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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 23, 2022 2:00pm-4:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines: ukraine tells its citizens to leave russia immediately, saying it is becoming increasingly difficult to protect them. in becoming increasingly difficult to protect them-— protect them. in the last hour, president _ protect them. in the last hour, president zelensky _ protect them. in the last hour, president zelensky has - protect them. in the last hour, president zelensky has called l protect them. in the last hour, l president zelensky has called for tougher sanctions on russia. translation:— tougher sanctions on russia. translation: ~ ., , translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions on the _ translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions on the russian _ translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions on the russian federation. l sanctions on the russian federation. we hope _ sanctions on the russian federation. we hope and expect that these sanctions will be enhanced in the nearest _ sanctions will be enhanced in the nearest future. the government has defended the scale of sanctions imposed on russian billionaires and banks after further criticism from the labour party. it is vital that after this first barrage, we work in lockstep with friends and allies around
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the world and we squeeze him. meanwhile, a defiant president putin says the security of his country is non—negotiable. here, the grieving mothers fighting for the truth about why their babies died in one of biggest maternity care scandals in nhs history. i'm still coming out of my general anaesthetic and she said, "he's dead." and that was it, and she left. pupils who fail maths and english gcse could be refused loans for university tuition fees in england. a children's charity accuses facebook of neglect, as a bbc news investigation shows children are at risk of grooming and sexual abuse in the world of virtual reality.
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borisjohnson says even more sanctions are coming against russia if it continues to threaten ukraine. in parliament this afternoon, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, pressed the prime minister to impose further measures because, he said, there'd already been an invasion, adding, "if not now, when?" the prime minister also confirmed the uk will be providing more military support to ukraine. today, ukraine urged its nationals to leave russia immediately. meanwhile, president putin said the security of russia and its citizens is non—negotiable. earlier this week, president putin said he was recognising two areas in eastern ukraine — the so—called people's republics of donetsk and luhansk — as independent. they've been controlled by russian—backed fighters since 2014. mr putin said he was sending in troops as peace—keepers. the united states says that's an invasion. our moscow correspondent
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caroline davies is in the city of rostov on don, 100km from the border with ukraine. so far, the kremlin have been dismissive about the sanctions, but the russian people may be genuinely concerned about how this will affect them. today is a national holiday in russia, where the military is celebrated, and it comes at a time when the world has not paid such close attention to what is happening with the russian army. young voices singing old melodies. a song from the second world war on a public holiday in honour of the armed forces. close to the border with ukraine, there are different views on what is happening. "of course it is scary," she tells me, "but what can we do?" alexander served in the russian fleet.
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"ukraine will stop shelling," he said and if they will not, as they said, we will send in troops. there was flower laying in moscow. what vladimir putin intends to do with the troops is unclear. translation: first, i didn't say i the troops would go straight there, second, it is not possible to predict possible actions. it depends on the situation that develops. in ukraine, they wait for moscow's next move. the russian president's decision to recognise the areas has had consequences with sanctions from the uk, us and others around the world. australians always stand up to bullies. and we will be standing up to russia, along with all of our partners and those who believe that it is unacceptable that russia could invade its neighbour.
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back at the border, the evacuation buses continue from the rebel—held areas. these tents have been erected in the last few days by the russian ministry of the emergency for the evacuees that are coming through. this tent said it is for mothers and children. here they're preparing for more to come through too. filling out paperwork, recent arrivals were feeling emotional about vladimir putin's decision to recognise the areas as independent. this 74—year—old said she has been waiting since the first day of the war. "how long can you hide?" she says. translation: we hope things will settle down, | and there is no more war. do you want to be part of russia? of course, we love russia. the russian president has promised
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that this is a step towards peace. around the world there are concerns that he has something else in mind. vladimir putin has said that he still is open to diplomacy, but after weeks of talks, many in the west may be wondering what diplomacy means to president putin. moscow correspondent caroline davies there, reporting from rostov—on—don. the ukrainian president has said that russia had violated ukrainian sovereignty and thanked western allies for their sanctions against russia. translation: ~ ., russia. translation: a, , translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions against _ translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions against the _ translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions against the russian - sanctions against the russian federation which were announced by the eu, the usa and the uk. we hope and expect that these sanctions will be enhanced in the nearest future.
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president zelensky. here, the prime minister defended the scale of british sanctions announced yesterday against three russian billionares and five banks, after labour and some conservative mps said they didn't go far enough. the measures were imposed following president putin's decision to order troops into those two regions of eastern ukraine. our political correspondent nick eardley has more. are you going to toughen up sanctions, prime minister? the concern is significant, but does the west need to go further in imposing sanctions? yesterday, the uk announced a crackdown on three allies of vladimir putin. five banks, some of which are key to the russian military, face asset freezes, and ministers have promised sanctions on russian politicians. the foreign secretary said it was just a start. there would be an escalation
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in the sanctions, nothing would be off the table in the event of a full invasion, and we are working closely with our allies, the americans and europeans and the g7, to inflict pain on the vladimir putin regime. some want the uk to go further faster. like ukraine's foreign minister, who said the pressure needs to step up to stop putin. "hit his economy and cronies." there is concern in parliament that promise of an immediate, firm crackdown haven't been matched by action. we all want to deter aggression in europe. we are not dealing with breakaway republics. vladimir putin is not a peace keeper. a sovereign nation has been invaded. the prime minister promised that in the event of an invasion, he would unleash a full package of sanctions. if not now, then when? there is more to come, and we will be stopping russia from raising sovereign debt, stopping companies, russian companies from raising money
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and stopping russian companies, as i said yesterday, even clearing in sterling and dollars on international markets, and this that will hit vladimir putin where it hurts. there are wider questions too, about russian money and influence in london. we shouldn't be waiting for russia to attack others to clean up - the corruption and russian money that has been in the uk. - under the tories, a sewer of dirty russian money has been allowedl to run through london for years. he is right, we need to stop corrupt russian money in london. the government says further measures are likely soon, as the west seeks to send a message to russia about the cost of invading ukraine.
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the defence secretary, ben wallace, has said that vladimir putin has gone full tonto in his recent decisions, he was speaking alongside home secretary priti patel earlier. whether you are based in cyprus, oman, brindisi, it is going to be busy. unfortunately vladimir putin has gone full tonto! and that is going to require 1000 people on standby. i think we should send the gurkhas and the scots guards, they kicked the backside of san nicolas
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l, kicked the backside of san nicolas i, we can always do that again! ben wallace and — i, we can always do that again! ben wallace and priti _ i, we can always do that again! ben wallace and priti patel there. we can speak to nick eardley, who we heard from earlier, and obviously this was a big feature of prime minister's questions today, but what is it going to take to echo what sir keir starmer said, to get britain to take more measures against moscow? the argument you hear from the government, martine, is that the government, martine, is that the government needs to do this incrementally. so the worse the situation gets a ukraine, the more sanctions should be introduced, and the arguments you hear from the foreign office is that is a strategy that has been agreed with other western countries, with the european union, with the united states, who have also announced targeted sanctions but not the full package
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of what they intend to do. the understanding is that the foreign secretary has drawn up a list of further sanctions that could be taken in the coming days and weeks. that is likely to include more sanctions against some of president putin's allies, against banks, and it is also likely to extend two key sectors of the russian economy, things like defence, energy, the chemical industry, as well. so all of that could come. you are continuing, however, to see pressure put on the government to do more. we heard from ukraine's foreign minister, saying that we need to hit president putin hard, now. we have heard various politicians in the house of commons saying that he might get the wrong message that this is a slap on the wrist, you want to go hard to make it clear to rush out that the uk and its allies mean business when it comes to sanctions. i think it is highly
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likely we will see more in the coming days and weeks, exactly when we'll be up to the government in those talks that it is having with its allies. the one tangible thing that the uk government has been talking about this afternoon is the government has written to ofcom asking it to review the licence of the broadcaster rt, formerly known as russia today, because there is concern in the uk government about russian misinformation, as they see it, being broadcast in the uk. that is a complicated process, not one that the government could make a decision on, and there is the risk that if it went ahead, there would be tit—for—tat sanctions imposed on uk broadcasters like the bbc. but thatis uk broadcasters like the bbc. but that is something that the uk government has asked the regulator to look at, and it wouldn't surprise me if we hear more of that sort of thing over the next few days. kollek
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nick, for the moment, thank you very much. joining me now is the senior ukrainian mp ivanna klympush—tsintsadze. she's the former vice prime minister for european and euro—atlantic integration and current chair of the parliamentary committee on integration of ukraine to the eu. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. thank you very much for “oining us on sac newt thank you very much for “oining us on bbc news. thank you for having me. on bbc news. thank you for having me- thank — on bbc news. thank you for having me- thank you- — on bbc news. thank you for having me. thank you. what _ on bbc news. thank you for having me. thank you. what is _ on bbc news. thank you for having me. thank you. what is your - on bbc news. thank you for having i me. thank you. what is your reading of who president _ me. thank you. what is your reading of who president putin _ me. thank you. what is your reading of who president putin is _ me. thank you. what is your reading of who president putin is working - of who president putin is working with, based on his actions in recent days? with, based on his actions in recent da s? ~ ., ., ., with, based on his actions in recent da 5? . . ., . ., with, based on his actions in recent da 52. . ., . ., , days? what do you mean, who is he workin: days? what do you mean, who is he working with? _ days? what do you mean, who is he working with? he _ days? what do you mean, who is he working with? he is _ days? what do you mean, who is he working with? he is working, - days? what do you mean, who is he working with? he is working, i - working with? he is working, i think, with his psychological trauma, not believing that ukraine is a state that has a right to exist, that is the major problem for the security of the whole country of ours, and that is something that
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lays the basis for all his further actions. but we have to understand that his appetite does not end with ukraine's sovereign territory, his appetite ends with his way of introducing rules to the global security order, and that is, i think, what a his shooting at. but he will follow through, from my perspective, with his military agenda in ukraine first, unless he is stopped by both ukraine's willingness and capacity to fight back, and the clear and unified and united action of our western partners. united action of our western partnere— united action of our western artners. �*, ., ,, ., partners. let's talk about the artners partners. let's talk about the partners in — partners. let's talk about the partners in a _ partners. let's talk about the partners in a moment, - partners. let's talk about the partners in a moment, but. partners. let's talk about the i partners in a moment, but what should ukraine's responsibly, and how well—equipped is the country to carry it out? how well-equipped is the country to carry it out?—
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carry it out? well, first i think we have to understand _ carry it out? well, first i think we have to understand that - carry it out? well, first i think we | have to understand that ukrainian society is ready to push back and to fight for our territory, for our land, and for our state, fight for our territory, for our land, and for ourstate, and fight for our territory, for our land, and for our state, and for our choice that we made back in 2014, moving towards european and nato integration roles. that is one thing. what do we need for that, to be capable of repelling the russian attack, definitely more weapons, more financial capabilities as well. i think we have to talk right now about air defence and naval defence capabilities with our partners. we are extremely grateful for all the additional military support that has come into the country over the last maybe month, definitely much more than we received over the years, so from the start of the russian attack and the russian war against ukraine backin and the russian war against ukraine back in 2014, but there are some
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areas where we still feel pretty vulnerable, and if russia decides to attack from the air or from the sea, we need some reinforcement there. and as far as the international community is concerned, we have already seen some sanctions being imposed against russian billionaires and russian banks, and the threat of more to come. how adequate are those sanctions at the moment? we more to come. how adequate are those sanctions at the moment?— sanctions at the moment? we are crateful sanctions at the moment? we are grateful that _ sanctions at the moment? we are grateful that our _ sanctions at the moment? we are grateful that our partners - sanctions at the moment? we are grateful that our partners have . grateful that our partners have started rolling out sanctions, that is very important, finally flat macro needs to be slapped on the wrist, but he will be blackmailing the west and ukraine with his next steps, and he will be using this opportunity that the russian duma has given to him with his usage of
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military force outside the russian federation and the nearest future, so i think it is important to go through pre—emptive measures, rather than responsive measures. taste through pre-emptive measures, rather than responsive measures.— than responsive measures. we really a- reciate than responsive measures. we really appreciate you _ than responsive measures. we really appreciate you talking _ than responsive measures. we really appreciate you talking to _ than responsive measures. we really appreciate you talking to us, - than responsive measures. we really appreciate you talking to us, thank i appreciate you talking to us, thank you for your time. the price of petrol has hit a new record high and could reach 150 pence a litre in the next few days, the motoring organisation the rac has warned, with the crisis between ukraine and russia increasing oil prices. so how else could our household energy bills be affected? 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith gave this update. already we are seeing some immediate impacts with petrol prices around the £1.50 mark. we have already of course seen that big increase in energy prices, because of global gas rises over the last six or eight months. this impact of what is happening in ukraine and russia will push that price up further.
