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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  April 11, 2022 7:00pm-9:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. austria's chancellor says he has held direct, open and tough talks vladimir putin as he becomes the first eu leader to meet him since the ukraine invasion. more evidence about the sexual violence women have suffered at the hands of russian forces. you have a special report. managed to escape along with her child. she called the ukrainian police and has given them her testimony. she was
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raped multiple times by the two drunk russian soldiers who killed her husband. the french election goes down to two. they prepared to goes down to two. they prepared to go head—to—head in the final round for the presidency. and elon musk and twitter continue their complicated relationship with the billionaire now and not going to take a seat on the board. let's turn to the war in ukraine. the austrian chancellor karl nehammer, has become the first eu leader to hold a meeting with president putin since the russian invasion. on the agenda — the issue of alleged war crimes in ukraine. it coms as horrors are being uncovered in areas regained by ukrainian forces in the north. in particular, we've heard stories of violence against women — and of soldiers using rape, as a weapon of war. our correspondent, yogita limaye, has been speaking to some of those
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affected, and the vivid descriptions of abuse, you may find distressing. a quiet rural neighbourhood, shattered by barbaric violence. in a village west of kyiv, a first—hand account of rape by invading soldiers. when we started talking to this woman, we didn't know what we were to hear. we are hiding her identity to protect her. translation: a soldier entered our house. - my husband and i were there. at gunpoint, he took me to a neighbouring house. he was ordering me, take your clothes off or i'll shoot you. then he started raping me. while he was doing that, what might more soldiers entered. i thought i was done for,
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but they took him away. she returned home to find her husband shot in the abdomen. he died two days later. she buried him in the backyard. translation: | found drugs | in the alcohol they left behind. they would get high and they were drunk. most of the invading soldiers are killers, rapists and looters. only a few are ok. i want to ask putin, why is this happening? i don't understand. we are not living in the stone age. just up the road, we heard of another rape case. it is being investigated by the police. this is the house a woman was taken to and assaulted. upstairs, the bedroom where she was later killed. it's a disturbing scene.
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on the mirror, a message in lipstick. tortured by unknown people, buried by russian soldiers, it says. out in the garden, we were shown her grave. a day after we went, ukrainian police exhumed her body. the note, we are told, was left by a separate unit of russians who found her body and buried her here. they later told a neighbour, oksana, about the dead woman. translation: they told me she had been raped and that her throat - was either slit or stabbed. they said she bled to death and there was a lot of blood. we travelled 70 miles east to another village. to what used to be
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the home of a family. a couple in their 30s and their young child. signs of their peaceful, ordinary life lie amidst the ruins. on the 9th of march, russian tanks rolled in. two soldiers shot the man dead. the woman who lived in this house managed to escape along with her child. she called the ukrainian police and she has given them her testimony. she has told them she was raped multiple times by the two drunk russian soldiers who killed her husband. and she said that they threatened to kill her little boy, too, if she didn't do exactly as they said. as the soldiers left, they burned down the house. in kyiv, we met ukraine's human rights ombudsman,
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who has been recording rape cases. translation: about 25 girls - and women aged 14-24 were raped during the occupation in the basement of one house in bucha. none of them are pregnant. a 25—year—old woman called to tell us her 16—year—old sister was raped in the street in front of her. to calculate the number of such sexual crimes is impossible at the moment because not everyone has come to us, not everyone is willing to talk to us. among the people we met, there is no relief that the russians have gone. because they have left behind deeply wounded lives that might never recover. yogita limaye, bbc news, kyiv.
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efforts are being stepped up to evacuate people from the donbas region. it's in the east of the country. russia has redirected its military offensive there. this is the ukrainian defence ministry spokesperson. at the same time, the ukrainian army is ready. we cannot predict when exactly it will happen but we have information from western sources that set the army is almost finished preparation on the offensive operation. we know from the uk ministry of defence shelling has continued in the key donbas regions of donetsk and luhansk. "with ukrainian forces repulsing several assaults," it says. have a look at this satellite image. it's a convoy of military forces heading south towards the donbas region — redeployed from the north. this new offensive might pose a bigger challenge for the ukrainian forces — according to one military expert. we heard the sound of artillery
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intensifying many people who live in this region have already fled that's what you see few lights on and i think the fighting will be different from what we saw and more open countryside and the advantage the ukrainians have is that they are all well dug duggan. in. they're tired but morale is still high. the advantage for russians is they are now fighting on fewer fronts and they now have the numeric advantage. when western officials is the expected russia to notjust officials is the expected russia to not just double officials is the expected russia to notjust double but triple the amount in this region but i could take some considerable time. i think everyone knows this next phase of the work to be decisive in the east and also bloodied. the new russian general in charge is known as the butcher of syria for reason.
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let's hear how this is all being received in russia — our correspondent jenny hill is in moscow. there is a school of thought that vladimir putin wants to take the donbas region by may nine. a very significant day in russia where the commemorate the soviet victory over nazi germany. and having presided over an invasion which is not really going to plan, vladimir putin could save face by telling russians on that day that he scored another historic victory as he would frame it by having taken some territory in eastern ukraine. it's some questions around and can he do it? this is military have the capability to take significant amounts of territory there? and the second question is will that be enough for vladimir putin? let's go live to kyiv — our correspondent anna foster is there. to have students of the moment, we've been hearing those horrific details of what has happened in
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areas of ukraine were russian forces of left and at the same time, ukrainians bracing for what is about to happen in the east.— to happen in the east. that's right. i am in kyiv — to happen in the east. that's right. i am in kyiv tonight, _ to happen in the east. that's right. i am in kyiv tonight, places - to happen in the east. that's right. i am in kyiv tonight, places where l i am in kyiv tonight, places where you have seen the images of absolute devastation you heard the stories, some of them reflected in the report by the stories of people who have seen and witnessed terrible things while the russians occupy those towns. as memories are still very strong and people are straining to head back now and some numbers and we met people today who are going back to their homes to see what was left of them to try and clean up and start their lives in some way. but as you quite rightly say, the further east, you have a whole new section of people who are being urged very seriously to leave the east of the country as ahead of this
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potential russian onslaught and you have to look at what ukrainian forces of managed to do around the capital, they managed to repel and push back russian forces in ways that even military analysts were surprised by how well the ukrainian forces did. there is a feeling that this next phase will be even more powerful and potentially even more brutal will be of seen already. last week this continued calls from president zelensky to get weapons now. someplace to come in and within days, not weeks. do we know anything about the supplies and have they arrived in time and are they getting to where they are needed in the east? ~ . , , , �* , east? what is interesting is it's very difficult — east? what is interesting is it's very difficult to _ east? what is interesting is it's very difficult to know. - east? what is interesting is it's| very difficult to know. president zelensky almost every day is appealing for weapons, particularly when he talks to parliamentarians and addressing politicians in south korea today and asking them for
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weapons and interestingly, soul is given humanitarian aid in giving things like helmets, medicines but they have not been given lethal weapons because given their own defence situation, they need to be able to protect themselves first. but it's hard to know how much of thatis but it's hard to know how much of that is arriving here in ukraine, exactly what is being given in your notice of the countries are kind of cagey about what military equipment they're passing on and ukrainians very keen not to let russian know too much about what is coming in and where it is going. but i think the mood music is that countries are providing these weapons but president zelensky says that if this campaign really is going to move forward, then they need more and more. in forward, then they need more and more. forward, then they need more and more, , ., forward, then they need more and more. .. , ., ., forward, then they need more and more. , ., ., , more. in the capital, we have seen re orts more. in the capital, we have seen reports from _ more. in the capital, we have seen reports from the _ more. in the capital, we have seen reports from the outskirts - more. in the capital, we have seen reports from the outskirts that - more. in the capital, we have seen i reports from the outskirts that came with the devastation left behind but now the russian withdrawal from the area, what does that mean for life in the capital? life
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area, what does that mean for life in the capital?— in the capital? life in the capital still very quiet. _ in the capital? life in the capital still very quiet. i _ in the capital? life in the capital still very quiet. i don't _ in the capital? life in the capital still very quiet. i don't know- still very quiet. i don't know if you can see behind me, the capital city is particularly dark and must use lights and night here in the city but there's still many checkpoints with your moving around and you will stop and share identification to ukrainian forces here and they do a lot of things that really prepare for the russians to get to this city so, even when you're driving around, there are lots of places with the road is narrow because he put sandbags there metal metalhead were built to the start of the war. so, it's a very quiet city and places are starting to reopen you'll find one or two restaurants are one or two people out doing that. not at this time of night it is a curfew and never once endures again but it really feels that even though the russians have moved away from this city, it still feels really quite haunting at times and ifeel feels really quite haunting at times and i feel it will remain that way for a little while now as people just try and remember what normal life was like here only six or seven
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weeks ago before this war began. thank you so much for that. now let's go to france, where the presidential election is underway. the current president, centrist emmanuel macron has won the first round of the election, getting 27.6% of the vote. in second place, his far right rival, marine le pen — who got 23.ai%. out of the race is far—left candidatejean—luc melenchon, who got 21.95%. the election happens in two stages. the first part is done. in the second part — emmanuel macron will go head to head against marine le pen. just as they did at the last election in 2017. so emmanuel macron came out ahead — just. and he had this message. don't make a mistake. this is not over. the debates we are going to have her the next 15 days are decisive for country and for europe.
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let's look more at emmanuel macron. he became france's youngest ever president in 2017. before, he was an economy minister. he started his centrist party — la republique en marche! — to challenge france's traditional left and right parties. and he won. as president, he's cut taxes, introduced strict anti—terrorist laws, and reduced unemployment. he's pro—european union, and pro—nato. but his policies have been criticised too. he was forced to scrap a planned fuel tax rise after these yellow—vest protests. many who voted for him before, won't this time. here's one of them. 2017, people voted for emmanuel macron because he was new and we did not know him and we thought, let's try it. we tried it and it was awful. we tried it and it was awful. macron has focused his campaign on the war in ukraine. but that's led to criticism. this is the french newspaper le monde,
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macron says he didn't campaign enough in the beginning, but as the race tightens it looks like that will change. this was him out today. now, let's look at his policies. he wants to continue reducing unemployment and cutting taxes. and continue capping fuel price cost increases by 4%. he wants to launch a major recruitment planfor nurses recruitment plan for nurses and care assistants. and he wants to push the retirement age up from 62 to 65. he says his policies will target the rising cost of living. but are they being heard? this journalist says no. that's not to say that emmanuel macron has not been talking about purchasing power, its macron has not been talking about purchasing power, it'sjust that macron has not been talking about purchasing power, its just that it does not play percolated through the same way and as you said, he is putting forth policies on the economy, investing in france and investing in the green transition from france but, his messages at this point have not been resonating with voters quite immediately as
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marine le pen. so marine le pen's economic policies are being heard. let's have a listen to some of her speech last night. what will happen on the 24th of april is notjust a vote about conditions. it is a matter of society. even of civilisation. marine le pen's has focused her campaign on the cost of living. let's remind ourselves who she is. marine le pen became the new leader of france's far right in 2011 — she took over the party, the national front, from herfather, jean—marie le pen. after she lost to macron in 2017, she reformed it. it's now called national rally. let's look at some of her policies. she wants to waive income tax for those under 30. she wants to reduce immigration, fight islamicism , and ban all islamic head coverings like the hijab in public. emmanuel macron has called her policies racist. let's hear from journalist catherine nicholson again. marine le pen has been speaking to voters about issues that really
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matter to them day today with money in their pocket. cutting fuel duty, no income tax for the under 30 and lots of issues that people can see and calculate an immediate positive impact on their lifestyles. and some voters are persuaded. here's one. she was good all along, she was good to the _ she was good all along, she was good to the people, she wasn't too much on the _ to the people, she wasn't too much on the tv, — to the people, she wasn't too much on the tv, more with us on the field she — on the tv, more with us on the field. she did everything right. let's look at marine le pen's foreign policy now. as we know, emmanuel macron is proudly pro—european union and pro—nato. marine le pen is the opposite. she wants to reform the european union — or turn it into an alliance of nations unchallenged by eu laws. and reduce france's participation in nato's military alliance. which brings us to another issue: ukraine. marine le pen has condemned russia's invasion. but she has ties to moscow.
