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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 4, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson. the headlines at 2pm... the eu proposes a ban on russian oil imports. the plan — which has to be approved by member states — also includes sanctions against individuals, including the head of russia's orthodox church. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine — including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. and after some people were evacauted from the besieged city of mariupol, there'll be more attempts today to help desperate civilians leave. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly.
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a memorial is to be unveiled to honour hms sheffield, hit by an argentine missile during the falklands war a0 years ago. and after liverpool reach the champions league final, all eyes are on man city tonight to see if they can make it too. hello to you and welcome. the government's introducing fresh sanctions against russia as part of the international pressure on president putin, as he intensifies his military offensive in ukraine. new measures will include a ban on russia accessing uk accountancy, management consultancy, and pr services. let's head to kyiv and ben brown.
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yes, thank you and hello from kyiv, the capital of ukraine. the west is stepping up pressure on president putin. the european union is set to unveil a new round of oil sanctions, as european commission president says mr putin must, in her words, pay the price for the invasion of this country. russian forces have intensified their attacks, including electrical plants supplying power to the railways. a number of locations were hurt, including lviv. russia appears to be targeting key supply routes that ukraine uses to transport troops and also western supply weapons to their forces in the east of the country, where much of the fighting is currently taking
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place and including the city of mariupol. this report now from jenny hill, who is in moscow for us at the moment. let's have a word withjenny hill on russian reaction to this news of an eu plan for complete oil boycott of russian oil. yes, the kremlin this morning dismissed such talk is just the plans. a spokesman for vladimir putin saying this would be a double—edged sword and by saying that, what he meant, he was repeating something vladimir putin quite often tells the russian people, that any kind of energy embargo on the part of europe would hurt europe more than it would hurt russia. vladimir putin i think for some time now has calculated, not withoutjustification, that it will be very difficult for the eu to come up be very difficult for the eu to come up with a cohesive and agreed position on any kind of embargo on
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russian energy supplies and he is seeing that today. it gives him a bit of time to try and work out what he will do when he loses. the very important revenue from oil and gas sales to europe. he is talking about intensifying sales to other customers, particularly those in asia. ultimately, of course, it will hit russia hard but vladimir putin knows it will take some time to really see europe making an actual final decision on what is going to do and really turn its back on russian oil and gas. let's talk about what is going on on the battlefield at the moment. the ukrainian defence ministry were saying in the last two or three hours that russia is really stepping up hours that russia is really stepping up the tempo of its offensive here, some 50 air strikes they say yesterday alone. what would you read into that, because there is a lot of talk about the victory day parade on
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the 9th of may in russia when president putin wants to present good news from the battlefield to his people. that is they may the 9th parade that commemorates russia's victory over nazi germany in the second world war. i victory over nazi germany in the second world war.— victory over nazi germany in the second world war. i think there are two thins second world war. i think there are two things going — second world war. i think there are two things going on _ second world war. i think there are two things going on here. _ second world war. i think there are two things going on here. after- second world war. i think there are two things going on here. after a i two things going on here. after a pretty bungled attempt at an invasion in the first few weeks, vladimir putin's command is pulled back from cities like kyiv to concentrate instead on what i suspect their commanders thought might be easier targets to take, the eastern regions and some of the southern regions of ukraine. we have seen them intensifying their efforts there. the stated aim at the moment from russia is to take the whole of the donbas region and they haven't done that yet. there is a deadline of sorts looming. on monday there will be military parades and fly pasts all over the country, we saw planes roaring overhead in moscow
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this morning as part of the rehearsals without victory day. a big holiday in the russian calendar when they celebrate the soviet victory over nazi germany in 1916. analysts thought that might be when president putin would want to present the people with an historic victory all of his own in ukraine. it is by no means clear that he can do that at this stage, although the kremlin does tend to present victories if they want to, it may not be something that is based on any kind of reality in ukraine. but there is now a lot of chatter around whether vladimir putin might use the occasion to actually officially declare war on his neighbour. remember, thus far, he has only told russians this is a special military operation to come to the rescue of russian speaking people in eastern ukraine. the other rumour is he might begin the mobilisation of reservists and potentially civilians to replenish depleted russian
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troops. this morning his spokesman dismissed both of those unconfirmed reports, as nonsense. but we have seen the kremlin in the past say one thing and do another and that is why as the intensification for rehearsals is ongoing across this country, you see real intensification of speculation over what victory day might mean this yearfor what victory day might mean this year for the russian what victory day might mean this yearfor the russian people, but of course for the world at large. 0k, course for the world at large. ok, jenny, thank you very much indeed for that update doesn'tjenny hill in moscow. let's bring in more at the european union has been saying about the proposed oil band. eu member states are being asked to approve a complete ban on imports of russian oil by the end of the year.
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crude oil at first and then other products later but the president of the european union said it will not be easy but it will be done on all russian oil seaborne and pipeline, crude and refined. ursula von der leyen- _ pipeline, crude and refined. ursula von der leyen. we _ pipeline, crude and refined. ursula von der leyen. we can _ pipeline, crude and refined. ursula von der leyen. we can bring - pipeline, crude and refined. ursula von der leyen. we can bring in - pipeline, crude and refined. ursula i von der leyen. we can bring in more on the latest russian attacks on ukraine. lviv are in the west which often hasn't been attacked very much by russian forces did suffer several missile strikes on infrastructure there. our correspondent from lviv has this report. for a city that felt a long way from the war, last night was a rude awakening. at least three electrical substations around lviv were hit by
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russian missiles. much of the city was left without power. water supplies were also —— water supplies were also disrupted. i supplies were also -- water supplies were also disrupted.— were also disrupted. i don't know the next target _ were also disrupted. i don't know the next target for _ were also disrupted. i don't know the next target for russian - the next target for russian missiles. today it is a huge hub for refugees and every day lviv hosts new wounded but today in the lviv hospital we have more than 1000 wounded. it hospital we have more than 1000 wounded. . , ., , hospital we have more than 1000 wounded. ., , . , wounded. it was actually the city centre that _ wounded. it was actually the city centre that was _ wounded. it was actually the city centre that was hit _ wounded. it was actually the city centre that was hit but _ wounded. it was actually the city centre that was hit but this - wounded. it was actually the city | centre that was hit but this place, rather anonymous industrial park on the outskirts. it is because of that, an electrical substations is that, an electrical substations is that the russians say six of them were hit in total across the country. they are trying to disable the rail network and the reason they want to do that is because that will stop the flow of weapons from the west to the east. andre found a part of a missile lodged in his shed. in this russian language... russia i of a missile lodged in his shed. in i this russian language... russia said it launched cruise _ this russian language... russia said it launched cruise missiles - it launched cruise missiles yesterday from a submarine in the black sea. and once nato if it
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shipment of weapons continue, they will be targeted as well. the port city of mariupol has witnessed some of the most brutal fighting of the invasion. in the last few hours, the mayor said a new convoy of evacuees is leaving the city. they are following a group fleeing over the weekend from the azovstal steelworks. yesterday there convoy arrived in the relative safety in zaporizhzhia. this is what living in the dark, short of food and water and under constant bombardment will do the people. translation: you enter attend. _ do the people. translation: gm, enter attend, take off your clothes, they check your documents. they kept saying all was well and they would rebuild and reconstruct marry you poll, there is no mariupol. but russian preparations are already under way for the annual victory parade on the 9th of may, with many predicting president putin needs to give people something to celebrate.
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the wind over negotiations could be closing. we can talk now in kyiv with the ukrainian member of parliament who joins me. thank you for being with us. let's pick up on the point made in that report about the victory day in that report about the victory day in russia on the 9th of may. are you worried that will be a precursor for more attacks and intensification of ataxia? {iii more attacks and intensification of ataxia? . ., , more attacks and intensification of ataxia? , ., ataxia? of course because for putin and the empire _ ataxia? of course because for putin and the empire he _ ataxia? of course because for putin and the empire he is _ ataxia? of course because for putin and the empire he is trying - ataxia? of course because for putin and the empire he is trying to - and the empire he is trying to build, it is a symbolic day. he takes some kind of victory day and he turns it into a big fight right now against nazis, which is russian propaganda, completely ridiculous, but it is his point that we need to fight the western world, america, the jewish population. fight the western world, america, thejewish population. so completely delusional aggressor and completely delusional aggressor and completely delusional dictator but we are expecting there will be quite tough
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times here in kyiv and in odesa and mariupol and other cities for the 9th of may. the mariupol and other cities for the 9th of may-— mariupol and other cities for the 9thofma. ,, ., mariupol and other cities for the 9thofma. ,, 9th of may. the russians seem to be intensi in: 9th of may. the russians seem to be intensifying their _ 9th of may. the russians seem to be intensifying their attacks _ 9th of may. the russians seem to be intensifying their attacks on - intensifying their attacks on infrastructure in the last day or so, especially the railways and electricity substations and so on. yes, actually, right now we are in kyiv so even yesterday in kyiv we had the largest number of sirens and alerts and missiles, you will probably remember that, for the last two weeks and they are intensifying hits on lviv, electrical stations. they are intensifying oil stations and reserves about oil, they know we are running out and we expected that and we are trying to get more into the country but with the ports closed it is not easy for is that we have no other choice than to get ready, to defend ourselves, to defend our lives and our country yesterday also for the first time they hit the western, western part of ukraine which was never hit
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before. they did it yesterday. there are no strategic military point there at all so they are just intensifying it in terms of panic and fearfor the civil intensifying it in terms of panic and fear for the civil population but we feel no fear any more. we have seen the worst, we have seen butcher, we have seen mariupol and we will do everything necessary to defend ourselves.— we will do everything necessary to defend ourselves. given all of that and all those _ defend ourselves. given all of that and all those attacks, _ defend ourselves. given all of that and all those attacks, do - defend ourselves. given all of that and all those attacks, do you - defend ourselves. given all of that and all those attacks, do you stilll and all those attacks, do you still believe ukraine can win this war? you know, yesterday we had a session in the parliament which was just over there in the centre of kyiv and we had a line from borisjohnson who said, i have one message for you, so this is my message i feel for the past 60 and one message is ukraine will win. we will win for sure because we are fighting for our lives, for our children, for our territory, for our ideals and our freedom, for our choice to make a choice ourselves. i am sure that we are going to win, especially with all the support we are getting from european countries in great britain and the us but the question is, what
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is the price of that? the prices are already incredibly high. what we saw in mariupol, what i see every week, it is horrifying. i will think about it is horrifying. i will think about it later after the war because right now it is not easy to think about it. , , .,, , it. indeed, lives being lost every hour, it. indeed, lives being lost every hour. really. _ it. indeed, lives being lost every hour, really, of— it. indeed, lives being lost every hour, really, of every _ it. indeed, lives being lost every hour, really, of every day. - it. indeed, lives being lost every| hour, really, of every day. thank you so much, member of the ukrainian parliament here in kyiv. that is the latest on the team here, i will hand you back to the studio in london. thank you very much, we will be back alive with ben brown a little later. european union member states are being asked to approve a complete ban on imports of russian oil but is not yet a done deal. they need to decide, particularly those countries heavily reliant on those imports. let's get more on this now to dr hilary ingham, senior lecturer in economics at lancaster university. welcome to bbc news. as we said,
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this is the latest round in sanctions by russia, but the harsh economic reality is many countries are so reliant on those imports it is not easy to come to a decision to ban them outright. ida. is not easy to come to a decision to ban them outright.— ban them outright. no, it will be a very difficult _ ban them outright. no, it will be a very difficult decision. _ ban them outright. no, it will be a very difficult decision. if _ ban them outright. no, it will be a very difficult decision. if you - ban them outright. no, it will be a very difficult decision. if you take l very difficult decision. if you take a country like germany, it has been highly dependent on russia and even within that country, there has been concerns raised about this previously. then if you look at another two member states, hungary and slovakia, these are landlocked countries, so shipping things like liquid natural gas is very difficult. then they are likely to be given a longer period to move away from dependency on russia, possibly until the end of 2023. so although the sanctions have been introduced today, as was said earlier in your programme, even taking some of the crude oil out of the equation, that is going to take six months and for refined oil, it
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will take a period of 12 months. so it is not an instantaneous imposition of sanctions, it is a move to lessen dependency on russia, taking it away completely but not until the end of the year. find taking it away completely but not until the end of the year. and they -hased until the end of the year. and they phased out — until the end of the year. and they phased out approach _ until the end of the year. and they phased out approach means - until the end of the year. and they phased out approach means all. until the end of the year. and they| phased out approach means all the while there will be money heading to the kremlin from countries that are buying oilfrom russia. i am looking at the latest figures, suggesting about $50 billion worth of revenue has flown into russia, as countries have continued to buy that oil. so you might say that all the other sanctions that have been imposed on the country are meaningless if we are still sending $50 billion to russia to pay for oil. this are still sending $50 billion to russia to pay for oil.— are still sending $50 billion to russia to pay for oil. this is the real irony _ russia to pay for oil. this is the real irony and _ russia to pay for oil. this is the real irony and i _ russia to pay for oil. this is the real irony and i don't _ russia to pay for oil. this is the real irony and i don't think - russia to pay for oil. this is the real irony and i don't think the l real irony and i don't think the majority of your viewers will have been aware of that because on the one hand, you know, the eu is quite rightly giving a lot of support to ukraine, that we all support and
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indeed helping member states where a lot of ukrainians are fleeing for short—term safety. but at the same time, they are actually paying russian money. so to an extent, we are helping to fund, you know, this effort of invasion of this country. i haven't used the term war because russia would deny it is a war but we are funding the operations that are going on there. we are funding the operations that are going on there-— are funding the operations that are going on there. we have also heard from president _ going on there. we have also heard from president putin's _ going on there. we have also heard from president putin's spokesman. from president putin's spokesman today saying the cost of these sanctions to citizens of europe will grow by the day. that is the interesting point in all of this, isn't it? it is not a one—way street. we know sanctions and trade was hurt both sides and you might say we are feeling it in europe through the soaring cost of energy, particularly oil prices and gas prices that are rising as a result. yes, we are already being hit in the uk and indeed further afield in europe by these absolutely horrendous hikes in energy prices and obviously these sanctions are going to make things worse. we can
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turn to america to import liquefied gas but that is a long way away and it will be expensive to transport it here. if you look to germany, it doesn't even have a terminal that can take that product. then we can look to the middle east, we can look to nigeria but these are likely to be higher cost sources of supply, simply because of the geographics concerned. so i think further down the line, you know, consumers, firms, everybody is going to be looking to paying higher energy prices yet again, unless there can be some resolution and peace restored in the region. but currently, at this point in time, that isn't looking likely in the short term. that isn't looking likely in the short term-— that isn't looking likely in the shortterm. �* ., ., ., . short term. and from an economic oint of short term. and from an economic point of view. _ short term. and from an economic point of view. i — short term. and from an economic point of view, i wonder _ short term. and from an economic point of view, i wonder what - short term. and from an economic point of view, i wonder what this l point of view, i wonder what this means for the wider economic picture, given that oil prices are such a huge part of that inflation increase we have seen of late. that has huge repercussions on so many different parts of the economy and i
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don't even want to get to the point of talking about a recession brought on by that soaring inflation. we of talking about a recession brought on by that soaring inflation.- on by that soaring inflation. we are havin: on by that soaring inflation. we are having soaring _ on by that soaring inflation. we are having soaring inflation. _ on by that soaring inflation. we are having soaring inflation. post - having soaring inflation. post covid, we did expect it because of pent up demand but monetary authorities like the ecb and the bank of england, they were convinced it was transitory and we would see it was transitory and we would see it dissipating but that is not the case. it is picking up pace and we are now predicting we are going to be having figures of around 9%, very high interest rates are going to discourage firms' investment because obviously if you have high caste finance, you need to be more profitable in terms of your project to repay and still make a profit and individuals on mortgages that have a variable rate, they will see those costs going up. so where ever you look, really, you just see increasing costs and inflation really at levels nobody predicted a few months ago. it
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really at levels nobody predicted a few months ago.— few months ago. it really does underline _ few months ago. it really does underline quite _ few months ago. it really does underline quite how _ few months ago. it really does underline quite how many - few months ago. it really does - underline quite how many implement implications arrive at theirs. we are grateful for your time, implications arrive at theirs. we are gratefulfor your time, thank are grateful for your time, thank you are gratefulfor your time, thank you very much. hilary ingham, lecturer at university of lancaster. elsewhere... a bbc news investigation into the government's homes for ukraine scheme has found that some would—be hosts with a reported history of violence are trying to exploit the system. the men have been making contact with women fleeing the russian invasion to arrange possible placements, using refugee support groups on facebook. with me is our correspondent, angus crawford. it is astonishing this, isn't it, what have you found? that it is astonishing this, isn't it, what have you found?- it is astonishing this, isn't it, what have you found? at the heart of the story end — what have you found? at the heart of the story end of _ what have you found? at the heart of the story end of the _ what have you found? at the heart of the story end of the problem - what have you found? at the heart of the story end of the problem is - what have you found? at the heart of the story end of the problem is the l the story end of the problem is the informal way in which sponsors are being matched with hosts. with refugees. anyone can register an interest to be a host, as long as they have a series of checks, including criminal record checks, but after that, that is where the problem seems to begin, in that that
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is left up to potential hosts and refugees to find each other. so huge numbers of people have resorted to going to unregulated facebook groups, set up with the best possible motivations. we found some men clearly unacceptable. they certainly, one case we found with a criminal record, serious convictions. we found another man with a history of domestic abuse trying to contact young women. we were also told in some areas of the country, up to 30% of those wanting to be hosts where men over 40, expressing an interest in hosting women in their 20s and 30s and an obvious red flag. i reported substandard housing, one house that a volunteer described as not fit for rehoming a dog. another, bizarrely enough full of nazi memorabilia. and another one where the refugee family were offered simply a mattress on the floor. �* ,., were offered simply a mattress on the floor. �* , , were offered simply a mattress on thefloor. �* , , the floor. and so i suppose this s stem the floor. and so i suppose this system set _ the floor. and so i suppose this system set no _ the floor. and so i suppose this system set up very _ the floor. and so i suppose this
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system set up very quickly - the floor. and so i suppose this system set up very quickly to l the floor. and so i suppose this| system set up very quickly to try the floor. and so i suppose this - system set up very quickly to try to respond to that crisis, what of the government said about checks and balances her? aha, government said about checks and balances her?— balances her? a couple of things. they dispute _ balances her? a couple of things. they dispute the _ balances her? a couple of things. they dispute the 3096 _ balances her? a couple of things. they dispute the 3096 figure. - balances her? a couple of things. | they dispute the 3096 figure. they they dispute the 30% figure. they say they do not mechanise that. they say they do not mechanise that. they say thousands of hosts and refugees have had perfectly good matches and is working well for them and they do reject this criticism. effectively, what they say is any attempt to exploit vulnerable people are in their disgusting and it says the home office has safeguards in place including background security checks on all sponsors. including background security checks on all sponsors-— on all sponsors. angus, thank you, fascinating- — on all sponsors. angus, thank you, fascinating- i _ on all sponsors. angus, thank you, fascinating. i know— on all sponsors. angus, thank you, fascinating. i know you _ on all sponsors. angus, thank you, fascinating. i know you will - on all sponsors. angus, thank you, fascinating. i know you will keep i on all sponsors. angus, thank you, j fascinating. i know you will keep us up—to—date on how your investigation goes. angus crawford on that refugee scheme. it's the final day of campaigning ahead of elections across the uk tomorrow. people in northern ireland will choose the government at stormont and voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area.