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and that means that when there is another increase in the price cap which we will see in september, that is likely to go up again, we are sure that will go up again, and of course that will hit households hard. the bank of england bosses have been speaking to mps today and they think that what is happening globally will hopefully be a temporary situation, but they're worried the increase in prices that we are seeing in all our household goods may get baked into the system if we are not careful. let's look at some other news. it's one of the biggest scandals in the history of the nhs. many babies died, while others were left with life—changing injuries following repeated failures in maternity care at hospitals in shropshire over the last two decades. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has been following the investigation into what went wrong. he's been speaking to one mother whose baby died. and you might find some of the conversation upsetting.
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these are all his clothes. in preparation for him? yeah. kamaljit uppal�*s son should be 18 years old. the prices are still on them. the prices are still on them, yeah. yeah, they have all hung in the wardrobe for him to come home. instead, she clings to the memory of what could have been. during her pregnancy, she was told that manpreet was in a breech position, lying in the wrong direction. i was told, you're not having a normal delivery. it will be a c—section. but when she went into labour, the royal shrewsbury hospital encouraged her to have a normal birth. 18 hours later, her son hadn't been born. she needed an emergency caesarean. i'm still coming out of my general anaesthetic and she says, "he's dead." and that was it. they had plonked the baby in my arms and said, "say goodbye." i just didn't know
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how to say goodbye. and...| just gave him a kiss, and that was it. in march 2003, just a month before manpreet�*s death, mps held a hearing amid concerns over the rising number of cesareans. panorama has discovered that clinical leaders from the royal shrewsbury hospital told the mps how they managed to have the lowest c—section rate in the country. the evidence we've seen show them telling the health select committee... "the culture of our organisation is that we have low intervention rates and once that is known, we attract both midwives and obstetricians who like to practise in that way." the promotion of natural birth was part of a wider national effort, though in shropshire the evidence suggests they pursued it too vigorously. following her son's death, kamaljit uppal was called to a meeting with a hospital consultant. she still remembers what he told her. i took the wrong
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option of delivering. and basically, if we had given him a c—section earlier at 3:45, he would have lived a normal life, there would have been nothing wrong with him. the midwife overseeing the official review which is looking at nearly 1900 cases over almost two decades, says caesarean rates at the trust were consistently lower than the england average. there were cases where an earlier recourse to a caesarean section rather than a persistence towards a normal delivery may well have led to a better outcome for mother or baby, or both. bernie bentick retired in 2020 after spending nearly 30 years with the trust. the gynaecologist says that while he questioned management, others were frightened to. i was increasingly concerned about the level of bullying and adverse culture within the trust. i believed that some of the ways they responded to problems were to try to preserve
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the reputation of the organisation. in a statement, the trust say they apologised for the distress caused but they had made strong progress, including investing in staffing and training. next month, a full report into shropshire's maternity failings will be published, a public recognition of two decades of private grief. michael buchanan, bbc news, shropshire. we are going to return now to the top story this afternoon, ukraine, and we are going to speak to michael
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kimmince, who worked at the us state department on the russia and ukraine portfolio. thank you very much for joining us. what is your reaction to the changes that we have seen in the last few days, that calling off of diplomatic meetings? it is last few days, that calling off of diplomatic meetings? it is quite strikin: , diplomatic meetings? it is quite striking. the _ diplomatic meetings? it is quite striking, the diplomacy - diplomatic meetings? it is quite striking, the diplomacy is - diplomatic meetings? it is quite striking, the diplomacy is over. striking, the diplomacy is over between the west and russia, at least diplomacy of a normal kind, there may be some crisis management, but there will be no deal—making. putin made a very stark and aggressive speech about his intentions vis—a—vis ukraine, and that has been matched on the ground with the recognition of the two people's republics and the movement of russian assets to the border, so the situation is certainly escalating. in the situation is certainly escalating-— escalating. in terms of intelligence, _ escalating. in terms of intelligence, how- escalating. in terms of- intelligence, how accurate has it been, to what extent have ukraine's
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allies and ukraine itself been taken by surprise by president putin's decisions? i by surprise by president putin's decisions?— by surprise by president putin's decisions? ~' , , , .., decisions? i think the surprise came in the fall and _ decisions? i think the surprise came in the fall and early _ decisions? i think the surprise came in the fall and early winter— decisions? i think the surprise came in the fall and early winter of- in the fall and early winter of 2021, that this could be happening. since then, the intelligence has been spot on, the prediction that the crisis would escalate, that it wouldn't reach some point of reconciliation, that putin would not sit back, that he has amassed an enormous military force, and if the intelligence continues to be true, it predicted an attack on the capital city and a much wider invasion of the country. of course, we don't know that yet, but it is consistent with the predictions. hosp consistent with the predictions. how adeauate consistent with the predictions. how adequate are _ consistent with the predictions. how adequate are the sanctions that have currently been put in place? i realise a number of nato allies do say they have more planned if president putin doesn't stop. sanctions are and will be an important tool. it is going to be
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much more formidable than what was organised in 2014. the problem with sanctions from a western point of view is that the effects will be slow, it will not change russian behaviour in the next six months or year, but it could alter the dynamic over the next few years. the key element of sanctions will be patience on the western side. what patience on the western side. what would have — patience on the western side. what would have more _ patience on the western side. what would have more immediate effects? president biden has announced there will be more us deployments to the three baltic nato states. is that sufficient? ., ., , ., sufficient? no, that is not really rermane sufficient? no, that is not really germane to _ sufficient? no, that is not really germane to the _ sufficient? no, that is not really germane to the exact _ sufficient? no, that is not really germane to the exact conflict, l sufficient? no, that is not really i germane to the exact conflict, that is reassurance of allies and an attempt to forestall the crisis from spreading beyond the borders of ukraine, but to be blunt about it, it would be the provision of air power and troops, us and european troops to ukraine, but that is a step that the biden administration and european countries are not willing to take.—
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and european countries are not willing to take. how naive is it to think that diplomacy _ willing to take. how naive is it to think that diplomacy has - willing to take. how naive is it to think that diplomacy has a - willing to take. how naive is it to | think that diplomacy has a place? willing to take. how naive is it to l think that diplomacy has a place? i think that diplomacy has a place? i do not think it is naive, but one has to be clear eyed about what it can accomplish. from an american perspective, the united states and russia remain the major nuclear powers. that demands diplomacy, however bad the relationship is, however bad the relationship is, however much conflict, so the place of diplomacy is to prevent this getting rapidly out of hand, which could happen. but it is not going to stop the problems of ukraine in the next year, two or three years, that will be decided on the battlefield. finally and briefly, if you would, what are president putin's ambitions? at minimum, he wants to render ukraine neutral. to be more maximalist, he would want to incorporate a large part of the country into russia. we appreciate ou talkin: country into russia. we appreciate you talking to _ country into russia. we appreciate you talking to us, _ country into russia. we appreciate you talking to us, thank— country into russia. we appreciate you talking to us, thank you - country into russia. we appreciate you talking to us, thank you for i you talking to us, thank you for your insight. you talking to us, thank you for your insight-— you talking to us, thank you for your insight. thank you so much. more coverage _ your insight. thank you so much. more coverage on _ your insight. thank you so much. more coverage on the _ your insight. thank you so much. more coverage on the ukraine i your insight. thank you so much. i more coverage on the ukraine crisis with an hour—long new special coming up, bringing you all of the latest
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from lyse doucet in kyiv and matthew amroliwala here in london, that is from four o'clock here on the bbc news channel and online on the bbc iplayer. pupils could be blocked from taking out student loans if they fail maths and english gcses, under government plans aimed at tightening controls on higher education in england. the proposals are set for consultation this week, and would see the introduction of both student number controls and minimum entry requirements for some university applicants. the department for education said the measures are being considered to prevent pupils from being "pushed into higher education before they are ready" and to ensure "poor—quality, low—cost courses aren't incentivised to grow uncontrollably." we can speak to the chief knowledge officer at times higher education. what is your reaction to these proposals? what is driving them? i think they are being driven by quite
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a straightforward affordability issue. i think the current university funding system is proving to be quite expensive to the taxpayer in terms of the upfront tuition fee loans and the cost to the taxpayer of writing off a lot of those loans. but it is actually, i think, a really negative retreat from the aspiration we have had for many years now, including previous conservative governments to come to have 50% of our young people at university, it is clearly saying we want fewer people to go to university, and that is negative in general for university, and that is negative in generalfor the university, and that is negative in general for the economy, for individuals, and just yesterday i was having a meeting in india, where they have agreed to move towards a 50% participation target, which is another 35 million young indians going to university at the very time that we are retreating. but going to university at the very time that we are retreating.— going to university at the very time that we are retreating. but going to university these _ that we are retreating. but going to university these days _ that we are retreating. but going to university these days carries - university these days carries enormous cost with it. where is the proof that going to university is going to adequately equip somebody
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for a betterjob that would give them a better income?- for a betterjob that would give them a better income? well, there is still, i think, — them a better income? well, there is still, ithink, clear— them a better income? well, there is still, i think, clear evidence _ them a better income? well, there is still, i think, clear evidence of- them a better income? well, there is still, i think, clear evidence of a - still, i think, clear evidence of a graduate premium. data shows that your average earnings over a lifetime will be higher with a degree. of course, the government is concerned about courses at some institutions, where the payback might not be as obvious, and that is one of the issues they are trying to address here, but the way they define a low value because, for example, can be very simplistic. they may look purely at graduate earnings, and there are so many other benefits to higher education in terms of your contribution to society, the wider societal benefits in terms of health, democracy, citizenship and engagement. there are a lot of societal benefits, and not all jobs are a lot of societal benefits, and not alljobs are about how much money you get paid. as we have seen in the pandemic, with fabulous nurses and carers. it is a crude mechanism, and my fear is that by proposing minimum entry
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requirements, you are cutting off opportunity for a wide range of people and it is likely to be the more disadvantaged communities that suffer, that are excluded from these opportunities, which is a nobody�*s interests and works against the levelling up agenda. now we have the latest sport. it is almost certain that uefa will no longer hold the champions league final in st petersburg after several countries including the uk introduced sanctions against russia. the 68,000 seater gazprom stadium had been selected as the season a's venue. uefa are closely monitoring the situation and any decision will be made in due course if necessary, they said. the london met said the
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english capital is ready to step in —— the london mayor sadiq khan. with the tottenham hotspur stadium one option. wembley�*s also under consideration but is due to host the league two and championship play off finals on that same weekend. manchester united are one of four english clubs hoping to reach that final, they're away at atletico madrid in the first leg of their last 16 tie tonight. this was united manager ralf rangnick�*s response when he was asked if the final should be moved away from russia. that is something for politicians to decide on, but we all hope that things won't escalate and nobody should be interested in a war within europe, so this is more important, actually, than a champions league game, if we are honest.