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this was her meeting vladimir putin in 2017. she's expressed admiration for him. and she's relied on a russian bank loan for her previous presidential campaign. and so a marine le pen victory worries some western allies. here's nick beake. more people are asking the question whether france is on the verge of having its own a brexit moment her donald trump moment. a political earthquake, something that has huge repercussions, notjust in this country but across europe and beyond. both candidates will be campaigning now, to win more support. which brings us to the third place candidate from the far—left, jean—luc melenchon. he did far better than expected. but now he's out. and his voters could decide the final round of this election. this was his message. you must not give a single vote to marine le pen. you must not give a
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single vote to marine le pen. you must not give a single vote to marine le pen. now, i think you've got the message. don't vote le pen, he said — but he also didn't explicitly back emmanuel macron. for some, the prospect of a far right government means they'll vote for macron to stop that happening. emmanuel macron is very sensitive to the economy but marine le pen has, really. _ the economy but marine le pen has, really. it— the economy but marine le pen has, really. it is_ the economy but marine le pen has, really, it is no choice situation. i will he _ really, it is no choice situation. i will be voting for emmanuel macron. but what if they don't want to vote for either candidate. there are three options. there's vote nul — to spoil the ballot paper, rather than choosing a candidate. these votes aren't counted. then there's vote blanc. or the white vote. it's for voters who want to take part, but reject all candidates.
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they can do it by placing an empty envelope in the ballot box, or a blank ballot paper. these votes are counted. and of course abstention — that is to not vote at all. obviously that impacts turnout. that's what this woman has chosen to do. politicians, they must be more intelligent and if we vote against marine le pen, though never change. hugh schofield is in paris. first round of voting done. now it is down to two. and now they have to make the decision and i suppose looking at those candidates now that have been knocked out and where those votes might go.— those votes might go. exactly, makin: those votes might go. exactly, making their — those votes might go. exactly, making their calculations, - those votes might go. exactly, making their calculations, i'ml making their calculations, i'm making their calculations, i'm making my calculations and it all comes a pretty tidy. really
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independent adding to the straightaway, the 7% and that is even harder line for the nationalists and journalists who went straight ahead. another candidate on the sovereign is nationalist wing and got about 1r% and so, you're up to 44, nationalist wing and got about 1r% and so, you're up to “1,40 5% and so, you're up to aa, a0 5% and then she has to get votes from the other content contenders. and quoting and playing the firebrand from the far left and encouraging his supporters not to vote for marine le pen, but there will be some who did because there are those among them who regard emmanuel macron as the global capital and they loathe him for it.
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and it's much more close to the people left wing in a way except from her, it is linked to the nationalism. but they loathe emmanuel macron. and they will decide that marine le pen would be the better of two bad choices. i don't know how many of these people will be but on the selection, will she be able to draw to her side people who simply said, i cannot vote for the far right but feel that she is acceptable, familiar, not like herfather, she really has made the changes to our party and has a profile of a social and economic issues which is closer to the left and therefore acceptable. let’s issues which is closer to the left and therefore acceptable. let's talk about marine _ and therefore acceptable. let's talk about marine le _ and therefore acceptable. let's talk about marine le pen, _ and therefore acceptable. let's talk about marine le pen, checking - and therefore acceptable. let's talk about marine le pen, checking in l about marine le pen, checking in with french politics every now and again, they would assume perhaps that she was far right and not really and with a chance.
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traditionally, the second stage, an unofficial coalition comes together to stop the far right coming in and france and any sign that that will hold up this time?— france and any sign that that will hold up this time? another way of -auttin hold up this time? another way of putting the _ hold up this time? another way of putting the same _ hold up this time? another way of putting the same question, - hold up this time? another way of putting the same question, all. hold up this time? another way of| putting the same question, all the parties come together and say where the republicans, she is not republican, left and right come together and squeeze her out. again, thatis together and squeeze her out. again, that is just a way of expressing the same issue, will there be enough people on the left of the left are no longer represented in the selection, a third of the electorate is out of the picture and so all of the battle is where they go on the past without question, they have gone for emmanuel macron, they didn't last time, to keep her out and he won by two thirds to one third, basically in second round. but the big question is, whether they would do it again. many of them will still feel that marine le pen
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it's unacceptable and behind her looks the shadow of her father in the far right and anti—semitism, all the far right and anti—semitism, all the rest of it. but others will be of a mind that emmanuel macron is the worst of the two because he represents capital and globalisation and slick money and all of these things that we don't like at all and it's pretty easy to go out to the provinces and hear voices that are far more hostile to emmanuel macron than marine le pen. what far more hostile to emmanuel macron than marine le pen.— than marine le pen. what you think emmanuel macron _ than marine le pen. what you think emmanuel macron will— than marine le pen. what you think emmanuel macron will be _ than marine le pen. what you think emmanuel macron will be focusing | than marine le pen. what you think. emmanuel macron will be focusing on in these campaigns are?— in these campaigns are? focusing on his record so — in these campaigns are? focusing on his record so far— in these campaigns are? focusing on his record so far and _ in these campaigns are? focusing on his record so far and how _ in these campaigns are? focusing on his record so far and how she - his record so far and how she is from the far right and therefore, dangerous. but he would be unwise to do that too much because the old question of, links to nazi fascism, i don't think that washes any more with the electorate. litre i don't think that washes any more with the electorate.— with the electorate. live from us there in paris _
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with the electorate. live from us there in paris we _ with the electorate. live from us there in paris we have _ with the electorate. live from us there in paris we have plenty - with the electorate. live from us l there in paris we have plenty more coverage over the next couple of days and more online. if you are online you can find me there. good evening. there is some relatively warm weather and the outlook as we head to the rest of this week and towards the easter weekend. but, that does me no stay completely dry today. some of the saw showers and it was quite breezy too. the swirl of cloud grazing to the western side of the uk. this cloud was them down to the south i will feed northwards to bring the some pretty hefty downpours overnight and into tomorrow. but through the next few days, we stick with this relatively warm air and so temperatures tend to be above the norm and during this time we'll see some of those heavy downpours drifting northwards and the odd
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flash of lightning and the odd rumble of thunder and some clear spells as well but it is going to be a mild night, frost free for much everybody in lowe's between five and 10 degrees. on tuesday morning, somewhat start, will see the outbreaks being quite erratic for the rain and quite sporadic on and off and heavy and thundery and equally there will be some triers spells and a little bit of sunshine and was sunny skies across eastern england, staying sunday for long enough, temperatures could climb to around 18, 19 or even 20 degrees. a warm day but not as windy as it has been today, still quite chilly in the northeast of scotland and wednesday, there'll be some areas low cloud, mist and fog western coasts and clearing to give us scattering of afternoon showers and again those wind conditions around 19, maybe 20 degrees and it will be turning a little less chilly at this
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stage. as a going to thursday, it just a push from the west and outbreaks of rain and affecting northern ireland and the western side of scotland and a fair amount of cloud elsewhere but the best of sunshine again bringing someone up with heights of nine or 20 degrees. and then going to its least we can, high pressure will try to establish itself and for that we can forecast comments about how strong the city of high pressure will be. and how well it will fend off the frontal systems that will try to push and from the west. a bit of uncertainty at this range but it does look like staying warm also dry and bright with the systems close by, there's the chance of some rain at times.
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hello, this is outside source. austria's chancellor says he has held direct, open and tough talks vladimir putin as he becomes the first eu leader to meet him since the ukraine invasion. more evidence about the sexual violence women have suffered at the hands of russian forces. the woman who lived in this house managed to escape along with her child. she called the ukrainian police and has given them her testimony. she says she was raped
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multiple times by the drunk russian soldiers who killed her husband. pakistan has a new prime minister... and elon musk and twitter continue their complicated relationship with their complicated relationship with the billionaire now not going to take a seat on the board. welcome back to the programme. we are going to take a closer look now at the role of nato in ukraine and how it is central to the conflict. have a look at this map. you can see nato has expanded into eastern europe since 1997. russia takes issue with that. in fact, before the invasion, it demanded an end to any future nato enlargement. but today there has been a development. finland and sweden are expected to bid for membership. this is the former prime minister of finland speaking to the bbc. the only thing that putin
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understands is power, and i think it is very important for a country like finland which is small to understand that our security is based on two things. one is geography and another is history. can't do anything about geography but history you can at least in an influence and therefore the people have decided overwhelmingly to join nato. both sweden and finland face russia across the baltic sea — and finland shares a land border. they're both expected to submit their applications to join nato in the next few months. one us official told the times newspaper "how can this be anything but a massive strategic blunder for putin?" this is what the kremlin had to say earlier. translation: we have repeatedly said that nato is more _ translation: we have repeatedly said that nato is more like _ translation: we have repeatedly said that nato is more like a _ translation: we have repeatedly said that nato is more like a tool— that nato is more like a tool designed for confrontation. this is not an alliance that ensures peace and stability. the further expansion of the alliance certainly won't bring additional security to the european continent. ian lesser is
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the vice—president of the german marshall fund, an american think—tank. thank you for coming on the programme. do you think this has been a big blunder by putin? absolutely. i mean, if as expected finland and then sweden apply and join nato, this will give nato additional strategic depth, it will give these countries additional reassurance and it is precisely the kind of thing i have to assume vladimir putin would not have wanted to see, the consolidation of nato. but does it bring with it its own risks? does it bring a direct conflict more likely? i risks? does it bring a direct conflict more likely?- risks? does it bring a direct conflict more likely? i don't think it does. conflict more likely? i don't think it does- this _ conflict more likely? i don't think it does. this is _ conflict more likely? i don't think it does. this is clearly _ conflict more likely? i don't think it does. this is clearly something j it does. this is clearly something that russia is not going to like at all. no, idon�*t that russia is not going to like at all. no, i don't think so, in fact i think it makes the defence of places already in nato like the baltic states much more secure. these are countries that already have enormous capacity for defence. they worked
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closely with nato already but they are not members and they are not covered by the article five commitment. i think that is what they are seeking. i5 commitment. i think that is what they are seeking.— they are seeking. is there any ossible they are seeking. is there any possible alternative _ they are seeking. is there any l possible alternative explanation here? you are very much of the opinion clearly that putin has made a miscalculation with this invasion, didn't expect the reaction. is there any possible other way in which this is perhaps an outcome he wanted? i can't imagine it. i can't imagine it. i mean, if we take them at their word in moscow, i don't believe it is true but it seems to be the russian perception that somehow nato and nato enlargement over the years has threatened them. i cannot imagine they would want to see further enlargement, and indeed this is nato acquiring countries that already have very sophisticated defence capacity, so ijust can't see this as being good news for russia but it is becoming increasingly likely, almost certain
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at this point. increasingly likely, almost certain at this point-— at this point. what about the possibility. _ at this point. what about the possibility, how _ at this point. what about the possibility, how scared - at this point. what about the possibility, how scared to . at this point. what about the | possibility, how scared to use at this point. what about the i possibility, how scared to use a rather basic word i suppose should those countries be? clearly there is a change in their calculation. they look set now to apply for membership. do you think the calculation has changed significantly now?- calculation has changed sianificantl now? ,, ., significantly now? both sweden and finland, especially _ significantly now? both sweden and finland, especially finland - significantly now? both sweden and finland, especially finland i - significantly now? both sweden and finland, especially finland i would i finland, especially finland i would say, are countries that are prepared for the contingency of confrontation with russia for many years. they have done it from a position of neutrality in a sense, but without foreclosing the possibility of nato membership. i think what this war has done is to make clear to them that it has done is to make clear to them thatitis has done is to make clear to them that it is one thing to have a close relationship with nato, it's another thing to be able to count on nato's security guarantee in war, and i think that is what they are seeking at this point. and of course public opinion has shifted as well. you look at finland _ opinion has shifted as well. you look at finland and _ opinion has shifted as well. you look at finland and we mentioned the significance of the history. it
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makes the relationship particularly delicate. ~ ., , delicate. well, it does. in fact very early _ delicate. well, it does. in fact very early in _ delicate. well, it does. in fact very early in 1940 _ delicate. well, it does. in fact very early in 1940 there - delicate. well, it does. in fact very early in 1940 there was l delicate. well, it does. in fact very early in 1940 there was a j very early in 19a0 there was a winter war between finland and russia, the then soviet union. in the end of the soviet union you could say won the war but at enormous cost for very little gain and the finnish are very conscious of the fact they fought off the russians in that contingency. the russians in that contingency. the russians will remember the same history. finland is very well for these kind of contingencies including the hardening of society civil defence preparations and things like that. finland would be better off not to crack under any conditions. as a member of nato, even tougher. conditions. as a member of nato, even tougher-— conditions. as a member of nato, even tougher. thank you very much for coming — even tougher. thank you very much for coming on _ even tougher. thank you very much for coming on and _ even tougher. thank you very much for coming on and giving _ even tougher. thank you very much for coming on and giving your- for coming on and giving your expertise, thank you.- for coming on and giving your expertise, thank you. good to be with ou. now let's turn to pakistan — after a volatile few days.
