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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 1, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm chris rodgers. the headlines at five. the united nations and the red cross begin an operation to evacuate civilians out of the devastated ukrainian city of mariupol. ukraine's president says a first group of "about 100 people" have escaped mariupol�*s azovstal steelworks — but around 1,000 civilians remain trapped in the complex. police have confirmed a body found in the forest of bowland on friday is that of missing mum of two, katie kenyon. pressure mounts for reform of working practices in westminster — after mp neil parish resigns for watching pornography in the house of commons. warnings of further food price increases for households — as inflation takes hold in the uk and the cost of living hits a 30—year high.
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the prince of wales urges people to protect the nation's ancient trees in honour of the queen's platinum jubilee this year. hello, and welcome. let's start with the latest news from ukraine. the evacuation of civilians from steelworks in mariupol has begun, ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has confirmed. it follows a long period of uncertainty over the fate of people still stuck in the last pocket of refuge for ukrainian soldiers and about a thousand civilians in mariupol, the southern ukrainian city. ukrainian president zelensky has tweeted. ..
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we'll bring you more on that developing story later here on bbc news. meanwhile, let's bring you another development. police have confirmed a body found in the forest of bowland on friday is that of missing woman, katie kenyon. the 33—year—old mother of two was last seen in burnley on the 22nd april. 0ur reporter, jo makel, joins us now with the latest. what more can you tell us? well, chris, obviously _ what more can you tell us? well, chris, obviously the _ what more can you tell us? well, chris, obviously the police - what more can you tell us? well, chris, obviously the police had i chris, obviously the police had indicated yesterday that they believed that the body they had found was that of katie. the confirmation came in the last half an hour. they have also said that
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the postmortem examination was conducted yesterday and that the cause of that was given as head injuries. they say that our thoughts remain with katie's family and loved ones at this difficult time. 0bviously ones at this difficult time. obviously a devastating confirmation for her family and friends. i'm where katie lived. she had two children and also sisters, and she was also a daughter. and there has been an outpouring of tributes on social media, including one from her sister, jenny, who said "i will love you forever and you will always be my beautiful big sister." the family have also sent their thanks to people, notjust for the moral people, not just for the moral support people, notjust for the moral support they have had over this past very difficult week, but also because they had launched a fundraising page to try to raise money to support both the family and the children, and also to pay for
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katie's funeral costs, and that has slashed its £10,000 target. people have raised £13,000 for the family. as you said, katie kenyon went missing about a week ago, just over a week ago, and she was last seen getting into a ford transit van in burnley. and then the police's search for her and reported finding the van, took them to the forest of bowland which is a really large area, but they were able to focus down on the forest and indeed on friday night that is where they found her body.— friday night that is where they found her body. friday night that is where they found herbod. , ., ., ., found her body. many thanks for that u date in found her body. many thanks for that update in burnley. _ the speaker of the house of commons, sir lindsay hoyle, has called for a radical review of working practices following a series of sexual misconduct and bullying claims about politicians. yesterday, the conservative mp
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neil parish resigned after admitting he'd watched pornography in parliament. the business secretary kwasi kwarteng has denied there is a culture of misogyny at westminster. 0ur political correspondent, helen catt, has been telling us how damaging this story has been to westminster — as a whole. it's the admission that shocked westminster. an mp watched porn in the commons chamber. i'm not going to defend it. i'm also not going to defend what i did. what i did was absolutely, totally wrong. neil parish�*s resignation has come at the end of a grim week for parliament, which has seen accusations of misogyny and sexism fly. it started with a backlash to an article about labour's deputy leader, angela rayner. later in the week, a cabinet minister, anne—marie trevelyan, described how she was pinned to a wall by a male mp. it has all raised fresh questions about the culture of the commons. i think we've got to distinguish between some bad apples, people who behave badly, and the general environment.
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it's very similar to when people say, "well, there are a number of racist people in this country so that means the whole country is racist. " that doesn't follow. there are some bad apples, people that have acted very badly, and they should be held to account. there have been suggestions that a mix of long hours, pressure and on—site bars is in part to blame. last week at westminster, we were voting at midnight and many of us had been there... there was a gap in the day and many of us had been to events which had alcohol at, and the bars are obviously open. but we are social creatures and we do a lot of work whilst were in those bars as well. i know that's not how it's going to be portrayed, but we do often sit down, we are talking about work and the work day. westminster doesn't run like some other workplaces. mps directly employ their staff, making it difficult for some to raise concerns. the speaker of the commons says
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there should be an urgent review. he's calling for a type of inquiry last used in 2008 to look into it. the speaker, i think, wants to pull parties together to see what else could be done. i'm very happy to participate in that because we can't go on with these allegations coming out over and over again. the snp and the liberal democrats have confirmed they would take part. parliament has of course been here before with allegations of poor behaviour. changes were made, but will any new attempt alter the culture for good? helen catt, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to dr charlotte proudman, a barrister who focuses on women's rights. i asked her how widespread this sort of behaviour is in the workplace. a lot has happened since the need to movement in 2016—2017, but we didn't really see the cultural revolution in terms of a shift towards how women are treated within the workplace, to the extent that sexual harassment continues. and it's not just in westminster, it's across the board. i see it in the legal profession as a barrister, women that i have worked with have
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experienced sexual harassment in other walks of life. and we know where professions are male dominated, in the media, in hollywood, in finance and law, in politics, the power is held and concentrated largely by men, and structures in place don't always make sexual harassment transparent and perpetrators are not always held accountable. it can create a culture where sexual harassment becomes rife and men are not held accountable and structures become complicit in that. that was one of the problems with me too. while we saw women speaking at great numbers about the sexual harassment in the workplace, but we didn't see was the institutional structures in place to hold men accountable for their actions. for example, neil parish, not necessarily named immediately by the party. there was no inquiry that was undertaken because he resigned before that. but he was very reluctant to resign in the first
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place and he even had the goal, the confidence, to speak on gb news about the fact that someone had been accused of watching pornography. we all know it was him, and yet he felt confident enough to be able to go to the media to speak about that, which shows the type of privilege that many men have in these positions in being able to objectify women in this way, and it is not on. it is commonplace and highly prevalent. as we have been reporting, the zelenskiy has confirmed that the evacuation of civilians in the steelworks has begun. they have been trapped there for many weeks in appalling conditions as russia attacked the city. joe inwood has sent this report. there is no doubt this is
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a breakthrough, albeit a small one. these shots were released by the russian ministry of defence and claim to show the first group of civilians to leave the azovstal steelworks. they've been trapped there for weeks, alongside the last ukrainian forces in mariupol, in increasingly dire conditions. the exact number who left is disputed. the russians say 46 in two groups. they were then seen this morning arriving at a village near the russian border. it is claimed they are being processed by separatist, although accompanied by un and red cross staff. the ukrainian deputy commander inside the steelworks confirmed the ceasefire had held, but said more people needed evacuation. translation: i emphasise that we want to guarantee i the evacuation, notjust of civilians, but also our wounded servicemen, who require urgent medical attention. meanwhile, one of the most senior us politicians was in kyiv. nancy pelosi's visit was signalling notjust america's increased financial commitment to ukraine, but also, increasing
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diplomatic support. we believe that we are visiting you to say thank you for your fight for freedom, that we are on a frontier of freedom and that your fight is a fight for everyone. and so, our commitment is to be there for you until the fight is done. but nancy pelosi wasn't the only high—profile american visitor this weekend. the actress, activist and un envoy angelina jolie has been here in lviv. she visited the railway station, where she met children displaced by the conflict. you're so cute! and the numbers forced from their homes are increasing all the time. it's now thought 13 million people have been displaced by the conflict. there's no sign of that situation improving any time soon. these ukrainian forces are heading to the front lines of the donbas. that is where, last night, president zelensky said russia was massing its forces ahead of an expected push.