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birmingham city captain troy deeney says the teaching of black, asian and minority ethnic histories should be made mandatory in schools. deeney commissioned a yougov survey of teachers, and found the majority believe the school system has a racial bias and only 12 per cent feel empowered to teach diverse topics. the best thing about black history at school was i got to watch route, which was about slavery, but that is about it. teachers are not feeling empowered. i think it is very dangerous because the people we are putting in charge, to teach our children, they don't feel confident enough within their role to talk about subjects that is happening in the world. next to tennis the world number 3 alexander zverev�*s apologised after being thrown out of the mexican open for attacking the umpire's chair at the end of a doubles match.
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this was last night and the game went to a deciding tie break in which zverev argued with the umpire over a line call here. once he and his partner were beaten zverev let his frustrations out. the atp says zverev, who was the defending singles champion, has now been withdrawn from the tournament for unsportsmanlike conduct. andy murray's bid to reach 700 wins
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on the atp tour is going to have to wait a little longer after he was beaten by the world number 10 jannik sinner at the dubai tennis championships. it was another second round exit for murray who has gone out at this stage at his past four tournaments, dating back to the australian open last month. sinner claimed the decisive break in a tight first set but was much more dominant in the second, winning four of the final five games to seal a 7 5, 6 2 win. and there was disappointment for emma raducanu who was forced to retire in a real marathon match in mexico her first competitive outing since losing at the australian open. the reigning us open champion was top seed at the guadalajara open, but was clearly struggling with her left hip after spending three hours and 36 minutes on court in herfirst round match against australia's daria saville. raducanu was down a break in the deciding set when she called it a day. that is all the sport for now, back to you. we have got the latest ons figures about death rates. joining me in the studio with more bbc head of statistics robert cuffe. what are the figures showing regarding the number of people dying with covid? taste
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regarding the number of people dying with covid? ~ ., , with covid? we are seeing significant _ with covid? we are seeing significant figures - with covid? we are seeing significant figures in - with covid? we are seeing i significant figures in january with covid? we are seeing - significant figures in january and significant figures in january and these are the best picture of what is going on because they are a dr reviewing somebody who died and seeing what caused the death, these are deaths caused by covid, and it was the third leading cause of death in january, was the third leading cause of death injanuary, so still pretty high, we had a lot of people catching it in december and it was still infecting enough people to kill thousands. the interesting thing, the overall number of deaths we saw injanuary was the same as it was in 2020 before the pandemic or even lower, so that is quite interesting, the leading causes of deaths, dementia, heart attacks, cancer, they are below the norm at the moment. the death figures have told us the result of what happened a month ago and they are moving in the right direction and i think these are the
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best numbers we have on infections because they tell us about how many people are getting infected and not people are getting infected and not people who are forgetting to enter the natural flow data into the system which not everybody does. —— natural flow test data. we can show to the audience that they are really moving in the right direction. coming down from the peak at christmas and now they really are moving in the right direction. still far higher than they were in november, so we are still, as i said, covid hasn't gone away, but a couple of weeks ago this was the only data where the trends were not moving in the right direction but now we can say all the data is pointing downwards which is how we wanted to go. the pointing downwards which is how we wanted to go-_ wanted to go. the government has made it clear _ wanted to go. the government has made it clear and _ wanted to go. the government has made it clear and the _ wanted to go. the government has made it clear and the scientific - made it clear and the scientific advisers have made clear that these ons statistics will be important in the future with the removal of covid
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restrictions and protections. find restrictions and protections. and the changes _ restrictions and protections. and the changes in — restrictions and protections. fific the changes in the way we test ourselves and the way in which we report it, the daily dashboard we have spent so much time looking at, they will stop reporting at weekends, that will change how the numbers appear, so surveys like this when you pick people at random and it does not depend on changes of rules, they are important for telling us the absolute levels, and they still tell you a good picture, and a different picture around the country, i should say. they have onlyjust country, i should say. they have only just started to country, i should say. they have onlyjust started to turn in northern ireland which is great news and in scotland may be moving up so still a reason to watch their and keep an eye on what is happening. for now, thanks forjoining us. a bbc investigation has found evidence of child grooming and sexually abusive behaviour on apps that allow people to interact using virtual reality headsets. the nspcc charity says it's shocked and angry by the revelations, which have sparked concerns about children's safety in the so called "metaverse".
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this report by angus crawford and a warning that it does contain some disturbing content of a sexual nature. meetjess. she is 25, a bbcjournalist. but in virtual reality, she is pretending to be a child. enter vrchat, one of the most popular apps. the age limit is 13. some rooms look innocent enough. but there is pole dancing and strip clubs too. hello, miss. we can hang out, watch a movie or something... men chase a child, demanding she strip. oh, my god! put your clothes back on, you're 14. there are rooms with condoms and sex toys. there are two people to the side of me now who are trying to get on top of each other. ok, so there's like a group of people that are like simulating sex.
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i want to say there's like five of them. there's avatars, right? can't go naked. someone threatens to rape her. oh, my god! and thenjess's avatar is assaulted. he is shoving a beer bottle up all of the female characters, like in their private areas. what was that like? horrible. it was strange, i felt like it was happening to me. stop it, leave me alone. today, we are going to talk about the metaverse... mark zuckerberg thinks the metaverse is the future of the internet. even rebranding facebook as meta. spending billions of dollars on the quest headset which dominates the market. there are games and apps made by meta, and by other companies too. the so—called metaverse doesn't actually exist yet. that is just the name given to a series of games and virtual reality experiences you get to using a headset like this one.
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choose what you want to look like, your avatar, and you can start exploring. the question is how safe is this world for children? it's just the most shocking breach of any responsibility. iam angry. because facebook promised us disney levels of safety. this isn't a theme park, this is a set of virtual worlds where children are at risk of grooming, of sexual abuse. meta told us it wants everyone to have a good experience and said, we provide tools that allow quest players to report and block users. we will continue to make improvements as we learn more about how people interact in these spaces. children and the metaverse, an exciting virtual adventure, but also a very real risk of harm.