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imran khan was removed as prime minister in a vote of no confidence. now the country now has a new prime minister. shehbaz sharif has been sworn in. this was the moment. shehbaz sharif was voted in unopposed but some opposition mps resigned en massejust before, and others boycotted the vote. sharif had this to say, after his victory. translation: this is the first time in histo a translation: this is the first time in history a no-confidence - translation: this is the first time in history a no-confidence motion l in history a no—confidence motion has succeeded. it is a victory of righteousness and evil has been defeated. we need dialogue, not deadlock, if we are to take this democratic process and this economy forward. sharif
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is from the pmln — the pakistan muslim league nawaz. he was previously chief minister of punjab, the biggest province in pakistan, where he was generally seen as doing a good job. shahbaz sharif is best known for being brother to nawaz sharif — who served three times as prime minister. key to any pakistani leader's prospects are their relations with the powerful military. hassan abbas is a former official who served in previous governments. historically their relationship has not been that good. the military was behind the ousting of nawaz sharif, but in the case of shehbaz sharif who was always seen as someone who had a good working relationship with the military. he was always pragmatic, he wanted his brother to neverfire pragmatic, he wanted his brother to never fire the former army chiefs and was always keeping one contact and was always keeping one contact and one window of contact open with
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the military. so the military relationship between and the military shehbaz sharif relationship will be relatively stable this time i think. imran khan spent his final days claiming a "foreign conspiracy" was behind efforts to remove him. and it's an argument that was effective in mobilising his supporters. tens of thousands took to the streets on sunday night after he lost that vote of no confidence. this footage was posted by the former prime minister himself, showing crowds in lahore. but if imran kahn wants to make a comeback, pulling a crowd might not be enough. shamila chaudhary is from the think tank new america. imran khan has benefited from using this anti—western platform and he is able to get people out onto the street. what i'm watching is what is the message now that he is asking his people to carry, now that he has been voted out of office? he is already clearly in campaigning mode but he has to quickly get organised
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because he represents a lot of recent chaos and a lot of economic mismanagement, and his kind of anti—western rhetoric on the global stage has not been received well. so i think he needs to start thinking less about the constituency that he would serve and more about how he is going to win the next election, if in fact that is what he wants. i'm joined now by the pakistani journalist and political analyst syed talat hussain. thank you for coming on the programme. after a very volatile few days, a new prime ministerfor the country. tell us a bit about him. he's a man known for his ability to deliver the goods, getting the development agendas of the table into the fields and into the works. he thrives on being very pro—china. and he likes to deliver the goods,
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so he is known for being a doer. at this time of course the challenges are pretty formidable because he is heading a coalition government and the streets are pretty hot considering that the ex prime minister is ratcheting up the heat on him. �* , ., . minister is ratcheting up the heat onhim. �*, .,. , , minister is ratcheting up the heat onhim. �*, , ., on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan- do you _ on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do you think— on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do you think this _ on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do you think this is _ on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do you think this is the - on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do you think this is the last i khan. do you think this is the last we will see of him?— khan. do you think this is the last we will see of him? imran khan has taken u- we will see of him? imran khan has taken up the _ we will see of him? imran khan has taken up the agenda _ we will see of him? imran khan has taken up the agenda of _ taken up the agenda of anti—americanism, which is different from anti—west slogan that we generally see in pakistan. in fact it is notjust anti—americanism, it is anti—biden administration. he did visit the us under donald trump and they seemed to hit it off very well between the two of them. in fact when he came back he used the analogy of being welcomed as if he had won the world cup. remember he's the champion captain of the 1992 world cup that he won pakistan. so
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he's clearly anti—biden and he has been twisting this theory of biden bankrolling the move that ousted him and continues to go into that past. let's leave imran khan at the moment, i'm sure it is not the last we have heard of him and his campaigning, but let's concentrate on the new man again. what difference do you think he will make to the country's international standing? you touched on relations with china, we will come back to those in the second but russia is the crucial one at the moment. russia certainly is the crucial one. i think his aim would be to rebuild ties with china and pakistan's other allies, mostly importantly saudi arabia and the uae in the middle east. he's already got a call from president erdogan in turkey, so he has started off on a fairly ok international endorsement, narendra
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modi from india has also sent him a message talking about because according to preconditions, so his entire effort is going to be to rebuild the damaged ties with the western world, and at the same time stay clear of the ukrainian and russian conflict, or at least i know that a bit imran khan was ousted by putin when putin moved his troops into ukraine and ukraine happens to be traditionally one of pakistan's biggest supporters. be that kashmir, be that the issue of arms and supplies. 50 be that the issue of arms and su -lies. . ., , be that the issue of arms and supplies-— be that the issue of arms and sunlies. . ., , ., ., supplies. so clearly moving away from imran _ supplies. so clearly moving away from imran khan's _ supplies. so clearly moving away from imran khan's position - supplies. so clearly moving away from imran khan's position but l from imran khan's position but maintaining a certain neutrality, not committing too hard to being anti—russia. not committing too hard to being anti-russia— anti-russia. yes, i mean imran himself was _ anti-russia. yes, i mean imran himself was quite _ anti-russia. yes, i mean imran himself was quite neutral - anti-russia. yes, i mean imran himself was quite neutral to - anti-russia. yes, i mean imran himself was quite neutral to be| himself was quite neutral to be honest with you. he was able to have international and multilateral donors really fund his regime, and
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he got all sorts of loans from the world bank, had a programme with the imf, and facilitated by the us as well. the us was supporting $800 million a year, so he was knocked really anti—american until such time he didn't receive a call from biden and that seemed to snowball into a big personal issue between him and biden. the russian trip came up and he thought it was a good opportunity to go over and strike a neutral note. itjust happened that he was there and putin used that and moved attacks into ukraine and that created an image as if he is very anti—american and trying to have it off with russia instead. i anti-american and trying to have it off with russia instead.— off with russia instead. i see! let's move — off with russia instead. i see! let's move on _ off with russia instead. i see! let's move on to _ off with russia instead. i see! let's move on to them - off with russia instead. i see! let's move on to them role i off with russia instead. i see! let's move on to them role of off with russia instead. i see! - let's move on to them role of the military and all of this, it always plays a crucial role in pakistani politics. how is that relationship going to move forward?-
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going to move forward? imran's taruet is going to move forward? imran's target is primarily _ going to move forward? imran's target is primarily what - going to move forward? imran's target is primarily what we - going to move forward? imran's target is primarily what we call. going to move forward? imran'sl target is primarily what we call in pakistan re—establishment which is a euphemism for the army, so the slogan on the street last night for instance didn't really talk much about the opposition being the lackeys of the americans. remember these are opposition parties which are drawn from the entire section of pakistan's society. the target really was the establishment, and some of the slogans were not exactly great compliments of the army's leadership in pakistan. i think that will damage imran's relationship with the army because it is notjust about the current army chief but also his long—term ties with the army and the establishment at large. i think as he moves up on this strange part of his protest, i think it will inflict a lot of damage on the establishment.— it will inflict a lot of damage on
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the establishment. thank you for cominu the establishment. thank you for coming on _ the establishment. thank you for coming on the — the establishment. thank you for coming on the programme. - a man from north london who was radicalised by the islamic state group has been found guity of murdering the conservative mp sir david amess. ali harber ali, who's 26, carried out the murder at the mp�*s weekly constituency surgery in leigh on sea in the east of england last october. before the killing, ali had spent months researching how he might murder other mps, even staking out the home of michael gove. in the end, he targeted sir david simply because he'd seen an advertisement for his constituency surgery online and it seemed, in his words, the easiest. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani was at the old bailey.
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emergency. police, please, quick, now. the man is wielding a knife. he's killed david amess at belfairs methodist church. the 15th of october last year, and in the leafy suburbs of leigh—on—sea, a man hasjust murdered an mp. he wants to be a hero. he wants the police to come and shoot him. who? what, the person with the knife? , yes. they say he's got i a knife and he'sjust stabbed someone. two officers with just batons and pepper spray are the first to the scene. they decide they can't wait for firearms or taser units to arrive. stay back, yeah? mate, drop the knife! on the floor now! on the bleep floor! get it down! taser! taser! we've got him. it's all right, it's all right. right, search him. right, mate, at the moment, you're under arrest for- murder, all right? at southend police station, the killer declares his motive. is it domestic or hate—related in any way? terror. pardon? terror. ali harbi ali grew up in croydon in south london. he was clever enough to consider becoming a doctor until syria's civil war changed the teenager's ambitions. at first, he wanted to fight for the islamic state group. but in 2019, he followed
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a worldwide call from the group's propagandists to strike at home instead. his target, any of the 52a mps who had voted to bomb is fighters. and, carrying a knife, he was tempted to kill anyone of them as they came and went from parliament. i'll be honest with you, there's been a lot of times where i've gone out in my head with a plan to do something and then i would come back home. so, you know, because, you know, what's the word? i bottled it. you know? people can self radicalise and do this almost entirely in secret, alone in their house, and do that online. and some of their activity when they then leave their house presents an opportunity for us and the public may be to work together and identify their behaviour. harbi ali considered attacking cabinet ministers but settled on this man, sir david amess, mp for southend west. he had advertised his constituency surgery on twitter and, lying that he was local, harbi ali fixed an appointment, e—mailing to
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say, i don't think i'll take too long. ali harbi ali arrived here at the old bailey a self—confessed terrorist killer, but he then taunted sir david's family, declaring that he'd done nothing wrong. he said he had killed to protect muslims in syria. but the judge said that was no defence to the crime of murder, and thejury tookjust 18 minutes to convict him. he literally did something that you can't even imagine. and it doesn't heal, itjust hurts. he's hurting all the people involved, making them relive it. arrogant to the end, he refused to stand for the verdict. just metres away, sir david's grieving family, watching the killer's final insult to them and a public servant who had only ever wanted to do good. dominic casciani spoke to us from outside the courtroom. we will be back here at the old
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bailey on wednesday for ali harbi ali's sentences and the judge has amongst his options are whole life order. he has used them before in other terrorism cases but there is also a question about ali harbi ali's involvement with the radicalisation scheme. we don't know what happened. that question may come up at a future inquest which is yet to be decided. go where the former presidentjacob zuma has been hospitalised ahead of the resumption of the corruption trial. zuma has pleaded not guilty to charges of corruption, money—laundering and racketeering relating to a $2 billion arms deal in a case that dates back to the 19905. in a case that dates back to the 1990s. the national prosecution authority has accused zuma of using delay tactics to stop the trial going ahead. our reporter has more.