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with many civilians still in their path, it will notjust be soldiers who will pay with their lives. joe inwood, bbc news, lviv. let's get a live update. we can speak to our correspondent. thank you very much forjoining us, you go. the world has been focused on marie apple for many weeks now, knowing that there are thousands of civilians trapped there. promise after promise to evacuate them. why has this suddenly now happened? what was the change in gear as we see civilians only getting out of mariupol. civilians only getting out of mariupol-— civilians only getting out of mariu ol. . , ~ ., mariupol. last week, we had the visit of the _ mariupol. last week, we had the visit of the un _ mariupol. last week, we had the visit of the un secretary - mariupol. last week, we had the visit of the un secretary generalj visit of the un secretary general who promised to give his personal inputin who promised to give his personal input in trying to reach a deal to allow the evacuation of civilians, particularly from the steelworks, the azovstal steelworks in mariupol. this is a major development because for many days there has been growing concerns about the conditions there
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for there of civilians and the soldiers, but for the civilians in particular who have been sheltering in underground bunkers and shelters for many, many weeks, many of them since the very first days of the war. food supplies, water supplies, medicine are low, so it is really a desperate situation for the people there. this has been, we understand, a extremely complicated negotiation, confirmation came only today, two days after the convoy started making its way to marry apple. and many details about how this evacuation process is going to unfold are still unclear. we understand from a tweet from the president, vladimir zelenskiy, that the first group of about 100 civilians have managed to leave the steelworks and they are expected to arrive in the city of zaporizhzhia, which is not farfrom
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here, tomorrow morning. but many other details are still not clear. and with them, hugo, they are likely to bring with them horrific stories of the last few weeks, the fear, the torment and, as you say, the lack of food, the lack of water, with them. these people have gone through the most terrific deal, haven't they? absolutely, and i have been covering what has been happening in marry apple since the very beginning, and every person i've spoken to as a desperate story to tell. mariupol has been the scene of some of the worst fighting in this war from the very first days of russia's invasion. the city has been completely cut off from the rest of the country, what has been described as a medieval like siege with no electricity, no running water, no gas, and people spending lots of their time in underground basements
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and bunkers because of the constant shelling and bombardment. and food supplies, water supplies running low. so it really is a desperate, tragic situation for many of them. let's not forget that an estimated 100,000 people still trapped in marry apple, outside the steelworks. but tens of thousands of them are still there in marry apple in a very desperate situation.— desperate situation. what is the situation right _ desperate situation. what is the situation right now? _ desperate situation. what is the situation right now? vladimir i desperate situation. what is the i situation right now? vladimir putin very confidently told the un secretary general in moscow that the operation is finished there, people are free to go, people are free to wander and go about their normal lives. from what we are seeing, from you and other bbc teams, that is not quite the case. it is you and other bbc teams, that is not quite the case-— quite the case. it is very implicated _ quite the case. it is very implicated to _ quite the case. it is very implicated to confirm i quite the case. it is very l implicated to confirm any information coming out of marry apple because there is no electricity. they say it is simply too dangerous to be out in the streets, to try to see what is
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happening. the steelworks is the last pocket of resistance where ukrainian soldiers and fighters are now sheltering capturing mariupol would give moscow the chance to build that land corridor between eastern ukraine and crimea. the city has been almost completely taken over by russia. ., ~' , ., been almost completely taken over by russia. ., ~ , ., ., been almost completely taken over by russia. . ~' , ., ., . been almost completely taken over by russia. ., ~ ., ., , ., some breaking news now, the bbc has learned that several groups of migrants have been brought to dover by the border force.
