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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  March 23, 2022 5:30am-6:01am GMT

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this is bbc news, with the latest business headlines, for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm sally bundock. the spring statement — rishi sunak gets reading to present at the dispatch box later today, but what has the chancellor got up his sleeve for cash strapped households and businesses? the us confirms it will drop trump—era tariffs on british steel and aluminium in return for the uk dumping tariffs on jeans and whiskey. is this the start of a new trade relationship? and, game on, as the 2022 game developers�* conference in san francisco begins, we take look closer at the $175—billion industry.
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if you have just joined if you havejustjoined us, you arejust in time if you havejustjoined us, you are just in time to get the very latest on what is happening in business. we begin with the issue of the cost of living. it will dominate the headlines in the uk today as, in a few hours, we'll get the latest inflation numbers. energy and transport costs have skyrocketed, and that has filtered down to the prices of all kinds of basic items. it's hitting businesses and families across the country with millions struggling to make ends meet. later today, the chancellor, rishi sunak, will deliver his spring statement under intense pressure to ease the cost of living crisis. we'll discuss what he might do in a moment. but first, our consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, has been meeting families in halifax to find out how
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they are impacted. the chancellor has been rehearsing, but the audience that really matters are a long way from westminster. he is under pressure to announce something to help the shade is from the scorching cost of every bell at the moment. it is a gorgeous day and everyone is making the most of the sunshine. this is my little boy, tiger. hello! we are just trying to do more like this, go out on days like this. i used to love going to the beach but i can't afford that in a field now, because i do have a car to run as well now, so we just do little things like this now. sometimes we just will get a bus, 120, instead? instead ? stevie instead? stevie is already behind gas and electricity bills. we're just trying to get by, keep upbeat about it anyway. paul and charlotte have been
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feeling the bite of the bills this winter as well. the gas, you know, it takes a while — the gas, you know, it takes a while to— the gas, you know, it takes a while to go— the gas, you know, it takes a while to go on. and _ while to go on. and perhaps back in the day when we were students and we just wouldn't have put the heating on, but we can't do that anymore because we have lewis, so we were using our tesco vouchers for some free tea this morning. but it is all of those things when you are planning, you arejust of those things when you are planning, you are just trying to save on costs wherever you can. good morning, all right, you? mark— good morning, all right, you? mark is— good morning, all right, you? mark is seeing prices rising in his coffey shop but he doesn't want to raise prices, he knows how people are finding it. you need to pay wages, rent, it has a huge impact. to keep that quality experience going, people may have to pay that extra pound to enjoy it. that extra pound to en'oy it. that is something _ extra pound to enjoy it. that is something that _ extra pound to enjoy it. that is something that stevie does can't afford. i is something that stevie does can't afford-— can't afford. i don't think i could save _ can't afford. i don't think i could save £1. _ can't afford. i don't think i could save £1. you - can't afford. i don't think i could save £1. you are - could save £1. you are literally _ could save £1. you are literally living -
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could save £1. you are literally living on - could save £1. you are literally living on whatj could save £1. you are - literally living on what comes in. , ., , , ., literally living on what comes in. , ., ,, ., ., in. yes, it goes straight out, es. in. yes, it goes straight out, yes- and _ in. yes, it goes straight out, yes- and if — in. yes, it goes straight out, yes. and if you _ in. yes, it goes straight out, yes. and if you can't - in. yes, it goes straight out, yes. and if you can't make . yes. and if you can't make those bills. _ yes. and if you can't make those bills, where - yes. and if you can't make those bills, where will- yes. and if you can't make those bills, where will you turn? ! those bills, where will you turn? ., �* turn? i either don't pay them and it will— turn? i either don't pay them and it will be _ turn? i either don't pay them and it will be debt, _ turn? i either don't pay them and it will be debt, or- turn? i either don't pay them and it will be debt, or i - turn? i either don't pay them and it will be debt, or i don't| and it will be debt, or i don't really want to ask family, but i do. ., . j , really want to ask family, but ido. ., i do. today's spring statement isn't suwosed _ i do. today's spring statement isn't supposed to _ i do. today's spring statement isn't supposed to be _ i do. today's spring statement isn't supposed to be a - i do. today's spring statement isn't supposed to be a full- isn't supposed to be a full budget, butjust tinkering around the edges won't be enough to help stevie and millions like her. coletta smith, bbc news, halifax. joining me now is george buckley, chief uk and euro area economist at nomura. good morning. it is a very familiar tale, good morning. it is a very familiartale, isn't good morning. it is a very familiar tale, isn't it, this is an at the uk but across europe, the us, many countries around the world are dealing with the cost of living crisis, so what will our government do about it, do you think?