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all the security measures were in place on the road in front of the courthouse cordoned off, but in the end of the trial was postponed and the former president zuma a no—show due to own medical emergency his representatives say. —— due to a medical emergency. there are four appeals pending. mr medical emergency. there are four appeals pending-— medical emergency. there are four appeals pending. mr zuma has usually invoked the entire _ appeals pending. mr zuma has usually invoked the entire appeal— appeals pending. mr zuma has usually invoked the entire appeal process - appeals pending. mr zuma has usually invoked the entire appeal process to i invoked the entire appeal process to the highest courts in this land and has in _ the highest courts in this land and has in many— the highest courts in this land and has in many variances unsuccessful. they— has in many variances unsuccessful. they have _ has in many variances unsuccessful. they have been viewed with distrust from some — they have been viewed with distrust from some quarters resulting only in delays _ from some quarters resulting only in delays which only favour him, do not per a _ delays which only favour him, do not per a amount delays which only favour him, do not pera amount to delays which only favour him, do not per a amount to an abuse of those rights _ per a amount to an abuse of those rights mr— per a amount to an abuse of those riahts. ~ , per a amount to an abuse of those riahts. ~ ., , , ., rights. mr zuma's lawyers want the lead prosecutor _ rights. mr zuma's lawyers want the lead prosecutor removed _ rights. mr zuma's lawyers want the lead prosecutor removed citing - rights. mr zuma's lawyers want the l lead prosecutor removed citing bias.
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it couldn't proceed today as we hoped — it couldn't proceed today as we hoped and _ it couldn't proceed today as we hoped and planned _ it couldn't proceed today as we hoped and planned with - it couldn't proceed today as we hoped and planned with all- it couldn't proceed today as we hoped and planned with all our| hoped and planned with all our witnesses _ hoped and planned with all our witnesses lined _ hoped and planned with all our witnesses lined up. _ hoped and planned with all our witnesses lined up. however, i hoped and planned with all our. witnesses lined up. however, the judge _ witnesses lined up. however, the judge stated _ witnesses lined up. however, the judge stated family— witnesses lined up. however, the judge stated family that - witnesses lined up. however, the judge stated family that the - witnesses lined up. however, the judge stated family that the law. judge stated family that the law regulating — judge stated family that the law regulating appeals _ judge stated family that the law regulating appeals need - judge stated family that the law regulating appeals need to - judge stated family that the law regulating appeals need to be l regulating appeals need to be respected _ regulating appeals need to be respected and _ regulating appeals need to be respected and as _ regulating appeals need to be respected and as such - regulating appeals need to be respected and as such we - regulating appeals need to be respected and as such we are| regulating appeals need to be - respected and as such we are hoping that by— respected and as such we are hoping that by the _ respected and as such we are hoping that by the 17th _ respected and as such we are hoping that by the 17th of— respected and as such we are hoping that by the 17th of may, _ respected and as such we are hoping that by the 17th of may, at _ respected and as such we are hoping that by the 17th of may, at least - that by the 17th of may, at least the president _ that by the 17th of may, at least the president of— that by the 17th of may, at least the president of the _ that by the 17th of may, at least the president of the supreme i that by the 17th of may, at least. the president of the supreme court of appeal— the president of the supreme court of appeal would _ the president of the supreme court of appeal would have _ the president of the supreme court of appeal would have finalised - the president of the supreme court of appeal would have finalised the i of appeal would have finalised the application — of appeal would have finalised the application for _ of appeal would have finalised the application for consideration. - of appeal would have finalised the application for consideration. thisl application for consideration. this case has application for consideration. case has limped along for application for consideration. tiitii: case has limped along for the application for consideration.- case has limped along for the better part of 17 years when the charges were first brought, dropped and then reinstated. mr zuma is charged with 16 counts of fraud and racketeering. it relates to a 2 billion us dollars arms deal. he is accused of receiving kickbacks and a french company has jointly been charged with him. elon musk has decided not to join the board of twitter. musk�*s appointment was due to become effective on saturday after revealing last week that he had bought a 9.2% stake in the social media platform. that's four times as many shares as twitter�*s founder, jack dorsey. but on monday the company's chief
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executive parag agrawal tweeted: "elon shared that same morning that he will no longer bejoining the board." in a statement he also said that mr musk " remains twitter�*s biggest shareholder and the firm will remain open to his input." on sunday elon musk posted a series of tweets. these included asking whether twitter is dying and if its headquarters should be turned into a homeless shelter. our north america technology correspondent james clayton is in san francisco. what is going on here? he was going tojoin the board and now he is not, do we know why? tojoin the board and now he is not, do we know why? me to join the board and now he is not, do we know why?— to join the board and now he is not, do we know why? we don't know why. the only person _ do we know why? we don't know why. the only person who _ do we know why? we don't know why. the only person who knows _ do we know why? we don't know why. the only person who knows is - do we know why? we don't know why. the only person who knows is elon - the only person who knows is elon musk himself. the crucial thing is that if elon musk were to take that board position, he would have only been able to buy 15% of twitter, that was written into that sort of contract, so the fact he hasn't taken up this board position has made many people speculate that elon musk actually wants to buy more and more of twitter. he comfortably has
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enough money to buy it outright. he could force a hostile takeover of twitter, that is certainly one option. the other is that if he were to be a board member of twitter, he would be constrained. he wouldn't necessarily be able to be tweeting these things like you have just mentioned like the san francisco hq should become homeless shelter. he would have to take a much more conservative position in terms of his public criticism of the company and that may well be why he's decided not to take a board position. at the moment only elon musk knows. the only thing he tweeted was an emoji of a person with a hand over theirface. what that means we have no idea, only elon musk. 50 that means we have no idea, only elon musk-— that means we have no idea, only elon musk. , ., ., ~ ., , elon musk. so it is a working theory that he still— elon musk. so it is a working theory that he still has _ elon musk. so it is a working theory that he still has more _ elon musk. so it is a working theory that he still has more freedom - that he still has more freedom outside looking in rather than on the inside. if we take that as a kind of working assumption, what do you think this means for the future of twitter? he clearly wants to make
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some changes. it is of twitter? he clearly wants to make some changes-— some changes. it is a massive distraction- — some changes. it is a massive distraction. whether - some changes. it is a massive distraction. whether he's - some changes. it is a massive distraction. whether he's on l some changes. it is a massive l distraction. whether he's on the board are not, he is still twitter�*s biggest shareholder and has this huge cash, i mean he's incredibly famous. you have this massive figure, the world's richest person who has become almost obsessed with the company who is a major shareholder so he will still have a lot of influence at twitter whether he is a board member or not. the question elon musk has to ask himself is do i want to buy twitter? because he could put the issue is he doesn't have that much physical cash money. he would have to sell a lot of shares of tesla, and then if he did that he would be hit by this massive capital gains tax bill. so it is not all upside for him at all. you may decide actually he would prefer to snipe from the sides. interesting stuff. his tweets always generate publicity and will continue
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to do so. thank you very much for that. that is it from me, plenty more online as always. if you are online, do get me on twitter. i am lewis vaughanjones, this is outside source. goodbye. good evening. there is some relatively warm weather in the outlook as we head through the rest of this week and towards the easter weekend, but that doesn't mean it's going to stay completely dry. today some of us are showers, it was quite breezy too. the swirl of cloud just grazing close to the western side of the uk. there's also this cloud now waiting down to the south which will feed northwards to bring some pretty hefty downpours overnight and into tomorrow. through the next few days, we stick with this relatively warm air so temperatures will tend to be above the norm for the time of year. during tonight we will see some of those heavy downpours drifting
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northwards, there could be the odd flash of lightning and rumble of thunder. some clear spells as well but it will be a mild night, frost—free for pretty much everybody. those between five and 10 degrees. i'll start to tuesday morning but for some wet start. the rain moving erratically northwards, quite sporadic, quite on and off but it could be heavy and thundery in places. equally there will be dry spells and a bit of sunshine. in fact where we see sunny skies in parts of eastern england, if it days are sunny for long enough, temperatures could reach 20 degrees. not as windy as it has been today, and still quite chilly in the north—east of scotland. as we get into wednesday, the winds will fall very light indeed. areas of low cloud, mist and fog, particularly around western coasts, mostly clearing a scattering of afternoon showers. again the highs of 19, may be 20 degrees, and even northern scotland will be turning a little less chilly at this stage. as we get
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into thursday, a frontal system tries to push on from the west so outbreaks of rain likely to affect northern ireland and the western side of scotland. a fair amount of cloud elsewhere but the best of the sunshine again bringing some warmth with highs of 20 degrees. we look towards the easter weekend, high pressure will try to establish itself. the big question over the weekend forecast is aboutjust how strong this area of high pressure will be and how well it will fend off the frontal systems that will try to push on from the west. there is a bit of uncertainty at this range but it does look like staying warm, often dry and bright. with those frontal systems close by, there is the chance of some rain at times.
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hello, i'm lewis vaughanjones, this is outside source. austria's chancellor says he's held "very direct, open and tough" talks with president putin — as he becomes the first eu leader to meet him since the ukraine invasion. meanwhile, in ukraine — there's more evidence emerging about the sexual violence women have suffered at the hands of russian forces — we have a special report. the woman who lived in this house managed to escape along with her child.
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she called the ukrainian police and has given them her testimony. she says she was raped multiple times by the two drunk russian soldiers who killed her husband. the french election goes down to two — emmanuel macron and marine le pen prepare to go head to head in the final round for the presidency. let's begin with the war in ukraine. the austrian chancellor karl nehammer, has become the first eu leader to hold a meeting with president putin since the russian invasion. he described the talks as �*open' and direct�* — have a listen. translation: i have no optimistic imression translation: i have no optimistic impression that _ translation: i have no optimistic impression that i _ translation: i have no optimistic impression that i can _ translation: i have no optimistic impression that i can report - translation: i have no optimistic impression that i can report on - translation: i have no optimistic impression that i can report on this conversation with vladimir putin on the offensive in eastern ukraine has evidently been prepared on a massive scale which is why i made very clear that a stable access for the international red cross is needed. on the agenda at that meeting —
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the issue of alleged warcrimes in ukraine. it comes as horrors are being uncovered in areas regained by ukrainian forces in the north. in particular, we've heard stories of violence against women — and of soldiers using rape, as a weapon of war. our correspondent, yogita limaye, has been speaking to some of those affected, and the vivid descriptions of abuse, you may find distressing. a quiet rural neighbourhood, shattered by barbaric violence. in a village west of kyiv, a first—hand account of rape by invading soldiers. when we started talking to this woman, we didn't know what we were about to hear. we are hiding her identity to protect her. translation: a soldier entered our house. - my husband and i were there. at gunpoint, he took me to a neighbouring house.