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it's the first time there have been crossings for 11 days. the authorities haven't yet revealed how many migrants are involved, but people in dover who watch and count the arrivals believe it's more than 200. a government spokesperson said, "the rise in dangerous channel crossings is unacceptable. not only are they an overt abuse of our immigration laws but they also impact on the uk taxpayer, risk lives and our ability to help refugees come to the uk via safe and legal routes." we will keep you updated on developments there because that is quite a huge number. the headlines on bbc news... the united nations and the red cross begin an operation to evacuate civilians out of the devastated ukrainian city of mariupol. ukraine's president says a first group of "about100 people" have escaped mariupol�*s azovstal steelworks — but around 1,000 civilians remain
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trapped in the complex. police confirm a body found in the forest of bowland on friday is that of missing mum of two — katie kenyon. let's catch up with all the bank holiday weekend sport. 0ver let's catch up with all the bank holiday weekend sport. over to the bbc sport centre, waiting for us is isaac. all smiles as frank lampard faced his club for the first time. everton�*s situation is serious. seamus coleman lucky not to be red carded for this. chances were few and far between in the first—half. anthony gordon had the best of them. the second half was a different
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story. less than two minutes into it, chelsea failed and a huge goal was slotted home. and it really should have been to. blazed over the bar, the frustration clear to see. lampard thought that chelsea would respond, that is exactly what happened. a mixture of the word word and some heroics kept his side in the lead. it didn't matter which part of the english goalie the ball hit, he was still keeping it out. he continued making great saves. there wasjust continued making great saves. there was just no way through for chelsea, but could there be a way out for everton? they are still in the bottom three, survival is still in their hands. tottenham are back up to fourth — for the time being — after a 3—1 home win over leicester city. there was a goal for harry kane and two for son heung min.
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leicester's kelechi iheanacho scored a consolation. here's confirmation of today's scores. arsenal will reclaim fourth spot with a win at west ham united. they've just reached half—time and it's1—1 — rob holding gave arsenal the lead, but jarrod bowen equalised in the 45th minute for west ham. celtic manager ange postecglou said his side were in a really good position after a 1—1 draw in the final old firm derby of the season against rangers. the hoops are edging closer to a 52nd scottish title. they're six points clear with only three games left and have a huge 19—goal advantage over the defending champions. celtic overcame early rangers pressure to take the lead through jota's close—range finish. but the visitors found the equaliser in the second half, fashion sakala with the goal. it's advantage celtic though, they're now unbeaten in 29 league games since september. in the women's super league, arsenal have cranked the pressure up
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on chelsea at the top of the table. they beat aston villa 7—0 at home. viviane miedema scored twice, and it means arsenal are currently a point behind chelsea — but emma hayes�* table—topping side are away at birmingham city who are bottom of the league. that match kicks off at quarter to seven tonight. and manchester united are back up to third, one point above manchester city — after they beat west ham 3—0. the match between between leicester and reading ended goalless. and in the last game of the day, everton are at home to spurs. two female fighters made history overnight. katie taylor and amanda serrano served up a classic at the iconic madison square garden. it's a boxing fight that will be rememberd for years to come. taylor got the win, retaining her undisputed world lightweight boxing title. she won on points via a split decision over
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amanda serrano, who proved to be a really dangerous opponent. taylor was on the brink at one stage and she described the fight as a warfor 10 rounds. and she described the fight it certainly looked that way, in what was an electric night for women's boxing. everyone was talking about coming into this fight, it was the biggest fight in women's boxing history. i think it exceeded everything people were talking about this week. just even walking into the ring today, just looking at a packed stadium, unbelievable. special, special moment. the best night of my career, for sure. moment. the best night of my career, forsure. i moment. the best night of my career, for sure. i wasn't sure if it was going to reach my 0lympic for sure. i wasn't sure if it was going to reach my olympic gold medal moment, but tonight was definitely the best moment of my career. finally, ronnie 0'sullivan leadsjudd trump 5—3 at the world snooker championships in sheffield after the first session but it could have more than that — 0'sullivan won five out of the first six frames, making a century
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break to go 5—1 up. but trump came back to win the last two frames of the session, and reduce the deficit to 5—3. play resumes at 7 o'clock tonight, live on bbc two and the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. thank you. let's return to westminster now, and there has been a growing number of calls from senior mps for a radical overhaul of practices following a series of allegations of sexual misconduct and bullying. 0ur political correspondent has been telling us how damaging this story has been to westminster as a whole.— how damaging this story has been to westminster as a whole. whenever you aet westminster as a whole. whenever you net the sort westminster as a whole. whenever you get the sort of — westminster as a whole. whenever you get the sort of stories _ westminster as a whole. whenever you get the sort of stories about _ get the sort of stories about behaviour of this type by mps, it is another way of damaging public trust in politics, and that is the real risk with this and why these stories are important. we have seen parliament try to fix this in the past, it has set up a independent whistle—blowing scheme, but there are questions about how long those investigations take and how effective it is that having an impact on the culture in parliament. what the speaker is suggesting here,
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thatis what the speaker is suggesting here, that is a way of perhaps addressing some of the imbalances between mps and their staff and the potential for imbalances there, but when it comes to accusations between mps, it wouldn't help there. there is set to be revisions to the code of conduct, we are expecting to hear the outcome and the standards committee are working on that. the chair of that committee, chris bryant, has said that the problem is that mps at the moment seem to feel they can act with impunity, and that is also something that i have come across are speaking to a female mp this week he was particularly frustrated by this. she said at the moment the feeling is that there are not consequences for mps who crossed the line. 0bviously, neil parish is feeling some consequences, so we have to see if this is the start of a change at westminster. another big roblem is a change at westminster. another big problem is the — a change at westminster. another big problem is the rising _ a change at westminster. another big problem is the rising cost _ a change at westminster. another big problem is the rising cost of— problem is the rising cost of living. the government under pressure to do more to help. what are opposition parties coming up with? , ., , ., ., .,
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with? this month is when a lot of those price _ with? this month is when a lot of those price rises, _ with? this month is when a lot of those price rises, the _ with? this month is when a lot of those price rises, the energy - with? this month is when a lot of those price rises, the energy cap| those price rises, the energy cap change this month, the national insurance rise kicked in this month as well, so people are seeing less money in their pay packets. and we have local elections next week, there is a big campaign issue there. there have been different calls here. the opposition parties, labour, snp, liberal democrats, have all been calling for a windfall tax. labour wants to see it on the profits of north sea oil and gas companies. here is what sir keir starmer said on sunday. irate companies. here is what sir keir starmer said on sunday.- companies. here is what sir keir starmer said on sunday. we are not talkin: starmer said on sunday. we are not talking about _ starmer said on sunday. we are not talking about taxing _ starmer said on sunday. we are not talking about taxing the _ starmer said on sunday. we are not talking about taxing the profits - talking about taxing the profits they expected to make, this is the profits— they expected to make, this is the profits they did not expect to make. we would _ profits they did not expect to make. we would then use that... profits they did not expect to make. we would then use that. . ._ profits they did not expect to make. we would then use that... how? i can tell ou we would then use that... how? i can tell you this. — we would then use that... how? i can tell you this, £600 _ we would then use that... how? i can tell you this, £600 help _ we would then use that... how? i can tell you this, £600 help with the energy— tell you this, £600 help with the energy bills for those that need it would _ energy bills for those that need it would be — energy bills for those that need it would be desperately needed and welcomed across the country. we also would _ welcomed across the country. we also would introduce a tax, a