- about it, do you think? there are a number— about it, do you think? there are a number of— about it, do you think? there are a number of things - about it, do you think? there are a number of things they l are a number of things they could do. they could make universal credits more generous, there is talk of a 5p
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per litre reduction in fuel duty. i think it is worth bearing in mind that since february, petrol prices are up by nearly 20p, diesel prices are up by more than that, probably not by more than 25 p. prices, are low—impact relative what we have seen. to add to this, we have the inflation figures this morning which are likely to show a 6% inflation rate, it will go higher than that. and on top of that we have just had some figures this morning as well which look at wages. it shows that wages are increasing by around about 3% per year. increasing by around about 3% peryear. inflation increasing by around about 3% per year. inflation is double what people are actually getting in terms of the increase in their pay packets. and there is a very real situation for many families who are having to make very tough decisions — do i hit my home? do i feed us all well? that kind of decision—making. many
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people are arguing we shouldn't be in this place on this day and age. but the chancellor has been very clear, he has put out the message in that this is a spring statement, not a budget, in that he cannot solve all the problems but he needs to give something away today, doesn't he? �* ~ something away today, doesn't he? �* “ ~ , something away today, doesn't he? �* ~ ., , he? and i think he has some win ale he? and i think he has some wiggle room _ he? and i think he has some wiggle room to _ he? and i think he has some wiggle room to do _ he? and i think he has some wiggle room to do that. - he? and i think he has some wiggle room to do that. forl wiggle room to do that. for example, we saw the budget deficit figures yesterday were better than expected over the course of the year so far, so they are certainly better than where they thought they were going to be at the last fiscal statement back in october when we had the budget, so i think he does have some room to do something but i think there's going to be, for him, given where we have come from and the deficits that were accrued during the pandemic, i think they will be a desire for him to try and balance the books. so there is certainly a balancing act him being able to give a lot more away, and
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balancing finances compared to what we have seen over the past few years. what we have seen over the past few yew-— few years. also, does he have to consider— few years. also, does he have to consider when _ few years. also, does he have to consider when at _ few years. also, does he have to consider when at the - few years. also, does he have| to consider when at the budget does come around, which is not far away, does come around, which is not faraway, because does come around, which is not far away, because the situation will not resolve itself anytime soon. if you listen to the bank of england, inflation is going up of england, inflation is going up and up and up, it could be double—digit at the end of the year. many problems causing inflation, such as current war inflation, such as current war in the ukraine, the covid pandemic, supply chain problems. it is not a quick fix, is it? therefore, in his next budget, will he want to save resources for then? possibly, and you are absolutely right, it is not a quick fix, it is not something that the bank of england can do a huge amount about by raising interest rates. typically, rises and inflation are created ijy rises and inflation are created by demand pressure, so people spending too much or supply
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shocks. this is very much a supply shock and it is where inflation has come from one particular source, perhaps a particular source, perhaps a particular few sources such as food and energy, and it has come from overseas. so it isn't something easily solvable by the bank of england saying, "we will raise interest rates." that will increase your mortgage cost. they are in a bind. in the bank of england tries to offset it, then it means we have higher costs through interest. so, yes, it is a real difficult position that everybody is and at the moment. that everybody is and at the moment-— that everybody is and at the moment. . , ., ~ , ., moment. certainly, thank you very much. — moment. certainly, thank you very much, george _ moment. certainly, thank you very much, george buckley i moment. certainly, thank you i very much, george buckley from nomura. let's unpack this a little bit. soaring energy prices is fuelling inflation worldwide. more than 50 conservative mps in the uk have called for a cut in fuel duty — this is currently 57.95 pence per litre with 20% vat applied on top. and with fuel prices spiralling upwards, uk logistic businesses