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he was ordering me, "take your clothes off or i'll shoot you." then he started raping me. while he was doing that, four more soldiers entered. i thought i was done for, but they took him away. she returned home to find her husband shot in the abdomen. he died two days later. she buried him in the backyard. translation: i found drugs -
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and the alcohol they left behind. they would get high and they were drunk. most of the invading soldiers are killers, rapists and looters. only a few are ok. i want to ask putin, why is this happening? i don't understand. we are not living in the stone age. just up the road, we heard of another rape case. it is being investigated by the police. this is the house a woman was taken to and assaulted. upstairs, the bedroom where she was later killed. it's a disturbing scene. on the mirror, a message in lipstick. "tortured by unknown people, buried by russian soldiers," it says. out in the garden, we were shown her grave. a day after we went, ukrainian police exhumed her body. the note, we are told, was left by a separate unit of russians who found her body and buried her here. translation: they told me she had been raped and that her throat - was either slit or stabbed. they said she bled to death and there was a lot of blood.
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we travelled 70 miles east to another village. to what used to be the home of a family. a couple in their 30s and their young child. signs of their peaceful, ordinary life lie amidst the ruins. on the 9th of march, russian tanks rolled in. two soldiers shot the man dead. the woman who lived in this house managed to escape along with her child. she called the ukrainian police and she has given them her testimony. she has told them she was raped multiple times by the two drunk russian soldiers who killed her husband. and she said that they threatened to kill her little boy, too, if she didn't do exactly as they said. as the soldiers left, they burned down the house. the police chief has told us
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they have gathered evidence and plan to go to the international court. in kyiv, we met ukraine's human rights ombudsman, ludmila denisova, who has been recording rape cases. translation: about 25 girls - and women aged 14-24 were raped during the occupation in the basement of one house in bucha. nine of them are pregnant. a 25—year—old woman called to tell us her 16—year—old sister was raped in the street in front of her. to calculate the number of such sexual crimes is impossible at the moment because not everyone has come to us, not everyone is willing to talk to us. among the people we met, there is no relief that the russians have gone, because they have left behind deeply wounded lives that might never recover. yogita limaye, bbc news, kyiv.
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incredibly distressing details in that report. efforts are being stepped up to evacuate people from the donbas region. it's in the east of the country. russia has redirected its military offensive there. this is the ukrainian defence ministry spokesperson. translation: at the same time, the ukrainian army is ready. we cannot predict when exactly it will happen but we have information from western sources. that said the army is almost finished preparation on the offensive operation. we know from the uk ministry of defence shelling has continued in the regions of donetsk and luhansk, known collectively as the donbas "with ukrainian forces repulsing several assaults," it says. have a look at this satellite image. it's a convoy of military forces heading south towards the donbas region — redeployed from the north.
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our defence correspondent jonathan beale is there. we certainly heard the sound of artillery intensifying in recent days. many people who live in this region have already left, which is why you can see few lights on in the block of flats behind me. i think the fighting here will be different from what we have seen in kyiv. it's more open countryside. the advantage the ukrainians have is that they are already well dug in. they have been fighting russian—backed separatists here for the past eight years and they are some of the most battle hardened troops, and also tired, but it looks like morale is still high. the advantage for the russians is they are now fighting on fewer fronts. they also have the numeric advantage, one western official saying he expected russia to not just double but possibly triple the number of forces it has in this region, but also saying that could take some considerable time. i think everybody knows that this next phase of the war could be decisive in the east.
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it could also be bloody. the new general, the new russian general in charge, is known as the butcher of syria for a reason. let's hear how this is all being received in russia — our correspondent jenny hill is in moscow. there is a school of thought that says vladimir putin wants to take the donbas region by may 9th. a very significant day in russia where they commemorate the soviet victory over nazi germany. and having presided over an invasion which is not really going to plan, vladimir putin could save face by telling russians on that day that he scored another historic victory, as he would frame it, by having taken some territory in eastern ukraine. lots of questions around it. can he do it?
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the military have the capability to take significant amounts of territory there? and the second question is will that be enough for vladimir putin? our correspondent anna foster is in kyiv — and i spoke to her a little earlier. i am in kyiv tonight, places where you have seen the images of absolute devastation you heard the stories, some of them reflected in the report by the stories of people who have seen and witnessed terrible things while the russians occupied those towns. memories are still very strong. people are straining to head back now in some numbers and we met people today who are going back to their homes to see what was left of them, to try and clean up and start their lives in some way. but as you quite rightly say, further east, you have a whole new section of people who are being urged very seriously to leave the east of the country ahead of this potential russian onslaught and you have to look
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at what ukrainian forces managed to do around the capital. they managed to repel and push back russian forces in ways that even military analysts were surprised by, how well the ukrainian forces did. there is a feeling that this next phase will be even more powerful and potentially even more brutal than we have seen already. last week, continued calls from president zelensky to get weapons now. some to come in within days, not weeks. do we know anything about the supplies and have they arrived in time and are they getting to where they are needed in the east? what is interesting is it's very difficult to know. president zelensky almost every day is appealing for weapons, particularly when he talks to parliamentarians. he was addressing politicians in south korea today and asking them for weapons and interestingly, seoul is given humanitarian aid in giving
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things like helmets, medicines, but they have not been given lethal weapons because given their own defence situation, they need to be able to protect themselves first. but it's hard to know how much of that is arriving here in ukraine, exactly what is being given. you'll notice the countries are kind of cagey about what military equipment they're passing on and ukrainians very keen not to let russian know too much about what is coming in and where it is going. but i think the mood music is that countries are providing these weapons but president zelensky says that if this campaign really is going to ramp up in the east, then they need more and more. in the capital, we have seen reports from the outskirts that came with the devastation left behind but now the russian withdrawal from the area, what does that mean for life in the capital there? life in the capital is still very quiet. i don't know if you can see behind me, the capital city is particularly dark.
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you can't use lights at night here in the city, there's still many checkpoints. when you're moving around, you will stop and share identification to ukrainian forces here and they do a lot of things that really prepare for the russians to get to this city so, even when you're driving around, there are lots of places with the roads narrow, because they've put sandbags there. so, it's a very quiet city and places are starting to reopen so you'll find one or two restaurants are open, one or two people out doing that.
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i feel it will remain that way for a little while now as people just try and remember what normal life was like here only six or seven weeks ago before this war began. now let's go to france, where the first round of the presidential election is over and the second already underway. the current president, centrist emmanuel macron came top, getting nearly 28% of the vote. in second place, his far right rival, marine le pen who got 23%. out of the race is far—left candidatejean—luc melenchon, who got 22%. from here the top two candidates go head to head for the second round — so that's emmanuel macron against marine le pen. just as they did at the last election in 2017. emmanuel macron came out ahead — just. and he had this message... commentator: don't make a mistake. this is not over. the debates we are going to have over the next 15 days are decisive for our country and for europe. let's look more at emmanuel macron. he became france's youngest ever president in 2017. before that, he was an economy minister. he started his centrist party — la republique en marche! — to challenge france's traditional left and right parties. and he won.
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as president, he's cut taxes, introduced strict anti—terrorist laws, and reduced unemployment. but his policies have been criticised, too. he was forced to scrap a planned fuel tax rise after these yellow—vest protests. many who voted for him before, won't this time. here's one of them... 2017, people voted for macron because he was new and we did not know him and we thought, let's try it. we tried it and it was awful. macron has focused his campaign on the war in ukraine. but that's led to criticism. this is the french newspaper le monde... macron says he didn't campaign enough in the beginning, but as the race tightens it looks like that will change. this was him out today. now let's look at his policies. he wants to continue reducing
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unemployment and cutting taxes. and continue capping fuel price cost increases by a%. he wants to launch a major recruitment plan for nurses and care assistants. and he wants to push the retirement age up from 62 to 65. he says his policies will target the rising cost of living. but are they being heard? this journalist says no... that's not to say that emmanuel macron has not been talking about cost of living or purchasing power, it's just that it has not percolated through the same way and as you said, he is putting forth policies on the economy, investing in france and investing in the green transition from france but, his messages at this point have not been resonating with voters quite immediately as marine le pen. so marine le pen's policies are being heard. let's have a listen to some of her speech last night. translation: what will happen on the 2ath
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of april is notjust a vote about conditions. it is a matter of society. even of civilisation. let's remind ourselves who she is. marine le pen became the new leader of france's far right in 2011 — she took over the party, the national front, from herfather, jean—marie le pen. after she lost to macron in 2017, she reformed it. it's now called national rally. let's look at some of her policies. she wants to waive income tax for those under 30. she wants to reduce immigration, fight islamicism , and ban all islamic head coverings like the hijab in public. emmanuel macron has called her policies racist. but her focus on the rising cost of living is attracting french voters. let's hear from journalist catherine nicholson again. marine le pen has been speaking to voters about issues that really matter to them day today, the euros in their pocket. cutting fuel duty, no income tax for the under 30s and lots of issues that people can see and calculate an immediate positive
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impact on their lifestyles. here's one voter who's been persuaded. she was good all along, she was good to the people, she wasn't too much on the tv, more with us on the field. she did everything right. let's look at marine le pen's foreign policy now. as we know, emmanuel macron is proudly pro—european union and pro—nato. marine le pen is not. she wants to reform the european union — or turn it into an alliance of nations unchallenged by eu laws. and reduce france's participation in nato's military alliance. which brings us to another issue: ukraine. marine le pen has condemned russia's invasion. but she has ties to moscow. this was her meeting vladimir putin in 2017. she's expressed admiration for him. and she's relied on a russian bank loan for her previous presidential campaign. and so a marine le pen victory worries france's western allies. here's nick beake.
