. suzy, thank you so much for talking to us, i'm glad you enjoyedj talking to us, i'm glad you enjoyed the programme. it is 8:44am. we're here on the bbc news channel until nine this morning. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. time for one last look at the weather forecast. isn't it lovely to start any positive? if i woke up to that view, i would know what i wanted to do. get out and enjoy the morning sunshine. this was rather an hour ago. there will be some showers around today and we have seen some through the night but on the whole,
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it will be sunny spells and scattered showers. we had one massive rain losing its way for the east. we had some showers for the north west and great glen. through the morning with a fish wrapper showers through wales and south—west england. some of those merging togetherfor england. some of those merging together for a england. some of those merging togetherfor a longer england. some of those merging together for a longer spell of rain, maybe an hour or so before it moves west to east. it will do so and then sunshine will come back out again. sunny spells and frequent scattered showers, a blustery afternoon for all of us in terms of the feel of things. a mild story to come. top damages between nine and 13 degrees, above where we should be at this time of year —— top temperatures. as you go through the night tonight, this rash of showers will develop, it is a cold front. the wind direction changing to a northerly. temperatures through the night around 6—8 but called the first thing into scotland and that trend
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will continue. as we go through the day on a bank holiday monday we have got this weather front down to the south. it could introduce more clout showery outbreaks of rain but sandwiched between those weather fronts, dry and settled with sunshine coming through. that front will rake in off but the cold air is the talking point. one last day of milder weather across england and wales, noticeably colder, brighter and crisper further north. wales, noticeably colder, brighter and crisperfurther north. highs of three — five celsius. that cold air is whitefish its way southwards as we move into tuesday. —— will push its way. still plenty of strong winds and driving in showers across scotland. tuesday is still a bank holiday. elsewhere, a good slice of sunshine will develop across much of england and wales. cloud will erode, but you will notice the difference any step outside across the country.
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top temperatures on tuesday 5—8 and that because they feel will stay with us. into wednesday morning we will see a widespread frost, the coldest days into the north. something less cold but not quite as warm as we have seen continues across england and wales. a noticeable difference to our weather from tomorrow onwards. back to wintry conditions again. thank you very much. enjoy your day. we are done. done and dusted. it is time for us to say goodbye. dan and sally will be back tomorrow at 6. now it's time for click. this week, sustainability is the name of the game, which is why i'm on the eve ecargo bike. it's electric, it's made from natural and recycled materials, and it's usually used for inner city deliveries. but today, it is delivering me to the studio. nice wheels! oh, hello down there! hey! sinclair c5 — blast from the past! i know! an icon of the '80s created by a computing icon. in memory of sir clive sinclair, i'm taking this for a spin,
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but it's really been souped up. inside is an escooter with some brand—new batteries, which means i can go pretty fast! here! wait for me! cheering and applause spencer chuckles whoa! ah! 0h! good engines! that's how to arrive in a studio! hey! welcome to click! hello, hello, hello! oh, look at us! we've got a shiny studio! we have an audience! hello, audience! and right next door, through that wall
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and across the river a bit, we have some very important neighbours. yes, we're here at bbc scotland in pacific quay glasgow and just over there, the united nations climate conference, cop26, is hosting leaders from around the world, along with 25,000 delegates from 196 nations. the question is will they agree to take the steps needed to tackle our climate emergency? the un says current systems won't suffice. we need new ideas and solutions to secure our future. and so in this show, we're asking what role do technology and innovation play in helping reduce our emissions? can technology save our world? so, let's start, and did you know that one of the biggest causes of greenhouse gas emissions is the agriculture industry? now, we know we need to cut down on our meat consumption and one of the reasons is that cattle are responsible for 10% of those emissions. yes, but it's not from what we think it is, is it? the back end? no, no, it's not, no. nearly all methane from cows — 95% — comes from the front
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and not the back. yep, it's all about the burps. 10% of our entire greenhouse gas emissions come from cow burps. and that means you, magenta — everybody, meet magenta, magenta, everybody. applause she's appearing here alongside her team and her showbiz agent eileen wall, head of research at scotland's rural college. eileen, welcome. hi, spencer, and hello, magenta. hello, magenta. can i ask you what is magenta wearing and why? magenta's wearing the latest in wearable technology for our bovine friends. she's got two bits of kit on her. one, a pedometer — kind of like what we all wear on our wrists — that measures what she is doing, lying down, sitting, walking around and how much energy she's using. and around her neck, she's got something that measures her head movements so we can know when she's eating and when she might be producing something out of her front end. and that helps you to work out how much methane she's producing? yeah, so methane is produced after she's eaten her meals, so if we know how much she's eating, how often she's eating, we'll be able to extrapolate her methane, as well as being able to measure it to compare it.