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are increasingly facing an unstainable burden. heidi skinner is policy and public affairs manager at logistics uk. good morning. iam good morning. i am assuming you will be hoping you will receive that news later today from rishi sunak that fuel duty is coming down?— rishi sunak that fuel duty is cominadown? , ., coming down? yes, good morning, we were asking _ coming down? yes, good morning, we were asking before _ coming down? yes, good morning, we were asking before the - we were asking before the spring statement forfuel discount, because it is the single biggest expense for logistics operators. we know how absolutely vital logistics industries are to the uk. just to give an example, fuel accounts for one third of the annual operating costs of an hgv, so it is absolutely vital that we see that cut today. the
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other thing _ that we see that cut today. the other thing to _ that we see that cut today. the other thing to note is that when oil prices were surging, at one point we had them at $139 per barrel of brent, but the price at the pump hasn't come down as we have seen elsewhere. come down as we have seen elsewhere-— come down as we have seen elsewhere. what we need to think about _ elsewhere. what we need to think about whether - elsewhere. what we need to | think about whether logistics industries is that we are working on very, very tight margins, as little as 1%, so this can make significant impact on logistics. we have seen over the last two years logistics is touching everybody�*s lives, every business, every community. it will be really important if we can have that cut today. to what extent are those in logistics having to pass the cost on? surely that has to happen if it hasn't yes, as i say, working on such low
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margins, businesses need to pass this on to customers and ultimately on to consumers, so it isn'tjust having an impact for logistics operators but also why do business. but also, we have to remember that in terms of demand for logistics, it went through the roof, dented, because who wanted everything delivered to the home, we didn't want to go out shopping, but we also had the problem of the shortage of hgv drivers, skilled drivers, it is a perfect storm, isn't it? you mention _ a perfect storm, isn't it? you mention this _ a perfect storm, isn't it? you mention this quite _ a perfect storm, isn't it? gm. mention this quite rightly. whether it was brexit, covid, it has shined a light on the industry. we have seen that whether it is the rollout of the covid vaccine or getting supplies into supermarkets, getting fuel into our forecourts, you know, logistics is impacting every single village, every single town. it touches all of the uk, so it is
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important we support the sector at this time. important we support the sector at this time-— at this time. heidi skinner, thank you. _ at this time. heidi skinner, thank you, good _ at this time. heidi skinner, thank you, good to - at this time. heidi skinner, thank you, good to talk - at this time. heidi skinner, thank you, good to talk to l at this time. heidi skinner, i thank you, good to talk to you this morning. 0n bbc news, we will be of course covering the spring statement, so stay with us for that. let's get some of the day's other news. p&0 ferries says the 800 staff it made redundant last week will be offered 36.5 million in total, with around a0 crew getting more than 100,000 pounds each. the firm has also denied that it broke the law when it sacked the workers without warning. however, unions say the compensation package being offered is "pure blackmail and threats". tesla boss elon musk has opened a huge electric car gigafactory near berlin which is the first european hub for the firm. musk celebrated the occasion showing off some dance moves, as he oversaw the handover of tesla's first german—made cars at the plant. he also said tesla will likely launch a test version of its new full self—driving software in europe.
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stay with us on bbc news, still to come: and, game on, as the 2022 game developers�* conference in san francisco begins, we take look closer at the $175—billion industry. applause i'm so proud of both of you. let there be no more wars or bloodshed between arabs and israelis. with great regret, _
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the committee have decided that south africa be excluded . from the 1970 competition. singing in own language streaking across the sky, the white—hot wreckage from mir drew gasps from onlookers on fiji. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: ukraine's president says there's a chance of surviving the war, as his military stops the russian advance on some key targets. leaving with pride, the women's world number one tennis player ash barty, says it's time to retire aged 25.