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more people are asking the question whether france is on the verge of having its own brexit moment or trump moment. a political earthquake, something that has huge repercussions, not just in this country but across europe and beyond. both candidates will be campaigning now, to win more support. which brings us to the third place candidate from the far—left, jean—luc melenchon. he did far better than expected. but now he's out. and his voters could decide the final round of this election. this was his message. translation: you must not give a single vote to marine le pen. now, i think you've got the message. vote to marine le pen. don't vote le pen, he said — but he also didn't explicitly
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back emmanuel macron. for some, the prospect of a far right government means they'll vote for macron to stop that happening. mr macron is very sensitive to the economy but marine le pen has a gun on the head. really, it is no choice situation. voting for macron? i will be voting for emmanuel macron. but what if they don't want to vote for either candidate? then there are 3 options. vote nul — to spoil the ballot paper, rather than choosing a candidate. these votes aren't counted. then there's vote blanc. or the white vote. it's for voters who want to take part, but reject all candidates. they can do it by placing an empty envelope in the ballot box, or a blank ballot paper. these votes are counted. and of course abstention — that is to not vote at all. obviously that impacts turnout. that's what this woman
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has chosen to do. politicians must change. they must be more intelligent and if we vote against marine le pen, they won't change. they never change. so where will those votes — votes for candidates that have been knocked out of the race — now go. i asked our paris correspondent, hugh schofield. they are making their calculations and we are making hours and it all comes out pretty tight, it seems to me, and marine le pen did very well and she can add to her score straightaway the 7% who voted for eric zemmour, the even harder line nationalistjournalist eric zemmour, the even harder line nationalist journalist who eric zemmour, the even harder line nationalistjournalist who ran and failed, but that will go straight to her. another candidate on the sovereign east nationalist wing as well who got about a% and that you are up to about 3a, 30 5%, then she has got to try and take votes from
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the other contenders, not least those on the left. you were quoting and playing jean—luc melenchon, the firebrand from the far left, urging his supporters not to vote for marine le pen but some will, some will do amongst his voters because there are amongst them many who regard emmanuel macron as the kind of acme of global capitalism and they loathe him for that and they see in marine le pen language which is much closer to the people, left wing, the way, except from her it is linked to the nationalism. but they loathe president macron, these people, and they will decide that marine le pen is the better of these two choices, and i don't know how many there will be, but can she draw
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to her side people who up to now have simply said, i cannot vote for the far right but now feel she is acceptable and familiar and she is not like herfather, she has made changes to her party, and has a profile on the social and economic issues which is much closer to the left and is therefore acceptable. let's talk about marine le pen. people who check in with french politics every now and again it would assume that she is far right are not really in with a chance but traditionally in the second stage a kind of unofficial coalition comes together to stop the far right coming in in france, any sign that we will hold up?— we will hold up? yes, that is another way _ we will hold up? yes, that is another way of _ we will hold up? yes, that is another way of putting - we will hold up? yes, that is another way of putting the l we will hold up? yes, that is - another way of putting the same question, will this barrage, will be other parties come together and say we are the republicans, left and right come together, and squeeze her out. again, that is a way of expressing the same issue, will
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there be enough people on the left, because the left are now no longer represented in this election, that third of the electorate is out of the picture so the battle is over where they go and in the past they would know question have gone for macron and they did that last time out and he won by two thirds to one third basically in the second round. the big question is whether they will do it again and many of them will do it again and many of them will still feel that marine le pen is unacceptable and that behind her lurks the shadow of her father and the far right and anti—semitism and anti—islamist and all the rest of it but others will be of a mind that macron is the worst choice of the two because he represents capital and globalisation and slick money, these are things which they don't like at all. it is easy to go out into the provinces today and hear voices that are far more hostile to emmanuel macron and they are to
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marine le pen.— emmanuel macron and they are to marine le pen. interesting. what do ou think marine le pen. interesting. what do you think macron _ marine le pen. interesting. what do you think macron will— marine le pen. interesting. what do you think macron will be _ marine le pen. interesting. what do you think macron will be focusing i marine le pen. interesting. what do you think macron will be focusing on in the next two weeks? his you think macron will be focusing on in the next two weeks?— you think macron will be focusing on in the next two weeks? his record at so far and he — in the next two weeks? his record at so far and he will— in the next two weeks? his record at so far and he will be _ in the next two weeks? his record at so far and he will be pressing - in the next two weeks? his record at so far and he will be pressing again i so far and he will be pressing again the button about how she is from the far right and therefore dangerous but i think he would be unwise to do that too much because to go back to the old question of links to the nazi fascist pass, i don't think that washes any more with the voters. our main news this hour — the austrian chancellor karl nehammer, has become the first eu leader to hold a meeting with president putin since the russian invasion. he described the talks as �*open' and direct�* — but also said, he wasn't optimistic for peace. translation: i have no optimistic imression translation: i have no optimistic impression i _ translation: i have no optimistic impression i can _ translation: i have no optimistic impression i can report _ translation: i have no optimistic impression i can report you - translation: i have no optimistic impression i can report you from i impression i can report you from this conversation with vladimir putin in the offensive in eastern ukraine is evidently being prepared on a massive scale which is why i made very clear that the stable access for the international red cross is needed.
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i will be back in a couple of minutes' time. good evening. there is some relatively warm weather in the outlook as we head through the rest of this week and towards the easter weekend. but that doesn't mean it's going to stay completely dry. today, some of us saw showers, it was quite breezy, too. this swirl of cloud, a weather system just grazing close to the western side of the uk. there's also this cloud now waiting down to the south. that's going to feed northwards to bring us some pretty hefty downpours overnight and into tomorrow. but through the next few days, we stick with this relatively warm air, so temperatures will tend to be above the norm for the time of year. but during tonight,
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we will see some of those heavy downpours drifting northwards, could be the odd flash of lightning, the odd rumble of thunder. some clear spells as well, but it is going to be a mild night — frost—free for pretty much everybody, lows between 5—10 degrees. so, a mild start to tuesday morning, but for some, a wet start. we'll see these outbreaks of rain moving quite erratically northwards, the rain quite sporadic, quite on and off, but could be heavy and thundery in places. equally, there will be some drier spells and a little bit of sunshine. in fact, where we see sunny skies across eastern england, if it stays sunny for long enough, temperatures could climb to 18, 19 or 20 degrees. it will be a warm day for many, not as windy as it has been today. still quite chilly in the northeast of scotland. as we get into wednesday, the winds will fall very light indeed. there'll be some areas of low cloud, mist and fog, particularly around western coasts, mostly lifting and clearing to give sunny spells, but a scattering of afternoon showers. but again, those warm conditions, highs of 19, maybe 20 degrees, and even northern scotland will be turning a little less chilly at this stage.
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as we get into thursday, a frontal system tries to push in from the west, so some outbreaks of rain likely to affect northern ireland and the western side of scotland. a fair amount of cloud elsewhere. best of the sunshine, though, again bringing some warmth with highs of 19 or 20 degrees. then, we look towards the easter weekend. high pressure is going to try to establish itself. the big question mark about the weekend forecast is aboutjust how strong this area of high pressure will be and how well it will fend off the frontal systems that will try to push in from the west. there is a bit of uncertainty at this range, but it does look like staying warm, often dry and bright. with those frontal systems close by, there is the chance of some rain at times.
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hello, i'm lewis vaughanjones. this is outside source. austria's chancellor says he's held "very direct, open and tough" talks with president putin, as he becomes the first eu leader to meet him since the ukraine invasion. meanwhile in ukraine, there's more evidence emerging about the sexual violence women have suffered at the hands of russian forces. the woman who lived in this house managed to escape, along with her child. she called the ukrainian police and has given them her testimony. she's told them she was raped multiple times by the two
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drunk russian soldiers who killed her husband. pakistan has a new prime minister. shehbaz sharif replaces imran khan as the political upheaval there continues. and elon musk and twitter continue their complicated relationship, with the billionaire now not going to take a seat on the board. welcome back to the programme. we're going to take a closer look at the role of nato in the war in ukraine and how its central to this conflict. have a look at this map. you can see nato has expanded into eastern europe since 1997. russia takes issue with that. in fact, before the invasion, it demanded an end to any future nato enlargement. but today, there's been a development. we now know that finland and sweden are expected to bid for membership. this is the former prime minister of finland speaking to the bbc. the only thing that putin understands is power,
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and i think it's very important for a country like finland, which is small, to understand that our security's based on two things — one is geography and the other is history. can't do anything about geography, but history can at least impact and influence. therefore, the finnish people have decided overwhelmingly tojoin nato. both sweden and finland face russia across the baltic sea. they're both expected to submit their applications to join nato in the next few months. one us official told the times newspaper, "how can this be anything but a massive strategic blunder for putin?" and this is what the kremlin had to say earlier. translation: we have is believably served that nato is _ we have is believably served that nato is more like a tool designed for confrontation. this is not an alliance — for confrontation. this is not an alliance that ensures stability. the further _ alliance that ensures stability. the further expansion won't bring additional security to the european continent — so, what would the impact be
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if nato expanded further? i got the assessment from ian lesser, of the american thinktank the german marshall fund. if as expected, finland and sweden apply— if as expected, finland and sweden apply and _ if as expected, finland and sweden apply and join— if as expected, finland and sweden apply and join nato, _ if as expected, finland and sweden apply and join nato, this _ if as expected, finland and sweden apply and join nato, this will - if as expected, finland and sweden apply and join nato, this will give l apply and join nato, this will give nato _ apply and join nato, this will give nato additional— apply and join nato, this will give nato additional strategic - apply and join nato, this will give nato additional strategic depth, i apply and join nato, this will give | nato additional strategic depth, it would _ nato additional strategic depth, it would give — nato additional strategic depth, it would give the _ nato additional strategic depth, it would give the countries - nato additional strategic depth, itl would give the countries additional reassurance, — would give the countries additional reassurance, and _ would give the countries additional reassurance, and it— would give the countries additional reassurance, and it is— would give the countries additional reassurance, and it is precisely- would give the countries additional reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of— reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of thing — reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of thing that _ reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of thing that i _ reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of thing that i have _ reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of thing that i have to - reassurance, and it is precisely the kind of thing that i have to assume vladimir— kind of thing that i have to assume vladimir putin— kind of thing that i have to assume vladimir putin would _ kind of thing that i have to assume vladimir putin would not _ kind of thing that i have to assume vladimir putin would not have - kind of thing that i have to assume i vladimir putin would not have wanted to see _ vladimir putin would not have wanted to see the _ vladimir putin would not have wanted to see. the consolidation _ vladimir putin would not have wanted to see. the consolidation of _ vladimir putin would not have wanted to see. the consolidation of data - to see. the consolidation of data rather _ to see. the consolidation of data rather than — to see. the consolidation of data rather than setting _ to see. the consolidation of data rather than setting it _ to see. the consolidation of data rather than setting it back. - to see. the consolidation of data rather than setting it back. but. rather than setting it back. but doesnt rather than setting it back. doesn't bring it on —— it's on rather than setting it back.- doesn't bring it on —— it's on risk? i don't think so. this is clearly something _ i don't think so. this is clearly something that _ i don't think so. this is clearly something that russia - i don't think so. this is clearly something that russia will. i don't think so. this is clearly| something that russia will not i don't think so. this is clearly- something that russia will not like at alt _ something that russia will not like at alt no, — something that russia will not like at alt no, i— something that russia will not like at all. no, i don't— something that russia will not like at all. no, i don't think _ something that russia will not like at all. no, i don't think so. - something that russia will not like at all. no, i don't think so. i- at all. no, i don't think so. i think— at all. no, i don't think so. i think it _ at all. no, i don't think so. i think it makes _ at all. no, i don't think so. i think it makes the _ at all. no, i don't think so. i think it makes the defence i at all. no, i don't think so. ii think it makes the defence of at all. no, i don't think so. i- think it makes the defence of places already— think it makes the defence of places already in_ think it makes the defence of places already in nato— think it makes the defence of places already in nato like _ think it makes the defence of places already in nato like the _ think it makes the defence of places already in nato like the baltic- already in nato like the baltic states — already in nato like the baltic states more _ already in nato like the baltic states more secure. - already in nato like the baltic states more secure. these i already in nato like the balticl states more secure. these are country _ states more secure. these are country that — states more secure. these are country that have _ states more secure. these are country that have enormous i states more secure. these are - country that have enormous capacity for defence — country that have enormous capacity for defence. they're _