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angus crawford, bbc news. severe flood warnings remain in place across england, following high rainfall from storm franklin. one of those is for bewdley in worcestershire where flood barriers were breached on tuesday. andrew plant is there for us. we are in bewdley in the west midlands here, right next to the severn. and you can see just how swollen it is. it is really high on the bridge there. the edge is supposed to be where those trees are, so you can see how much it has burst its banks. you mightjust be able to pick out the bin there, that shows you how high the water has come up. almost over—the—top. you can see they have installed these temporary flood barriers to protect the houses on the other side. they go all the way back,
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snaking around that corner there. in the water has actually just come over the top of those right at the end and into the homes next door. now all of these houses have got basements, we are told, and they are already starting to pump some of that water out of their but at the moment they're holding off because emergency services say this might be as high as it gets. we have seen them going door—to—door today, just knocking on doors checking people are ok, checking if they need anything. but they have kind of paused at the moment because they are told that the waters might be peaking right about now and then possibly going down again. so they've stopped pumping for the moment and are just waiting to see if the water levels do start to drop, then if they do, they can start to pump some of this water back into the river where it is supposed to be. moby and iggy pop have paid tribute to mark lanegan who has died at the age of 57. the manic street preachers work with him on their
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latest apple —— album and they described him as a huge talent with a huge artistic vision. a south asian family from the uk has secured a place in the guinness world records, for having the most siblings with albinism. the parvez family, who are originally from pakistan but currently live in coventry in england have six siblings who have inherited this rare condition which affects the pigmentation in the hair, skin and eyes. 0ur south asia diaspora reporter gaggan sabherwal reports. throughout our lives as a family we have faced a lot of bullying and discrimination and people used to break our windows and leave dog mess on the front of the house and we had fireworks through the door.- fireworks through the door. growing u . fireworks through the door. growing u- would fireworks through the door. growing up would be — fireworks through the door. growing up would be difficult, _ fireworks through the door. growing up would be difficult, we _ fireworks through the door. growing up would be difficult, we were - fireworks through the door. growing up would be difficult, we were given nasty— up would be difficult, we were given nasty names and we did not fit in with any— nasty names and we did not fit in with any category, we weren't white or asian _ with any category, we weren't white or asian. ,, . with any category, we weren't white or asian. . . ,
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with any category, we weren't white or asian. ,, . , ., or asian. since birth, the parvez family have _ or asian. since birth, the parvez family have faced _ or asian. since birth, the parvez family have faced bullying - or asian. since birth, the parvez family have faced bullying and i family have faced bullying and discrimination because of the way they look. all six of them have albinism, a genetic condition that affects the production of melanin, the pigment which gives colour to the pigment which gives colour to the skin, hairand the pigment which gives colour to the skin, hair and eyes. people often have a white or very light blonde hair and suffer from often have a white or very light blonde hair and sufferfrom other medical conditions including eye problems. we medical conditions including eye roblems. ~ ., medical conditions including eye roblems. ., i, , medical conditions including eye roblems. ., , , problems. we have poor eyesight is a really severe — problems. we have poor eyesight is a really severe site _ problems. we have poor eyesight is a really severe site that _ problems. we have poor eyesight is a really severe site that cannot - problems. we have poor eyesight is a really severe site that cannot be - really severe site that cannot be corrected with glasses and we are unable to drive and as soon as the temperature starts to rise we have to start putting the sun block on so we don't burn and get skin cancer. the siblings inherited the condition from their parents and despite the challenges of the family has faced, they say they have all grown to like their condition and are proud of their condition and are proud of their identities. b5 their condition and are proud of their identities. this! their condition and are proud of their identities.— their condition and are proud of their identities. as i have grown up i've their identities. as i have grown up we loecome _ their identities. as i have grown up i've become more _ their identities. as i have grown up i've become more confident - their identities. as i have grown up i've become more confident in - their identities. as i have grown up i've become more confident in whoj their identities. as i have grown upl i've become more confident in who i am and _ i've become more confident in who i am and because of my colour i do get compliments, because one thing my husband _ compliments, because one thing my husband normally says to me, i don't have to _ husband normally says to me, i don't have to spend too much money on make
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up, have to spend too much money on make up. because _ have to spend too much money on make up, because you don't need it. what i like up, because you don't need it. what i like about — up, because you don't need it. what i like about it, _ up, because you don't need it. what i like about it, it _ up, because you don't need it. what i like about it, it gives _ up, because you don't need it. what i like about it, it gives me _ up, because you don't need it. twist i like about it, it gives me a unique outlook on life and i connect with more people because of my uniqueness. it with more people because of my uniqueness-— with more people because of my uniqueness. it is this uniqueness that has helped _ uniqueness. it is this uniqueness that has helped her _ uniqueness. it is this uniqueness that has helped her and - uniqueness. it is this uniqueness that has helped her and at - uniqueness. it is this uniqueness that has helped her and at her i that has helped her and at her family to get into the guinness book of world records for having the most siblings with albinism. brute of world records for having the most siblings with albinism.— siblings with albinism. we have been celebratin: siblings with albinism. we have been celebrating our _ siblings with albinism. we have been celebrating our uniqueness _ siblings with albinism. we have been celebrating our uniqueness and - siblings with albinism. we have been celebrating our uniqueness and i - celebrating our uniqueness and i thought, let's do this, and winning the guinness world record is amazing. the guinness world record is amazinu. , , , the guinness world record is amazin.. , , , , the guinness world record is amazin. , , , , . amazing. the siblings say they are lad none amazing. the siblings say they are glad none of _ amazing. the siblings say they are glad none of their _ amazing. the siblings say they are glad none of their children - amazing. the siblings say they are glad none of their children have i glad none of their children have this condition and would not have to go through any of the discrimination and challenges that they have had to face. �* ., , , and challenges that they have had to face.�* . , _ , , and challenges that they have had to face.�* , , ., and challenges that they have had to face. �* , , ., ., face. i'm happy because he would not have to experience _ face. i'm happy because he would not have to experience the _ face. i'm happy because he would not have to experience the bullying - face. i'm happy because he would not have to experience the bullying and i have to experience the bullying and he would _ have to experience the bullying and he would not go through the vision difficulties that i go through and i have been through in the past. i�*m have been through in the past. i'm blessed with three beautiful children— blessed with three beautiful children and _ blessed with three beautiful children and just _ blessed with three beautiful children and just knowing i blessed with three beautiful i children and just knowing their eyesight— children and just knowing their eyesight is— children and just knowing their eyesight is perfect, _ children and just knowing their eyesight is perfect, that - children and just knowing their eyesight is perfect, that is i children and just knowing theirj eyesight is perfect, that is god gifted — eyesight is perfect, that is god gifted god _ eyesight is perfect, that is god gifted. god forbid _ eyesight is perfect, that is god gifted. god forbid if— eyesight is perfect, that is god gifted. god forbid if i - eyesight is perfect, that is god gifted. god forbid if i pass- eyesight is perfect, that is god i gifted. god forbid if i pass away, but they— gifted. god forbid if i pass away, but they would _ gifted. god forbid if i pass away, but they would not _ gifted. god forbid if i pass away, but they would not need -
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gifted. god forbid if i pass away, but they would not need to i gifted. god forbid if i pass away, but they would not need to be i but they would not need to be dependent _ but they would not need to be dependent on _ but they would not need to be dependent on anyone. - but they would not need to be dependent on anyone. the i but they would not need to be dependent on anyone. the family will share their experiences _ dependent on anyone. the family will share their experiences and - dependent on anyone. the family will share their experiences and hope i dependent on anyone. the family will share their experiences and hope to l share their experiences and hope to educate people about albinism and help reduce the stigma attached to it. the conservative mp, james brokenshire, was 53 when he died from lung cancer in october. before he passed away, he formed a close friendship online with mandee lucas, who was also undergoing treatment for lung cancer. mandee has recently been given the all clear and has been to meet mr brokenshire's widow, cathy. 0ur reporter zoe conway was there. are we allowed to hug? i think so. lovely to see you. sorry, i'm wet, aren't i? so lovely to see you, cathy. don't worry. not at all. thanks so much for having me today. well, you're more than welcome. cathy brokenshire and mandee lucas, meeting for the very first time. go through there. cathy's husband, james, died of lung cancerfour months ago. mandee has been free of the disease for the last five years. how are you feeling? i miss him all the time.
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but no, we are coping and getting involved in the charity is good. in april 2018, james brokenshire was interviewed on bbc breakfast. he'd had surgery to remove part of one lung just a few months before. yet there he was, back as a cabinet minister. it's been hard, you know, i it's been really, really difficult. and i rememberjust those early days where, you know, that sort— of sinking feeling in your stomach, the pit of your stomach _ of, what is this? you know, what does this mean? and i think also recognising huge pressures on your family. - my wife, cathy, and the kids have been absolutely extraordinary i at times where, yeah, - you do go to dark moments, you do really think about, i what does the future hold? watching at home was mandee, who was recovering from her own lung cancer treatment. and i don't know why, but i connected with him, which sounds ridiculous, but i just felt for him. i'd been through the same thing. he's the same age as me. i was a couple of years down the line, but i felt like i wanted to reach out and say,
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"if you want to talk, i'm here. and have you heard of roy castle lung cancer foundation?" which i did. and he responded, saying, "thank you for reaching out. "it's nice to know that other people have been in the same boat as me, "and i'm hoping for a full recovery." and there wasn't an awful lot of chat. and then the announcement in october came that he'd passed away and i literally sat with my cornflakes on my lap, crying my eyes out. i couldn't believe my ears — that this man who was so vibrant and full of life and full of good, can just not be here at that age. 53. same age as me. cathy says she knew she wanted to marry james the first time she met him in a pub in essex. she says it was his charisma, his presence, that so attracted her. and when he went into politics, she became what she calls a pa to his personal life. we were soulmates, and i kind of did everything in his personal life that he couldn't do because he was running around — dealing with politics.
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and we've oftenjoked in the past, the pair of us, that we've done so well and lasted so long because we're still in our honeymoon period 31 years later, but life is very different. it has... it was very quiet. i mean, unfortunately, i lost my best mate and my husband overnight. more on ukraine now. a number of conservative mps have called for stronger action against russia. including iain duncan smith and he joins us now. what message do you believe the current level of sanctions is sending to vladimir putin? to sanctions is sending to vladimir putin? ., , , putin? to put this in context, vladimir putin _ putin? to put this in context, vladimir putin knew - putin? to put this in context, vladimir putin knew very i putin? to put this in context, vladimir putin knew very well putin? to put this in context, i vladimir putin knew very well what he was going to do and he was going to dojust enough he was going to do and he was going to do just enough to save face and also enough to provoke the west,
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nato and so forth, to some kind of rejection and that is what he has done. he will watch now to see what we do and so will other parts of the world, china will watch, because they have got there ready hands wanting to grab taiwan, so how we react this time around has much bigger ramifications for the world and notjust ukraine and russia. the government position so far looked to me behind closed doors as subject to not full agreement with the rest of the nato countries so all the extra stuff we want to do which is huge about hammering all of this illicit money, very much the banking arrangements, these would really hamstring them and we have got to get to those pretty quickly and i gather those under discussion but i would have liked them all done in one go to say to him, 0k, would have liked them all done in one go to say to him, ok, you have done what you have done, you have
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continued the invasion, we are now going to slam you with everything we have got to give you a starter of how bad this is going to be for you. we have sent him a signal but the signal now needs to be turned up. financial sanctions often take time to bite, so hitting them hard and now, what would that look like? right now it has to be sanctions because that is the only thing that we have agreement about and we can still continue to supply a much greater level of military equipment to ukraine than we have done already but i don't believe any of the nato nations are prepared to take direct military action themselves so this is going to be about strengthening ukraine and weakening the russians. and vladimir putin. there is no question that vladimir putin is capable of being weakened and so the first thing we have got to do is to do the economic sanctions on them,
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very hard indeed, and that is why everything we have got now has got to be thrown at him in that regard, and that means all of the stuff about russian money. vladimir putin has about £250 billion squirrelled away around the world in london and elsewhere, it is in the hands of these so—called oligarchs and i think many of them are not real oligarchs, their money comes directly from vladimir putin's corrupt practices in russia, siphoning off money from the russian people. it is squirrelled away as though it was theirs but we know where it is and we should be getting after it, and this will require new york to do the same and paris and frankfurt to do the same, as well, and we must persuade other countries that run important financial centres like tokyo and some of the areas in and around southeast asia, so these are areas we will have to go hard on and i think this will cause problems
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for him and his cohorts. iloathed for him and his cohorts. what questions _ for him and his cohorts. what questions should _ for him and his cohorts. what questions should political- for him and his cohorts. what questions should political parties that have accepted donations from some of these sources be asking themselves?— some of these sources be asking themselves? ~ , ~ , . themselves? why? why did we receive those donations? _ themselves? why? why did we receive those donations? i— themselves? why? why did we receive those donations? i think _ themselves? why? why did we receive those donations? i think all _ those donations? i think all politics should be very careful about receiving donations from overseas, and it is much more difficult than it used to be anyway, but you should not be wanting to ask ourselves the question, why would people want to give us money, because it is important for us to know if they are here, if they are citizens, and we have got to be careful not saying to others who have genuinely chosen to come to the uk to be here, and it is important for them to support them and we don't have the taxpayer picking up the full bill for political parties and i have never been in favour of that because some of them may not want to give money to parties they don't support. so we do need to fill the gaps with other sport but it has got to be above board and clean and we need to make sure that is the
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case so we need to ask where the money has come from —— we need to fill the gaps with other support. and what influence they are trying to buy? and what influence they are trying to bu ? , ., , and what influence they are trying tobu? ., to buy? there is always that suggestion. _ to buy? there is always that suggestion, people - to buy? there is always that suggestion, people will i to buy? there is always that suggestion, people will give to buy? there is always that - suggestion, people will give money because they like the general nature of the policies, so you certainly can't afford to have anybody that comes to you and gives you money to then say, i want you to do the following things as a party, because ministers should immediately ring the alarm bells and say they are not going to do with that individual because the optics would look terrible. and it would be wrong of them to do it. individuals and civil servants should guard that as much as the parties do themselves, but i do believe the uk politics is comparatively to other countries very clean and sometimes it doesn't appearso very clean and sometimes it doesn't appear so because we look at ourselves but i look at american money and money across the continent and what goes on and i think the uk system works better which does not mean it can't be improved. iaih mean it can't be improved. iain duncan smith, _ mean it can't be improved. iain duncan smith, thanks forjoining us.