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and you have belch chambers, is that right? we do. we use those for research, that's not something we use routinely in the field, and we use it very infrequently to really get an idea of how the methane changes over time, how it might differ for this cow over another cow or eating different foods. is there any way we can find out how much methane magenta's producing right now? yeah, so the equipment that we have in the chamber is not exactly the same as this — this is a laser methane reader. right. that measures the parts per million of methane that might be coming out of magenta's front end at any one time. let's give that a go. i'm going to get out of the way because it is a laser! there's a laser, and we all know how dangerous lasers are. so, magenta, if you don't mind. yeah, don't listen, magenta! 0k. oh...she's licking it, she knows it's coming. she doesn't chase it like a cat does. oh, she's... and the reading is 18 ppm. so it's been a while since she's had a lot of food. ok, she's having a clean day. all right.
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well, that went a lot more smoothly than it may have done! but what comes out of a cow could also be affected by what you put into a cow. this lot are eating feed created from seaweed found in the waters of hawaii, and its makers, blue ocean barns, claim it cuts emissions by 80%. but will it make your beef taste fishy? apparently not, because the thing is... bugs! come and get your lovely bugs! your tasty, nutritious bugs! spencer, what are you doing? lara, welcome to my wondrous emporium filled to the brim with fine foods from the future. oh, great, because i am absolutely starving. 0k. well, i tell you what, get your lips around these delicacies. um, ok, i'm actually thinking that because our audience have gone to the trouble of coming here to join us today, that they may be more deserving of this than me. i'm sure you'd love to try some, wouldn't you? just here, we've got the first course for you. help yourselves. did we fill in the forms for this? i'm sure there were forms. listen, trust me, they're not bad. i've eaten roasted mealworm in china and it never did me any harm. see, in the future, we might be
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eating more insects than meat. they are cheap, they're richer in protein, calcium and iron and have less fats than beef, pork or chicken. best of all, there are bazillions of them. yes, i heard — there are 1.5 billion per person on earth. what do you think? how do they taste? they're very crispy. crispy. you don't look too impressed. and you? like roasted chickpeas. ok, that's not bad! interesting. do you like roasted chickpeas? love them, yeah. 0k! fairenough! how about. . .these? ok, that actually looks borderline appetising. hmm—mm. do you want to try? i think i may be asking you again. yeah, right, ok. just behind here you will find that. all right. just have a taste of that. there we go, any time you are ready, and i will tell you that these are — drum roll — spicy crickets. yes, these dishes are made from insect packed by a british firm called bug — who love bugs, obviously — and they say that bugs use less water, they use less land
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than animals, they need less feed than animals and, in fact, they can be fed on the things that we throw away. but are they delicious? weakly: they're quite spicy! clears throat 0k. a bit of a kick! right, i do not think you're impressed by any of this! i think it's like _ sweet—and—sour chicken. ok — again, that's not bad. you'll eat anything! chickpeas and sweet and sour chicken! i think you have got dinner here sorted, haven't you? totally! now, it's all very well having tasty stuff to eat, but in terms of the climate, how ourfood is produced is key. and our very ownjen copestake is in a greenhouse for us. jen. yes, i'm here in the norwich greenhouse and it looks completely different than it did on my last visit. it's absolutely filled with plants now. there are 378,000 tomato plants here, and that represents 5% of the uk's consumption of tomatoes. last year, we saw this world—first project being built using an environmentally friendly heating system. a typical greenhouse would burn
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fossil fuels to create the heat that you need to go through these rails. but our greenhouse takes waste heat from sewage treatment works. we use that heat instead of burning fossil fuels. the hard hats and hi—vis gear we wore last time have been replaced by coveralls to protect the crops from bringing in external bugs and viruses. workers here have their clothes cleaned on site. and how many people are working here now? because when i came before, there was nobody. yeah, so we have about 50 people currently working in here on picking. so these tomatoes are going out to the shops? yes, yeah, they're being picked, ready to be packed and you'll see them in the supermarket soon. and we see different varieties of tomatoes, so can you explain what's going on? as we've got here, this is ready to be picked. these ones are just starting to get some colour on, so they'll be picked within the next ten days. we introduced predatory insects. at the beginning the year, we introduced macrolophus pygmaeus, which is a true bug.