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country that have enormous capacity for defence. they're not _ country that have enormous capacity for defence. they're not members i country that have enormous capacity. for defence. they're not members and they're _ for defence. they're not members and they're not— for defence. they're not members and they're not covered _ for defence. they're not members and they're not covered by _ for defence. they're not members and they're not covered by the _ for defence. they're not members and they're not covered by the article - they're not covered by the article five commitment _ they're not covered by the article five commitment of _ they're not covered by the article five commitment of nato, - they're not covered by the article five commitment of nato, and ii they're not covered by the article - five commitment of nato, and i think that's— five commitment of nato, and i think that's what— five commitment of nato, and i think that's what they're _ five commitment of nato, and i think that's what they're seeking. - five commitment of nato, and i think that's what they're seeking. 15 - that's what they're seeking. [53 there that's what they're seeking. there any possible that's what they're seeking]! there any possible alternative explanation? you are very much of the opinion that putin has made a miscalculation with this invasion. is there any possible way this is an outcome he wanted? i ican imagine i can imagine it. i don't believe this is— i can imagine it. i don't believe this is true, _ i can imagine it. i don't believe this is true, but _ i can imagine it. i don't believe this is true, but it _ i can imagine it. i don't believe this is true, but it seems - i can imagine it. i don't believe this is true, but it seems to- i can imagine it. i don't believe this is true, but it seems to be| i can imagine it. i don't believe . this is true, but it seems to be the russian _ this is true, but it seems to be the russian perception that _ this is true, but it seems to be thej russian perception that somehow, nato and _ russian perception that somehow, nato and enlargement _ russian perception that somehow, nato and enlargement over- russian perception that somehow, nato and enlargement over the - russian perception that somehow, i nato and enlargement over the years has threatened — nato and enlargement over the years has threatened them. _ nato and enlargement over the years has threatened them. i— nato and enlargement over the years has threatened them. ican't- nato and enlargement over the years has threatened them. i can't imaginej has threatened them. i can't imagine they would _ has threatened them. i can't imagine they would want _ has threatened them. i can't imagine they would want to _ has threatened them. i can't imagine they would want to see _ has threatened them. i can't imagine they would want to see further- they would want to see further enlargement _ they would want to see further enlargement. this _ they would want to see further enlargement. this is _ they would want to see further enlargement. this is acquiring| enlargement. this is acquiring countries _ enlargement. this is acquiring countries that— enlargement. this is acquiring countries that are _ enlargement. this is acquiring countries that are ready- enlargement. this is acquiring countries that are ready have i countries that are ready have sufficient _ countries that are ready have sufficient capacity, _ countries that are ready have sufficient capacity, so - countries that are ready have sufficient capacity, so i- countries that are ready have sufficient capacity, so ijust l sufficient capacity, so ijust cannot _ sufficient capacity, so ijust cannot see _ sufficient capacity, so ijust cannot see this _ sufficient capacity, so ijust cannot see this as - sufficient capacity, so ijust cannot see this as being. sufficient capacity, so ijust i cannot see this as being good sufficient capacity, so ijust - cannot see this as being good news for russia, — cannot see this as being good news for russia, ttut— cannot see this as being good news for russia, but is— cannot see this as being good news for russia, but is becoming - for russia, but is becoming increasingly— for russia, but is becoming increasingly likely- for russia, but is becoming increasingly likely and - for russia, but is becoming i increasingly likely and certain for russia, but is becoming - increasingly likely and certain at this point — increasingly likely and certain at this oint. ~ . ., this point. what about the possibility. _ this point. what about the
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possibility, how _ this point. what about the possibility, how scared - this point. what about the possibility, how scared to | this point. what about the i possibility, how scared to use this point. what about the - possibility, how scared to use a basic word, should those countries be? clearly there's a change in the calculation. they look set to apply for membership. you think the calculations has changed? bath calculations has changed? both sweden and — calculations has changed? both sweden and finland, _ calculations has changed? both sweden and finland, especially finland. — sweden and finland, especially finland. are— sweden and finland, especially finland, are prepared - sweden and finland, especially finland, are prepared for- sweden and finland, especially finland, are prepared for the i finland, are prepared for the confrontation _ finland, are prepared for the confrontation with— finland, are prepared for the confrontation with russia - finland, are prepared for the confrontation with russia for| finland, are prepared for the - confrontation with russia for many years _ confrontation with russia for many years. they've _ confrontation with russia for many years. they've done _ confrontation with russia for many years. they've done it— confrontation with russia for many years. they've done it from - confrontation with russia for many years. they've done it from a - years. they've done it from a position _ years. they've done it from a position of— years. they've done it from a position of neutrality, - years. they've done it from a position of neutrality, but. years. they've done it from a| position of neutrality, but not foreclosing _ position of neutrality, but not foreclosing the _ position of neutrality, but not foreclosing the possibility. i. position of neutrality, but not - foreclosing the possibility. i think what _ foreclosing the possibility. i think what this— foreclosing the possibility. i think what this war _ foreclosing the possibility. i think what this war has _ foreclosing the possibility. i think what this war has done _ foreclosing the possibility. i think what this war has done is - foreclosing the possibility. i think what this war has done is make i foreclosing the possibility. i think. what this war has done is make clear to them _ what this war has done is make clear to them that — what this war has done is make clear to them that it's _ what this war has done is make clear to them that it's one _ what this war has done is make clear to them that it's one thing _ what this war has done is make clear to them that it's one thing to - what this war has done is make clear to them that it's one thing to have i to them that it's one thing to have relationship — to them that it's one thing to have relationship with— to them that it's one thing to have relationship with nato, _ to them that it's one thing to have relationship with nato, it's - to them that it's one thing to have | relationship with nato, it's another to count _ relationship with nato, it's another to count them _ relationship with nato, it's another to count them guaranteed - relationship with nato, it's another to count them guaranteed in - relationship with nato, it's another to count them guaranteed in war. ij to count them guaranteed in war. i think— to count them guaranteed in war. i think that's — to count them guaranteed in war. i think that's what _ to count them guaranteed in war. i think that's what they're _ to count them guaranteed in war. i think that's what they're seeking i to count them guaranteed in war. i| think that's what they're seeking at this point — think that's what they're seeking at this point in— think that's what they're seeking at this point. in public— think that's what they're seeking at this point. in public opinion - think that's what they're seeking at this point. in public opinion has - this point. in public opinion has shifted — this point. in public opinion has shifted as well. _ this point. in public opinion has shifted as well.— shifted as well. you look at finland, — shifted as well. you look at finland, and _ shifted as well. you look at finland, and it _ shifted as well. you look at finland, and it makes - shifted as well. you look at finland, and it makes the i finland, and it makes the relationship particularly delicate. it does. in fact, very early in
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1940, — it does. in fact, very early in 1940, there _ it does. in fact, very early in 1940, there was _ it does. in fact, very early in 1940, there was a _ it does. in fact, very early in 1940, there was a war- it does. in fact, very early in i 1940, there was a war between finland — 1940, there was a war between finland and _ 1940, there was a war between finland and russia. _ 1940, there was a war between finland and russia. then- 1940, there was a war between| finland and russia. then soviet union — finland and russia. then soviet union in — finland and russia. then soviet union in the _ finland and russia. then soviet union. in the end, _ finland and russia. then soviet union. in the end, you - finland and russia. then soviet union. in the end, you could . finland and russia. then sovietl union. in the end, you could say finland and russia. then soviet - union. in the end, you could say the soviet— union. in the end, you could say the soviet union — union. in the end, you could say the soviet union won, _ union. in the end, you could say the soviet union won, but _ union. in the end, you could say the soviet union won, but i— union. in the end, you could say the soviet union won, but i did - union. in the end, you could say thel soviet union won, but i did enormous cost _ soviet union won, but i did enormous cost finns— soviet union won, but i did enormous cost finns are — soviet union won, but i did enormous cost finns are very— soviet union won, but i did enormous cost. finns are very conscious - soviet union won, but i did enormous cost. finns are very conscious at - cost. finns are very conscious at the fact— cost. finns are very conscious at the fact they _ cost. finns are very conscious at the fact they fought _ cost. finns are very conscious at the fact they fought off - cost. finns are very conscious at the fact they fought off the - the fact they fought off the russians, _ the fact they fought off the russians, and _ the fact they fought off the russians, and russians - the fact they fought off the | russians, and russians will the fact they fought off the _ russians, and russians will remember the same _ russians, and russians will remember the same. finland _ russians, and russians will remember the same. finland is— russians, and russians will remember the same. finland is well—prepared - the same. finland is well—prepared for these _ the same. finland is well—prepared for these contingencies, _ the same. finland is well—prepared for these contingencies, including i for these contingencies, including the hardening _ for these contingencies, including the hardening of— for these contingencies, including the hardening of society - for these contingencies, including the hardening of society and - for these contingencies, including. the hardening of society and things like that _ the hardening of society and things like that. finland _ the hardening of society and things like that. finland is _ the hardening of society and things like that. finland is a _ the hardening of society and things like that. finland is a tough - the hardening of society and things like that. finland is a tough nut - the hardening of society and things like that. finland is a tough nut toi like that. finland is a tough nut to crack— like that. finland is a tough nut to crack under— like that. finland is a tough nut to crack under any conditions. - like that. finland is a tough nut to crack under any conditions. in - like that. finland is a tough nut to. crack under any conditions. in nato, it would _ crack under any conditions. in nato, it would he — crack under any conditions. in nato, it would be even _ crack under any conditions. in nato, it would be even tougher. _ president zelensky has told the south korean parliament that he fears tens of thousands of people are likely to have been killed in russia's assault on the south—eastern city of mariupol. some civilians have managed to escape, heading north to the relative safety of the city of zaporizhzhia, where they've been telling our correspondent tom bateman
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about their treatment at the hands of russian troops. mariupol is a city of survivors, forced to live underground. people say they scavenge for food or walk miles for water. amid the siege, it is the elderly and disabled most trapped in the line of fire. 80—year—old valentina has just been evacuated further north. she is blind and was in her kitchen when a shell exploded. translation: it's a good thing that my children were home, i they picked meet up, carried me outside and we left immediately. i don't know what happened to my house, if it burned down or anything, we don't have any communications. the calls are no longer going through. here, they're bringing in the wounded from all over the south. wasil was doing all he could to help his fellow villagers under fire.
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ferrying bread, sugar and medicines to the elderly. but moscow's war reached him at the roadside, and he rages at president putin. translation: we stopped, | i saw a bullet hit my window. as i wasjumping out of the car, i got blown up by a mine. we were just living like normal people, we didn't ask anyone to come here. we didn't want this. what kind of liberty is he on about? because of him, i lost my leg. i lost everything. in towns even further north of here, there are now calls to evacuate. now, these people can feel some safety here, for now. but it might not be for long. and they know how merciless the russian assault is. thousands more have fled the fighting. they arrive at the aid shelters with nothing but the trauma of war. serhei's village was
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caught in the crossfire. he says the russian soldiers forced him into his home, demanding vodka, stealing his money, his phone, even his shoes. he says one put a gun to his chest. translation: he cocked his weapon and pulled the trigger, _ but the weapon had a stoppage. me and my wife were holding our hands together, - we thought that's it for us. and we said our goodbyes with our eyes. _ but the round jammed, _ i pick up that bullet later and gave it to my godson as a memory of us managing to stay alive. _ he says he's sure he will go back home soon. ukrainians believe they've won the first stage of this war. but as russia pours troops into the east, they know the next phase will be decisive. tom bateman, bbc news, zaporizhzhia, in south—east ukraine.
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now let's turn to pakistan after a volatile few days. imran khan was removed as prime minister in a vote of no confidence. now the country now has a new prime minister. shehbaz sharif has been sworn in after this moment in parliament. shehbaz sharif is declared to have been elected... shehbaz sharif is declared to have been elected. . ._ shehbaz sharif was voted in unopposed, but some opposition mps resigned en massejust before, and others boycotted the vote. sharif had this to say after his victory. ventilation might this is the first time in history _ ventilation might this is the first time in history that _ ventilation might this is the first time in history that a _ ventilation might this is the first. time in history that a no-confidence time in history that a no—confidence has succeeded. it's righteousness, and evil— has succeeded. it's righteousness, and evil has— has succeeded. it's righteousness, and evil has been defeated. we need dialogue _ and evil has been defeated. we need dialogue if— and evil has been defeated. we need dialogue if we are to take this
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democratic process in this economy forward _ democratic process in this economy forward he — democratic process in this economy forward. , shehbaz sharif is from the pml—n, the pakistan muslim league nawaz. he was previously chief minister of punjab, the biggest province in pakistan, where he was generally seen as doing a good job. shahbaz sharif is best known for being brother to nawaz sharif, who served three times as prime minister. key to any pakistani leader's prospects are their relations with the powerful military. hassan abbas is a former official who served in previous governments. historically, their relationship has not been that good. the military was behind the ousting of nawaz sharif, but in the case of shehbaz sharif who was always seen as someone who had a good working relationship with the military. he was always pragmatic, he wanted his brother to never fire the former army chiefs and was always keeping one contact and one window of contact open with the military.