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in england, ballots are being held for 146 councils in major cities including leeds, manchester, birmingham and all 32 london boroughs. there aren't many elections in rural areas. there is also a handful of mayoral elections. in scotland, every local authority, 32 in total, is being contested. all of the seats in 22 local councils across wales are up for election. in northern ireland, voters will elect 90 members of the legislative assembly our political correspondents in england, scotland and wales brought us the latest. most of the votes cast in england tomorrow will be in towns and cities, from parish councils to elected mayors. largely in london, local authorities providing local services, from libraries to bin collections, planning and potholes. but they will also provide the best indication for some time of the national political picture. so the
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conservatives will be braced for the voters' verdict on their handling of the cost of living crisis for many, the cost of living crisis for many, the government has met response to the government has met response to the war in ukraine and partygate scandal. sir keir starmer will talk about his plans to tackle household bills but is still facing questions about his own conduct in lockdown. the liberal democrats will be looking to take seats from the conservatives in the south, labour in the north and the greens and others will want to make gains as well. there is plenty at stake. a lot of conservative mps here are waiting for the results of these local elections to decide whether it is time for borisjohnson to go and sir keir starmer is facing a big test to show he can lead labour to success. once the votes are in and begin to be counted tomorrow night, plenty at westminster will be watching very carefully. this is a week of political anniversaries. it is 25 years since tony blair came to power at
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westminster and it is 15 years since the snp took charge of scotland's devolved administration. what is remarkable looking back is how rapidly that political shift occurred in historical terms, how short the gap between those two events was. where does that leave us now? well, labour have faded over time in scotland and the city is an example of that. the snp now run the council here in glasgow, once really the heartland of the labour movement. what is going to happen this time? that of course it's up to the voters. they will be choosing councillors, all 1200 also up for election in 32 councils across the country and in scotland, they will be using a system of proportional representation, not first past the post. they will be ranking candidates in order of preference. on the face of it, these elections are about local issues such as schools and been collections in libraries and so on, but they might also tell us something about the
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wider political picture. what does the snp vote tell us about the current level of support for independence in scotland? how are the conservatives bearing with the partygate scandal, especially given their leader in scotland that first called for the prime minister to resign and then withdrew that demand? and what about labour, are there any signs of a revival for the party? in here vertically what they used to call red clydeside. we might get some answers by friday evening. here in wales, labour has been the dominant force in welsh politics for the last century but in the last local elections here in 2017, its grip weakened, it lost over 100 council seats and ended up with overall control of only seven of the 22 local authorities. plaid cymru and the conservatives took one counsel each, but large swathes of the welsh political map were a big grey area, representing all the little coalitions and the real
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significant role of independent candidates here in wales. take a look for example at what happens to this area, the vale of glamorgan, could it turn from grey into a primary colour? this place has been taken by both labour and the conservatives before. and whilst it is also about local issues like planning, schools and council tax bills, the role of national leaders might really come into play, whether it's how people think mark drakeford, the welsh first minister performed in the pandemic or what they make of the prime minister borisjohnson's they make of the prime minister boris johnson's role they make of the prime minister borisjohnson's role in the pandemic and partygate. one otherfactor borisjohnson's role in the pandemic and partygate. one other factor in wales is 16 and 17—year—olds get the vote, counting won't begin until friday morning here, and we should start to get some early results on friday afternoon. so that the view from england, scotland and wales. but the election results for the stormont assembly in northern ireland could trigger months of uncertainty and negotiations over who leads the executive. our correspondent chris page
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brought us the latest. you might be forgiven for thinking that politics in this part of the uk tends to be very predictable but in this election, there is a significant possibility of a huge shift. forthe significant possibility of a huge shift. for the last five elections to the devolved assembly here at stormont, the democratic unionists have won the most seats and sinn fein has come second. however, polls are suggesting that there could be a surge in support for the cross community alliance party and that sinn fein could emerge as the largest party. that would put the party's vice president michelle o'neill in line to become the first ever irish nationalists to hold the first minister's position in northern ireland. now aside from the battle as to who comes out on top, the other issue is prominent in this campaign have included the rising cost of living and the health service. northern ireland presently has the longest hospital waiting times in the uk by far. but there is serious doubt as to whether a
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devolved government will be formed at all after this election. under the power—sharing system, both the biggest unionist and the biggest nationalist party have to agree to go into coalition and the dup leader xijeffrey donaldson has go into coalition and the dup leader xi jeffrey donaldson has said go into coalition and the dup leader xijeffrey donaldson has said his party will be staying out of government unless the brexit trade border with england, scotland and wales is scrapped. whenever it comes to the over all picture, while there is no doubt a shift towards sinn fein and away from unionism would be a significant moment for northern ireland. however, the offices of first and deputy first minister are equal so other party say it doesn't matter who wins this election. in any case, this ballot will be critical for the very future of devolution in northern ireland and also given the importance of that brexit issue, it will potentially have babe implications for the relationship between the uk and the eu. , ., ,, ., ., ., eu. chris page there in stormont for us. just eu. chris page there in stormont for us- just time — eu. chris page there in stormont for us- just time to _ eu. chris page there in stormont for us. just time to tell— eu. chris page there in stormont for us. just time to tell you. .. _ the american comedian
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dave chappelle has been attacked during a performance at the hollywood bowl in los angeles. videos shared on social media showed someone running into chappelle. in other clips, the comic seemed to be unharmed after returning to the stage at the netflix is ajoke festival. chappelle faced criticism and protests last year when a programme he made for the streaming service was accused of being transphobic. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan. we are going to see some pretty heavy thunderstorms. today, they will be rattling around, gradually pushing out towards the north sea. some wet weather in the south—east across east anglia and up into the north—east of england. you can see by the small hours of thursday, things are much quieter. we could see a few patches of mist and fog on thursday. to the west, we see some
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weak weather fronts trying to push their way in. there will be more cloud round for scotland and northern ireland. they could be some rain there as well. through the evening, a south—westerly air stream picks us a much warmer air than we have had early in the week and it lifts our temperatures on thursday. across england and wales, some sunshine and we could see highs of 20 or 21 degrees. in northern ireland and scotland, we are still looking at temperatures in the high teens for now. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the eu proposes a ban on russian oil imports. the plan, which has to be approved by member states, also includes sanctions against individuals, including the head of russia's orthodox church. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine, including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. and after some people were evacauted
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from the besieged city of mariupol, there'll be more attempts today to help desperate civilians leave. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. and a memorial is to be unveiled to honour hms sheffield, hit by an argentine missile during the falklands war 40 years ago. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's paul scott. thank you very much. good afternoon, we start with football. manchester city are looking to reach a second successive champions league final against an english club. they're in spain to face real madrid in the semi—finals tonight. they have a 4—3 advantage from a dramatic first leg, knowing liverpool await the winner
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in the final. city have never won the champions league, it's the one piece of silverware that's so far evaded pep guardiola at the club, although they came close last season, but lost to chelsea in the final. i think they are two good teams. we saw it a week ago when we played. they are the champions in spain, we are trying to be champions, so, like i said a week ago, being in the semifinal, to try to be in another finalfor the semifinal, to try to be in another final for the second year of the row is our time. liverpool managerjurgen klopp says his side will be ready for their third champions league final in five years, after beating villarreal last night. that's despite a scare in the first half of their semifinal second leg,
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they eventually won 3—2 on the night, 5—2 on aggregate. having already won the league cup, the victory keeps alive their hopes of winning an unprecedented quadruple. it's really difficult to reach three finals, that's probably the reason why nobody has done it so far but we made that happen. and when these specific files show up on our schedule, we will make sure that we are ready for it. elsewhere, bournemouth are back among english football's elite. after two years away, they're returning to the premier league. substitute striker kieffer moore, who recovered from a broken foot to help the club's promotion push, with the only goal of the game against nottingham forest. a special moment for the team and the fans on the south coast. forest go in to the play—offs. a worrying moment before kick off though, nottingham forest defender steve cook, who used to play for bournemouth, has thanked paramedics for saving his dad's life. cook says his dad suffered a cardiac
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arrest at the stadium, but paramedics were able to bring him back to life, saying he'll be forever grateful for their actions. dan evans hasjoined andy murray in the third round of the madrid masters tennis. but the brit was pushed all the way by home favourite roberto bautista agut. evans took the first set of a match which lasted almost 3 hours, but the spaniard forced a decider. evans coming through in a final set tie breaker. he'll face andrey rublev next, rublev saw off another britjack draper in round 2. it's been an impressive tournament for the brits so far. cam norrie is also looking to progress to the last 16. he's in action right now, against the big serving veteran john isner, norrie has taken the first set 6—4. andy murray is set to renew his rivalry with novak djokovic, the two former world number 1's will meet in madrid, for the first time in 5 years. that's after murray beat denis shapovalov in three sets
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in the second round. and tony brooks, one of formula one's defining drivers of the 1950s has died aged 90. the british driver was one of the most succesful of his era, winning six grands prix and narrowly missing out on the world championship in 1959. he's regarded alongside stirling moss as the best british driver never to win the f1 title. that's all the sport for now, we'll be back soon. thank you. we will see a little later. the governor of the us state of oklahoma, has signed a law which bans abortion after 6 weeks of pregnancy. the move came hours after a leaked document suggested that an historic law which legalised abortion in the united states, could be overturned. abortion has been a legal right across the us for almost 50 years under the roe vs wade decision. our north america correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. abortion is violent!
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it's a decision that many pro—choice campaigners had feared. and whilst it's not the final decision, people have been having their say, including vice president kamala harris. those republican leaders who are trying to weaponise the use of the law against women, well, we say, how dare they? how dare they tell a woman what she can do and cannot do with her own body? applause. how dare they? how dare they try to stop her from determining her own future? how dare they try to deny women their rights and their freedoms? this is all happening because the supreme court of nine justices, who serve life terms, have been asked to rule on a law in the state of mississippi. that law directly challenges roe v wade. the bench has a conservative majority, which is in favour of rolling back abortion rights.
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if the court is successful, nearly half of america could ban abortion. 13 states have so—called trigger laws. another 13 would automatically ban, or severely limit, access. 36 million women of reproductive age would live in places without abortion services. following the leak of the draft, there have been many protests in states like florida, where a restrictive law has already been signed which will ban abortion at 15 weeks. but pro—choice campaigners are worried that if roe v wade is overturned, states like these will ban abortion outright. we need to make sure that people are aware that abortion remains legal. people can still access abortion care, and this fight is not over. you can stay at school and have a baby. you can have a job and have a baby. as an adult woman, when birth control failed me, my husband| and i made the choice i to have a legal abortion. and i'm horrified about that decision would be strippedl away from my grandsons
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and granddaughters. - polls consistently suggest most americans want to keep roe v wade in place. but it's not what everyone wants. i'm pro—life. and i've made that very clear from the moment i announced my candidacy. and i believe that what we found during the campaign, and even through today, is that there is a lot of common ground on this topic. we want fewer abortions in virginia, not more. it is very rare that rulings made by the supreme court are made public ahead of time, and draft opinions can change. the court will release its final decision over the summer. women's rights lawyer gloria allred worked with norma mccorvey, otherwise known as jane roe, in the 1973 court case: roe v wade. she told me about her
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personal experience. i actually met jane i actually metjane a i actually met jane a row at i actually metjane a row at a pro—choice demonstration. we worked together and she had her voice heard. i hope to have a voice heard for many years. then she became anti—choice but at a deathbed confession, she confessed that she essentially only did that for the money. she was already pro —— always pro—choice. as for me, i have been pro—choice. as for me, i have been pro—choice for many years because of my own life experience. when i was in my 20s, i went to mexico on a vacation, i was raped at gunpoint by a doctor. they came back to california, and this was in the 60s, it was unlawful for a woman to have an abortion at that time in california —— i came back to california. it was unlawful for a health care professional to provide one. i had to go back to a back alley person who did it in many, who
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then left me in a bathtub haemorrhaging and blood all over me, and ultimately, i had someone call and ultimately, i had someone call an ambulance for me and i was taken to a hospital and i had a 160 degrees fever and i almost died and thatis degrees fever and i almost died and that is where a nurse said to me, i hope this teaches you a lesson because she was obviously anti—choice. i did learn a lesson but the lesson i learnt was that abortion should be safe and legal, affordable and available and never illegal because that is what endangers women's lives. so, that is why i have been fighting this fight for roe v wade or so many years and i will continue to do so. i will speak next week at a big rally but as part of a national rally all around the country on the 14th of may and i will be speaking in support of roe v wade because this has to end.