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self—defeating tax at the worst possible — self—defeating tax at the worst possible time. this week, many people — possible time. this week, many people got their pay slip and they would _ people got their pay slip and they would have looked at that. the bills are going _ would have looked at that. the bills are going up, the payslip is less because — are going up, the payslip is less because the government hasjust whacked — because the government hasjust whacked me for even more tax in a cost of— whacked me for even more tax in a cost of living — whacked me for even more tax in a cost of living crisis. the government _ cost of living crisis. the government had - cost of living crisis. the government had been l cost of living crisis. tie: government had been fairly resistance in previous months to the idea of a windfall tax. they said they had been doing things to help with the cost of living, they pointed to the £150 council tax rebate which is also starting to go to some people's bank accounts from this month. and then people will repay it over time. so they say they are taking action. this issue of a windfall tax has come up again though, because the business secretary has written to north sea oil and gas companies, telling them that they need to reinvest their profits in domestic supply, particularly in cleaner, greener energy, which he says will bring down bills in the long term. the chancellor seems to open the door again to a windfall tax when he said
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quite recently that if they weren't doing that, if they weren't seen to be investing, then he would open the door possibly to a windfall tax. so that spiders come up again. however, kwasi kwarteng was speaking to the bbc earlier, he made it pretty clear that he was against the idea, but he didn't rule it out happening. i’zre didn't rule it out happening. i've alwa s didn't rule it out happening. i've always been _ didn't rule it out happening. i've always been publicly against them. but is _ always been publicly against them. but is the — always been publicly against them. but is the government _ always been publicly against them. l but is the government considering? you are _ but is the government considering? you are having conversations with the chancellor. he will make that decision — the chancellor. he will make that decision. as the government government ruled it out? asl decision. as the government government ruled it out? as i said, he and i government ruled it out? as i said, he and i talk _ government ruled it out? as i said, he and i talk about _ government ruled it out? as i said, he and i talk about these _ government ruled it out? as i said, he and i talk about these things - government ruled it out? as i said, he and i talk about these things all| he and i talk about these things all the time _ he and i talk about these things all the time he — he and i talk about these things all the time. he has _ he and i talk about these things all the time. he has always— he and i talk about these things all the time. he has always been- the time. he has always been pro—investment. _ the time. he has always been pro—investment. so— the time. he has always been pro-investment.— the time. he has always been pro-investment. so the chancellor hasn't ruled _ pro-investment. so the chancellor hasn't ruled it _ pro-investment. so the chancellor hasn't ruled it out? _ pro-investment. so the chancellor hasn't ruled it out? i'm _ pro-investment. so the chancellor hasn't ruled it out? i'm not - pro-investment. so the chancellor hasn't ruled it out? i'm not going l hasn't ruled it out? i'm not going to be rolling _ hasn't ruled it out? i'm not going to be rolling out— hasn't ruled it out? i'm not going to be rolling out what _ hasn't ruled it out? i'm not going to be rolling out what the - to be rolling out what the chancellor _ to be rolling out what the chancellor is _ to be rolling out what the chancellor is going - to be rolling out what the chancellor is going to - to be rolling out what the chancellor is going to dol to be rolling out what the - chancellor is going to do isn't going — chancellor is going to do isn't going to _ chancellor is going to do isn't going to do _ chancellor is going to do isn't going to do in _ chancellor is going to do isn't going to do in an— chancellor is going to do isn't going to do in an october- chancellor is going to do isn't - going to do in an october budget. that isn't— going to do in an october budget. that isn't my— going to do in an october budget. that isn't monb _ going to do in an october budget. that isn't myjob. but _ going to do in an october budget. that isn't myjob. but it— going to do in an october budget. that isn't myjob. but it is- going to do in an october budget. that isn't myjob. but it is still- that isn't myjob. but it is still on the — that isn't myjob. but it is still on the table for the government? as he on the table for the government? he said, he is on the table for the government? as he said, he is responsible for the budget— he said, he is responsible for the budget and — he said, he is responsible for the budget and he _ he said, he is responsible for the budget and he is— he said, he is responsible for the budget and he is going _ he said, he is responsible for the budget and he is going to- he said, he is responsible for the budget and he is going to look. he said, he is responsible for the budget and he is going to look at all options — budget and he is going to look at all options-— budget and he is going to look at all options. opposition parties on the whole are _ all options. opposition parties on the whole are fairly _ all options. opposition parties on the whole are fairly in _ all options. opposition parties on the whole are fairly in favour -
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all options. opposition parties on the whole are fairly in favour of i the whole are fairly in favour of this idea. the snp would like to see it windfall tax on all large companies that profited from the pandemic, for example. they also want to see that money coming off energy bills later in the year to become a straight grant so people wouldn't have to pay it back. the liberal democrats back a windfall tax, but they want to see people's vat cut on things as well to provide immediate tax cuts. they say that could happen in the queen's speech, they believe there are ways to do that, which of course comes next week. here is the liberal democrat leader, explaining little bit more about what they would do. millions of pensioners _ about what they would do. millions of pensioners and _ about what they would do. millions of pensioners and families - about what they would do. millions of pensioners and families are - of pensioners and families are really— of pensioners and families are really worried about the cost of living — really worried about the cost of living. they are pretty annoyed that the conservative government seems to be making _ the conservative government seems to be making it _ the conservative government seems to be making it worse with tax rises. boris _ be making it worse with tax rises. borisjohnson didn't be making it worse with tax rises. boris johnson didn't seem be making it worse with tax rises. borisjohnson didn't seem to care, he doesn't — borisjohnson didn't seem to care, he doesn't seem to have a plan, and what _ he doesn't seem to have a plan, and what liberal — he doesn't seem to have a plan, and what liberal democrats are saying is that we _ what liberal democrats are saying is that we need a bold tax cut, a cut in vat— that we need a bold tax cut, a cut in vat of— that we need a bold tax cut, a cut in vat of that would help smaller businesses struggling in the high
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street, _ businesses struggling in the high street, and i think it would be good for our— street, and i think it would be good for our economy. 50 street, and i think it would be good for our economy. sol street, and i think it would be good for our economy.— for our economy. so i think the one thin we for our economy. so i think the one thing we can _ for our economy. so i think the one thing we can definitely _ for our economy. so i think the one thing we can definitely gather - for our economy. so i think the one thing we can definitely gather is - thing we can definitely gather is that this is not an issue that is going to go away and i think it is going to go away and i think it is going to go away and i think it is going to become increasingly dominant over the coming months, if not the dominant political issue. plant a tree for the jubilee. that's the message from the prince of wales today as he invites nature—lovers to mark the queen's 70—year reign. it's part of a scheme called "the queen's green canopy", which will also dedicate 70 ancient woodlands to her majesty. here's more from our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell.