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so the military relationship between and the military shehbaz sharif relationship will be relatively stable this time, i think. khan spent his final days claiming a "foreign conspiracy" was behind efforts to remove him. and it's an argument that's been effective in mobilising his supporters. tens of thousands took to the streets on sunday night after he lost that vote of no—confidence. this footage was posted by the former prime minister himself, showing crowds in lahore. but if imran kahn wants to make a comeback, pulling a crowd might not be enough. shamila chaudhary is from the think tank new america. imran khan has benefited from using this anti—western platform and he is able to get people out onto the street. what i'm watching is what is the message now that he is asking his people to carry, now that he has been voted out of office? he is already clearly in campaigning mode, but he has to quickly get
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organised because he represents a lot of recent chaos and a lot of economic mismanagement, and his kind of anti—western rhetoric on the global stage has not been received well. so, i think he needs to start thinking less about the constituency that he would serve and more about how he's going to win the next election, if in fact that is what he wants. earlier, i spoke to the pakistani journalist and political analyst syed talat hussain. he told me more about the new prime minister. he's a man known for his ability to deliver the goods, getting the development agendas of the table into the fields off the table into the fields and into the works. he thrives on being very pro—china. and he likes to deliver the goods, so he is known for being a doer.
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but this time, of course, the challenges are pretty formidable because he is heading a coalition government and the streets are pretty hot considering that the ex—prime minister is ratcheting up the heat on him. let's touch briefly on imran khan. do you think this is the last we will see of him? do you think this is the last we'll see of him? well, imran khan has taken up the agenda of anti—americanism, which is different from anti—west slogan that we generally see in pakistan. in fact, it's notjust anti—americanism, its recently anti—biden administration. he did visit the us under donald trump and they seemed to hit it off very well between the two of them. in fact, when he came back, he used the analogy of being welcomed as if he had won the world cup. remember, he's the champion captain of the 1992 world cup that he won for pakistan. so, he's clearly anti—biden and he has been twisting this theory of biden bankrolling the move that
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ousted him and continues to go into that past. let's leave imran khan at the moment. i'm sure it's not the last we've heard of him and his campaigning, but let's concentrate on the new man again. what difference do you think he will make to the country's international standing? you touched on relations with china — we'll come back to those in a second — but russia is the crucial one at the moment. russia certainly is the crucial one. i think his aim would be to rebuild ties with china and pakistan's other allies, mostly importantly saudi arabia and the uae in the middle east. he's already got a call from president erdogan in turkey, so he has started off on a fairly ok international endorsement, international endorsement. and narendra modi from india has also sent him a message talking
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a twitter message talking about because according to preconditions, so his entire effort is going to be to rebuild so, his entire effort is going to be to rebuild the damaged ties with the western world, and at the same, time stay clear of the ukrainian and russian conflict, or at least dilute that a bit, because imran khan was ousted by putin when putin moved his troops into ukraine and ukraine happens to be traditionally one of pakistan's biggest supporters. be that kashmir, be that the issue of arms and supplies. so, clearly moving away from imran khan's position but maintaining a certain neutrality, not committing too hard to being anti—russia. yes, i mean, imran himself was quite neutral to be honest with you. he was able to have international and multilateral donors really fund his regime, and he got all sorts of loans from the world bank, had a programme with the imf, and facilitated by the us as well.
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the us was supporting $800 million a year, so he wasn't really anti—american until such time he didn't receive a call from biden and that seemed to snowball into a big personal issue between him and biden. then the russian trip came up, and he thought it was a good opportunity to go over and strike a neutral note. itjust happened that he was there and putin used that and moved attacks into ukraine, and that created an image as if he is very anti—american and trying to have it off with russia instead. a man from north london who was radicalised by the islamic state group has been found guity of murdering the conservative mp sir david amess. ali harber ali, who's 26, carried out the murder at the mp's weekly constituency surgery in leigh on sea last october. before the killing, ali had spent
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months researching how he might murder other mps, even staking out the home of michael gove. in the end, he targeted sir david simply because he'd seen an advertisement for his constituency surgery online and it seemed, in his words, the easiest. our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, was at the old bailey. emergency. police, please, quick, now. the 15th of october last year, and in the leafy suburbs of leigh—on—sea, a man hasjust murdered an mp. they say he's got a knife and he's just stabbed someone. _ two officers with just batons and pepper spray are the first to the scene. they decide they can't wait for firearms or taser units to arrive. stay back, yeah? mate, drop the knife! on the floor now! on the bleep floor! get it down!
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taser! we've got him. right, search him. right, mate, at the moment, you're under arrest for- murder, all right? at southend police station, the killer declares his motive. ali harbi ali grew up in croydon in south london. he was clever enough to consider becoming a doctor until syria's civil war changed the teenager's ambitions. at first, he wanted to fight for the islamic state group. but in 2019, he followed a worldwide call from the group's propagandists to strike at home instead. his target, any of the 52a mps who had voted to bomb is fighters. and, carrying a knife, he was tempted to kill anyone of them as they came and went from parliament. i'll be honest with you, there's been a lot of times where
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people can self radicalise and do this almost entirely in secret, alone in their house, and do that online. and some of their activity when they then leave their house presents an opportunity for us and the public may be to work together and identify their behaviour. harbi ali considered attacking cabinet ministers but settled on this man, sir david amess, mp for southend west. he had advertised his constituency surgery on twitter and, lying that he was local, harbi ali fixed an appointment, e—mailing to to say, "i don't think i'll take too long." ali harbi ali arrived here at the old bailey a self—confessed terrorist killer, but he then taunted sir david's family, declaring that he'd done nothing wrong. he said he had killed to protect muslims in syria. but the judge said that was no defence to the crime of murder, and thejury tookjust 18 minutes to convict him.
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he literally did something that you can't even imagine. and it doesn't heal, itjust hurts. he's hurting all the people involved, making them relive it. arrogant to the end, he refused to stand for the verdict. just metres away, sir david's grieving family, watching the killer's final insult to them and a public servant who had only ever wanted to do good. dominic casciani, bbc news, at the old bailey. dominic casciani spoke to us from outside the courtroom. we will be back here at the old bailey on wednesday for ali harbi ali's sentences and the judge has amongst his options are whole life order. he has used them before in other terrorism cases but there is also a question about ali harbi ali's involvement with the radicalisation scheme. we don't know what happened. that question may come up at a future inquest which is yet to be decided.
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elon musk has decided not to join the board of twitter. mr musk�*s appointment was due to become effective on saturday after revealing last week that he had bought a 9.2% stake in the social media platform. that's four times as many shares as twitter�*s founder, jack dorsey. but on monday the company's chief executive parag agrawal tweeted. .. in a statement, he also said... on sunday, elon musk posted a series of tweets. these included asking whether twitter is dying and if its headquarters should be turned into a homeless shelter. our north america technology correspondent, james clayton, is in san francisco. i asked him if we know why elon musk decided not to join twitter�*s board. we don't know why. the only person who knows is elon musk himself. the crucial thing is that if elon musk were to take that board position,
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he would have only been able to buy 15% of twitter — that was written into that sort of contract — so the fact he hasn't taken up this board position has made many people speculate that elon musk actually wants to buy more and more of twitter. he comfortably has enough money to buy it outright. he could force a hostile takeover of twitter, that's certainly one option. the other is that if he were to be a board member of twitter, he would be constrained. he wouldn't necessarily be able to be tweeting these things like you just mentioned, like the san francisco hq should become a homeless shelter. he would have to take a much more conservative position in terms of his public criticism of the company and that may well be why he's decided not to take a board position. at the moment, only elon musk knows. the only thing he's tweeted was an emoji of a person with a hand over theirface. what that means, we have no
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idea, only elon musk. so, it's a working theory that he still has more freedom outside looking in rather than on the inside. if we take that as a kind of working assumption, what do you think this means for the future of twitter? he clearly wants to make some changes. it's a massive distraction. whether he's on the board or not, he is still twitter�*s biggest shareholder and has this huge cash, i mean he's incredibly famous. shareholder and has this huge cashe. i mean, he's incredibly famous. you have this massive figure, the world's richest person who has become almost obsessed with the company who is a major shareholder, so he will still have a lot of influence at twitter whether he's a board member or not. the question elon musk has to ask himself is do i want to buy twitter? because he could put the issue is he doesn't have that much physical cash money. he would have to sell a lot of shares of tesla, and then if he did that he would be hit by this massive
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capital gains tax bill. so, it's not all upside for him at all. you may decide actually he would prefer to snipe from the sides. he may decide actually he would prefer to snipe from the sides. a reminder of our top story.... austria's chancellor, karl nehammer, has said he's pessimistic about the chances for a diplomatic end to the war, after a face—to—face meeting with president putin. chancellor nehammer said the russian leader had "massively entered into a logic of war", and that vladimir putin showed no interest in a meeting with the ukrainian president, volodymyr zelensky. that's it from me. it me on social media. i'm lewis vaughanjones and this is outside source —— get to me. bye—bye. good evening. there is some relatively warm weather in the outlook as we head through the rest of this week and towards the easter weekend. but that doesn't mean it's going to stay completely dry. today, some of us saw showers, it was quite breezy, too. this swirl of cloud,
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a weather system just grazing close to the western side of the uk. there's also this cloud now waiting down to the south. that's going to feed northwards to bring us some pretty hefty downpours overnight and into tomorrow. but through the next few days, we stick with this relatively warm air, so temperatures will tend to be above the norm for the time of year. but during tonight, we will see some of those heavy downpours drifting northwards, could be the odd flash of lightning, the odd rumble of thunder. some clear spells as well, but it is going to be a mild night — frost—free for pretty much everybody, lows between 5—10 degrees. so, a mild start to tuesday morning, but for some, a wet start. we'll see these outbreaks of rain moving quite erratically northwards, the rain quite sporadic, quite on and off, but could be heavy and thundery in places. equally, there will be some drier spells and a little bit of sunshine. in fact, where we see sunny skies across eastern england, if it stays sunny for long enough, temperatures could climb to 18, 19 or 20 degrees. it will be a warm day for many, not as windy as it has been today.
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still quite chilly in the northeast of scotland. as we get into wednesday, the winds will fall very light indeed. there'll be some areas of low cloud, mist and fog, particularly around western coasts, mostly lifting and clearing to give sunny spells, but a scattering of afternoon showers. but again, those warm conditions, highs of 19, maybe 20 degrees, and even northern scotland will be turning a little less chilly at this stage. as we get into thursday, a frontal system tries to push in from the west, so some outbreaks of rain likely to affect northern ireland and the western side of scotland. a fair amount of cloud elsewhere. best of the sunshine, though, again bringing some warmth with highs of 19 or 20 degrees. then, we look towards the easter weekend. high pressure is going to try to establish itself. the big question mark about the weekend forecast is aboutjust how strong this area of high pressure will be and how well it will fend off the frontal systems that will try to push in from the west. there is a bit of uncertainty at this range, but it does look like staying warm, often dry and bright.
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with those frontal systems close by, there is the chance of some rain at times.
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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern. you're watching the context on bbc news. president macron fires up his campaign for re—election after acknowledging he didn't do enough in the first round. marine le pen's far right party is in a buoyant mood after last night's results despite trailing the president by four points. the mayor of mariupol says the fight for his city is not over, denying reports the russians are close to victory there. republican congresswoman liz cheney takes on a candidate backed by donald trump as she fights for her politcal future — we'll look at how the party is divided. tonight with the context, from paris, georgina wright, she's
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a director at the think tank, the montaigne institut. and from florida, mike shields — a former chief of staff at the republican national committee.

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