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she was a women's rights lawyer who was involved after the court case, roe v wade. after more than a month of strict lockdowns, authorities in china's biggest city of shanghai, are beginning to gradually ease restrictions. the number of new cases is falling but thousands of people remain in government run quarantine facilities, as officials try to stop the spread of the omicron wave. our correspondent, robin brant, reports. it's taken more than a month. but now, shanghai's leaders think this outbreak is contained. so it's time for a mass clean up. disinfection by an army of workers, thousands of them, before a gradual opening up. but the brutal war against covid has left a scarred city. people as old as 100 were among those tested positive and taken to quarantine centres.
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one man detailed what he saw first—hand on social media. translation: a lot of the old people have underlying health problems. - and the conditions inside quarantine centres are not good. we hope the elderly can be sent to better hospitals. in the five weeks i've been locked down, you can't step outside the gates. it's shanghai's most vulnerable, who've suffered the most. almost all the official dead are elderly and unvaccinated. china's leaders insist that still chasing zero covid is the right thing. the enforcement has been harsh at times. some people barricaded into their homes, or forced out of them. communities fenced off. but xijinping has made it clear there's no change. the man in charge of china's ruling communist party believes persistence is victory. this is now a test of china's way —
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of his credibility. one part of china has changed tack, though. in hong kong, we never did a total lockdown. schools were closed. a lot of people were working from home, but it was by no means a lockdown. my concern in shanghai would be, how long can this go on? because the case numbers are not going to come down to zero immediately. they're going to drop down slowly. but the whole thing could happen again in a month or two months or three months if there's another outbreak of omicron. debate about living with it on the mainland has been shut down in public, though, and there's little room for dissent. this man was detained by police for simply showing his shopping. some pork donated by a neighbouring province. his crime highlighting the food supply problems. the government said this small scale, subtle protest — banging pots in parts of shanghai — is influenced by foreign forces.
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china's capital is now on guard against any spread. most of this country has been virus free now for almost two years. but as omicron threatens, renewed anxiety is spreading. complaints about university courses from students in england and wales reached a record high last year. more than a third of the nearly 2,800 complaints to the office of the independent adjudicator were related to the pandemic. the largest category were complaints about how courses were delivered, with students unable to access facilities like laboratories, or pursue studies abroad. the adjudicator says amount of compensation given to students exceeded £1.3m. jonathan goodwin, a man who was on britian's got talent in 2019 has been left paralysed, after a stunt went wrong. mr goodwin's fiancee says he was taking part in a tv show
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in america when it happened. the stunt involved him trying to escape from a straightjacket while hanging upside down in between two cars. the headlines on bbc news... the eu proposes a ban on russian oil imports. the plan, which has to be approved by member states, also includes sanctions against individuals, including the head of russia's orthodox church. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine, including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. a charity is calling for all medical students to receive better training about eating
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disorders after a survey suggested that patients did not receive adequate care. around 1.25 million people in the uk have an eating disorder, according to the charity �*beat�*, but there are currently no requirements for medical schools to provide any teaching in this area. it added that over two thirds of the people they surveyed, who have an eating disorder, felt their gp did not understand how to help them. zoe conway has this report. when you restrict your food intake, it numbs you. and so anorexia is a functional illness, it's a way to cope with difficult feelings or beliefs. joss had anorexia for five years. she says it was a way of coping with the sexual abuse she suffered as a child by a nonfamily member. i was quite skeletal. i was just very depressed. i would pace around the house all day. my day was just pretty much filled with numbness. i couldn't really take in much information.
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it was all about just like the exercise i was doing, the food i was eating. her family knew nothing of the abuse. the illness came out of the blue. was this an incredible shock, walking into this house, just feels like such a loving family environment? it was a complete shock. you think these things happen to other people, not to you. and yeah, we just never saw it coming at all. when suddenly they say, you know, ifjoss can put on so much weight a week, and i was doing the maths and i was thinking, well, to get to the target weight, that's going to be three months. and you had this sudden moment, this isn't a quick fix. this is something we are living with. joss feared for her own life. she grew increasingly desperate. i sought out my gp's number of her own home and ijust rang her at her home one evening and kind of put my foot down and said look, i'm really scared for my life. and i really need you to advocate for me, to fight for me, because the services just kept
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putting me on waiting lists and just kept telling me your weight is not low enough or we don't have room for you. the charity beat says medical schools need to do a betterjob of training doctors. at the moment, two thirds of people who go to their gp report that they don't get the referral for assessment that they should get, that the nice guidelines say they should get. so the medical professionals, they want to do a good job. but the system that is letting them down and eating disorder patients down is the medical training establishment. the general medical council says that eating disorders �*are a complex, high risk area of practice that should be covered in every doctor's education. we've asked medical schools to develop a common approach to improve how eating disorders are taught at medical school.�* joss has turned her life around, she is now working for the nhs as a psychologist. i am very, very proud ofjoss. she has come so far.
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you know, she has accomplished so much. i don't know how to put it into words, really. we really are enormously proud of her. for details of organisations, which offer advice and support with eating disorders, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline 40 years ago today, during the falklands war, an argentinian jet launched an exocet missile at the royal navy destroyer hms sheffield. the results were devastating: 20 crewmen died and the ship was fatally damaged. it was the first british warship to sink in enemy action since the second world war, becoming a defining moment of the conflict. today, a memorial in honour of those who served on the ship is being unveiled at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. phil mackie has this report. it was a moment the realities
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of the falklands war in stockholm. —— struck home. the first of four british ships to be sunk in 1982. 20 lives were lost and many more were wounded. argentine newspapers described it as the adventure of the belgrano. the attack on hms sheffield is a devastating blow to the enemy. today, the survivors had a chance to remember theirfriends who did not make it. dave harrington was a stoker and in the engine room when the missile struck. there was a thump, that is all i can describe it as and two seconds later a fireball totally covered me. and in my nightmares regularly, i can see myself with my hands up to my face screaming and seeing my reflection in the flames. it was quite harrowing, shall we say.
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and you still have nightmares now? oh, god, yes. regularly. this will stand as a tribute to those who died, made of sheffield steel, it is called the shiny sheffield and was unveiled at the service today. of course, it is a memorial, there are people who had partners and parents who died in that day in 1982 but also a reunion as many of these people have not seen each other for four years and so it is a chance for them to get back together once again. dave harrington suffered 20% burns. he was also diagnosed 17 years later from ptsd. so normally he spent the anniversary of his own. i've met a few people so far from sheffield and it is very emotional. i brought my handkerchief just in case. and of course looking at these names. it is heartbreaking. to think of all those ones we lost. it is very emotional,
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that is the only way i can put it. it was the first british ship lost in action since the second world war. it is a day old comrades will never forget. every day for the past 12 months, at sunrise and sunset, different people have watched over the city of hull from a glass pod eight storeys above the ground. it was for an unusual art project called hull vigil, which came to an end yesterday. more than 700 people took part, and crispin rolfe has been speaking to some of them. i can't believe it's a whole year since i was standing here doing the first vigil. hull is the perfect place. interesting. eye opening. yeah. so many ranges of emotions, so many thoughts going through your head, all at one space of time, really. the 730 places for the vigil
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went in four hours. but i'll miss it. for a year now, at both sunset and sunrise, for the lucky few, it's just been a case of you and the view. but all things come to an end. obviously, you walk up this ramp and it's like someone's given you the key to the city. like, you look after the city for an hour. you seem to be the highest person up. a really beautiful working public space leaves a trace. so, yes, there's the vigils that took part. there's the companions that manage them. and then there's a trace of it. if you saw this shelter from east or west hull, when you walk past this building from two weeks from now, it won't be here any more. and you'll remember that thing that was on the roof. so i think the legacy is notjust in the people that directly took part, i think it's also in the people that walk past. so the end then of a project,
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which has seen hundreds of people come and stand in this box, in this tiny container, and gaze out over the city of hull. unless you've done it, it's difficult to imagine what it would be like. but it is very close, it is very high and it is, in a way, full of emotion. we've had asylum seekers and refugees in the vigil and their comments have been really moving. you know, you've got people who are hoping for a new life and those who are wishing for their old life. that's what's touched me the most, really. but hull's 365—day vigil is now over. it's seen pandemics, empty streets and new normals. and yet, with those who've taken part all writing down their thoughts, it will have marked the dawn and dusk of people's lives. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with susan. hello. we've got some intense downpours set to affect the eastern side of the uk in the hours ahead. on into the evening, we will start to see them thinning out and eventually clearing. but some of the showers are going to be accompanied by lightning, hail, thunder, squally winds. here we are at 6pm, the evening rush, if you like. i think perhaps some of the worst of them by then will be away from the south east of scotland. but it looks like there could be some lively weather crossing the north east of england, clearing the east midlands, but running through into east anglia and the south east of england. and then they continue their journey eastwards as we finish off wednesday. they should almost be gone, i think, into the earliest hours of thursday. then it becomes much quieter across england and wales. light winds, we could even see a few patches of mist or fog forming here or there. to the northwest, our next set of weather fronts, though, tries to squeeze its way towards scotland and northern ireland. it's bumping up to a pretty big
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area of high pressure, though, which is trying to establish further south. between the two, a south—westerly airstream bringing much milderair than we've had earlier in the week in from further south in the atlantic. so all areas experiencing a warmer day on thursday. england and wales, dry, with bright or sunny spells. northern ireland, some patchy rain for a time. scotland, always a bit more cloud, the fronts around here and some rain, particularly in the west and that will keep things a little cooler. just 15 in glasgow, but 16 for aberdeen. further south, we could be looking at highs of 19 to 21. and with the fine weather and the sunshine across england and wales, we're anticipating high pollen levels. it's tree pollen at this point in the season. thursday into friday, the high kind of sinks a little bit south. it looks like we'll see a rather more potent weather front sliding its way south across the uk for the end of the week. the rain clearing scotland and northern ireland through the day, the sun will come out. there could be a few showers in the west. it willjust feel perhaps a little fresher through the afternoon, but we could still get up to 17 degrees in the best of any
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sunshine in aberdeen. further south, we're still looking at around the 20 mark, always cooler where we have the rain. front�*s off, though, to the continent for the weekend. high pressure back centering up across the uk for much of the weekend. the story is looking like a pretty dry one. there may be some rain coming into the northwest later on on sunday, but it's also looking pretty warm as well.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson. the headlines at 3: the eu proposes a ban on russian oil imports. the plan — which has to be approved by member states — also includes sanctions against individuals, including the head of russia's orthodox church. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine — including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. and after some people were evacauted from the besieged city of mariupol, there'll be more attempts today to help desperate civilians leave. also ahead: political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. a memorial is to be unveiled to honour hms sheffield,
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hit by an argentine missile during the falklands war 40 years ago. and after liverpool reach the champions league final, all eyes are on man city tonight to see if they can make it too. hello to you and welcome to bbc news. the eu is proposing its toughest sanctions yet against russia, including a total ban on russian oil imports by the end of the year. the plans need member states�* approval and this lunchtime, it emerged that at least four countries, all of them heavily dependent on russian oil, have called for exemptions before they approve it. the european commission president, ursula von der leyen, said the move would be phased
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in and the aim was to put the maximum pressure on russia, while minimising the disruption to the eu and global energy markets. today, we will propose to ban all russian oil from europe. this will be... applause. this will be a complete import ban on all russian oil, seaborne and pipeline, crude and refined. we will make sure that we phase out russian oil in an orderly fashion, so in a way that allows us and our partners to secure alternative supply routes and at the same time, be very careful that we minimise the impact on the global market, and this is why we will phase out russian supply of crude oil within six months and refined products by the end of the year. ursula von der leyen there.
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let's talk to our correspondent bethany bell. no surprise those countries that are most heavily reliant on russian oil and gas exports are reluctant to do and gas exports are reluctant to do a deal immediately.— and gas exports are reluctant to do a deal immediately. absolutely, we have heard from _ a deal immediately. absolutely, we have heard from hungary, - a deal immediately. absolutely, we | have heard from hungary, slovakia, the czech republic, these country very, very heavily dependent on russian oil and hungary in particular saying that it is just a matter of survival, that they can't accept the proposals as they currently stand. countries are still going through these proposals by the commission, going through all the different impacts. we have heard that some countries are calling for possible exemptions and we have also heard from diplomatic sources hear that that might be possible, certainly for countries like hungary and slovakia. but more negotiations needed at the moment before this step would go through. if it is eventually decided that the eu
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brings in this oil embargo it would come as you say, be the toughest set of sanctions on russia so far. the eu is very keen to see the revenues from russian oil being reduced. at the moment, the eu pays a great deal of money to russia for both oil and gas and they want at least to reduce the oil. , ., ., ., ., the oil. yes, and on that, one fiaure the oil. yes, and on that, one figure suggesting _ the oil. yes, and on that, one figure suggesting that - the oil. yes, and on that, one| figure suggesting that actually the oil. yes, and on that, one - figure suggesting that actually the eu has spent $50 billion on russian oil and gas since this crisis began, so whilst there are other sanctions and many governments making a big deal of the sanctions they are putting on place on individuals or russia as a whole, if we are still sending $50 billion worth of revenue to the kremlin to pay for this oil and gas they pale into insignificance, don't they? it is very complicated _ insignificance, don't they? it 3 very complicated and this is something that is going to hurt the eu. ursula von der leyen admitted
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this wouldn't be easy and she says it is important that countries are given time to find alternative sources of oil. that is complicated and they knock on effect of this also could be, we are hearing, is oil prices have gone up since this announcement this morning. if that continues, that will hurt consumers both in europe and it will also increase the revenues for russia. it is interesting, we had from the kremlin spokesman a little while ago saying this would hurt the eu as much as russia. he said russia was looking into its options. yes. looking into its options. yes, absolutely- _ looking into its options. yes, absolutely. we _ looking into its options. yes, absolutely. we will _ looking into its options. yes, absolutely. we will pick - looking into its options. yes, absolutely. we will pick up i looking into its options. yes, | absolutely. we will pick up on looking into its options. yes, absolutely. we will pick up on that thought right now. bethany bell live in brussels for us with the relators. we have heard from president putin's spokesman says the cost of these sanctions to the citizens of europe will grow by the day, referring one would assume, to the rising cost of energy.
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my colleague ben brown was speaking to our correspondentjenny hill. she was in moscow and described russia's reaction to those sanctions. the kremlin this morning dismissed such talk as just plans. a spokesman for vladimir putin saying that this would be a double—edged sword and by saying that, what he meant, he was repeating something which vladimir putin quite often tells the russian people, that any kind of energy embargo on the part of europe would hurt europe more than it will hurt russia. vladimir putin, i think for some time now, has calculated, not without justification, that it will be very difficult for the eu to come up with a cohesive and agreed position on any kind of embargo on russian energy supplies and he's seeing that today. it gives him a bit of time to try and work out what he will do when he loses the very important revenue from oil and gas sales to europe. he's talking about intensifying sales to other customers, particularly those in asia.
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ultimately, of course, it will hit russia hard but vladimir putin knows it's going to take some time to really see europe making an actualfinal decision on what it's going to do and really turn its back on russian oil and gas. let's talk about what's going on on the battlefield at the moment. the ukrainian defence ministry were saying in the last two or three hours that russia is really stepping up the tempo of its offensive here, some 50 air strikes, they say, yesterday alone. what would you read into that, because there's a lot of talk about the victory day parade on the 9th may in russia, when president putin wants to present good news from the battlefield to his people. that's the may 9th parade that commemorates russia's victory over nazi germany in the second world war. i think there are two things going on here. after a pretty bungled attempt at an invasion
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in the first few weeks, vladimir putin's commanders pulled back from cities like kyiv to concentrate instead on what i suspect their commanders thought might be easier targets to take — the eastern regions and some of the southern regions of ukraine. we have seen them intensifying their efforts there. the stated aim at the moment from moscow is to take the whole of the donbas region and looking at the gains they've made so far, you know, they haven't achieved that aim yet. and you're right, there is this deadline of sorts looming. on monday, there'll be military parades and fly pasts all over the country. in fact, we saw war planes roaring overhead here in moscow this morning as part of rehearsals for that victory day. it's a big holiday in the russian calendar. it's when russians commemorate the soviet victory over nazi germany in 1945. and a lot of analysts had thought that's when vladimir putin might want to present the russian people with an historic victory all of his own in ukraine.