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newsreel: after the spade work, a good watering ensured - that the seedling got a proper start in life. she has, over the 70 years of her reign, planted many a tree to mark a visit by the monarch. buckingham palace estimates it must be something like 1,500. but the planting of trees has much more than a merely symbolic significance. they are, of course, vital to the environment. so plant a tree for thejubilee is the message being pushed today by the prince of wales, no mean tree—planter himself. to launch the queen's green canopy, 70 of the oldest trees and most ancient woodlands around the united kingdom have been identified. one of the ancient trees is at dumfries house in ayrshire. i am delighted, therefore, to have the opportunity to launch this project in the grounds of dumfries house under the majestic branches of this old sycamore, which predates the very house itself, having grown from seed more than 420 years ago. planted in 1599, or thereabouts, during the reigns of queen elizabeth i and king james vi, it is remarkable that this ancient tree is as old as shakespeare's hamlet and caravaggio's david and goliath. the purpose of the project,
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said the prince, was to conserve the united kingdom's natural heritage, to protect ancient woodlands and to plant many thousands of new trees in celebration of the queen's 70 years on the throne. for some northern parts of the uk the final day of the month changed all that. some really heavy rain. that is the scene in glasgow yesterday. thanks to this cloud and rain. you can see in our earlier satellite and radar image that weather, though, has been sinking southwards into the wettest conditions have been found across england and was particularly in south wales and south—west england allowing for something drier and brighter to develop in scotland. much brighter skies overhead in glasgow this afternoon. this is how it looks into the first part of the evening. some splashes of rain
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across south wales and south—west england. drier conditions further north with some late brightness but, as we head through tonight, i think they're going to keep quite a lot of cloud and even where we have some clear bags they will tend to fill them with patches of mist and fog but it is going to be a mild night. staying frost free for the vast majority. we are looking at lows of six and 9 degrees that i'm back on the day monday will start off with extensive cloud cover. the cloud producing the odd spot of an across parts of scotland and north—east england. and we will see some shower are starting to develop in places as the day wears on but some byjust buzz coming through. the best of the sunshine in western scotland. northerly wind starting to make it feel a little cooler in the north of scotland. 11 in aberdeen, 15 for cardiff, 17 is high in london. as you move out of monday into tuesday we do see a frontal system trying to push on from the west but pressure remains relatively high so we are not looking at huge amounts of rain everywhere. there'll be a lot of dry
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weather around on tuesday. some sharp showers breaking out where we see sunshine. elsewhere, extensive cloud cover. patchy rain into northern ireland later and a decidedly cool feel for parts of eastern scotland and north—east england. 9 degrees for example in newcastle. as we head deeper into the weak bc high pressure building to the south of the uk. frontal systems up to the west and that is where we had the greatest chance of seeing some outbreaks of rain but not a huge amount of rain in the outlook. it will often be dry with some rain at times. largely, the knights will be frost free and it will turn quite a bit warmer for many of us towards the end of the week.
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been besieged for weeks by russian forces. around 100 people have made it out so far — they've been trapped in appalling conditions in the complex, where ukrainian troops are making a desperate last stand.
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translation: we want to guarantee the evacuation notjust of civilians - but also our wounded servicemen, who require urgent medical attention. here in the capital, kyiv, the us speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, makes a surprise visit and promises american support for ukraine, she says, "until the fight is done". also on the programme... calls for action to end what some see as a "culture of misogyny" at westminster. it follows the resignation of tory mp, neil parish, who'd admitted viewing pornographic material on his phone in the commons chamber. the undisputed lightweight champion of the world, katie taylor! and ireland's katie taylor retains her world boxing titles in a historic top—of—the—bill fight in madison square garden.