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it's a predatory insect that feeds on anything like whitefly, aphids, commonly known as greenfly, spider mites. there is one of my macrolophus. ah! hello! so we do not want to damage him? he's fine? he looks like a greenfly. yeah, he's just searching away, looking for something to eat. because we're coming to the end of the crop, we've taken the top of the plant off. so this would have extended all the way to the top of the greenhouse? up to the top of the wire, the string here. oh, wow. so we keep a buffer above the top of the greenhouse so we can control the atmosphere and the climate within here. and more produce is growing in a greenhouse just next door using the same green technology. how many cucumbers are you growing in the other greenhouse? the other greenhouse here is iii million cucumbers. iii million?! 22 million peppers. 22 million peppers?! i don't know how many tons of tomatoes, but a lot. it's done better than we'd anticipated in its first year, if i'm honest. yes. um, but, you know, great. so this project has proven that you can grow a large scale
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of produce in a low—carbon way — you just need to be near a waste heat source and there are plenty of those around the world. thanks, jen. of course, once our crops have been harvested, they need to be stored safely so they don't spoil. an estimated 630 million tonnes of grain goes bad each year, which is such a waste. well, doctor lorenzo conti thinks he might have a solution. doctor lorenzo, what is it? what we have developed, lara, is the world's first subterranean drone and we're using it specifically to help the grain storage operators maintain the quality of their stock. you called it a drone but it doesn't look much like a drone. that's right. since there wasn't a word in the dictionary to describe what it is, we have come up with one. we call it a 'crover'. how does it work and what does it do exactly? it swims through grain in storage, like in silos and sheds, monitoring the conditions of the grain like temperature and moisture and helping maintain quality.
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how does this vary from conventional methods of looking after your grain? well, traditionally, you would need a farmer to physically walk on top of the grain bulk with a heavy spear and taking samples at a few points, which is dangerous and in some situations not possible to do. ok, that sounds like a biggerjob. so do you think farmers are going to use this? right now, we're focused mostly on centralised grain storage hubs, which are usually owned by grain merchants and port operators, but we'd like to develop in the future a version that is suitable for farmers as well. ok, and i'm hoping when it's used in the real world, it doesn't mix up the grains like that. i can hardly look! thank you so much, dr lorenzo. thank you, lara. and that is it.
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as usual, you can keep up on social media. thank you for watching. see you soon. goodbye.
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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. i'mjoanna i'm joanna gosling. our top stories... secondary school pupils are to be required to wear facemasks in class in england, as covid cases continue to surge across europe. fears a quarter of uk public sector workers could be off due to covid — as firms are warned to make contingency plans. france will cut the covid self—isolation period from ten to seven days, in a bid to ease staff pressures. dozens of fire crews are tackling a blaze at the houses of parliament in the south african city of cape town. a us judge throws out prince andrew's attempt to halt proceedings in a civil lawsuit against him.

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