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now it's by no means clear that he can do that at this stage, although the kremlin does tend to present victories if they want to, it may not be something that is based on any kind of reality in ukraine. but there is now a lot of chatter around whether vladimir putin might use the occasion to actually officially declare war on his neighbour. remember that, thus far, he has only told russians that this is a special military operation designed to come to the rescue of russian speaking populations in eastern ukraine. the other rumour doing the rounds here is that he might begin the mobilisation of reservists, and potentially civilians, to replenish depleted russian troops. now, this morning his spokesman dismissed both of those unconfirmed reports as nonsense. but, you know, we have seen the kremlin in the past say one thing and do another and that's why as the intensification for rehearsals is ongoing across this country,
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you see real intensification of speculation over what victory day might mean this year for the russian people, but, of course, for the world at large. jenny hill there with the latest from moscow. in ukraine, russian forces have intensified their attacks on ukrainian infrastructure — including electrical plants supplying power to the railways. russian missiles hit a number of locations, including lviv in the west, which hasn't been attacked for more than a week. russia appears to be targetting key supply routes that ukraine uses to transport troops, and western—supplied weapons, to the east of this country, where much of the fighting is taking place, including the city of mariupol. our correspondent in lviv, joe inwood reports. for a city that has often felt a long way from the war, last night was a rude awakening. at least three electrical substations around lviv were hit by russian missiles.
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much of the city was left without power. water supplies were also disrupted. i don't know where is the next target for russian missiles. today in lviv, it is a huge hub for refugees and every day lviv hosts new wounded. today in lviv hospital, we had to gather more than 1000 wounded. it was not actually the city centre that was hit, but this place, a rather anonymous industrial park on the outskirts and it is because of that — an electrical substation. the russians say that six of them were hit in total across the country. they're trying to disable the rail network and the reason they want to do that is because that will stop the flow of weapons from the west to the east. andre found a part of a missile lodged in his shed. russia says it launched cruise missiles yesterday from a submarine in the black sea and it has warned nato that if shipments
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of weapons continue, they will be targeted as well. the port city of mariupol has witnessed some of the most brutal fighting of the invasion. in the last few hours, the mayor said a new convoy of evacuees is leaving the city. they are following a group freed over the weekend from the massive azovstal steelworks, the last point of ukrainian resistance. yesterday, their convoy arrived in the relative safety of the ukrainian city of zaporizhzhia. this is what weeks of living in the dark, short of food and water and under constant bombardment will do to a person. even the journey to safety was an ordeal. translation: you enter a tent, take off your clothes, _ they check your documents. they kept saying that all was well and they would rebuild and reconstruct mariupol — there is no more mariupol. but russian preparations are already under way for the annual victory parade on the 9th of may. with many predicting president putin needs to give people
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something to celebrate, the window to negotiations could be closing. the ukrainian mp alyona shkrum has been speaking to my colleague ben brown about her concerns that russia would intensify its attacks in ukraine in the coming days. yeah, of course because for putin and the empire he's trying to build, bascially, this is a symbolic day, right? so he takes some kind of victory day and he turns it into a big fight right now against nazis, which is russian propaganda and completely ridiculous, but this is his point — that we need to fight the western world, we need to fight america, we need to fight the jewish population, as lavrov said yesterday that they are fighting also with ukrainians here. so completely, you know, delusional aggressor and completely delusional dictator but, yeah, we are expecting there will be quite tough times here in kyiv and in odesa and in mariupol and in other cities for the 9th may.
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the russians seem to be intensifying their attacks on infrastructure in the last day or so, especially the railways and electricity substations and so on. yes, actually, well, right now we are in kyiv. so even yesterday in kyiv, we had the largest number of sirens and alerts and missiles, you will probably remember that, for the last two weeks and they are intensifying hits on lviv, electrical stations. they are intensifying the oil stations and reserves of our oil, they know we are running out and we expected that and we are trying to get more into the country but with the ports closed it is not easy but we have no other choice than to get ready, to defend ourselves, to defend our lives and our country. yesterday also for the first time they hit the western, western part of ukraine which was never hit before. they did it yesterday. there are no strategic military
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points there at all, so they are just intensifying it in terms of panic and fear for the civil population but we feel no fear any more. we have seen the worst, we have seen bucha, we have seen mariupol and we will do everything necessary to defend ourselves. given all of that and all those attacks, do you still believe ukraine can win this war? you know, yesterday we had a session in the parliament which was just over there in the centre of kyiv and we had a line from borisjohnson who said, i have one message for you, so this is my message which i feel for the past 60 and one message is ukraine will win. we will win for sure because we are fighting for our lives, for our children, for our territory, for our ideals and our freedom, for our choice to make a choice ourselves. i am sure that we are going to win, especially with all the support we are getting from european countries and great britain and the us but the question is, what is the price of that?
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the price is already incredibly high. what we saw in mariupol, what i see every week in bucha, it is horrifying. i will think about it later after the war because right now it is not easy to think about it. it is worth letting you know, tomorrow then brown will be answering your questions on the war in ukraine live from kyiv. ben will have a range of panellists to answering questions on a range of aspects of the conflict. if you have questions you would like him on the panel to answer... you can get in touch on twitter, using the hashtag �*bbc your questions�* — and you can email us on — yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. that is 4.30 tomorrow. the headlines on bbc news... the eu proposes a ban on russian oil imports.
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the plan — which has to be approved by member states — also includes sanctions against individuals, including the head of russia�*s orthodox church. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine — including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. seniorjudges have been hearing challenges to the so—called �*whole—life�* prison sentences of five killers. it includes sarah everard�*s murderer wayne couzens and emma tustin — the stepmother of arthur labinjo—hughes — the six—year—old who died in the west midlands i�*m nowjoined by our home and legal correspondent dominic casciani
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who is at the high court. all of this relates to whether whole life sentences are excessive or appropriate. tell us what has gone on in court?— on in court? quite a complicated business. today _ on in court? quite a complicated business. today we _ on in court? quite a complicated business. today we had - on in court? quite a complicated business. today we had five - on in court? quite a complicated business. today we had five of l on in court? quite a complicated l business. today we had five of the country�*s most seniorjudges are the most seniorjudges in england and wales and it is what amounts to a super appeal. we have a bit of a debate going on about the precise boundaries of whether a whole life order can be are used. it is precisely that, a life term for a murder in specific circumstances where the crime is so serious, that the offender should never be released from jail as a just punishment. no hope of release. there are 64 people in jail at the moment with these terms. today we have been hearing appeals from two of them. one of them is wayne couzens, the murderer of sarah
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everard. we have also been hearing applications from the attorney general to actually impose how live orders on some other murderers who the crown basically says have been treated unduly leniently by trial judges. quite a complicated picture and that is why so manyjudges are involved because what they say at the end of this well defined with howjudges the end of this well defined with how judges a the end of this well defined with howjudges a deal with these cases. let me tell you about wayne couzens�* case. when he was jailed last autumn for the murder of sarah everard, the former police officer was told by the trialjudge who is one of the most seniorjudges in the country, that his crime is so serious because he committed it as a serving police officer, abusing his position as a serving police officer to basically trick her into his car and to take away her to kill her that he warranted a whole life order, effectively because his crime as a police officer had undermined trust, the whole of society�*s trust in the
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police. rememberthe the whole of society�*s trust in the police. remember the public outcry at the time. his counsel told the court today that that whole life order was manifestly unfair because although he should be locked up for decades, he did cross the barfor a whole life order because he showed remorse as a part of his case. there is a bit of debate about that, if he showed remorse but that is the nub of his argument and the critical factor they are being if you have shown some kind of remorse, then a whole life order isn�*t an appropriate punishment because you are potentially on the road to some kind of understanding of your crimes. one of the other interesting cases before the court today was emma tustin. she murdered her partner�*s sam, six—year—old arthur labinjo—hughes. she was jailed for 29 years at coventry crown court. the attorney general wants that sentence lifted. the day in court her barristers basically said at the very least she should have been considered for a whole life order. her team hit back very hard on this,
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saying the crime did not cross the threshold for one of these lifelong, never to be released sentences because of the complicated situation behind her own background, she had mental health illness problems, that she had tried suicide a number of times, she had been a victim of abuse and violence herself down the years and therefore the kind of categories of sadistic and premeditated murder which we had seen another whole life cases didn�*t apply to hers. it is a very complicated picture, as you can see, and that is why there are five judges on it and they will decide where these boundaries are. one thing that is clear, there is no suggestion whole life orders will be abandoned because of this hearing, they can be used in a variety of circumstances of the big question is precisely which circumstances they should be used in.— precisely which circumstances they should be used in. yes, absolutely, dominic, thank— should be used in. yes, absolutely, dominic, thank you. _ should be used in. yes, absolutely, dominic, thank you. so _ should be used in. yes, absolutely, dominic, thank you. so complex i should be used in. yes, absolutely, | dominic, thank you. so complex but thank you for making sense of that for us. it�*s the final day of campaigning ahead of elections across the uk tomorrow.
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people in northern ireland will choose the government at stormont and voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. in england, ballots are being held for 146 councils in major cities including leeds, manchester, birmingham and all 32 london boroughs. there aren�*t many elections in rural areas. there is also a handful of mayoral elections. in scotland, every local authority, 32 in total, is being contested. all of the seats in 22 local councils across wales are up for election. in northern ireland, voters will elect 90 members of the legislative assembly. our political correspondents in england, scotland and wales brought us the latest. most of the votes cast in england tomorrow will be in towns and cities, from parish councils to elected mayors. largely in london, local authorities providing local
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services, from libraries to bin collections, planning and potholes. but they will also provide the best indication for some time of the national political picture. so the conservatives will be braced for the voters�* verdict on their handling of the cost of living crisis for many, the government�*s response to the war in ukraine and partygate saga. sir keir starmer will talk about his plans to tackle household bills but is still facing questions about his own conduct in lockdown. the liberal democrats will be looking to take seats from the conservatives in the south, labour in the north and the greens and others will want to make gains as well. there is plenty at stake. a lot of conservative mps here are waiting for the results of these local elections to decide whether it is time for borisjohnson to go and sir keir starmer is facing a big test too to show that he can lead labour to success.
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once the votes are in and begin to be counted tomorrow night, plenty at westminster will be watching very closely. this is a week of political anniversaries. it�*s 25 years since tony blair came to power at westminster and it�*s 15 years since the snp took charge of scotland�*s devolved administration. what�*s remarkable looking back is how rapidly that political shift occurred in historical terms, how short the gap between those two events was. where does that leave us now? well, labour have faded over time in scotland and this city is an example of that. the snp now run the council here in glasgow, once really the heartland of the labour movement. what is going to happen this time? that of course it�*s up to the voters. they will be choosing councillors, all 1200 or so up for election in 32 councils across the country and in scotland, they will be using a system of proportional representation, not first
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past the post. they will be ranking candidates in order of preference. on the face of it, these elections are about local issues such as schools and bin collections in libraries and so on, but they might also tell us something about the wider political picture. what does the snp vote tell us about the current level of support for independence in scotland? how are the conservatives bearing with the partygate scandal, especially given their leader in scotland at first called for the prime minister to resign and then withdrew that demand? and what about labour, are there any signs of a revivalfor the party? and here that they used to call red clydeside. we might get some answers by friday evening. here in wales, labour has been the dominant force in welsh politics for the last century but in the last local elections here in 2017, its grip weakened, it lost over 100 council seats and ended up with overall control of only seven of the 22 local authorities.
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plaid cymru and the conservatives took one council each, but large swathes of the welsh political map were a big grey area, representing all the little coalitions and the real significant role of independent candidates here in wales. take a look for example on friday at what happens to this area, the vale of glamorgan, could it turn from grey into a primary colour? this place has been taken by both labour and the conservatives before. and whilst it is also about local issues like planning, schools and council tax bills, the role of national leaders might really come into play, whether it�*s how people think mark drakeford, the welsh labour first minister performed in the pandemic or what they make of the prime minister boris johnson�*s role in the pandemic and partygate. one other factor in wales is 16 and 17—year—olds get the vote, counting won�*t begin until friday morning here, and we should start to get some early results on friday afternoon.
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the view there from england, scotland and wales. the election results for the stormont assembly in northern ireland could trigger months of uncertainty and negotiations over who leads the executive. our correspondent chris page brought us the latest. you might be forgiven for thinking that politics in this part of the uk tends to be very predictable but in this election, there is a significant possibility of a huge shift. for the last five elections to the devolved assembly here at stormont, the democratic unionists have won the most seats and sinn fein has come second. however, polls are suggesting that there could be a surge in support for the cross community alliance party and that sinn fein could emerge as the largest party. that would put the party�*s vice president michelle o�*neill in line to become the first ever irish nationalist to hold the first minister�*s position in northern ireland. now aside from the battle as to who comes out on top,
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the other issues prominent in this campaign have included the rising cost of living and the health service. northern ireland presently has the longest hospital waiting times in the uk by far. but there�*s serious doubt as to whether a devolved government will be formed at all after this election. under the power—sharing system, both the biggest unionist and the biggest nationalist party have to agree to go into coalition and the dup leader sirjeffrey donaldson has said his party will be staying out of government unless the brexit trade border with england, scotland and wales is scrapped. whenever it comes to the overall picture, while there is no doubt a shift towards sinn fein and away from unionism would be a significant moment for northern ireland. however, the offices of first and deputy first minister are legally equal so other party say it doesn�*t matter who wins this election. in any case, this ballot will be critical for the very future of devolution in northern ireland and also given the importance of that brexit issue,
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it will potentially have big implications for the relationship between the uk and the eu. that was chris page at stormont. the american comedian dave chappelle has been attacked during a performance at the hollywood bowl in los angeles. videos shared on social media showed someone running into chappelle. in other clips, the comic seemed to be unharmed after returning to the stage at the netflix is ajoke festival. chappelle faced criticism and protests last year when a programme he made for the streaming service was accused of being transphobic. jonathan goodwin, a man who was on britian�*s got talent in 2019 has been left paralysed — after a stunt went wrong. mr goodwin�*s fiancee says he was taking part in a tv show in america when it happened. the stunt involved him trying to escape from a straightjacket while hanging upside down in between two cars. all the latest headlines coming up
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for your next. but now let�*s check what the weather is doing, susan has all the details. hello, some pretty heavy thunderstorms taking a while to clear the eastern side of the uk. through the remainder of the day, they will be rattling around, gradually pushing out towards the north sea. certainly for the evening rush hour comes in quite wet weather and in the south—east and east anglia into the north—east of england. you can see by the small hours of thursday, things much quieter in england and wales and high pressure starts to take hold. could see a few early—morning patches of mist and fog first thing thursday. to the north—west, seven—week weather fronts trying to push in. more cloud around the scotland and northern ireland, there could be some rain for a time as well foster between the high pressure in the south and the low to the north, a south—westerly airstream picks us up so much warmer airstream picks us up so much warmer air than we have had earlier in the week and lifts our temperatures for all of thursday. across england and wales, some sunshine and highs of 20 or 21. scotland and northern
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ireland, despite more cloud, still looking at temperatures in the high teens for many. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the eu proposes a ban on russian oil imports. the plan, which has to be approved by member states, also includes sanctions against individuals, including the head of russia�*s orthodox church. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine, including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. and after some people were evacauted from the besieged city of mariupol, there�*ll be more attempts today to help desperate civilians leave. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. and a memorial is to be unveiled to honour hms sheffield,
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hit by an argentine missile during the falklands war 40 years ago. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we start with reports that sirjim ratcliffe has had his offer to buy chelsea rejected. the businessman tabled an offer of £4.25 billion for the club. the billionaire is the majority shareholder of the chemical company ineos. their director tom crotty has reportedly told bloomberg the offer was rejected out of hand. a consortium led by la dodgers owner todd boehly is thought to be the preferred bidder. chelsea are operating under a special licence from the uk government, which expires at the end of the month. manchester city are looking to reach a second successive champions league final, against an english club. they�*re in spain to face real madrid in the semi—finals tonight.