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the us has confirmed it will drop tariffs on british steel and aluminium shipments, which were imposed by former president donald trump in 2018 as he sought to protect americanjobs. it follows similar deals america has made with japan and the european union. in exchange, the uk said it was ending duties it put on us products such as bourbon whiskey and levi jeans in retaliation. britain's trade minister anne—marie trevelyan says this is progress. it's fantastic news, both for the uk and the us, it means we will be able to take away the rebalancing measures, so for the us stripping away some of the us stripping away some of the costs that they were seeing on some of their products and for us on hours. it means we can put behind us now what was a very frustrating irritant and now we have been able to do it in just now we have been able to do it injust eight weeks now we have been able to do it in just eight weeks to clear this off our books so that we can work together on the really important things, not only working very closely to make
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sure that we support ukraine at this incredibly difficult time for them under the illegal war that putin is waging against them also as we look forward to working more closely to boost our trade relationship in the years ahead. the us's chief trade negotiator katherine tai says it is time for the us and uk to concentrate on their shared values and economic approaches in building a new trade relationship. she has been talking to our north america business correspondent, samira hussain. it isa it is a very challenging global economy that we are facing right now. coming through two years of a pandemic and its associated economic and supply chain disruptions. we have now russia's invasion of ukraine with its associated human and economic costs and i think both the united states and the
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united kingdom are also working together to address how we make globalisation and an interconnect global economy work better for our people. what are you looking for from the trade relationship with the uk and the united states? we are looking — uk and the united states? - are looking for further are looking forfurther alignment between our economies and we have been doing this since last year with the settlement of the boeing air bus case at the wto, how do we stop fighting each other and how do we start working together and addressing the larger challenges that we are going to be facing and particularly that case from nonmarket economy competitors who are enjoying state support like nothing either of us has experienced. it’s
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like nothing either of us has experienced.— like nothing either of us has experienced. it's been made re experienced. it's been made pretty clear. _ experienced. it's been made pretty clear, even _ experienced. it's been made pretty clear, even we - experienced. it's been made pretty clear, even we heard | pretty clear, even we heard from secretary trevelyan just now at the press conference saying that if a free trade agreement is on the table they will be ready to mobilise on that quite immediately. is that completely off the table for the united states? let completely off the table for the united states?- completely off the table for the united states? let me do this. i the united states? let me do this i am _ the united states? let me do this i am a — the united states? let me do this. i am a person _ the united states? let me do this. i am a person who - the united states? let me do this. i am a person who lovesj this. i am a person who loves to have options. anybody who has gone shopping with me knows that, it is really aggravating, i will want to look at all of the options. i think the issue is, what kind of collaboration is, what kind of collaboration is going to be fit for the purpose of addressing the challenges that we have today? so i am not going to exclude any options. so i am not going to exclude any options— any options. you've talked about the _ any options. you've talked about the need _ any options. you've talked about the need for - any options. you've talked about the need for trading | about the need for trading partners to counter china's unfair trade practices. so what exactly does that mean?- exactly does that mean? what exactly does that mean? what exactly that — exactly does that mean? what exactly that means _ exactly does that mean? what exactly that means is - exactly does that mean? what exactly that means is we - exactly does that mean? what exactly that means is we have | exactly that means is we have to be clear eyed about the challenges that we are facing. the kinds of things that we see
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from a nonmarket economy like china and the impact that it has on our ability to thrive, to compete, our ability for our workers in our industry is to continue to grow and be able to compete verily so in terms of working together i think it is a matter of how can we join forces? how can we speak louder when we do it together and how can we be more effective in taking measures to defend the rights of our economies and our workers to grow and compete when we are facing a competitor who is really structured and operating on parameters very different from our own. that is catherine _ different from our own. that is catherine tie _ different from our own. that is catherine tie the _ different from our own. that is catherine tie the us's - different from our own. that is catherine tie the us's chief - catherine tie the us's chief trade negotiator speaking to samaria hussein. —— tai. the video game industry was one of the biggest economic winners of the covid—19 era, as time spent gaming soared during lockdowns and console