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good evening from ukraine, where around 100 civilians have finally been evacuated from a steel plant in the besieged southern city of mariupol. they've been trapped there for weeks in increasingly dire conditions, with little food, water or medicine. around 1000 more civilians are still sheltering inside the vast steelworks complex, along with around 2000 ukrainian fighters, who are making a desperate last stand in the city that has been almost completely destroyed by russian forces. our correspondent laura bicker is in zaporizhzhia, where the evacuated civilians are being taken, and has the latest for us this evening. after 60 days of darkness, they can
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finally take the first steps in daylight. they had survived weeks of russian shelling by living in bunkers in the besieged city of mariupol. these pictures were taken by the russian defence ministry. this was the last refuge for nearly 1000 civilians desperate to hide from the daily russian bombardment. the steel plant is one of the biggest in the world, a unit of ukrainian fighters has tried to hold on as the city around them was reduced to rubble. women and children have also used the maze—like tunnels under the plant as a shelter. but they have been cut off from supplies for weeks. these pictures were released by the ukrainian fighters. i want to play in the sunlight, says this little girl. in a makeshift nursery, one toddler is wrapped in a plastic bag instead of a diaper. the deputy commander of the fighters pleaded for their release. translation: brute
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for their release. translation: we want for their release. translation: - want to guarantee the evacuation not just of civilians but also our wounded servicemen, who require urgent medical attention. refugees from all over— urgent medical attention. refugees from all over the _ urgent medical attention. refugees from all over the south _ urgent medical attention. refugees from all over the south of— urgent medical attention. refugees from all over the south of the - from all over the south of the country are making their way to the safe city of zaporizhzhia. they have taken any car or bus they can and it can take many days and sometimes weeks to get your. it is rare that any make it from encircled mariupol. we found one family who escaped after six weeks in a bunker. when you finally got out of the bunker, what did you save your city, what was left? translation: it what did you save your city, what was left? tuna/mom- was left? translation: it was nonexistent, _ was left? translation: it was nonexistent, nine _ was left? translation: it was nonexistent, nine floor- was left? translation: it was| nonexistent, nine floor buildings were tendered into three or four floor buildings. smaller ones were gone completely. we walked and hitchhiked and then picked up a shopping cart and put our kids into it so it was easier than carrying them. , ., , ., ~ ., it so it was easier than carrying them. ,.,y ., ~ ., it so it was easier than carrying them. ., ~ ., , them. glory to ukraine, says this three-year-old. _
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them. glory to ukraine, says this three-year-old. it _ them. glory to ukraine, says this three-year-old. it is _ them. glory to ukraine, says this three-year-old. it is now- them. glory to ukraine, says this three-year-old. it is now a - them. glory to ukraine, says this three-year-old. it is now a tensej three—year—old. it is now a tense wait to see if more civilians from her city will make it out alive. we can go live to laura bickerfor the latest. 100 out so far. what are the latest. 100 out so far. what are the chances of getting those other civilians out?— civilians out? well, we had confirmation _ civilians out? well, we had confirmation within - civilians out? well, we had confirmation within the - civilians out? well, we had| confirmation within the last civilians out? well, we had - confirmation within the last hour, president zelensky said we expect this 100 civilians here in zaporizhzhia at the refugee centre tomorrow but you are right, that is 100 civilians, there are thought to be 1000 still within the steel plant and within the city itself there are thought to be 100,000 people. you can see the scale of the operation still to come. i am told that negotiations between the ukrainians and the russians are delicate and complicated. there is a reason why this operation has been shrouded in secrecy. everyone wants to see it succeed. here in zaporizhzhia, aid
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workers are at the ready. hospitals are on standby in case they managed to get these buses out. but here it is a tense wait to ensure the safe passage of this humanitarian corridor and make sure that it actually goes ahead. bill corridor and make sure that it actually goes ahead. all right, laura, actually goes ahead. all right, laura. thank _ actually goes ahead. all right, laura, thank you _ actually goes ahead. all right, laura, thank you very - actually goes ahead. all right, laura, thank you very much. l actually goes ahead. all right, - laura, thank you very much. laura bicker in zaporizhzhia. here in kyiv, nancy pelosi, the speaker of the us house of representatives, has made a surprise visit for talks with ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky. she said the united states would stand with ukraine until the "fight is done" and said congress would move quickly to deliver $33 billion worth of aid proposed by president biden. nancy pelosi is the latest high—profile international political figure to come to kyiv. an offer president zelensky moral support. and he is getting more than that from the united states. some $33
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billion worth of economic humanitarian and economic military assistance promised by president biden. speaking in poland after nancy pelosi had left ukraine, she said ukraine is fighting for everyone's freedom. [30 said ukraine is fighting for everyone's freedom. do not be bullied by _ everyone's freedom. do not be bullied by bullies. _ everyone's freedom. do not be bullied by bullies. if _ everyone's freedom. do not be bullied by bullies. if they - everyone's freedom. do not be bullied by bullies. if they are i bullied by bullies. if they are making threats, you cannot back down. that is my view of it. you are therefore the fight. and you cannot, you cannot fold to a bully.— you cannot fold to a bully. russia is now stepping _ you cannot fold to a bully. russia is now stepping up _ you cannot fold to a bully. russia is now stepping up its _ you cannot fold to a bully. russia is now stepping up its offensive l you cannot fold to a bully. russia. is now stepping up its offensive on the eastern front in the donbas, raining down rockets... artillery and tank fire on ukrainian trenches and tank fire on ukrainian trenches and bunkers. after two months on the front line, these ukrainian troops from the 81st brigade are now pulling back for a short rest, a breakfrom the pulling back for a short rest, a break from the relentless russian onslaught that has killed and injured many of their colleagues. a
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combat doctor treats some of the troops for trench foot because they have not been able to change soaking wet boots and socks. translation: this is a good opportunity for the boys to rest and return to the fight with new energy. to recover physically, morally and psychologically.- physically, morally and psychologically. physically, morally and -s cholouicall. �* , ., psychologically. but before too lona , his psychologically. but before too long. his men _ psychologically. but before too long, his men will _ psychologically. but before too long, his men will head - psychologically. but before too long, his men will head back . psychologically. but before too| long, his men will head back to psychologically. but before too - long, his men will head back to the front line, perhaps to face an even more ferocious rushing attack. this war, which president putin had hoped would only last for a few days, could now rage on for months or even years to come, consuming more lives with every passing day. we will have more on that evacuation operation throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. well, that's the latest from me and the team here in ukraine. clive, back to you in the studio with the rest of the news. many thanks to you and the team in
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here. —— in kyiv. the speaker of the house of commons, sir lindsay hoyle, has called for a radical review of working practices following a series of sexual misconduct and bullying claims against politicians. yesterday, the conservative mp neil parish resigned after admitting he'd watched pornographic material on his phone in the commons chamber. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, has denied a culture of misogyny exists at westminster. our political correspondent ben wright reports. sexism and misogyny... sexism and misogyny _ sexism and misogyny... sexism and misoa n . ,, ., . misogyny. sexual misconduct. there are some bad _ misogyny. sexual misconduct. there are some bad apples _ misogyny. sexual misconduct. there are some bad apples who _ misogyny. sexual misconduct. there are some bad apples who behave - misogyny. sexual misconduct. there| are some bad apples who behave like animals and are bringing parliament into disrepute. it animals and are bringing parliament into disrepute.— into disrepute. it has been a grim week for parliament, _ into disrepute. it has been a grim week for parliament, with - into disrepute. it has been a grim week for parliament, with mps i week for parliament, with mps agreeing this place needs to change. yesterday the tory mp neil parish quit after admitting to watching pornography on his phone in the house of commons. that followed the backlash to an article about labour's deputy leader angela rayner. there was cross—party outrage at a story that said she crossed and uncrossed her legs to