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they have a 4—3 advantage from a dramatic first leg — knowing liverpool await the winner in the final. city have never won the champions league, it�*s the one piece of silverware that�*s so far evaded pep guardiola at the club, although they came close last season, losing to chelsea in the final. kevin de bruyne says it�*s an opportunity for the club to change the way it�*s perceived. it would change the perspective from our side. it would change the perspective from ourside. i don�*t it would change the perspective from our side. i don�*t think, obviously, as a player, you want to win the trophies and you want to win this one but in the fact that we have been fighting for it in numerous years means that we have been doing really well. obviously, it is a competition and the quality is very high, so it is very difficult to it�*s seven years, we did really well, but obviously, we did not win it. thousands of city fans have made the journey to the spainish capital.
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these supporters are optimistic they can make it to the final in paris. ijust hope for a 0—0 draw and a really— ijust hope for a 0—0 draw and a really boring match but obviously it is not _ really boring match but obviously it is not going to be that and i expect loads— is not going to be that and i expect loads of— is not going to be that and i expect loads of goals. is not going to be that and i expect loads of goals-— is not going to be that and i expect loads of goals. every game, you have 'ust not to loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win. _ loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and _ loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and it _ loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and it is _ loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and it is so _ loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and it is so hard. - just got to win, and it is so hard. we are city fans. nerves, we are used to it. we are city fans. nerves, we are used to it-_ we are city fans. nerves, we are used to it. ~ . , , ., ., ., used to it. we really should have a two-coal used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion _ used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion by _ used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion by now - used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion by now but - used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion by now but that. used to it. we really should have a| two-goal cushion by now but that is two—goal cushion by now but that is not the _ two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city— two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way _ two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we _ two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we like _ two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we like to - two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we like to make i two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we like to make it hard for _ not the city way. we like to make it hard for ourselves. _ not the city way. we like to make it hard for ourselves. i— not the city way. we like to make it hard for ourselves.— hard for ourselves. i think if we can -la hard for ourselves. i think if we can play the — hard for ourselves. i think if we can play the same _ hard for ourselves. i think if we can play the same way - hard for ourselves. i think if we can play the same way tonight | hard for ourselves. i think if we i can play the same way tonight as hard for ourselves. i think if we - can play the same way tonight as we did last week, we will have them. liverpool remain on course for an historic quadruple after winning their semifinal with villarreal 5—2 on aggregate. bossjurgen klopp says his side are ready to try and make history. it's it�*s really difficult to reach three finals and that�*s probably the reason why nobody has done it so far but we made that happen, and when
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the specific finals show up in our schedule, we will make sure that we are ready for it. dan evans hasjoined andy murray in the third round of the madrid open tennis. but the brit was pushed all the way by home favourite roberto bautista agut. evans took the first set of a match which lasted almost 3 hours, but the spaniard forced a decider. evans coming through in a final set tie breaker. he�*ll face andrey rublev next. rublev saw off another britjack draper in round 2. cam norrie is also looking to progress to the last 16. he�*s in action right now against big serving americanjohn isner. norrie took the first set but isner has just forced a decider. andy murray is set to renew his rivalry with novak djokovic. the two will meet in madrid, for the first time in 5 years. that�*s after murray beat denis shapovalov in three sets in the second round.
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lee westwood says he and "many others" have asked to be released from the pga and european tours to play in greg norman�*s saudi—funded golf invitational series next month. englishman richard bland has also requested to be released for the event in hertfordshire injune. westwood says, "if anyone comes along and gives any of us a chance at a pay rise, then you have to seriously consider it." six time major winner phil mickelson was one of the first high—profile players to seek a release from the pga tour last month. that�*s all the sport for now. paul, thank you very much. we will see you a little later. let�*s return now to our top story and the eu�*s proposals for new sanctions on russia including a total ban on russian oil imports by the end of the year. the plans, which need member states�* approval, also include sanctions on individuals, including those suspected of war crimes. i spoke to dr hilary ingham, senior lecturer in economics
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at lancaster university who told me this is not going to be an instantaneous imposition of sanctions. it�*s going to be a very difficult decision. you know, if you take a country like germany, it has been highly dependent on russia, and even within that country, there has been concerns raised about this previously. and then, if you look at another two member states, hungary and slovakia, these are landlocked countries, so shipping things like liquid or gas is very difficult. they are likely to be given a longer period to move away from the dependency on russia, possibly until the end of 2023, so although these sanctions have been introduced today, as was said earlier in your programme, even taking some of the crude oil out of the equation, that is going to take six months, and for refined oil, it is going to take a period of 12 months, so it isn�*t an instantaneous position of sanctions,
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it is a move to less dependency on russia, ie taking away completely but not until the end of the year. yes, and that phased out approach means that all the while, there will be money adding to the kremlin from countries that are buying oilfrom russia. i�*m looking at the latest figures, suggesting about $50 billion worth of revenue has flown into russia, as countries have continued to buy that oil, so you might say that all of the overt sanctions that have been imposed on the country are meaningless if we are still sending $50 billion to russia to pay for oil. i mean, this is the real irony and i don�*t think the majority of your viewers will have been aware of that, because on the one hand, the eu is quite rightly giving a lot of support to ukraine, and indeed, it is helping members states, where a lot of ukrainians are fleeing for short—term safety, but at the same time, we are actually paying russia money,
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so to an extent, we are helping to fund this effort of invasion of this country. i haven�*t used the term war because russia would deny that it is a war but we are funding the operations that are going on there. we have also heard from president putin�*s spokesman today, saying the cost of these sanctions to citizens of europe will grow by the day. that is the interesting point in all of this, isn�*t it, it�*s not a one—way street? we know that sanctions, trade wars hurt both sides and you might say that we are feeling it in europe through the soaring cost of energy, particularly oil prices and gas prices that are rising as a result. yes, we are already being hit in the uk and indeed further afield in europe by these absolutely horrendous hikes in energy prices, and obviously, these sanctions are going to make things worse. we can turn to america to import liquefied natural gas that is a long way away.
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it is going to be expensive to transport it here, and if you look to germany, it doesn�*t even have a terminal that can take that product. and then, we can look to the middle east and nigeria, but these are likely to be higher cost sources of supply, simply because of the geographics concern. so, i think further down the line, consumers, firms, everybody is going to be looking to paying higher energy prices yet again, unless they can be some resolution or peace restored in the region, but currently, at this point in time, that isn�*t looking likely in the short term. yes, and from an economic point of view, i wonder what this means for the wider economic picture, given that oil prices are such a huge part of that inflation increase that we have seen lately. that has huge repercussions on so many different parts of the economy and they don�*t even want to get to the point of talking about the recession brought
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on by the soaring inflation. well, we are having soaring inflation. post—covid, we did expect it because of pent—up demand better monetary authorities like the ecb and the bank of england, they were convinced it was transitory and we would see it dissipating, but that isn�*t the case. it is picking up pace and we are now predicting that we are going to be having figures of around 9%. very high interest rates are going to discourage firms investment because, obviously, if you have got high cost finance, you need to be more profitable in terms of your projects to repay and still make a profit, and individuals on mortgages will have got a variable rate, those costs are going to go up, so wherever you look really, you just see increasing cost and inflation at levels that nobody predicted a few months ago.
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a bbc news investigation into the government�*s homes for ukraine scheme has found that some would—be hosts with a reported history of violence are trying to exploit the system. our correspondent, angus crawford explains. welcome at the heart of the story, and the problem is the informal way, in which sponsors are being matched with hosts. with refugees. anyone can register an interest to be a host, as long as they have a series of checks, including criminal record checks, but after that, this is where the problem seems to begin, it is left up to potential hosts and refugees to find each other, so a huge amount of people have gone to unregulated facebook groups, set up with the best possible regulations. we have found some men who are clearly unacceptable. in one case, we found one man with a criminal record and another man with a
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history of domestic abuse trying to contact young women. we were also told that in some areas of the country, to 30% of those wanting to be hosts were men over 40 expressing an interest in hosting women in their 20s and 30s, an obvious red flag, and we had a lot of report about substandard housing. one house that a volunteer described does not fit for rehoming a dog. another, bizarrely enough, full of nazi memorabilia. and the final one, where a refugee family were on a mattress on the floor. 50. where a refugee family were on a mattress on the floor.— where a refugee family were on a mattress on the floor. so, i suppose the system — mattress on the floor. so, i suppose the system set _ mattress on the floor. so, i suppose the system set up — mattress on the floor. so, i suppose the system set up very _ mattress on the floor. so, i suppose the system set up very quickly - mattress on the floor. so, i suppose the system set up very quickly to i the system set up very quickly to try to respond to that crisis but whatever government said about checks and here?— checks and here? festival, they disute checks and here? festival, they dispute that _ checks and here? festival, they dispute that 3096 _ checks and here? festival, they dispute that 3096 figure. - checks and here? festival, they dispute that 3096 figure. they i checks and here? festival, they - dispute that 3096 figure. they think dispute that 30% figure. they think that they don�*t recognise that. they say that thousands of posts and refugees have had a perfectly good matches and it is working well for them and they do reject this criticism. effectively, what they say is any attempt to exploit people
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is in their words despicable, and in a statement, the government said to me the homes for ukraine schemes has safeguards in place including home office security and background checks of all sponsors. the governor of the us state of oklahoma, has signed a law which bans abortion after 6 weeks of pregnancy. the move came hours after a leaked document suggested that an historic law which legalised abortion in the united states, could be overturned. abortion has been a legal right across the us for almost 50 years under the roe vs wade decision. our north america correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. abortion is violent! it�*s a decision that many pro—choice campaigners had feared. and whilst it�*s not the final decision, people have been having their say, including vice president kamala harris. those republican leaders who are trying to weaponise the use of the law against women, well, we say, how dare they? how dare they tell a woman what she can do and cannot do with her own body?
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applause. how dare they? how dare they try to stop her from determining her own future? how dare they try to deny women their rights and their freedoms? this is all happening because the supreme court of nine justices, who serve life terms, have been asked to rule on a law in the state of mississippi. that law directly challenges roe v wade. the bench has a conservative majority, which is in favour of rolling back abortion rights. if the court is successful, nearly half of america could ban abortion. 13 states have so—called trigger laws. another 13 would automatically ban, or severely limit, access. 36 million women of reproductive age would live in places without abortion services. following the leak of the draft, there have been many protests
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in states like florida, where a restrictive law has already been signed which will ban abortion at 15 weeks. but pro—choice campaigners are worried that if roe v wade is overturned, states like these will ban abortion outright. we need to make sure that people are aware that abortion remains legal. people can still access abortion care, and this fight is not over. you can stay at school and have a baby. you can have a job and have a baby. as an adult woman, when birth control failed me, my husband| and i made the choice i to have a legal abortion. and i'm horrified about that decision would be strippedl away from my grandsons and granddaughters. - polls consistently suggest most americans want to keep roe v wade in place. but it�*s not what everyone wants. i'm pro—life. and i've made that very clear from the moment i announced my candidacy. and i believe that what we found during the campaign,
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and even through today, is that there is a lot of common ground on this topic. we want fewer abortions in virginia, not more. it is very rare that rulings made by the supreme court are made public ahead of time, and draft opinions can change. the court will release its final decision over the summer. women�*s rights lawyer gloria allred worked with norma mccorvey, otherwise known as jane roe, in the 1973 court case: roe versus wade. she told me about her experiences back then. i actually met jane roe, norma mccorvey, at a pro—choice demonstration after roe v wade became the law of the land. we worked together and she had her voice heard. i helped her to have her voice heard for many years. then, ultimately, she became anti—choice, but as a deathbed confession, she confessed that she essentially only did that for the money, became anti—choice.
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she was always pro—choice. as for me, i have clearly been pro—choice for many years because of my own life experience. when i was in my 20s, i went to mexico on a vacation. i was raped at gunpoint by a doctor. i came back to california and this was in the 60s. it was unlawful, it was a crime for a woman to have an abortion at that time in california. it wasn�*t a crime for the woman but it was a crime for the doctor or nurse or licensed health care professional to provide one, so i had to go to a back alley person, who did it for the money, who then left me in a bathtub haemorrhaging, blood all over me. and, ultimately, i had someone call an ambulance for me and i was taken to a hospital and packed and iced with 160 degrees fever and almost died and that is where a nurse said to me, i hope this teaches you a lesson, because she was obviously anti—choice.
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and i did learn a lesson but the lesson i learnt was that abortion should be safe and legal, affordable and available, and never illegal because that is what endangers women�*s life, so that is why i have been fighting this fight for roe v wade for so many years and i will continue to do so. i will speak next week, i am a featured speaker at a big rally that is part of a national rally all over the country on the 14th of may and i will be speaking in support of roe v wade because this has to end. complaints about university courses from students in england and wales reached a record high last year. more than a third of the nearly 2,800 complaints to the office of the independent adjudicator were related to the pandemic. the largest category were complaints about how courses were delivered, with students unable to access facilities like laboratories, or pursue studies abroad.
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the family of a nine—month old baby boy who died after choking at nursery school have launched a petition against plans to change the adult—to—child ratio in early—years childcare. oliver steeper�*s parents say proposals to reduce childcare costs would put lives at risk. josie hannett reports. look at you, sat in your chair, mr oliver. oliver steeper was nine months old when he choked at a nursery and died five days later. he wasjust perfect and crazy head and... his parents have launched a petition in response to the prime minister�*s suggestion to his cabinet to relax staff—to—child ratios in early year settings like nurseries, making it cheaper for parents to tackle the cost of living crisis. after losing oliver in a childcare setting, you know, to then reduce the adult—to—child ratios
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was just disgusting. you know, how can they put the safety of children over helping the economy? i can�*t get my head around it, it�*s just terrible. it's notjust the safety aspect either. i was thinking of the fact that you pay this money for your kids to go to nursery or a childminder and you want them to have a decent time, while they are there and a quality of care when they are there as well with learning different things and stuff like that and i'm just kind of thinking how could that work if the kids that the adults are looking after, there are more of them? the government says they are clear that supporting families with access to childcare and early education is a priority and they are looking at ways to improve the cost, choice and availability of childcare places. thejelly beans nursery, where the incident happened, had its licence immediately suspended by ofsted, following what they said were serious safeguarding concerns.
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within a few weeks, the nursery voluntarily closed itself down. meanwhile, the police investigation into oliver�*s death is ongoing. 40 years ago today, during the falklands war, an argentinian jet launched a missile at the royal navy destroyer hms sheffield. the results were devastating: 20 crewmen died and the ship was fatally damaged. it was the first british warship to sink in enemy action since the second world war. today a memorial in honour of those who served on the ship has been unveiled at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. it was a moment the realities of the falklands war struck home. the first of four british ships to be sunk in 1982. 20 lives were lost and many more were wounded. argentine newspapers described
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the super etendardit as the avenger of the belgrano. the attack on hms sheffield as a devastating blow to the enemy. today the survivors had a chance to remember theirfriends who did not make it. dave harrington was a stoker and in the engine room when the missile struck. there was a thump, that is all i can describe it as, and two seconds later a fireball totally covered me. and one of my nightmares regularly now is that i can still see myself with my hands up to my face screaming and seeing my reflection in the flames. it was quite harrowing, shall we say. and you still have nightmares about that? oh, god, yeah. regularly. this will stand as a tribute to those who died, made of sheffield steel, it is called the shiny sheff and was unveiled at the service today. of course, it is a memorial, there are people whose partners
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or parents died that day in may 1982, but it�*s also a reunion, as many of these people have not seen each other for 40 years and so it is a chance for them to get back together once again. dave harrington suffered 20% burns. he was also diagnosed 17 years later from ptsd. so normally, he spends the anniversary of his own. i�*ve met a few people so far from the sheffield and it is very emotional. i brought my handkerchief just in case. and of course looking at these names... it is heartbreaking. to think of all those ones we lost. it is very emotional, that is the only way i can put it. it was the first british ship lost in action since the second world war. it is a day old comrades will never forget.
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every day for the past 12 months, at sunrise and sunset, different people have watched over the city of hull from a glass pod eight storeys above the ground. it was for an unusual art project called hull vigil, which came to an end yesterday. crispin rolfe has been speaking to some of those taking part. i can�*t believe it�*s a whole year since i was standing here doing the first vigil. hull is the perfect place. interesting. eye opening. yeah. so many ranges of emotions, so many thoughts going through your head, - all at one space of time, really. the 730 places for the vigil went in four hours. but i'll miss it. for a year now, at both sunset and sunrise, for the lucky few, it�*s just been a case of you and the view. but all things come to an end.