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pleasure. the nadine dorries has asked ofcom to look at the news channel rt which has an operation here and in other parts of the world and they have now responded, thanking herfor her letter. she raised concerns about broadcasting standards and how the situation in the ukraine was being reported. we had of ofcom melanie doors said she agrees that a free media is one of the cornerstones of our democracy. now time for a look at the
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weather forecast. four southern parts of the uk it has turned into a day of sunshine and just a few showers, much—needed dry weather after the flooding problems of late but further north this swirl of cloud approaching on the satellite picture, an area of low pressure with a weather front which has brought cloud and rain and is the front continues its journey south it will leave us with much colder air spreading to the north into tomorrow, with wintry showers starting to develop. behind the weather front outbreaks of rain pushing down into northern england and north wales, but ahead of it, mainly dry with a few showers, and it will be windy for everyone, gusts of 50-60 it will be windy for everyone, gusts of 50—60 miles bra and temperatures will be dropping away as we go into the evening —— miles per hour. the weather front continues its journey south—east to the evening and overnight with some wintry weather on the back edge potentially but these showers developing in northern ireland and scotland that give cause for concern and a yellow warning for
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“p for concern and a yellow warning for up to 20 centimetres of snow over high ground but also the chance of frequent lightning in association with those showers which will continue through the night bringing snow to low levels for a time and the weather front ofjoni south—eastwards across england and wales, temperatures dropping away and potentially ice behind it. the frontal system clearing tomorrow morning and some wintry weather on the back edge over higher ground and thenit the back edge over higher ground and then it is a sunshine and showers day but the showers will be wintry over high ground in england and wales and also to low levels in northern ireland and parts of scotland. accompanied with hail and thunder and some lightning, the snow piling up in parts of scotland. another windy day, up to 65 mph potentially in the most exposed areas in the north—west, and a colder for areas in the north—west, and a colderfor your, 5—9, areas in the north—west, and a colderforyour, 5—9, but areas in the north—west, and a colderfor your, 5—9, but factor in the strength of the wind, it will feel colder than that —— a colder day. this is something we haven't seen much of lately, high pressure building its way in, and mainly dry
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and to the week. still some showers most —— first thing but feeling a bit milder with lighter winds, as well, 7—11. ab bit milder with lighter winds, as well, 7-11. ab 12 bit milder with lighter winds, as well, 7—11. ab 12 in the far south—west. the weekend begins dry —— maybe 12 in the far south—west. eastern parts should stay dry.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... ukraine urges its citizens to leave russia as the government in kyiv steps up its response to what it calls an intensified aggression from moscow. president zelensky calls for tougher sanctions on its neighbour. ukraine welcomes new sanctions and is the russian federation. we hope and expect that this sanctions will be enhanced in the near future. here in the uk, the prime minister has defended the scale of sanctions imposed on russian billionaires and banks after further criticism from the labour party. it is vital that after this first barrage we work in lockstep with friends and allies around
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the world and we squeeze him simultaneously. meanwhile, a defiant president putin says the security of his country is �*non—negotiable'. here, the grieving mums fighting for the truth about why their babies died in one of biggest maternity care scandals in nhs history. i'm still coming out of my general anaesthetic and she said he's dead...and that was it..and she left. pupils who fail maths and english gcse could be refused loans for university tuition fees in england under new government proposals. and a children's charity accuses facebook of �*neglect�* as a bbc news investigation shows children are at risk of grooming and sexual abuse in the world of virtual reality.
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borisjohnson boris johnson says borisjohnson says even more sanctions will come against russia if it continues to threaten ukraine but he has been criticised by the labour leader sir keir starmer by not going further because he said there has already been an invasion. the prime minister also confirmed the uk will be providing more military support to ukraine. it comes as ukraine urged its nationals to leave russia immediately. meanwhile, president putin says the security of russia and its citizens is non—negotiable. earlier this week, president putin said he was recognising two eastern areas of ukraine, the so—called people's republics of donetsk and lushansk as independent. the shaded areas have been controlled by russian fighters —— backed fighters since 2014. mr
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putin says he is sending in troops of peacekeepers. the united states is that is an invasion. 0ur moscow correspondent is in the city of rostock, 100 families from the border with ukraine. so far the kremlin has been... the russian people feel differently and generally concerned about how this is going to affect them. today its defenders of the fatherland in russia where the military are celebrated and it comes at a time when for quite some time, the world has not paid such close attention to what is happening with the russian army. young voices singing old melodies. a song from the second world war on a public holiday in honour of the armed forces. in rostock close to the border with ukraine, there are different views on what is happening less than 100 kilometres away. of course, it is scary but we can do nothing. alexander served in the
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russian fleet. ukraine will stop the shelling, he says, and if they were not as he said on tv, we will send in troops. there was flower living in troops. there was flower living in moscow. president putin inspected the troops, but at what he intends to do with them is still unclear. first i didn't say that the troops would go that after the meeting here. second, it is generally not possible to predict possible actions. it depends on the specific situations that develop on the ground. in situations that develop on the round. ~ ., v . , situations that develop on the round. ~ . �*, . , , ground. in ukraine's trenches, they weiah for ground. in ukraine's trenches, they weigh for moscow's _ ground. in ukraine's trenches, they weigh for moscow's next _ ground. in ukraine's trenches, they weigh for moscow's next move. i ground. in ukraine's trenches, they| weigh for moscow's next move. the russian president may not have an ounce that troops have entered ukraine, but his decision to recognise a separatist held areas has already had consequences worldwide. sanctions from the us, uk and europe were followed by others around the world.— and europe were followed by others around the world. australians always stand u- to around the world. australians always stand up to bullies _ around the world. australians always stand up to bullies and _ around the world. australians always stand up to bullies and we _ around the world. australians always stand up to bullies and we will- around the world. australians always stand up to bullies and we will be i stand up to bullies and we will be standing — stand up to bullies and we will be standing up to russia, along with all of— standing up to russia, along with
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all of our— standing up to russia, along with all of our partners who believe that it is absolutely unacceptable that russia _ it is absolutely unacceptable that russia could invade its neighbour. back at— russia could invade its neighbour. back at the — russia could invade its neighbour. back at the border, the evacuation buses continue from the rebel held areas. these tents have been erected in the course of the last few days by the russian ministry of emergency. the evacuees are coming through here and this says that it is for mothers and children and here they are preparing for more evacuees to come through as well. filling out paperwork, recent arrivals from the separatist held areas were feeling emotional president putin's decision to recognise the areas they live living as independent. 74—year—old has been waiting for the first day of the war for this decision. hagar of the war for this decision. how lona can of the war for this decision. how long can you _ of the war for this decision. how long can you hide _ of the war for this decision. how long can you hide in _ of the war for this decision. how-h" long can you hide in your basement from shelling she says? we long can you hide in your basement from shelling she says?— long can you hide in your basement from shelling she says? we hope that thins from shelling she says? we hope that thin . s will from shelling she says? we hope that things will settle _ from shelling she says? we hope that things will settle down _ from shelling she says? we hope that things will settle down and _ from shelling she says? we hope that things will settle down and there i things will settle down and there is no more _ things will settle down and there is no more war. don't be part of russia? — no more war. don't be part of russia? 0t— no more war. don't be part of russia? of course, we would love it
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because _ russia? of course, we would love it because love russia. the russia? of course, we would love it because love russia.— because love russia. the russian - resident because love russia. the russian president has _ because love russia. the russian president has promised _ because love russia. the russian president has promised that i because love russia. the russian president has promised that thisl because love russia. the russianl president has promised that this is a step towards peace. around the world, there are serious concerns that he is something else in mind. president putin has said that he is still open to diplomacy but after weeks and months of diplomatic talks, many in the west may be wondering what his diplomacy and what it means to putin? the last hour ukraine president has been speaking and thanked western allies for sanctions against russia. translation: ukraine | welcomes new sanctions against the russian federation, which were announced by the eu, the usa and the uk. we hope and expect that these sanctions will be enhanced in the near future.
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here, the prime minister defended the scale of british sanctions are... we have heard a lot of ukrainians thanking their allies to send that message to russia, but privately, how adequate do they think it is? i privately, how adequate do they think it is?— think it is? i agree, i think the last think it is? i agree, ithink the last few weeks _ think it is? i agree, ithink the last few weeks that _ think it is? i agree, ithink the last few weeks that is - think it is? i agree, ithink the last few weeks that is all i think it is? i agree, ithink the last few weeks that is all we i think it is? i agree, i think the i last few weeks that is all we have heard, but i think the last 24 hours we have seen quite a dramatic shift in tone. president zelinsky in the press conference said it was much more serious than a weather forecast but our troops will be ready for what happens. 36,000 reservists have now been called up but look at the measures that have been announced. security officials have announced a state of emergency and that will involve checkpoints, increased police patrols, we have seen military uniforms today, the first time i have seen it for a few weeks.