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distract borisjohnson. today crossed and uncrossed her legs to distract boris johnson. today a crossed and uncrossed her legs to distract borisjohnson. today a tory source claimed that after investigating the matter that miss ranger had originally made the comments are cell. labour call that a sexist smear. cabinet colleagues might have been telling of their experiences, one said she was pinned to a wall by a male mp. it puts a spotlight on the culture of the commons. brute spotlight on the culture of the commons-— spotlight on the culture of the commons. ~ ., ., , , commons. we have to distinguish between some — commons. we have to distinguish between some bad _ commons. we have to distinguish between some bad apples, - commons. we have to distinguish| between some bad apples, people commons. we have to distinguish i between some bad apples, people who behave badly, and the general environment. it is similar to win people say, there are a number of racist people in this country so that means the whole country is racist. ., ., , ., that means the whole country is racist. ., ., ., ., racist. that does not follow. parliament _ racist. that does not follow. parliament has _ racist. that does not follow. parliament has always i racist. that does not follow. parliament has always been | racist. that does not follow. l parliament has always been a racist. that does not follow. - parliament has always been a strange place to work with late nights, long hours, powerful people and bluesy bars. ., , hours, powerful people and bluesy bars. . , . ~' hours, powerful people and bluesy bars. . , ., ~ ., bars. last night a week at westminster _ bars. last night a week at westminster were - bars. last night a week at westminster were voting | bars. last night a week at i westminster were voting at bars. last night a week at _ westminster were voting at midnight and there was a gap in the day and many of us had been to events which had alcohol in the bars are open. the speaker of the commons says there needs to be an urgent review
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into how westminster works and is calling for the type of inquiry last used in 2008 to look into it. i think we want to pull parties together and i am happy to participate in that because we cannot go on. participate in that because we cannot go on-_ participate in that because we cannot go on. with allegations cominu cannot go on. with allegations coming out — cannot go on. with allegations coming out over— cannot go on. with allegations coming out over and _ cannot go on. with allegations coming out over and over i cannot go on. with allegations i coming out over and over again. opposition parties have said they will take part. brute opposition parties have said they will take part-— opposition parties have said they will take part. we need to show to women and _ will take part. we need to show to women and girls _ will take part. we need to show to women and girls that _ will take part. we need to show to women and girls that if _ will take part. we need to show to women and girls that if you - will take part. we need to show to women and girls that if you come l women and girls that if you come into politics, it is going to be an environment where you feel safe, you will feel respected. it environment where you feel safe, you will feel respected.— will feel respected. it has been really difficult _ will feel respected. it has been really difficult to _ will feel respected. it has been really difficult to get _ will feel respected. it has been really difficult to get women i will feel respected. it has been really difficult to get women to j really difficult to get women to come _ really difficult to get women to come forward and stand for election because _ come forward and stand for election because it _ come forward and stand for election because it is a sense that politics and public— because it is a sense that politics and public life is not a safe space for women — and public life is not a safe space for women any more. the and public life is not a safe space for women any more. the question is, what can be — for women any more. the question is, what can be done _ for women any more. the question is, what can be done to _ for women any more. the question is, what can be done to change _ for women any more. the question is, what can be done to change the i what can be done to change the culture here? today, the commons speaker sir lyndsay hoyle said he was considering putting an outside body in charge of employing parliamentary aides. but some mps doubt that will make any difference to tackling the problems of sexism, misogyny and bullying that have damaged parliament's reputation once
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again. changing working structures could be easier than improving standards at westminster. ben lancashire police have confirmed that the body found in the forest of bowland on friday is that of 33—year—old katie kenyon. a post—mortem examination has determined that the mother—of—two died of head injuries. 50—year—old andrew burfield from burnley has been charged with ms kenyon's murder. people in scotland who test positive for covid or have mild symptoms no longer need to self—isolate. instead, they're being advised to stay at home until they feel better. testing sites have closed and contact tracing will no longer be carried out due to the falling number of infections. the prince of wales has urged people to protect the nation's ancient trees in honour of the queen's platinum jubilee. the initiative, called the queen's green canopy, has identified 70 areas across the uk where woodlands need protection. some are 1000 years old.
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now, with more on that historic women's boxing match at madison square garden and the rest of the sport here's chetan pathak at the bbc sport centre. good evening. the biggest fight in the history of women's boxing lived up to expectations in the early hours of this morning as ireland's katie taylor beat amanda serrano at new york's madison square garden to retain her undisputed lightweight title. ade adedoyin reports. and still the undisputed lightweight champion of the world... _ katie taylor retaining her world titles after a battling and bruising encounter. a career—defining performance and a defining night for the sport. serrano, all smiles on the way to the ring. taylor, calm and composed. both found the target early. it did not take long for things to heat up. then taylor decided to fight fire
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with fire in the fifth, and almost paid the price. the champion showing incredible reserves of courage to survive over the next two rounds. but in a fight of fluctuating fortunes, she rallied in the late rounds. the final few seconds of the bout, an incredible feat. a brilliant finish to a brilliant contest. a performance from both fighters that more than lived up to the occasion. this was billed as the biggest bout in women's boxing. and what a way to write their names in the history of this iconic venue. the best night of my career, for sure. i wasn't sure if anything could reach my olympic gold medal moment, but tonight was absolutely the best moment of my career. the fight lived up to the hype and there is already a clamourfor a rematch, possibly in ireland. this blockbuster bout the perfect showcase for the rise of women's boxing. ade adedoyin, bbc news, new york. everton have beaten chelsea to boost their hopes of premier league survival. the crucial breakthrough came early in the second half at goodison park, richarlison pouncing
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and finishing calmly. everton remain in the relegation zone, but two points from safety with a game in hand over leeds and burnley. tottenham are fourth for now after a 3—1win over leicester. in scotland, celtic are a step closer to winning the premiership title after a 1—1 draw with rangers. the home side took the lead in the old dirm derby after 20 minutes, jota with the close—range finish. but rangers got their eqauliser mid—way through the second half thanks to fashion sakala. the result means celtic stay six points clear at the top with three games to go. and ronnie o'sullivan has made a strong start in the final of the world snooker championship at the crucible as he looks to win a record—equalling seventh title. o'sullivan leads the 2019 winner judd trump by five frames to three after the first sesssion. the first to 18 wins. play resumes at 7pm. and in the women's super league, arsenal are within a point of leaders chelsea after thrashing
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aston villa 7—0. all the results are on the bbc sport website. arsenal lead 2—1 at west ham in the premier league withjust arsenal lead 2—1 at west ham in the premier league with just over one hour played. that's it. i'll be back with the late news at 10pm. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good evening. more now from kyiv and my colleague ben brown, earlier this afternoon,
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i'm joined here in kyiv by valeriy chaly, a former ukrainian ambassador to the united states, between the years 2015 and 2019. thank you very much for being with us. first of all, let me ask you about the situation in mariupol. it does seem to be good news that at least some people are being evacuated from that city. you're right, some civilians. the main thing now, how to take out the civilians. and another important thing is how to survive for injured ukrainian soldiers. it is also important that we don't forget about that. that is also a rule of war and i believe this will happen. but unfortunately, putin wants to kill them. just kill them. and that's the main problem. now we need this combination of diplomatic efforts and military efforts.