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obviously, you walk up this ramp and it�*s like someone�*s given you the key to the city. like, you look after the city for an hour. you seem to be the highest person up. a really beautiful working public space leaves a trace. so, yes, there's the vigils that took part. there's the companions that manage them. and then there's a trace of it. if you saw this shelter from east or west hull, when you walk past this building from two weeks from now, it won't be here anymore. and you'll remember that thing that was on the roof. so i think the legacy is notjust in the people that directly took part, i think it's also in the people that walk past. so the end then of a project, which has seen hundreds of people come and stand in this box, in this tiny container, and gaze out over the city of hull. unless you�*ve done it, it�*s difficult to imagine what it would be like. but it is very close, it is very high and it is,
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in a way, full of emotion. we�*ve had asylum seekers and refugees in the vigil and their comments have been really moving. you know, you�*ve got people who are hoping for a new life and those who are wishing for their old life. that�*s what�*s touched me the most, really. but hull�*s 365—day vigil is now over. it�*s seen pandemics, empty streets and new normals. and yet, with those who�*ve taken part all writing down their thoughts, it will have marked the dawn and dusk of people�*s lives. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with susan. hello. we�*ve got some intense downpours set to affect the eastern side of the uk in the hours ahead. on into the evening, we will start to see them thinning out and eventually clearing. but some of the showers are going to be accompanied
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by lightning, hail, thunder, squally winds. here we are at 6pm, the evening rush, if you like. i think perhaps some of the worst of them by then will be away from the south east of scotland. but it looks like there could be some lively weather crossing the north east of england, clearing the east midlands, but running through into east anglia and the south east of england. and then they continue their journey eastwards as we finish off wednesday. they should almost be gone, i think, into the earliest hours of thursday. then it becomes much quieter across england and wales. light winds, we could even see a few patches of mist or fog forming here or there. to the northwest, our next set of weather fronts, though, tries to squeeze its way towards scotland and northern ireland. it�*s bumping up to a pretty big area of high pressure, though, which is trying to establish further south. between the two, a south—westerly airstream bringing much milderair than we�*ve had earlier in the week in from further south in the atlantic. so all areas experiencing a warmer day on thursday. england and wales, dry, with bright or sunny spells. northern ireland, some
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patchy rain for a time. scotland, always a bit more cloud, the fronts around here and some rain, particularly in the west and that will keep things a little cooler. just 15 in glasgow, but 16 for aberdeen. further south, we could be looking at highs of 19 to 21. and with the fine weather and the sunshine across england and wales, we�*re anticipating high pollen levels. it�*s tree pollen at this point in the season. thursday into friday, the high kind of sinks a little bit south. it looks like we�*ll see a rather more potent weather front sliding its way south across the uk for the end of the week. the rain clearing scotland and northern ireland through the day, the sun will come out. there could be a few showers in the west. it willjust feel perhaps a little fresher through the afternoon, but we could still get up to 17 degrees in the best of any sunshine in aberdeen. further south, we�*re still looking at around the 20 mark, always cooler where we have the rain. front�*s off, though, to the continent for the weekend. high pressure back centering up across the uk for much of the weekend. the story is looking like a pretty dry one. there may be some rain coming into the northwest later
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on on sunday, but it�*s also looking pretty warm as well. this is bbc news. i�*m ben thompson. the headlines at 4pm: the west steps up pressure on president putin over the war in ukraine, with an eu plan to ban all imports of russian oil by the end of this year. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine — including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. a memorial is to be unveiled to honour hms sheffield, hit by an argentine missile during the falklands war 40 years ago. after liverpool reach the champions league final, all eyes are on man city tonight
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to see if they can make it too. and a shirt worn by diego maradona when he scored the iconic hand of god goal is expected to fetch millions of pounds when it goes under the hammer within the next half hour. hello hello to you and welcome to bbc news. the government�*s introducing fresh sanctions against russia as part of the international pressure on president putin as he intensifies his military offensive in ukraine. bulgaria, slovakia and the czech republic have called for exemptions. the proposal was announced by the european commission this morning as part of its latest round of sanctions on moscow in retaliation
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for the war in ukraine. the british government is also introducing fresh sanctions. we can cross live to ukraine and our correspondent there, ben brown. hello and welcome from the ukrainian capital kyiv and we are hearing this hour that russian forces are trying to storm the steelworks in mariupol where some 2000 ukrainian fighters and troops have been holding out in and troops have been holding out in a desperate last stand in that steelworks. they are in the bunkers and the tunnels of that steelworks and the tunnels of that steelworks and have been there for weeks and weeks, since the beginning of this war with standing russian bombardments. trapped in that russian steel works alongside them are an estimated 200 civilians, including some 30 children. according to the mayor of mariupol speaking on ukrainian television, the russians are now using artillery, jets, tanks and warships
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to carry out a final storming of the azovstal steel plant. the russians by the way are denying they are storming the plant. meanwhile, russian forces have carried out strikes, missile strikes on many infrastructure targets here in ukraine, including in the western city of lviv. this report now from lviv. for a city that has often felt a long way from the war, last night was a rude awakening. at least three electrical substations around lviv were hit by russian missiles. much of the city was left without power. water supplies were also disrupted. i don�*t know where is the next target for russian missiles. today in lviv, it is a huge hub for refugees and every day lviv hosts new wounded. today in lviv hospital, we had to gather more than 1000 wounded. it was not actually the city centre that was hit, but this place,
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a rather anonymous industrial park on the outskirts and it is because of that — an electrical substation. the russians say that six of them were hit in total across the country. they�*re trying to disable the rail network and the reason they want to do that is because that will stop the flow of weapons from the west to the east. andre found a part of a missile lodged in his shed. russia says it launched cruise missiles yesterday from a submarine in the black sea and it has warned nato that if shipments of weapons continue, they will be targeted as well. the port city of mariupol has witnessed some of the most brutal fighting of the invasion. in the last few hours, the mayor said a new convoy of evacuees is leaving the city. they are following a group freed over the weekend from the massive azovstal steelworks, the last point of ukrainian resistance. yesterday, their convoy arrived in the relative safety of the ukrainian
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city of zaporizhzhia. this is what weeks of living in the dark, short of food and water and under constant bombardment will do to a person. even the journey to safety was an ordeal. translation: you enter a tent, take off your clothes, _ they check your documents. they kept saying that all was well and they would rebuild and reconstruct mariupol — there is no more mariupol. but russian preparations are already under way for the annual victory parade on the 9th of may. with many predicting president putin needs to give people something to celebrate, the window to negotiations could be closing. joe inwood with that report from lviv. i am join now by an adviser to the ukrainian president, volodymyr zelensky. thank you very much for being with us. i wonder if you could tell us what you know of the
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situation with the azovstal steelworks in mariupol and that information that it is being stormed by russian forces at the moment. thank you for bringing me in. that is right, that is what we can confirm. there is heavy and vicious fighting going on right now. we don�*t have much contact with our troops at this moment because the situation unfolds as we speak. but there is heavy fighting going on and obviously not a good situation. does it look to you _ obviously not a good situation. does it look to you like _ obviously not a good situation. does it look to you like this _ obviously not a good situation. does it look to you like this is _ obviously not a good situation. does it look to you like this is a final attempt by the russians to storm that steelworks, to get, you know, to finish off those ukrainian fighters who are in there, some 2000 fighters? that is essentially the last resistance, isn�*t it, in the city of mariupol? last resistance, isn't it, in the city of mariupol?— last resistance, isn't it, in the city of mariupol? you are quite riaht, city of mariupol? you are quite right. that _ city of mariupol? you are quite right. that is — city of mariupol? you are quite right, that is probably - city of mariupol? you are quite right, that is probably what - city of mariupol? you are quite l right, that is probably what they intend to do, to annihilate the rest of our troops and against the civilian population we still have
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there. we have been waiting for some people to get out and now they probably calculated this would be the right moment to take the steel plant by storm. we don�*t know exactly what their plans are but we know how they have treated our people in other places where they managed to establish their occupation. so there is nothing good that probably awaits our civilians and our troops in case they are successful in taking control of this steel plant. successful in taking control of this steel plant-— successful in taking control of this steel lant. �* , ., , .,~ steel plant. and it is heartbreaking because there _ steel plant. and it is heartbreaking because there are _ steel plant. and it is heartbreaking because there are at _ steel plant. and it is heartbreaking because there are at least - steel plant. and it is heartbreaking because there are at least a - steel plant. and it is heartbreakingj because there are at least a couple of hundred civilians inside azovstal. including 30 children, who are there in those bunkers and tunnels beneath the steelworks. that is cuite tunnels beneath the steelworks. that is quite right- — tunnels beneath the steelworks. that is quite right- it _ tunnels beneath the steelworks. that is quite right. it is _ tunnels beneath the steelworks. trust is quite right. it is notjust military personnel but also civilians. not everybody has been evacuated and the russians just decide to take it by storm nonetheless.— decide to take it by storm nonetheless. ~ . ., ,., nonetheless. we have had some re orts nonetheless. we have had some reports that _ nonetheless. we have had some reports that the _ nonetheless. we have had some
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reports that the russians - nonetheless. we have had some reports that the russians want l nonetheless. we have had some| reports that the russians want to stage some sort of victory parade in mariupol on the 9th of may which is when they mark their victory over, the soviet victory over nazi germany. is that you are understanding, that you have heard those reports that that is something they might try to do? that those reports that that is something they might try to do?— they might try to do? that might be true, we they might try to do? that might be true. we have _ they might try to do? that might be true, we have heard _ they might try to do? that might be true, we have heard these - they might try to do? that might be true, we have heard these reports. | true, we have heard these reports. we have also heard reports they are preparing to escalate the war further, to declare a state of war finally and officially on may the 9th, to basically bring in more troops and organising full—scale mobilisation of their population to increase the pace of their offensive. so far, they have stormed, as we can see for the last few weeks and days they haven�*t been advancing, almost not at all in the east and now they are probably trying to bring renewed energy to that offensive and take more territory yet again. and we have seen these attacks on
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ukrainian infrastructure. we have had them before, of course, but they seem to have been a lot last night, in particular in lviv. do you think they are trying to bring this country to a standstill almost, hitting electricity substations, cutting off power, hitting petrol stations and roads and so on? that is riaht, stations and roads and so on? that is right. they _ stations and roads and so on? that is right, they are _ stations and roads and so on? tryst is right, they are trying to upset our logistics through any means possible they have. they are also trying to disrupt supplies of new weaponry coming in from the west. they know exactly what they are doing and they are also hitting the civilian population as before, trying to destabilise the country from within as much as possible and obviously bring horror and hardship to our civilian population. so that is all the type of objectives they are pursuing. how do you see this war going now? we are into the third month. you are getting supplies of weapons from the west. do you honestly believe this is a war you can ultimately win?
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i think in the long run, there is no question we will be victorious. the question we will be victorious. the question is how much more suffering there will be in the short to medium run and how much it would take to bring this to an end? i can�*t tell you exactly what is going on what is going to happen but i am sure this regime is not going tojust going to happen but i am sure this regime is not going to just step back and withdraw their troops. this is not the type of regime we are dealing with. they will officially go until the end or try to go until the end and as we will be getting new weapons, perhaps that will push them back more. so they will try to escalate further but they are going to be trying to escalate this war within ukraine, that is important to understand, so that the west doesn�*t fall for all these non—credible threats about potential attacks on nato. i don�*t think that is credible at all. but i do think they will try to escalate this within ukraine. we are very grateful to you for your time, i know you are extremely busy, presidential adviser here in ukraine, thank you very much indeed for being with us on bbc news.
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international pressure on russia is increasing. the european union is asking member states to approve a complete ban on imports of russian oil by the end of this year. the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, said it won�*t be easy but it will be donein said it won�*t be easy but it will be done in what she called an orderly fashion, so eu member states can find alternative energy supplies. today, we will propose to ban all russian oil from today, we will propose to ban all russian oilfrom europe. this will be... russian oil from europe. this will be... r r ,, be... applause this be. . . applause this will - be. . . applause this will be - be. . . applause this will be a i be... applause - this will be a complete be... applause _ this will be a complete import ban on all russian oil, seaborne and pipeline, crude and refined. so, as we have heard, european member states being asked to approve a complete ban on imports of russian oil and we werejust a complete ban on imports of russian oil and we were just hearing from
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ursula von der leyen, the president of the european commission. we are just getting some reaction now from the ukrainian foreign minister about countries that are trying to block that embargo on imports. the foreign minister says if there is any country in europe who will continue to oppose the embargo on russian oil, there will be good reason to say this country is complicit in the crimes committed by russia in the territory of ukraine. we know that hungary and slovakia are opposed to that than on russian oil because they are very heavily dependent on russian oil. in fact, there has been talk they might veto those proposals unless they get an exemption from the oil ban. i am joy now from brussels by our corresponding bethany bell. how much unity is there in the european union or disunity if you like about this proposed ban on russian oil? well, countries have been sent the
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proposals, they are going through them, combing through the detail to see what and what they... what they can accept and what they can�*t accept. we have heard from hungary over the last couple of hours or so. it's over the last couple of hours or so. it�*s foreign minister said that his country can�*t accept the proposals in their current form. he said they would simply destroy the hungarian economy. he said it wasn�*t a question of political will, it was simply a geographical and economic all reality for us that we have also heard doubts from countries like the czech republic and from slovakia. slovakia said that it was in principle in favour of an oil ban but it said it needed more time in order to be able to find alternative sources of oil. notably, though, from germany, which had been quite doubtful about this, it now says that it can be ready to implement
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this oil embargo by the end of the year, as foreseen in the commission�*s proposals, but its economy minister warned the prices may rise and that he couldn�*t guarantee that there might not be interruptions in oil supply. and it is obviously going to be very difficult for eu member states but what about gas? we have talked about oil, what will the eu do about imports of russian gas? est oil, what will the eu do about imports of russian gas? at the moment. _ imports of russian gas? at the moment. the _ imports of russian gas? at the moment, the discussions - imports of russian gas? at the moment, the discussions are l imports of russian gas? at the l moment, the discussions are all about oil. they don�*t even know if they can implement this proposed oil embargo yet. gas is much more complicated. the eu is extremely dependent on russian gas and, you know, that is countries like germany, hungary, countries like austria, which gets 80% of its gas from russia. so that is a whole discussion which will have to come another day. for now, the question
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is whether this six package of sanctions the eu is proposing can be agreed over the next few days. if they are to agree an oil embargo, it would be seen as the toughest package of sanctions so far. all right, bethany, thank you very much indeed. in fact, we arejust hearing presidentjoe biden of the united states will be talking this week to g7 leaders about potential more international moves to put more pressure on russia, more moves and more sanctions, presumably, on russia, to put more pressure on vladimir putin. that is the very latest from here in kyiv, back to you in the studio in london. thank you very much, we will be back live in ukrainejust a little thank you very much, we will be back live in ukraine just a little later. and just to let you know that tomorrow ben brown will be answering your questions on the war
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in ukraine, lvie from kyiv. ben will have a range of panellists to answering questions on a range of aspects of the conflict. you can get in touch on twitter, using the hashtag �*bbc your questions�* — and you can email us on — yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. the headlines on bbc news... the west steps up pressure on president putin over the war in ukraine, with an eu plan to ban all imports of russian oil by the end of this year. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine — including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. elsewhere, political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. seniorjudges have been hearing challenges to prison sentences of five killers.