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the border agency is going to tighten restrictions as well, especially on the borders around russia, belarus and those occupied territories in the east of the country and then you have this travel advice, urging ukrainians to immediately leave russia and for people not to go there. this is quite removed from the previous messaging of stay calm, don't panic, we thank our allies, please give us more military support if you can, the uk specifically asked this today. i think this is because the urgency of the situation that is facing ukraine. it is causing the country to look inward now and just assess how prepared it is for an escalation in this crisis, a war that has already been happening for the past eight years. it also marks, given how us officials and are cancelling meetings with russian counterparts, it marks how the diplomatic courses running out of road as well and the uncertainty
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ordinary people continues. for the moment, ordinary people continues. for the moment. stay _ ordinary people continues. for the moment, stay with _ ordinary people continues. for the moment, stay with us _ ordinary people continues. for the moment, stay with us if _ ordinary people continues. for the moment, stay with us if you i ordinary people continues. for the moment, stay with us if you will. ordinary people continues. for the i moment, stay with us if you will and we will come back to but we are going to go live to the united nations in new york for the un secretary is speaking.— nations in new york for the un secretary is speaking. thanks to a number of life-support _ secretary is speaking. thanks to a number of life-support devices. i secretary is speaking. thanks to a i number of life-support devices. but number of life—support devices. but now those _ number of life—support devices. but now those devices have been disconnected. we must also be concerned _ disconnected. we must also be concerned about preserving the integrity — concerned about preserving the integrity of peacekeeping. the united — integrity of peacekeeping. the united nations has a long and recognised experience deploying peacekeeping operations which only take place with the constants of the host country. mr president, it is time _ host country. mr president, it is time for— host country. mr president, it is time for restraint, reason and de—escalation. there is no place for actions _ de—escalation. there is no place for actions and — de—escalation. there is no place for actions and statements that will take this — actions and statements that will take this dangerous situation over the abyss — take this dangerous situation over the abyss. it is time to establish a ceasefire — the abyss. it is time to establish a ceasefire and return to the passive dialogue _ ceasefire and return to the passive dialogue and negotiations, to save the people under ukraine and beyond from the _ the people under ukraine and beyond from the scourge of war. i urge all
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parties _ from the scourge of war. i urge all parties to— from the scourge of war. i urge all parties to make full use of article 33 of— parties to make full use of article 33 of the — parties to make full use of article 33 of the charter and its diverse instruments and specific settlement of this— instruments and specific settlement of this bill. mr president, the united — of this bill. mr president, the united nations system is continuing to support _ united nations system is continuing to support the people in the ukraine through— to support the people in the ukraine through humanitarian rights. there are or— through humanitarian rights. there are or they— through humanitarian rights. there are or they are documenting civilian casualties, — are or they are documenting civilian casualties, monitoring freedom of movement and reporting on allegations of human rights allegations. our manager humanitarian operations are independent of whoever might control the territory where people are living — the territory where people are living. even before this latest escalation, 2 million people in the ukraine _ escalation, 2 million people in the ukraine needed humanitarian assistance and since the start of 2022 _ assistance and since the start of 2022 alone, we are alone and our partners — 2022 alone, we are alone and our partners have delivered hundred and 40 metric— partners have delivered hundred and 40 metric tonnes of life—saving aid across— 40 metric tonnes of life—saving aid across the — 40 metric tonnes of life—saving aid across the contact line. again, our actions _ across the contact line. again, our actions are — across the contact line. again, our actions are based entirely on humanitarian principles endorsed by
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the general assembly. the united nations— the general assembly. the united nations humanitarian assistance is guided _ nations humanitarian assistance is guided by— nations humanitarian assistance is guided by four humanitarian principles, humanitarian duty, neutrality, impartiality and independence. and this priorities are central to establishing and maintaining an aid to people including those in the context of an armed _ including those in the context of an armed conflict. the general assembly has repeatedly underscored the importance of promoting and respecting these principles within the framework of humanitarian assistance. our humanitarian agencies _ assistance. our humanitarian agencies are committed to staying and delivering to support the people in ukraine _ and delivering to support the people in ukraine and are ready to readjust and re—prioritise their operations as necessary. as we know too well, in conflicts. — as necessary. as we know too well, in conflicts, civilians including women — in conflicts, civilians including women and children always suffer first and _ women and children always suffer first and suffer most. if the conflict _ first and suffer most. if the conflict in ukraine expands, the world _ conflict in ukraine expands, the world will— conflict in ukraine expands, the world will see a scale and severity of need _ world will see a scale and severity of need unseen for many years. i urge _ of need unseen for many years. i urge all— of need unseen for many years. i urge all sides to allow the safe
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access— urge all sides to allow the safe access for— urge all sides to allow the safe access for humanitarian agencies, including — access for humanitarian agencies, including non—government—controlled areas _ including non—government—controlled areas of— including non—government—controlled areas of eastern ukraine. all parties — areas of eastern ukraine. all parties must uphold their obligations under international humanitarian law. mr president, i am fully committed to support all efforts — fully committed to support all efforts to resolve this crisis without _ efforts to resolve this crisis without further bloodshed. my good offices _ without further bloodshed. my good offices remain available. we cannot and will— offices remain available. we cannot and will not relent in the search for a _ and will not relent in the search for a peaceful solution. thank you. the un _ for a peaceful solution. thank you. the un secretary general speaking in new york as part of a discussion about the tensions between russia and ukraine, talking about the integrity of peacekeeping, the need for restraint, reason and de—escalation in this conflict, as he said. also reminding all those nations involved of their obligations under international law and also the need to allow
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humanitarian aid in and when it is needed. here, the prime minister has defended the scale of british sanctions announced yesterday against three russian billionaires and five banks after labour and some conservative mps said they didn't go far enough. the measures were imposed following president putin's decision to order troops into those two regions of eastern ukraine. let us go back to the united nations now and listen to that ukrainian foreign minister. the and listen to that ukrainian foreign minister. . , minister. the same feeling currently dominates the _ minister. the same feeling currently dominates the mindsets _ minister. the same feeling currently dominates the mindsets of - minister. the same feeling currently. dominates the mindsets of ukrainians and people around the globe. hope for peace, hope for common sense to prevail, hope for diplomacy to ease tensions. however, today we need much more than hope, we need swift, concrete and resolute actions. a new type of actions by the united
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nations and international community which is relevant to the level of the threat we all, notjust ukraine, face today because of russia's aggressive course. the people of ukraine need these actions by ukraine's strategic partners and international community. we are at a critical juncture international community. we are at a criticaljuncture in world history and our actions today to find it for decades to come. we all read history books, we all watched movies about the mistake politicians made in the run—up to 1914 and 1939. about the feats of our grandparents and this catastrophic price in which fascism was defeated in europe. there is no greater task today than to not repeat the mistakes of the past. i do believe in the power of the free
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world and ourjoint ability to avert a new devastating and catch trophy in europe that no nation will be able to sit out. this is why today i address you on behalf of over 40 million ukrainians who only wish to live in peace and prosperity. not in fear, intimidation, not under russian fire, bombs and shelling. we are currently in the middle of the largest security crisis in europe since the second world war. this crisis was created and is being escalated by one side unilaterally, by the russian federation. russia public accusations of ukraine are absurd. ukraine has never threatened or attacked anyone. ukraine has never planned nor does it planned any such action. ukraine has never
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planned and does not plan any military offensive in the donbas. neither any provocations or acts of sabotage. it is ultimately absurd to suggest that ukraine could have prepared for anything like this and waited for months until russia amassed an enormous military force along our borders to proceed with such plans. this absurdity defies basic logic. not less absurd are accusations of ukraine escalating by acquiring defensive weapons from its partners. the only, i want to stress that, the only reason for ukraine to boost its defences is russia's is ongoing and planned military and political actions. russia's actions and statements are outrageous, horrific and go far beyond
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threatening ukraine. in fact, horrific and go far beyond threatening ukraine. infact, in horrific and go far beyond threatening ukraine. in fact, in his address this week, the russian president vladimir putin overtly denied ukraine's right to exist. anyway, anyone who thinks i might exaggerate as the ukrainian foreign ministry should just watch this horrifying speech. it is with a heavy heart that we all need to admit the grim reality of a new aggressive rule rising over europe. this is the first time the general assembly debates the situation in the temporarily occupied territories of ukraine. however, this is the first time we debated this situation in the new reality, created by the illegal recognition of two territories of ukraine by russia. and the backdrop of our discussion
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todayis and the backdrop of our discussion today is much more dangerous as russia attacks the very fundamental principles of international peace and security. the pillars of the united nations and as i mentioned the very existence of the ukrainian state, a founding member of the united nations. ukraine signed the un charter in san francisco in 1945 and made the principle enshrined in article two of the charter a cornerstone of its foreign policy. a state that voluntarily gave up its nuclear arsenal under the security assurances of nuclear powers, a state that has endured years of assault by one of these powers, a permanent member of the united nations security council. two days ago, in the february 21, the russian president recognised so—called independence of the temporarily
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occupied parts of the donetsk and lushansk regions of ukraine and ordered the deployment of the russian armed forces in these areas. this is our upfront attack on the united nations and core principles of international law. an ultimate blow to years of peace process and russia's unilateral withdrawal from the minsk agreement. what is happening right now in eastern ukraine, where russian tanks are rolling in and along the ukrainian borders were russian forces are amassed in enormous quantities must be a concern for everyone. for all of you. i warn every nation in this distinguished chamber, no one will be able to sit out this crisis if president putin decides that he can move forward with his aggression against ukraine. your governments and your people will face painful
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consequences together with our government and our people. this is why we need to use this last chance for action and stop russia where it is. it is clear that president putin will not stop by himself. distinguished representatives, the beginning of a large—scale war in ukraine will be the end of the world order as we know it. if russia does not get a severe, swift and decisive response now, this will mean a total bankruptcy of international security system and international institutions which are tasked with maintaining the global security order. this is a grim scenario which will throw us back to the darkest times of the 20th century. russia will not stop at ukraine. if a
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permanent member of the european security council succeeds in breaking literally all the rules, other actors will be inspired by him and follow his pattern. what he tries to do now is to prove that the united nations are weak, indecisive and unable to defend their core principles, the rules do not apply to him, to russia, to put in. what role for the united nations does russia seek? a new league of nations? we must deny russia what it wants. i graduated from the university with a degree in international law and strong belief international law and strong belief in the multilateralism. many years after practising diplomacy, i still do believe in both —— rules. rules containing aggression and power of our collective and firm action. if
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the are for dry if the united nations make an appeal to be a strong and proactive player which is not afraid of resolute actions in using all of its might and power is, i am confident that russia will stop. in this context, i welcome your�*s statement by the united nations secretary general, which is truly different in tone, we need decisive actions of the same kind to follow these right words. russia shows signs of readiness to fully escalate its aggression to ukraine and we have limited time to stop, deter and contain it. every hour of inaction now is a threat to the lives of ukrainians. not only military but also civilians, including women and children. this
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is an escalating threat to our collective global security and to our freedom. collective global security and to ourfreedom. ukraine expects our freedom. ukraine expects decisive, ourfreedom. ukraine expects decisive, immediate and proportional actions by the international community. the united nations is the organisation that has to demonstrate leadership. notjust condemnations. but it can create actions to stop the russian machine of war without stepping into a bloody conflict with many thousands of casualties, and devastation and suffering. i do not want this, ukraine does not want this. the world does not want this. we need your help right now to stop russia from proceeding with its aggressive plans. ukraine believes in diplomacy. we see no alternative to peaceful solutions by political and diplomatic means. there is still
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and diplomatic means. there is still an opportunity for diplomacy to say it's word, even as russia continues its escalation and provocations. for months, russia pretended to pursue diplomacy while bringing more and more troops to our borders and in the temporarily occupied areas of ukraine. now this number stands at least at 150,000. underthe ukraine. now this number stands at least at 150,000. under the vienna document on confidence and security building measures, such actions fall under the qualification of unusual military activities that would require explanation. however, russia has persistently to provide it. —— refused to provide it. instead it has offered threats. literally has literally stuffed the black sea with at least 46 military vessels. it routinely closes large parts of the seas under the pretext of holding
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naval exercises. in practice, it amounts almost to a blockade of ukrainian seaports. this is already an attack on the global freedom of navigation, one of the sacred principles of international law. russia's propaganda machine is in full swing. it desperately tries to create a pretext of aggression against ukraine. we resolutely reject all russian insinuations about any alleged ukrainian offensive military operations in dom basque. we do not hold or plan any such actions. —— matt donbas. we remain committed to political and emetic settlement and together with our partners we maxing out efforts to reduce tensions and keep the situation in line with diplomatic dialogue. for now we see that russian occupational forces have already significantly increased
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shelling of ukrainian territory and civilian infrastructure. artillery fire at the contact line in the donbas from the occupied territory hit kindergarten in a town. and in a school in another town. these are among the latest terrible examples. recognition of the so—called republics has no legal implications. it merely confirms russia's own involvement as a party to the armed conflict in donbas which russia timidly denied all these years. the situation in the occupied donbas has already been terrible for years with residents living in the atmosphere of fear, lawlessness and insecurity. the infamous and secret prison in the occupied donetsk remains inaccessible for human rights and