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we've had nancy pelosi, the us house speaker, here in kyiv on a visit. are you getting the kind of help now from the west, from the united states and other western countries, that you need in terms of weaponry? heavy weapons is what you have been asking for. you know, the only chance how to take back territory and give people the chance to survive is heavy weapon, heavy equipment. and you know, on an official level, we asked many times about that. finally we received it. appreciation for that. and an important thing is the coordination by the us, great britain, other countries. so it is like an anti—putin coalition. and that means, for us, like a message, "you will win." that's important for all ukrainians. an anti—putin coalition you say, but russia has warned that nato is fighting a proxy war here in ukraine and could even risk a third world war by doing that. you know, we are now under attack and that's not the time thinking
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it's the beginning of the third world war orjust the war against ukraine and our allies. more important how we will finish. we need dynamic, aggressive steps from our side in defence, in defence of operation. in that case, we can stop that. if not, they will go further. and the russians are pushing hard now in the east, in the donbas. right, and we now have many information, many sources that chief of russian army was injured, near donbas. that means no chance for them to go further and we will stop them there. and just briefly, you have met vladimir putin, the russian leader. what is his strategy here? what is he doing? why has he invaded ukraine like this? as a deputy minister for foreign affairs and foreign policy adviser, i met many different times with him.
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you know, it's a different two guys. one putin in that time, and now. that's why we are not thinking about what he thinks in his brain but we need to just react to the real steps from him and from russia. you know, only one thing, putin goes further if we will be not strong enough. if you are strong, if you demonstrate an ability to defend and fend, offensive operations, he will stop. 0k, valeriy chaly, former ukrainian ambassador to the united states, thank you very much indeed. that is the latest, chris, from here in kyiv. i'll hand you back. hello there. for some of us, it was a significantly drier april than we'd normally expect. but for some northern parts of the uk, the final day of the month changed all that with some really heavy rain. that was the scene in glasgow yesterday, thanks to this cloud and rain that you can see on our earlier satellite and radar image. that wet weather, though, has been sinking southwards. and so the wettest conditions today have been found across england and wales, particularly in south wales and south—west england, allowing for something drier
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and brighter to develop in scotland. much brighter skies overhead in glasgow this afternoon. this is how it looks into the first part of the evening. still some splashes of rain across parts of south wales and more especially south—west england. drier conditions further north with some late brightness. but as we head through tonight, i think we are going to keep quite a lot of cloud and even where we have some clear breaks, well, they'll tend to fill in with patches of mist and fog. but it is going to be a mild night, staying frost—free for the vast majority. we're looking at lows between six and nine degrees. but bank holiday monday will start off with extensive cloud cover — that cloud producing the odd spot of rain across parts of south—east scotland and north—east england. and we will see some showers starting to develop in places as the day wears on, but some brighter spells coming through. perhaps the best of the sunshine in western scotland, and northerly winds starting to make it feel a little cooler in the north of scotland. so 11 degrees there for aberdeen, but further south, 15 for cardiff,
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17 the high in london. now as we move out of monday into tuesday, we do see a frontal system trying to push in from the west, but pressure remains relatively high, so we're not looking at huge amounts of rain everywhere. actually, there'll be a lot of dry weather around on tuesday, some sharp showers breaking out where we see some sunshine in parts of wales and the south—west of england. elsewhere, extensive cloud cover, a bit of patchy rain into northern ireland later and a decidedly cool feel for parts of eastern scotland and north—east england. just nine degrees for example, in newcastle. then as we head deeper into the week, we see high pressure building to the south of the uk, frontal systems up to the north—west. so that's where we have the greatest chance of seeing some outbreaks of rain, but not huge amounts of rain in the outlook. it will often be dry with just some rain at times. largely the nights will be frost—free, and then it will turn quite a bit warmer for many of us towards the end of the week.
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this is bbc news. i'm chris rogers. the headlines at six... around 100 people have been evacuated from a steel works in the ukrainian city of mariupol — where civilians and troops have been sheltering for weeks from heavy russian bombardments. translation: we want to guarantee the evacuation, _ translation: we want to guarantee the evacuation, not _ translation: we want to guarantee the evacuation, notjust _ translation: we want to guarantee the evacuation, notjust of— the evacuation, notjust of civilians but also our wounded servicemen who require urgent medical attention. the us speaker of the house makes a surprise visit to kyiv — and promises american support for ukraine — she says "until the fight is done". pressure mounts for reform of working practices in westminster — after mp neil parish resigns for watching pornography in the house of commons. police confirm a body found in the forest of bowland on friday is that of missing mum of two — katie kenyon.

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