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it includes sarah everard�*s murderer wayne couzens, who is appealing his whole—life term sentence. it�*s a punishment that means he would never leave jail. lawyers are also looking to give a whole life term sentence to emma tustin, the stepmother of arthur labinjo—hughes — the six year—old who died after being abused at the family home in the west midlands. our home and legal correspondent, dominic casciani, is at the high court and describes today�*s hearing as a �*super appeal�*. what we�*ve got is a bit of a debate going on about the precise boundaries of when a whole—life order can be used. now, a whole—life order is precisely that — it is a life term for a murder, in specific circumstances where the crime is so serious, the circumstances behind it, that the offender should never be released from jail as a just punishment. so effectively has a factor of retribution there and no hope of release. now there are 64 people in jail
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at the moment with these terms. today we have been hearing appeals from two of them. one of them is wayne couzens, the murderer of sarah everard. but we�*ve also been hearing applications from the attorney general to actually impose whole—life orders on some other murderers who the crown basically says have been treated unduly leniently by trialjudges. so it�*s quite a complicated picture and that�*s why so manyjudges are involved because what they say at the end of this will basically define how sentencing judges will deal with these kind of exceptional cases in years to come. let me tell you a little bit about wayne couzens�* case. now when he was jailed last autumn, for sarah everard�*s murder, the former police officer was told by the trialjudge, who�*s one of the most senior judges in the country, that his crime was so serious because he�*d committed it as a serving police officer, abusing his position as a serving police officer to basically trick her into his car and to take away her to kill her that he warranted a whole—life order.
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effectively because his crime as a police officer had undermined trust, the whole of society�*s trust in the police. remember the public outcry at the time. now his counsel told the court today that that whole—life order was manifestly unfair because although he should be locked up for decades, he didn�*t cross the bar for a whole—life order because he�*d actually showed remorse as a part of this case. there is a bit of debate about that, if he did actually show remorse but that�*s effectively the nub of his argument and the critical factor there being that if you�*ve shown some kind of remorse, then the whole—life order isn�*t an appropriate punishment because you are potentially on the road to some kind of understanding of your crimes. one of the other interesting cases before the court today was emma tustin. she murdered her partner�*s son, six—year—old arthur labinjo—hughes. she was jailed for 29 years at coventry crown court and the attorney general wants
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that sentence lifted. today in court, her barristers basically said at the very least she should have been considered for a whole—life order. her team hit back very, very hard on this, saying that the crime didn�*t cross the threshold for one of these lifelong, never to be released sentences because of the complicated situation behind her own background. that she had mental health illness problems, that she had tried suicide a number of times, she had been a victim of abuse and violence herself down the years and therefore the kind of categories of sadistic and premeditated murder which we�*ve seen in other whole—life cases didn�*t apply to hers. now it�*s a very complicated picture, as you can see, ben, and that�*s why there�*s five judges on it and they will go away and basically decide exactly where these boundaries are. one thing is clear, there is no suggestion whole—life orders will be abandoned because of this hearing. they�*re clear in law that they can be used in a variety of circumstances. the question is precisely which circumstances they should be used in.
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that from the high court. it�*s the final day of campaigning ahead of elections across the uk tomorrow. people in northern ireland will choose the government at stormont and voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. in england, ballots are being held for 146 councils in major cities including leeds, manchester, birmingham and all 32 london boroughs. there aren�*t many elections in rural areas. there is also a handful of mayoral elections. in scotland, every local authority, 32 in total, is being contested. all of the seats in 22 local councils across wales are up for election. in northern ireland, voters will elect 90 members of the legislative assembly. our political correspondents in england, scotland and wales brought us the latest. most of the votes cast in england tomorrow will be in towns and cities, from parish councils
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to elected mayors. largely in london, local authorities providing local services, from libraries to bin collections, planning and potholes. but they will also provide the best indication for some time of the national political picture. so the conservatives will be braced for the voters�* verdict on their handling of the cost of living crisis for many, the government�*s response to the war in ukraine and the partygate saga. labour�*s leader sir keir starmer will talk about his plans rising household bills but is still facing questions about his own conduct during lockdown. the liberal democrats will be looking to take seats from the conservatives in the south, labour in the north and the greens and others will want to make gains as well. there is plenty at stake. a lot of conservative mps here are waiting for the results of these local elections to decide whether it�*s time for borisjohnson to go and sir keir starmer is facing a big test too to show that he can
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lead labour to success. so once the votes are in and begin to be counted tomorrow night, plenty at westminster will be watching very closely. this is a week of political anniversaries. it�*s 25 years since tony blair came to power at westminster and it�*s 15 years since the snp took charge of scotland�*s devolved administration. what�*s remarkable looking back is how rapidly that political shift occurred in historical terms, how short the gap between those two events was. where does that leave us now? well, labour have faded over time in scotland and this city is an example of that. the snp now run the council here in glasgow, once really the heartland of the labour movement. what is going to happen this time? that of course it�*s up to the voters. they will be choosing councillors, all 1200 or so up for election in 32 councils across the country
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and in scotland, they will be using a system of proportional representation, not first past the post. they will be ranking candidates in order of preference. on the face of it, these elections are about local issues such as schools and bin collections, and libraries and so on, but they might also tell us something about the wider political picture. what does the snp vote tell us about the current level of support for independence in scotland? how are the conservatives faring with the partygate scandal, especially given their leader in scotland at first called for the prime minister to resign and then withdrew that demand? and what about labour, are there any signs of a revivalfor the party? and here that they used to call red clydeside. we might get some answers by friday evening. here in wales, labour has been the dominant force in welsh politics for the last century but in the last local elections here in 2017, its grip weakened, it lost over 100
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council seats and ended up with overall control of only seven of the 22 local authorities. plaid cymru and the conservatives took one council each, but large swathes of the welsh political map were a big grey area, representing all the little coalitions and the real significant role of independent candidates here in wales. take a look for example on friday at what happens to this area, the vale of glamorgan, could it turn from grey into a primary colour? this place has been taken by both labour and the conservatives before. and whilst it is also about local issues like planning, schools and council tax bills — the role of national leaders might really come into play, whether it�*s how people think mark drakeford, the welsh labour first minister performed during the pandemic or what they make of the prime minister boris johnson�*s role in the pandemic and partygate. one other factor in wales is 16 and 17—year—olds get the vote, counting won�*t begin until friday
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morning here, and we should start to get some early results on friday afternoon. that was the view from england, scotland and wales. the election results for the stormont assembly in northern ireland could trigger months of uncertainty and negotiations over who leads the executive. our correspondent chris page brought us the latest. you might be forgiven for thinking that politics in this part of the uk tends to be very predictable but in this election, there is a significant possibility of a huge shift. for the last five elections to the devolved assembly here at stormont, the democratic unionists have won the most seats and sinn fein has come second. however, polls are suggesting that there could be a surge in support for the cross community alliance party and that sinn fein could emerge as the largest party. that would put the party�*s vice president michelle o�*neill in line to become the first ever irish nationalist to hold
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the first minister�*s position in northern ireland. now aside from the battle as to who comes out on top, the other issues prominent in this campaign have included the rising cost of living and the health service. northern ireland presently has the longest hospital waiting times in the uk by far. but there�*s serious doubt as to whether a devolved government will be formed at all after this election. under the power—sharing system, both the biggest unionist and the biggest nationalist party have to agree to go into coalition and the dup leader sirjeffrey donaldson has said his party will be staying out of government unless the brexit trade border with england, scotland and wales is scrapped. whenever it comes to the overall picture, well, there is no doubt that a shift towards sinn fein and away from unionism would be a significant moment for northern ireland. however, the offices of first and deputy first minister are legally equal, so other party say it doesn�*t matter who wins this election. in any case, this ballot will be
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critical for the very future of devolution in northern ireland and also given the importance of that brexit issue, it will potentially have big implications for the relationship between the uk and the eu. chris page instalment for us. the governor of the us state of oklahoma has signed a law which bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. the move came out after a leaked document suggested an historic law that legalised abortion in the united states could be overturned. abortion has been legal right across the united states for nearly 50 years under the roe versus wade decision. we can cross now to washington and our correspondent is there. good to see you. the court will not make a final decision on this for months but already lots of reaction and protest. t this for months but already lots of reaction and protest.— reaction and protest. i think a lot of --eole reaction and protest. i think a lot of people right — reaction and protest. i think a lot of people right now— reaction and protest. i think a lot of people right now are - reaction and protest. i think a lotj of people right now are grappling with the idea that something that has been codified in the
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constitution may no longer exist. for women like myself and several thousand others this has been the law of the land for our entire lives. so i think now that the shock has sort of worn off, i think people are now asking questions about, what does this mean? i think specifically for us lawmakers, what this means is there needs to be more action taken. so in reaction to the law enacted in texas and the similar law that was just enacted in oklahoma banning abortions after six weeks, we are seeing lawmakers are trying to put forth a new rule that is titled with the women�*s health act and try to give the same protections that were included in roe versus wade and codify that into us law. now, of course, as everything in washington is going to require a lot of support from both sides of the aisle and i think democrats are really hoping that more moderate republicans and
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especially women may feel more compelled to support this bill that it may notjust fall solely on political lines.— it may notjust fall solely on political lines. yes, and quite aside from — political lines. yes, and quite aside from that, _ political lines. yes, and quite aside from that, a _ political lines. yes, and quite aside from that, a very - political lines. yes, and quite i aside from that, a very separate issueis aside from that, a very separate issue is the issue of the leak from the supreme court and there has now been an investigation promised to find out, one would assume, where the leak came from and how it got out? this cannot be sugar coated. this is an unprecedented leak. we have never seen a leak of a draft opinion come from the supreme court, so i think in some ways, you are seeing that actually, the supreme court is trying to figure out what tools it has available to it to try and launch this kind of investigation, so chiefjustice, mr roberts, has in fact said that he wants to have an investigation, but who is going to lead that is still up in the air. yes, there is a court—martial because that fit the brief of what a
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normal supreme court court—martial would do? so, i think there are some avenues available in terms of getting the fbi or the department of justice to help in this investigation but i think overall, what it will do in the supreme court is make people pretty nervous. we are talking about the highest court in this country and lawmakers pointed to this highest court for life are going to be asked some tough questions about what they were doing and what did they know about this document.— doing and what did they know about this document. thank you. i know you will keep us — this document. thank you. i know you will keep us up-to-date _ this document. thank you. i know you will keep us up-to-date but _ this document. thank you. i know you will keep us up-to-date but thank - will keep us up—to—date but thank you very much for now. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with susan powell. good afternoon. i look like i am stood in front of a giant speech bubble but what we actually looking at here is a big storm cloud and this extending down is a twister if it touched the ground, it could stir at the state level. these are quite
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unusual, we only get them when we get really lively thunderstorms, and this has been observed in lincolnshire recently in scunthorpe to be precise. that is because we have a line of intense thunderstorms marching their way through here at the moment. this line extends all the moment. this line extends all the way down to the south—east of england. it is away from eastern scotland, where they were earlier but they will rattle away across east anglia and the south—east of england this evening with hail and thunder. it does become much quieter overnight. high pressure is starting to take hold, clearing the skies with a bit of mist and fog for england and wales on thursday. some other fronts pushing england and wales on thursday. some otherfronts pushing into scotland and first down at northern ireland on thursday. scotland, more persistent rain on thursday but some brightening skies to the east. temperatures on the up for the next couple of days but we are looking at a 21 in the south—east of england tomorrow. hello this is bbc news.
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the headlines... sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. we start with an update around the ongoing sale of chelsea football club — the billionaire sirjim ratcliffe has reportedly had his offer rejected. the majority shareholder of chemical group ineos made the late bid of 4.25 billion last friday, weeks after the deadline. the company�*s director tom crotty has reportedly told bloomberg the offer was rejected out of hand. a consortium led by la dodgers owner todd boehly is thought to be the preferred bidder. to matters on the pitch and manchester city are looking to reach a second successive champions league final. they�*re at real madrid with a 4—3 advantage from a dramatic first leg. the champions league is the one piece of silverware that has evaded manchester city.
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they came close last season but lost out to chelsea. win tonight and it�*s another english side waiting for them in the final in paris. it would change the perspective from our side. as a player, obviously you want to win the trophies and we want to win this one but the fact that we have been fighting for its numerous years and been to the other stages means that we have been doing really well. obviously, it is a competition and the quality is high, so it is very difficult to win it. for seven years we did very well but obviously we did not win it and i think winning it would just change the narrative. thousands of city fans have made the journey to the spainish capital. these supporters are optimistic they can do it. ijust hope for a 0—0 draw and a really— ijust hope for a 0—0 draw and a really boring match, but obviously,
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it is not _ really boring match, but obviously, it is not going to be that and i expect— it is not going to be that and i expect loads of goals.- it is not going to be that and i expect loads of goals. every game, ou have expect loads of goals. every game, you have just _ expect loads of goals. every game, you have just got — expect loads of goals. every game, you have just got to _ expect loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, _ expect loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and - expect loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and it - expect loads of goals. every game, you have just got to win, and it so l you have just got to win, and it so hard. we are city fans. nerves, we are used to it. brute hard. we are city fans. nerves, we are used to it— are used to it. we really should have a two-goal _ are used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion - are used to it. we really should have a two-goal cushion by - are used to it. we really should| have a two-goal cushion by now are used to it. we really should - have a two-goal cushion by now but have a two—goal cushion by now but that is— have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not— have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not the — have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city— have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. _ have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we - have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we like - have a two—goal cushion by now but that is not the city way. we like to. that is not the city way. we like to make _ that is not the city way. we like to make it _ that is not the city way. we like to make it hard — that is not the city way. we like to make it hard for— that is not the city way. we like to make it hard for ourselves. - that is not the city way. we like to make it hard for ourselves. i- that is not the city way. we like to make it hard for ourselves. i reckon if we can pay _ make it hard for ourselves. i reckon if we can pay the — make it hard for ourselves. i reckon if we can pay the same _ make it hard for ourselves. i reckon if we can pay the same weight - if we can pay the same weight tonight as we did last week, i think we will have them. watford manager roy hodgson has said he will be leaving the club at the end of the season and wont be taking up another managerialjob in the premier league. the 74 year old was at buckingham palace today, being honoured with a cbe for his services to football. watford are on the verge of relegation to the championship, which will be confirmed if they fail to beat hodgson�*s former club crystal palace at the weekend. dan evans is through to the third round of the madrid open tennis afte beating roberto bautista
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agut. meanwhile british number one cameron norrie makes it three british men in the last 16.. after he battled past john isner in three sets — 6-4, 6-7, 6-4.. andy murray faces novak djokovic next. lee westwood says he and "many others" have asked to be released from the pga and european tours to play in greg norman�*s saudi—funded golf invitational series next month. englishman richard bland has also requested to be released for the event in hertfordshire injune. westwood says, "if anyone comes along and gives any of us a chance at a pay rise, then you have to seriously consider it." six time major winner phil mickelson was one of the first high—profile players to seek a release from the pga tour last month. that�*s all the sport for now. more throughout the evenign.
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the fiancee of escapologist jonathan goodwin who appeared on britain�*s got talent in 2019 has said he has been left paralysed after an accident during rehearsals for america�*s got talent: extreme. she said he now uses a wheelchair as she described his injuries saying he nearly died twice. joining me now mark stannage who runs a stunt company and is a stuntman and escapologist himself. thank you for being with us. we know some detail about this. run through some detail about this. run through some of what we know so far but given the work that you do, how could this have happened.