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humanitarian missions. it continues to function as a literal concentration camp in europe. and this is in the 21st—century. hundreds of people have passed through this camp and were subject to heavy forced labour, humiliation, tortures, cases of extrajudicial killings have been also reported. russia continues to block the release of illegally detained persons. in september 2029, the president of ukraine vladimir zelinsky had the secretary general of the list of more than 100 ukrainians from the donbas and crimea who had been unlawfully detained, sentence or even transferred from the occupied territories to the russian federation. we reiterate our call of the secretary general to provide good offices and facilitate their
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immediate release. and i appreciate the readiness of the secretary general to do so. mr president, today ukraine defines not only global security but also freedom, democracy and fundamental principles of international law. peaceful life in the future of millions of people in the future of millions of people in europe and around the globe rely on the rules that russia tries to destroy. diplomacy and international form must prevail and stop the russian aggression. since 2014, the general assembly has already adopted 11 resolutions reaffirming its commitment to ukraine's territorial integrity and condemning the temporary occupation of ukraine's territories by russia. the general
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assembly has not and will not accept the russian mantra that the case of crimea is closed, end of quote. the occupying power persists in destroying the identity of ukrainians and the inter—genuine people on the peninsula, and the crimea. since 2014, more than 64,000 ukrainian citizens have had to leave crimea and moved to mainland ukraine due to fear, persecution from human rights activism, discrimination and ethnic and religious grounds. political persecution has continued unabated. among many others, the deputy head of the korean people, participant of the international chromium platform summit, remains behind bars. —— crimean... he is one
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of more than 100 political prisoners in the kremlin. unsavoury 16th, of more than 100 political prisoners in the kremlin. unsavoury16th, a journalist was sentenced to six years in prison and he is one of 14 ukrainian per trip during the by russia in prison. russia may continue to pretend it doesn't violate international norms and principles, yet reports by the un security secretary general of of the high commissioner of human rights, their missions is one of the report of the international communal court prosecutor, all testify to the contrary. if russia does not agree with the resolutions, it should simply provide access to crimea, to the united nations humanitarian monitoring mission, and the access
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of international organisations to the occupied territories is critical. ukraine guarantees such access throughout the government—controlled territory and continues to demand from the russian side to do the same in the occupied territories. esteemed members of the general assembly, the whole world witnesses today that russia turns too threatening and blackmailing the global community, to close the crimea case. it is, in fact, one of the points in the long list of its recent so—called security demands. ukraine continues efforts to achieve the occupation of crimea by peaceful means, and the crimea platform is a tool designed exactly for that end. we are truly thankful to all the countries supporting the international crimea platform, your active involvement in the platform
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is a sound foundation for our future success. we are open to new members and i call on you tojoin the crimea platform, be it state or international organisation, you are welcome. we expect the united nations will engage with this initiative, established on the principle of the un charter. mr president, your colleagues, ukraine made a historic contribution to global security. made a historic contribution to globalsecurity. in 1994 made a historic contribution to global security. in 1994 we denuclearise, giving up the world's third largest nuclear arsenal. we have no plans to regain nuclear weapons and today we expect the world reciprocally to make sure of our security with relevant scale and
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resoluteness of actions in the face of a historic level of threat. this is the reason why ukraine requested urgent consultations under article six of the budapest memorandum. the world owes ukraine its security. the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky initiated a new format of negotiations to settle the security crisis created by russia. five permanent members of the united nations security council plus ukraine, germany, and turkey. this is the format that we are trying to convey. i reaffirm that ukraine proposed some years ago to deploy a un peacekeeping mission to ukraine. until now, united nations security council has failed to take necessary
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decisions. ukraine proposes to combine stock sanctions policy and strengthening of ukraine together with keeping diplomatic channels open to persuade russia to de—escalate and to prioritise diplomacy. the urge member states to use all available means to protect ukraine and deter russia. whatever action you can take, is appreciated. we are grateful for the actions already taken by many of you. we expect the international community to do its best to put out the fire in the centre of europe which is about to flare up. the russian security crisis must end with russia returning to the path of diplomacy. we call on all states and international organisations not to recognise any alteration of the statues of the certain areas of the
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donetsk and luhansk regions of ukraine and to refrain from any action of dealing that might be interpreted as recognising any such altered status. the absence of proper reaction or a neutral stance will only contribute to further escalation and sufferings, and i regret to say, it will not be limited to ukraine's board and territory. 0n the contrary, active diplomacy, strong political messaging, tough economic sanctions and strengthening ukraine can still force moscow to abandon aggressive plans. swift and resolute actions by the united nations can reclaim the organisation's leading role at this historic and dark moment. russia must withdraw its forces from the sovereign territory of ukraine. much
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must russia must stop —— russia must stop destabilising the area. we stand ready for all possible scenarios and ready to protect our land and our people if russia make further attacks. ukraine will not hesitate to exercise its inherent right of self defence as outlined in article 51 of the charter of the united nations in response to the armed attacks of the russian federation. these days, we have probably the last window of opportunity to do what russia does not expect the united nations and its member states to do, demonstrate unprecedented ability and readiness to act in order to stop aggression. no matter what relations you develop
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amongst each other, it is your ultimate duty to defend the charter. the charter of the united nations. i thank you. the charter of the united nations. i thank ou. �* �* ,, thank you. applause studio: _ thank you. applause studio: the - thank you. applause| studio: the ukrainian thank you. applause - studio: the ukrainian foreign minister there speaking to the united nations in new york, laying the blame for the conflict in his country firmly at the door of russia. he spoke for a long time and he talked about the violations of human rights by russia and the existence of prisons, he said, in the east of ukraine to which there was no access, and also of the detention ofjournalists. making it very clear that ukraine needed the support of the international
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community via the united nations as we have seen. nato also extending their support from all members and we are expecting to hear from nato in a while. the uk representative of the un now speaking.— the un now speaking. territorial integrity--- _ the un now speaking. territorial integrity- -- we _ the un now speaking. territorial integrity... we stand _ the un now speaking. territorial integrity... we stand with - the un now speaking. territorial integrity... we stand with the i integrity... we stand with the people of ukraine and we stand with their right to determine their own future. president putin's decision to recognise the so—called donetsk people's republic and luhansk people's republic and luhansk people's republic and luhansk people's republic as independent states proves beyond doubt that russia has chosen the path of confrontation over the path of diplomacy and dialogue. putin has ordered his troops into ukrainian territory and this amounts to a further invasion of ukraine. mr
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president, at every step russia has rebuffed office of diplomacy and indeed discarded its international commitments. commitments it has itself agreed and signed up to, and rather it has pursued a campaign to redraw ukraine's internationally recognised borders by force. it is vital that we, the united nations, the international community, must respond. we must understand the grave nature of where we are today and together we must call on russia to uphold the very founding principles of this, the united nations, established precisely as you said yourself, mr president, to end the scourge of war. peace must prevail. we must highlight the human
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cost and respond to the humanitarian consequences of any further russian military action. we know this will take a terrible toll on ukrainians, but also it will take a toll on russians alike. both victims of an unnecessary war of the kremlin's choosing. and it is therefore essential that we must meet russia's aggressive acts with solidarity and strength, including through coordinated sanctions, to impose a severe cost on russian interests and their economy. yesterday the uk announced new sanctions targeting billions of russian assets, and this is the largest sanctions package against russia in british history. it is part of our coordinated actions sanctions effort alongside our allies. actions sanctions effort alongside ourallies. but actions sanctions effort alongside our allies. but mr president, we are
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clear, that acting together with our allies this is just the start. if russia continues its campaign of aggression, we have a further package of sanctions ready to go. we urge the wider international community tojoin us in urge the wider international community to join us in this effort, the kremlin must understand the strength of the world's condemnation of president putin's war of choice. mr president, let us pause for a moment and reflect, this very week marks eight years since russia's illegal annexation of crimea. and the city therein. it also marks eight years since russia forcibly seized the macro seized ten miles —— square miles of territory, and it is
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also eight years since week at the general assembly of the un, record through resolution 68 262, the obligations of all states under article two of the un charter, to refrain from the threat or use of force against a territorial integrity or political independence of any state of the united nations. yet eight years on, tragically, here we are again. confronted by russian aggression against the sovereignty of ukraine. and as secretary general has made clear, russia's unilateral measures conflict directly with the very principles of the united nations charter. their actions are a fundamental challenge to global peace and security, and a challenge to the international order on which we all rely. and equally important,
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it is for everyone to protect. we must condemn unequivocally this aggression together and stop president putin's expansionist ambitions. we must hold russia true to its commitments, under the un charter, and say to russia very clearly, pull back, choose peace and not war, whilst also sending a very clear message to the people of ukraine, that in your hour of need the international community, united nations, we stand with you. thank you. nations, we stand with you. thank ou. ,, , ., ., , nations, we stand with you. thank ou. ,, , . �* , you. studio: that was the british forei . n you. studio: that was the british foreign office _ you. studio: that was the british foreign office minister— you. studio: that was the british foreign office minister speaking l foreign office minister speaking there at the united nations. making it very clear that the uk stands with the ukraine and that sanctions have already been imposed. and that
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there is another package of sanctions that the uk government is ready to introduce should it be deemed necessary. we will leave the united nations for now but we are expecting to head to the hague and hear from expecting to head to the hague and hearfrom nato expecting to head to the hague and hear from nato very shortly. the sanctions put in place against russia have come from the united states, the uk and germany. the eu is cutting off russia boss my access to their banks and financial markets as well as banning trade
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from the two rebel held regions —— russia's access. ian murray is the shadow secretary in scotland. there are many calls for the british government to do more now because in the view of president biden this is already an invasion? it the view of president biden this is already an invasion?— already an invasion? it is. if you listen to the _ already an invasion? it is. if you listen to the words _ already an invasion? it is. if you listen to the words of _ already an invasion? it is. if you listen to the words of the - already an invasion? it is. if you i listen to the words of the ukrainian foreign minister that you just broadcast at the general assembly, you hear the stark warnings that the international community must act now and not make mistakes of the past. this is notjust about the sovereign integrity of the ukraine, but also about upholding international law and what we have demanded is for the uk government to go much faster and further and deeper in terms of its sanction regime beyond the five banks and the three russian businessmen that have been sanctioned who have already been sanctioned who have already been sanctioned by the us since 2018. we want the financial systems of london to stop russia being involved in the
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swift cleaning system, for example, and really put the squeeze on the russian regime as the uk foreign minister says, russian regime as the uk foreign ministersays, before russian regime as the uk foreign minister says, before it is too late. ., ,, ., ., late. nicola sturgeon has added her voice to those _ late. nicola sturgeon has added her voice to those calls _ late. nicola sturgeon has added her voice to those calls so _ late. nicola sturgeon has added her voice to those calls so why - late. nicola sturgeon has added her voice to those calls so why not i late. nicola sturgeon has added her voice to those calls so why not go i voice to those calls so why not go faster and one of your own colleagues has also said the same. absolutely. we are disappointed that the prime minister today did not commit to going faster and keir starmer said in parliament that the opposition would be united across parliament to make sure we could get legislation through quickly and sanction through quickly if that is required but the prime minister responded by saying the economic crime bill which is about trying to clean up the city of london and clean up the city of london and clean up the city of london and clean up london which is known as the laundromat for russian money in the laundromat for russian money in the world, and that is now being delayed until the next session of parliament which means we won't see that until after the summer. that is
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too late. let's do these things now and use the unifying parliament we have got to push the legislation through and make sure we have a proper and deep sanctions regime that really puts the squeeze on president putin otherwise he will just continue to act with impunity and as the ukrainian foreign minister set out, he will not stop out until the international community stands as one and we do everything in our power to stop him in his tracks. the everything in our power to stop him in his tracks-— in his tracks. the prime minister has been talking _ in his tracks. the prime minister has been talking about - in his tracks. the prime minister has been talking about the i in his tracks. the prime minister- has been talking about the sanctions against russia, we are hearing, there were representatives from some of the big banks like morgan stanley and goldman sachs and the prime minister said sanctions are more effective if the financial centres are doing it at the same time. but he said it is not easy because it is important that the city of london is open to investment so these are tricky issues to navigate. it is the
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lack of coordinated effort, perhaps, a lack of coordinated wheel across several allies, that is may be holding things up for the uk? —— coordinated will. holding things up for the uk? -- coordinated will.— coordinated will. london is the financial capital _ coordinated will. london is the financial capital in _ coordinated will. london is the financial capital in terms i coordinated will. london is the financial capital in terms of- coordinated will. london is the i financial capital in terms of being a clearing house forfinancial products in the world and therefore using the power of the city of london to be able to make significant steps in sanctions is a significant steps in sanctions is a significant steps in sanctions is a significant step forward, but the prime minister is not going fast enough. the city of london want more information before sanctioning 351 members of the dumas in russia but they have already been sanctioned by they have already been sanctioned by the eu so we could be getting onto doing this —— duma. we have got to take the lead on this and if we are only now following the us from 2018, we are not doing enough. the chickens are coming home to roost.