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sales surged throughout the pandemic. the global games market is reported to be worth around $175 billion and is forecast to almost double in five years. this week the 2022 game developers�* conference, the world�*s longest—running event for professionals dedicated to the art of making games, is back in—person in san francisco after two years of virtual events. joining me now is jason kingsley, co—founder and ceo of video game developer rebellion developments and is also chairman of uk games developer association, tiga. good morning to you. good morning- — good morning to you. good morning- why _ good morning to you. good morning. why are - good morning to you. good morning. why are you - good morning to you. good morning. why are you not l good morning to you. good | morning. why are you not in good morning to you. good - morning. why are you not in san francisco? _ morning. why are you not in san francisco? l _ morning. why are you not in san francisco? i chose _ morning. why are you not in san francisco? i chose not _ morning. why are you not in san francisco? i chose not to - morning. why are you not in san francisco? i chose not to fly - francisco? i chose not to fly this year- — francisco? i chose not to fly this year- my _ francisco? i chose not to fly this year. my brother - francisco? i chose not to fly this year. my brother is - francisco? i chose not to fly this year. my brother is out| this year. my brother is out there but i am trying to minimise my air miles if i can and we�*ve gota minimise my air miles if i can and we�*ve got a big game to launch coming up soon so why needed to be doing two things at once. ., ., at once. you are multi- skilling and _ at once. you are multi- skilling and thinking - at once. you are multi- i skilling and thinking about your carbon footprint and you
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are plugging your game, you got it all in there in your first answer, well done. i have to confess that before lockdown, i as a mum invested in a gaming console package because i�*ve got three boys at home and a newjust got three boys at home and a new just the one got three boys at home and a newjust the one we had in the home would be a real issue. gaming hasjust gone gaming has just gone stratospheric, hasn�*t it, because of the pandemic? yes stratospheric, hasn't it, because of the pandemic? yes it has. we obviously _ because of the pandemic? yes it has. we obviously had _ because of the pandemic? yes it has. we obviously had the - has. we obviously had the awkwardness of people transitioning to working from home which in our industry work for some skills, coding, you can concentrate on what you are doing. when it comes to quality assurance and testing when you need to get the new game downloaded every day, that is more of an issue with domestic and wits but broadly speaking we have coped fairly well with the pandemic and our audience, we have kept our audience entertained which i think is quite useful to stay distract this is difficult times. but also it wasn't _ this is difficult times. but also it wasn't just - this is difficult times. but also it wasn't just the - this is difficult times. but
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also it wasn't just the fact also it wasn�*t just the fact that they were entertained also able to be connect did to their friends and also make new friends and also make new friends at a time when we were all isolating. friends at a time when we were all isolating-— all isolating. absolutely. a lot of peeple _ all isolating. absolutely. a lot of people have - all isolating. absolutely. a lot of people have this - lot of people have this old—fashioned idea that games are isolating. i think they are exactly the opposite. it�*s like taking part in a global hobby. there are many things that you can do other than just play the game, you can watch other people playing it, you can look at people trying different strategies. ifind gaming strategies. i find gaming incredibly strategies. ifind gaming incredibly sociable in fact, in a virtual sense. with games we are almost well ahead in this metaverse thing that is being discussed quite a bit. so what is ahead? _ discussed quite a bit. so what is ahead? and _ discussed quite a bit. so what is ahead? and that _ discussed quite a bit. so what is ahead? and that is - discussed quite a bit. so what is ahead? and that is what. discussed quite a bit. so what is ahead? and that is what is| is ahead? and that is what is going to be discussed in san francisco, isn�*t it? and how you sustain this momentum? brute you sustain this momentum? we don't have _ you sustain this momentum? - don't have everybody in the don�*t have everybody in the world playing our games so i guess that is the ceiling. if everybody is playing all of our games all the time, that is our
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ceiling. but games as a service is a thing that is growing. rather than having a game that we might think of as you play it through one and you are done, which is perfectly valid and perfectly good. a bit like reading a really good book. you will also have games where you can stay in that ecosystem, you can stay in that ecosystem, you can stay in that ecosystem, you can stay in that environment, chat with your friends, play more games. so games are almost getting broader and giving you more options. i can see games as a service as being a very big growth area.— as a service as being a very big growth area. what about though the _ big growth area. what about though the issue _ big growth area. what about though the issue of - big growth area. what about. though the issue of addiction, which is an issue. we have seen china be very proactive about this, seriously restrict the amount of time young people under 18 are allowed to do gaming. your thoughts on measures needed to be taken to prevent the problem of addiction? i prevent the problem of addiction?— prevent the problem of addiction? ~ ., . ., , addiction? i think addiction is at one extreme _ addiction? i think addiction is at one extreme and, - addiction? i think addiction is at one extreme and, like - addiction? i think addiction is at one extreme and, like in l at one extreme and, like in many things. you could talk