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unfortunately, when you are doing professional stunt work like myself and jonathan do, things go wrong on occasions. health and safety is paramount and the safety of all of the staff involved in the stunt work, but unfortunately, sometimes things do go slightly wrong. my heart goes out to jonathan things do go slightly wrong. my heart goes out tojonathan and his family. i�*m wishing them all the best, obviously. fight! family. i'm wishing them all the best, obviously.— best, obviously. and of course, clearly that _ best, obviously. and of course, clearly that job _ best, obviously. and of course, clearly that job is _ best, obviously. and of course, clearly that job is not _ best, obviously. and of course, clearly that job is not without . best, obviously. and of course, | clearly that job is not without its clearly thatjob is not without its risk butjonathan�*s beyonce is saying that he nearly died twice last year. does that sort of risk sound like a rare occurrence? tt�*s last year. does that sort of risk sound like a rare occurrence? it's a .| , sound like a rare occurrence? it's a -| , to sound like a rare occurrence? it's a pity. to be — sound like a rare occurrence? it's a pity, to be honest. _ sound like a rare occurrence? it's a pity, to be honest. the _ sound like a rare occurrence? it's a pity, to be honest. the most - pity, to be honest. the most famous... unfortunately, in our lack of business, accidents do happen but we do take as we can, safety precautions. we always have a good team of people, who make sure these
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things don�*t happen because at the end of the day, we have all got families and we want to go home at the end of our working day. we don�*t want to be laying in a hospital bed, so it does happen, unfortunately, over the years, i have had the unfortunate to be injured once or twice myself, but luckily i have been able to walk away from it. ts been able to walk away from it. is pressure in show businesses, films and so on to be more risky, more extreme and to do something that no one else has done before? i guess, the more extreme it is, the more risky it is. what sort of checks and balances are in place to make sure that if you are trying to do something extreme, it does remain safe? th something extreme, it does remain safe? . , ., safe? in the film and television indust , safe? in the film and television industry. it _ safe? in the film and television industry. it is — safe? in the film and television industry, it is always _ safe? in the film and television industry, it is always down - safe? in the film and television industry, it is always down to i safe? in the film and television i industry, it is always down to the stunt coordinator or the secondary director to make sure that everything runs smoothly and everything runs smoothly and everything is taken care of. i suppose in the type of work that
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myself and jonathan do, where it tends to be live shows where you have got a life audience and it�*s not all pre—recorded and you have not all pre—recorded and you have not got the cgi and all of that type of thing, you do tend to put a lot of thing, you do tend to put a lot of pressure on yourself. i suppose when you do a show like america�*s got talent, you are then under a lot of pressure to come up with something bigger and better because you have that night because if you don�*t do that, you are out of the competition, you know? don't do that, you are out of the competition, you know? clearly, the element of peril— competition, you know? clearly, the element of peril in _ competition, you know? clearly, the element of peril in all— competition, you know? clearly, the element of peril in all of— competition, you know? clearly, the element of peril in all of this - competition, you know? clearly, the element of peril in all of this is - element of peril in all of this is what you do, escapology, because you have got to escape while everything else is going on, which in its own right is risky. talk about how you try to mitigate those risks and how you make sure that it looks amazing and daring but it is still safe in that respect and you know what you are doing? mac as i was saying
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earlier, talking for myself, it�*s hard to talk about what has happened to jonathan because hard to talk about what has happened tojonathan because i don�*t really knowjonathan and i have never had the pleasure of working with the fella, you know? but in the team that i have, i have got very experienced men working for me and everybody knows theirjob inside and out and they are all professionals and what they do, and we have practised endless hours to get everything nailed, so we know that if we go to a live event, festival or a carnival or something like that, everybody knows exactly what they are doing, and all of the risk has hopefully been taken out and we can put on the best entertainment possible, because we are entertainers at the end of the day. people from the audience wanted to see people get hurt, unfortunately. it is just part of life. and it is ourjob to make it look as spectacular as possible without any injuries. yes, one would hope. mark,
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thank you for that insight. it is really interesting to get your thoughts on how this could have happened. thank you. a charity is calling for all medical students to receive better training about eating disorders after a survey suggested that patients did not receive adequate care. around 1.25 million people in the uk have an eating disorder, according to the charity beat, but there are currently no requirements for medical schools to provide any teaching in this area. it added that over two thirds of the people they surveyed, who have an eating disorder, felt their gp did not understand how to help them. zoe conway has this report. when you restrict your food intake, it numbs you. and so anorexia is a functional illness, it�*s a way to cope with difficult feelings or beliefs. joss had anorexia for five years. she says it was a way of coping with the sexual abuse she suffered as a child by a nonfamily member. i was quite skeletal. i was just very depressed.
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i would pace around the house all day. my day was just pretty much filled with numbness. i couldn�*t really take in much information. it was all about just like the exercise i was doing, the food i was eating. her family knew nothing of the abuse. the illness came out of the blue. was this an incredible shock, walking into this house, just feels like such a loving family environment? it was a complete shock. you think these things happen to other people, not to you. and yeah, we just never saw it coming at all. when suddenly they say, you know, ifjoss can put on so much weight a week, and i was doing the maths and i was thinking, well, to get to the target weight, that's going to be three months. and you had this sudden moment, this isn't a quick fix. this is something we are living with. joss feared for her own life. she grew increasingly desperate. i sought out my gp�*s number of her own home and ijust rang her at her home one evening
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and kind of put my foot down and said look, i�*m really scared for my life. and i really need you to advocate for me, to fight for me, because the services just kept putting me on waiting lists and just kept telling me your weight is not low enough or we don�*t have room for you. the charity beat says medical schools need to do a betterjob of training doctors. at the moment, two thirds of people who go to their gp report that they don't get the referral for assessment that they should get, that the nice guidelines say they should get. so the medical professionals, they want to do a good job. but the system that is letting them down and eating disorder patients down is the medical training establishment. the general medical council says that eating disorders �*are a complex, high risk area of practice that should be covered in every doctor�*s education. we�*ve asked medical schools to develop a common approach to improve how eating disorders are taught at medical school.�* joss
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has turned her life around, she is now working for the nhs as a psychologist. i am very, very proud ofjoss. she has come so far. you know, she has accomplished so much. i don't know how to put it into words, really. we really are enormously proud of her. zoe conway, bbc news. for details of organisations which offer advice and support with eating disorders, go online to bbc.co.uk/actionline a bbc news investigation into the government�*s homes the headlines on bbc news... the west steps up pressure on president putin over the war in ukraine, with an eu plan to ban all imports of russian oil by the end of this year. as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine, including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. political parties take part
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in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. a bbc news investigation into the government�*s homes for ukraine scheme has found that some would—be hosts with a reported history of violence are trying to exploit the system. the men have been making contact with women fleeing the russian invasion to arrange possible placements, using refugee support groups on facebook. our correspondent, angus crawford explains. well, at the heart of the story, and the problem, is the informal way in which sponsors are being matched with hosts, with refugees. anyone can register an interest to be a host, as long as they have a series of checks, including criminal record checks, but other than that, this is where the problem seems
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to begin, in that that is left up to potential hosts and refugees to find each other, so a lot of people, huge numbers of people, have resorted to going to unregulated facebook groups, set up with the best possible motivations. now, we have found some men clearly unacceptable. certainly, in one case, we found one with a criminal record, serious convictions, another man with a history of domestic abuse trying to contact young women. we told that in some areas of the country, up to 30% of those wanting to be hosts were men over 40 expressing an interest in hosting women in their 20s and 30s. an obvious red flag. and we have lots of reports of substandard housing. one house that a volunteer described as not fit for rehoming a dog. another, bizarrely enough, full of nazi memorabilia, and a final one, where the refugee family were often sleeping on mattresses on the floor. so, i suppose this system, set up very quickly to try
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to respond to that crisis, but whatever government about maybe checks? well, a couple of things. first of all, they dispute that 30% figure. they say they don�*t recognise that. they also say that thousands of hosts and refugees have had perfectly good matches and it is working well for them and they do reject this criticism, and effectively, what they say is any attempts to exploit vulnerable people are in their words despicable, and in a statement, the government said to me, the homes for ukraine scheme has safeguards in place, including home office security and background checks on all sponsors. the family of a nine—month old baby boy who died after choking at nursery school have launched a petition against plans to change the adult—to—child ratio in early—years childcare. oliver steeper died in september, following the incident atjelly beans nursery in ashford in kent. his parents say proposals to reduce childcare costs by allowing one member of staff to care for more
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than three infants would put lives at risk. josie hannett reports. look at you, sat in your chair, mr oliver. oliver steeper was nine months old when he choked at a nursery and died five days later. he wasjust perfect and crazy head and... his parents have launched a petition in response to the prime minister�*s suggestion to his cabinet to relax staff—to—child ratios in early year settings like nurseries, making it cheaper for parents to tackle the cost of living crisis. after losing oliver in a childcare setting, you know, to then reduce the adult—to—child ratios was just disgusting. you know, how can they put the safety of children over helping the economy? i can�*t get my head around it, it�*s just terrible. it's notjust the safety aspect either. i was thinking of the fact that you pay this money for your kids
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to go to nursery or a childminder and you want them to have a decent time, while they are there and a quality of care when they are there as well with learning different things and stuff like that and i'm just kind of thinking how could that work if the kids that the adults are looking after, there are more of them? the government says they are clear that supporting families with access to childcare and early education is a priority and they are looking at ways to improve the cost, choice and availability of childcare places. thejelly beans nursery, where the incident happened, had its licence immediately suspended by ofsted, following what they said were serious safeguarding concerns. within a few weeks, the nursery voluntarily closed itself down. meanwhile, the police investigation into oliver�*s death is ongoing. now for any football fan, this is one of the most recognisable
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40 years ago today, during the falklands war, an argentinian jet launched an exocet missile at the royal navy destroyer hms sheffield. the results were devastating: 20 crewmen died and the ship was fatally damaged. it was the first british warship to sink in enemy action since the second world war, becoming a defining moment of the conflict. today a memorial in honour of those who served on the ship is being unveiled at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. phil mackie has this report... it was a moment the realities of the falklands war struck home. the first of four british ships to be sunk in 1982. 20 lives were lost and many more were wounded. argentine newspapers described the super etendard as the avenger of the belgrano. the attack on hms sheffield as a devastating blow to the enemy. today the survivors had a chance to remember theirfriends who did not make it. dave harrington was a stoker
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and in the engine room when the missile struck. there was a thump, that is all i can describe it as, and two seconds later a fireball totally covered me. and one of my nightmares regularly now is that i can still see myself with my hands up to my face screaming and seeing my reflection in the flames. it was quite harrowing, shall we say. and you still have nightmares about that? oh, god, yeah. regularly. this will stand as a tribute to those who died, made of sheffield steel, it is called the shiny sheff and was unveiled at the service today. of course, it is a memorial, there are people whose partners or parents died that day in may 1982, but it�*s also a reunion, as many of these people have not seen each other for 40 years and so it is a chance for them to get back together once again. dave harrington suffered 20% burns.
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he was also diagnosed 17 years later from ptsd. so normally, he spends the anniversary of his own. i�*ve met a few people so far from the sheffield and it is very emotional. i brought my handkerchief just in case. and of course looking at these names... it is heartbreaking. to think of all those ones we lost. it is very emotional, that is the only way i can put it. it was the first british ship lost in action since the second world war. it is a day old comrades will never forget. phil mackie, bbc news, at the national memorial arboretum. now for any football fan, this is one of the most recognisable and infamous moments in the game. it is diego maradona�*s "hand of god" goal that helped knock england out of the 1986 world cup.
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after the match the argentina legend swapped his shirt with england�*s steve hodge, and now, he�*s put it up for auction. but owning a piece of sporting memorabilia doesn�*t come cheap — the auction has just closed, and it�*s an eye—watering sum. matt dale, co—founder of classic football shirts, join us now from llandudno. good to see you. so an eye watering seven. how much was it? tt good to see you. so an eye watering seven. how much was it?— good to see you. so an eye watering seven. how much was it? it went for 7.14 million, — seven. how much was it? it went for 7.14 million, which _ seven. how much was it? it went for 7.14 million, which breaks _ seven. how much was it? it went for 7.14 million, which breaks the - 7.14 million, which breaks the previous record for a football shirt. the previous shirt was 157,000, so it is quite a rise compared to that. my market has blown the previous record of the water, hasn�*t it? talk to me about why this shirt is so valuable. there are so many factors to it. it is a
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unique shirt, it was only one in that match by maradona and the rest of the argentinian team. basically, what happened was they used a different blue shed earlier in the tournament that was made from cotton, then the players complained it was too hot because it was in mexico, so they were due to play england in the afternoon and it was set to be 40 degrees, so they asked kit man to go and have a look round local city and they found what would have been an amateur team kit, they sold the crest on and added a number on the back of it, so it a real one—off because obviously the infamous hand of god and then the goal of the century, added to that as well, it is a really special shirt. �* , . , �* as well, it is a really special shirt. �*, . , �* , shirt. it's nearly didn't come up for sale at _ shirt. it's nearly didn't come up for sale at all _ shirt. it's nearly didn't come up for sale at all because - shirt. it's nearly didn't come up for sale at all because we - shirt. it's nearly didn't come up for sale at all because we knowj shirt. it's nearly didn't come up - for sale at all because we know that backin for sale at all because we know that back in november 2020, he said that he didn�*t want to sell it, so why the change of heart? you he didn't want to sell it, so why the change of heart? you would have to ask him, — the change of heart? you would have to ask him. to _ the change of heart? you would have to ask him, to be _ the change of heart? you would have to ask him, to be honest. _ the change of heart? you would have to ask him, to be honest. it- the change of heart? you would have
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to ask him, to be honest. it has - to ask him, to be honest. it has been on display for about 20 years, some people have had plenty of time to appreciate it but it will be interesting to see where it goes to, for sure. �* interesting to see where it goes to, for sure. . , ,, . interesting to see where it goes to, for sure. . , , , . ., for sure. and it suspected that we don't know _ for sure. and it suspected that we don't know anything _ for sure. and it suspected that we don't know anything about - for sure. and it suspected that we don't know anything about the - for sure. and it suspected that we i don't know anything about the bidder don�*t know anything about the bidder who paid that much but who would want something like this? anyone, reall . want something like this? anyone, really- you — want something like this? anyone, really- you can _ want something like this? anyone, really. you can see _ want something like this? anyone, really. you can see the _ want something like this? anyone, really. you can see the value - want something like this? anyone, really. you can see the value in - want something like this? anyone, really. you can see the value in it i really. you can see the value in it in terms of sports memorabilia, it has always been going up, so that is the most expensive piece across all sport. the one that comes second to that will be babe ruth... you can see there has been a trend, it�*s almost like a modern antique. see there has been a trend, it's almost like a modern antique. matt, thank ou almost like a modern antique. matt, thank you for— almost like a modern antique. matt, thank you for your _ almost like a modern antique. matt, thank you for your thoughts. - almost like a modern antique. matt, thank you for your thoughts. it's thank you for your thoughts. it�*s astonishing, £7.1 million for that. that is matt, and co—founder of classic football shirts. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with susan.
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it is looking lively at the moment across eastern counties of england. big bendable i�*ve developed in the last hours. thus my thunderstorms. this is a recent radar image. you can see some of the more intense showers are now pulling away from eastern scotland but there is a whole clutch here to push through from the east midlands into east anglia and the south—east as we look at this evening�*s rush hour. it will take for these to finally clear from the north—east of england, so a lively evening for easternmost counties of england. to the far north—west of the uk, we will see some friends are beginning to brushing. there will be some outbreaks of for northern and western scotland. very mild under the cloud to the north—west. further south, clearer spells. we could see a few patches of mist and fog developing for first thing on thursday, as this area of high pressure stretches into the south of the uk. but we keep the front to the north and between the two, we pick
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up north and between the two, we pick up a south—westerly that comes quite a away south in the atlantic, so it is striking and relatively warm air. yes, it has cooled a little bit on its way across the atlantic but temperatures will be higher. england and wales will see a few showers, there may be rain first thing for northern england, but in the afternoon and in the sunshine, we could get up to 20 or 21 degrees. one of the scotland and northern ireland as well. early rain for northern ireland should clear, saying a little bit danko across scotland. the weather front does manage to sink further south through friday. wet initially for northern ireland and scotland, brighton later. in the brightness, we still should get some height of 15 to 17. 15 degrees in liverpool. to the south, we are still looking at temperatures in the high teens to the low 20s. ahead to the weekend, some heavy rain into saturday across wales and southern counties of
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england is high pressure yet again that comes to dominate our forecast as we look at the coming saturday and sunday. perhapsjust some weather fronts weaving in later sunday. a largely dry story for the weekend and we will still be in that relatively warm air, so temperatures, we can see anything up to the high teens across scotland and the sunniest spots of northern ireland, we could push up over 20 degrees for england and wales. one theme for our weather as we look for theme for our weather as we look for the days ahead.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the west steps up pressure on president putin over the war in ukraine, with an eu plan —to ban all imports of russian oil by the end of this year as the war rages on, russian missiles strike key infrastructure in ukraine — including three electricty stations in the western city of lviv, causing power blackouts. political parties take part in a final day of campaigning for local elections in england, scotland and wales and elections for the northern ireland assembly. after liverpool reach the champions league final, all eyes are on man city tonight to see if they can make it too. and a shirt worn by diego maradona when he scored the iconic hand of god goal is expected to fetch millions
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of pounds when it goes under the hammer within

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