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moscow's gold report in 2018 when the current prime minister was foreign secretary and we had the suppressed russian report, all of this laid out the problems with russian money in london, in the city of london and the financial markets, and the government had to do something about it, but they have done nothing since, and that we have a crisis on our hands where we have to play catch up and what we are seeing is parliament is unified on theseissues seeing is parliament is unified on these issues and if you need legislation and parliament to act, bring it now and we will make sure it gets through so we can have the strongest and deepest and most rigorous sanction regime that this country has ever had against russia and our international partners will come with us on.— and our international partners will come with us on. thanks for “oining us. we are joined i come with us on. thanks for “oining us. we are joined nowi come with us on. thanks for “oining us. we are joined now by i come with us on. thanks for “oining us. we are joined now by a i come with us on. thanks forjoining. us. we are joined now by a sanctions expert at the reed smith law firm. how effective can sanctions be when often you are dealing with a problem in the moment but the effect of sanctions might take some time to start to bite?—
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start to bite? yes, often sanctions are viewed — start to bite? yes, often sanctions are viewed slightly _ start to bite? yes, often sanctions are viewed slightly negatively - start to bite? yes, often sanctions are viewed slightly negatively by l are viewed slightly negatively by the business community because it hampers business but they do have a significant effect, especially in the banking community, even if they are not directly applied, because banks are very reluctant to engage in activities that could put them in the regulator's so they tend be more conservative and they react even sooner than the sanctions —— regulator's says. sooner than the sanctions -- regulator's says.— sooner than the sanctions -- regulator's says. how closely can ou regulator's says. how closely can you target _ regulator's says. how closely can you target sanctions? _ regulator's says. how closely can you target sanctions? you - regulator's says. how closely can you target sanctions? you can i you target sanctions? you can in oint you target sanctions? you can pinpoint them. _ you target sanctions? you can pinpoint them, and _ you target sanctions? you can pinpoint them, and the - you target sanctions? you can j pinpoint them, and the united you target sanctions? you can - pinpoint them, and the united states is well known for targeting people on a special list which has a crippling effect on their ability to engage in any banking transactions andindeed engage in any banking transactions and indeed any globally. so they do have a significant impact. if a
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have a significant impact. if a country is _ have a significant impact. if a country is being targeted or people within it, like russia, and we are told that president putin has hundreds of billions of dollars of reserves stashed around the world, how is it really going to have that much of an effect right now? i how is it really going to have that much of an effect right now? i think it is clear, and _ much of an effect right now? i think it is clear, and the _ much of an effect right now? i think it is clear, and the uk _ much of an effect right now? i think it is clear, and the uk in _ it is clear, and the uk in particular has been very upfront saying that this initial round of sanctions was reallyjust its first shot across the bow is. we would expect additional sanctions to be coming down the road on a greater number of banks and financial institutions but it really has a hindering effect on business globally if you are sanctioning these banks because it makes it very difficult to move money even if it doesn't necessarily target putin's own assets. doesn't necessarily target putin's own assets-— doesn't necessarily target putin's own assets. ~ . ., , ., ., own assets. what extra legislation with the uk _ own assets. what extra legislation with the uk need _ own assets. what extra legislation with the uk need to _ own assets. what extra legislation with the uk need to deepen - own assets. what extra legislation with the uk need to deepen the i with the uk need to deepen the sanctions it is capable of bringing
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in? , , , ., , sanctions it is capable of bringing in? , , , in? they did pass a very robust ackaue in? they did pass a very robust package early _ in? they did pass a very robust package early in _ in? they did pass a very robust package early in february - in? they did pass a very robust package early in february to i in? they did pass a very robust i package early in february to allow them to add additional persons and entities to their designated parties list so it may not necessarily be the legislation that needs to be updated but more the willingness to include additional parties and persons on the list. haifa include additional parties and persons on the list. how important is it for different _ persons on the list. how important is it for different countries - persons on the list. how important is it for different countries and i is it for different countries and allies across the world to act in concert for it to be most effective? absolutely. it is critical. we can look back to the iran sanctions, several years ago, when the world was coordinated on the sanctions, it was coordinated on the sanctions, it was a real force was coordinated on the sanctions, it was a realforce in bringing arguably iran to the negotiating table and having those coordinated sanctions will make a difference. thank you very much for talking to us. several ukrainian state websites
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are inaccessible this afternoon. the ukrainian authorities said this week they had seen online warnings that hackers were prepared to launch major attacks on government agencies, banks and the defence sector. our cyber reporter is with us now, who is behind this? the websites of— us now, who is behind this? ila: websites of various us now, who is behind this? iie: websites of various different ukrainian military and officials are down so net blocks which monitors internet outages says that it has confirmed... internet outages says that it has confirmed. . ._ confirmed... inaudible a confirmed. .. inaudible a number— confirmed... inaudible a number of _ confirmed... inaudible a number of websites . confirmed... inaudible i a number of websites have confirmed... inaudible - a number of websites have been impacted by network disruption and it seems similar to recent attacks. just over a week ago there were similar attacks on military websites and also a couple of banks in ukraine and these kind of attacks are usually quite widespread, more than one website is normally
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targeted, but they also very unsophisticated. they are the same as when, for example, glastonbury tickets go on sale and people tried to buy them at the same time and they flood the service of the website and the website goes down which is what is happening in this case. hence these websites are affected. we don't know where it is coming from. the us and uk both blamed russia a week ago, for the attacks them, but we don't know who is responsible for these ones today. for the moment, thanks forjoining us. our cyber reporter therejoe us. our cyber reporter there joe tidy. us. our cyber reporter therejoe tidy. talking about the problem the various websites in ukraine are suffering from, and it appears hackers have been meddling with their servers. hackers have been meddling with theirservers. much hackers have been meddling with their servers. much more on the ukraine story on bbc news and at four o'clock we will be of course be
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having more coverage of the ukrainian situation as the sanctions are brought in. now time for a look at the weather forecast. for southern parts of the uk it has turned into a day of sunshine and just a few showers, some much—needed dry weather after the flooding problems of late but further north this swirl of cloud approaching on the satellite picture, an area of low pressure with a weather front which has brought cloud and rain and as the front continues its journey south it will leave us with much colder air spreading to the north into tomorrow, with wintry showers starting to develop. behind the weather front, outbreaks of rain pushing down into northern england and north wales, but ahead of it, mainly dry with a few showers.
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it will be windy for everyone, gusts of 50—60mph and temperatures will be dropping away as we go into the evening. the weather front continues its journey south—east through the evening and overnight with some wintry weather on the back edge potentially but these showers developing in northern ireland and scotland that give cause for concern and a yellow warning for up to 20 centimetres of snow over high ground but also the chance of frequent lightning in association with those showers which will continue through the night bringing snow to low levels for a time. our weather front moves south—eastwards across england and wales, temperatures dropping away and potentially ice behind it. the frontal system clearing tomorrow morning and some wintry weather on the back edge over higher ground and then it is a sunshine and showers day but the showers will be wintry over high ground in england and wales and also to low levels in northern ireland and parts of scotland for a time. accompanied with some hail and thunder and some lightning, the snow piling up in parts of scotland. another windy day, up to 65mph
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potentially in the most exposed areas in the north—west, and a colderfeel, 5—9, but factor in the strength of the wind, it will feel colder than that. this is something we haven't seen much of lately — high pressure building its way in, a mainly dry end to the week. still some showers first thing but feeling a bit milder with lighter winds, as well, 7—ii. maybe 12 in the far south—west. the weekend begins dry. that spreads eastwards. eastern parts should stay dry.
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this is a bbc news special on the escalating ukraine crisis. i'm matthew amroliwala in london. and i'm lyse doucet in kyiv. ukraine declares a state of emergency and calls up reservists to join the regular army in response to what it calls increased russian aggression and gives this warning at the un. this is an escalating threat to our collective global security and to our freedom. collective global security and to ourfreedom. ukraine expects our freedom. ukraine expects decisive, ourfreedom. ukraine expects decisive, immediate and proportional actions by the international community. vladimir putin tells his armed forces the security of russia is non—negotiable, but claimed he is still open to diplomacy.

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