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about alcohol abuse which is a serious problem for a tiny minority you could talk about gambling abuse which is a problem for a tiny minority but i think it is seriously there and you need to give parents in particular the education and the tools to enable them to manage difficult situations like that copy so i think it is a, addiction to social media for example. it is a broad society problem. how do you deal with something that is very compelling that you want to do too much? but very compelling that you want to do too much?— very compelling that you want to do too much? but the problem with gaming _ to do too much? but the problem with gaming and _ to do too much? but the problem with gaming and i _ to do too much? but the problem with gaming and i know _ to do too much? but the problem with gaming and i know because. with gaming and i know because like sai with gaming and i know because like sa! and a mum with three boys, with young players they kind of get drawn in because it�*s all the bits they buy and they got to get a scan and this and that and it wrecks up and puts pressure on parent? yes, i think is also — puts pressure on parent? yes, i think is also part _ puts pressure on parent? yes, i think is also part of _ puts pressure on parent? yes, i think is also part of growing - think is also part of growing up think is also part of growing up and becoming educated and kids will, when i was a kid i probably did things that i think probably i ought not to
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have done back in the time but i�*ve learned from it as well, so i think opening a dialogue with kids is probably the right thing. we with kids is probably the right thin. ~ ., ., ., �* with kids is probably the right thin. ~ ., ., .,�* , thing. we got to go i'm sorry jason, thing. we got to go i'm sorry jason. but — thing. we got to go i'm sorry jason, but thank _ thing. we got to go i'm sorry jason, but thank you - thing. we got to go i'm sorry jason, but thank you so - thing. we got to go i'm sorry| jason, but thank you so much for getting up early and thank you too, i will see you soon. hello there. at this time of year, warm days are often followed by decidedly chilly nights. and tuesday was certainly a warm day, with temperatures in northwest wales getting close to 21 degrees, the warmest day of the year so far. plenty of other places not too far behind. but as soon as the sun went down, the temperatures followed. it has been turning quite chilly out there. high pressure still close by on wednesday. it stays mostly dry, but with those clear skies overhead, quite a chilly start to the morning, with temperatures down around freezing, below freezing in a few places. one or two early fog patches around as well. they should tend to lift and clear by the middle part of the morning. and then it is another beautiful spring day, with lengthy spells of sunshine. the vast majority will stay dry. there�*s just a small chance of one
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or two showers popping up in northeast scotland and maybe across eastern counties of england. not as breezy as it was on tuesday across western areas and every bit as warm. top temperatures between 16 and 20, maybe 21 degrees. but as we head through wednesday night, again, the sun goes down, the orange colours drain away from the map, replaced by blues and greens, with temperatures again dropping down to around freezing. those are the values for the towns and the cities. out in the countryside, i think there will be a touch of frost, and again potentially some fog patches on thursday morning. now, england and wales will once again have a mostly sunny day, with just the odd rogue shower. for scotland and northern ireland, expect more cloud creeping in from the northwest, with some spots of light rain and drizzle. top temperatures through thursday between 16 and 19 degrees in most places. now, for friday, again, the further north you are, there will be a bit more in the way of cloud. some rain for the northern isles.
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further south, more in the way of sunshine, a bit more of a breeze through the english channel at this stage, and temperatures maybe down just a fraction but still getting up to between 15 and 19 degrees. and then we head into weekend, and some of that cloud in the north associated with a weak frontal system will try to work a little further southwards, but high pressure continues to hold firm, so despite that extra cloud and the greater chance of a bit of fog, it is going to stay fine and dry with some spells of sunshine. into next week, though, we develop a northerly wind. it�*ll start to feel quite a lot colder and there could even be some wintry showers.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today — a cut in fuel duty and changes to national insurance payments. they�*re two of the options available to rishi sunak as he tackles the cost of living in today�*s spring statement. prices statement. are rising fast, faster than they prices are rising fast, faster than they have for 30 years. we will get they have for 30 years. we will get the latest inflation figures this morning, and we will be asking traders on merseyside what they want to hear from the chancellor, and what surprises he might have in store. the ukrainian president, volodomyr zelensky, says there is "nothing left" of the city of mariupol, and his country is teetering
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on the "brink of survival." the ukrainians continue to try and resist the russian advances,

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