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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  May 4, 2022 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten, the plight of ukraine's most vulnerable children, abandoned by carers, young victims of russia's invasion. we report from a centre in southern ukraine, with very few facilities to look after children with disabilities. because of their disabilities, they are not treated as human beings. they are only kept alive here. and it is not a problem of this institution, it is the problem of the system. in the besieged port of mariupol, officials say the russians have launched a major assault on the remaining ukrainian forces there. we'll have the latest on the conflict and the european union's plans for a total ban on oil imports from russia. also tonight... amber heard takes the stand in the defamation trial brought
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by former husband johnny depp. she alleges domestic abuse. and he slapped me again. like... it was clear it wasn't a joke any more. we meet the man who still wants to buy chelsea football club, despite being rejected first time round. and a late goal takes the champions league semifinal into extra time for manchester city against real madrid. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel, arsenal take the wsl title race to the final game of the season, with a win over north london rivals tottenham. good evening. we start tonight with the plight of thousands of disabled children in ukraine, victims of the russian invasion,
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who've been abandoned without proper care. the human rights organisation disability rights international says its investigation found children with severe disabilities tied to beds in children's homes that can't cope. the bbc has visited one institution in the west of ukraine, where disabled children from the east of the country have been left by their carers, fleeing the conflict. this report by our correspondent danjohnson includes some distressing images. here's a sound of the war you haven't heard yet. anna's teeth—grinding anxiety hints at the hidden trauma of ukraine's disabled children, this conflict�*s most vulnerable and least visible victims. they are nervous, disorientated and distressed. they're not treated as human beings. they're only kept alive here. and they've been dumped in a place that can barely cope. are you certain you can give these children the care they need?
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ni. the director couldn't believe how their carers fled and left these children behind. translation: they were so selfish that they ran out of here _ as fast as they could. i thought they would come in here and tell us who had epilepsy, who was incontinent, and so on. but then they sat here till lunchtime and left. i don't like criticising my colleagues, but this is not the way it's done. victoria's one of 22 children moved here from an orphanage in donetsk, and left behind when the less severely disabled children were taken to germany. she has frequent seizures, and we're told she's put in restraints at night. victoria is 14 years old. in fact, these are all teenage girls. the nurse tells me she's not used to dealing with this level of disability and she believes the children aren't able to understand their situation. she asks, "what intellect can you see here?"
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my heart breaks, actually, as a mother of two children. disability rights experts are documenting the conditions. even though they're in a safe place, their state will deteriorate with time because they are not getting any stimulation, any kind of rehabilitation. and, to me, this is further disabling them. these were confined lives of institutionalised dependence long before the war. there's no future for these children beyond these walls. these homes are relics of an outdated system. the boss insists a resident sings for us. staff shortages mean older residents help care for some children, and those in from the east have much greater needs than this place can handle. and disability rights investigators filmed at three more nearby institutions struggling with fragile young arrivals. they barely had time to give them any individual attention before the war. now they are left lying in cribs, lying in beds, tied down.
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total neglect. it's very dangerous. these children with disabilities are paying the price for the war. this flies in the face of any sort of international good practice in terms of the care these girls should be receiving. but then, on the other hand, this is people trying to do their best in the toughest of circumstances. we were told oksana couldn't speak because of severe learning difficulties, but helena makes a connection. she says, in a full sentence, that her toe hurts. and then oksana spots our microphone. there's a flicker of the potential that could be unlocked. are you taking myjob, oksana? da! there is a call for these children to get more international support or the love and care of a family. but when so many ukrainians are running from war, it looks like thousands will still face lives of loss and waste, unseen and unheard. danjohnson, bbc news,
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in south—western ukraine. the heart—rending plight of vulnerable children in ukraine, dan johnson reporting. the european union has announced plans for a total ban on oil imports from russia by the end of the year. but the plans require unanimous support from eu member states, and hungary has already rejected the proposals. around 3.5 million barrels of russian oil are imported by the eu every day, for which russia is paid up to hundreds of millions of dollars a day. in ukraine, officials there say moscow has launched a major assault on the besieged azovstal steel works in mariupol, the last part of the city held by ukrainian forces. russia claims it will implement a ceasefire and open a humanitarian corridor for civilians for three days, starting tomorrow. our eastern europe correspondent sarah rainsford has more on reports of several ukrainian cities being shelled this evening.
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the very centre came under fire tonight in the city, the missile hitting five minutes after an air raid siren, no time to reach cover. it has been ten weeks of war now and russia is still attacking ukraine from east to west. moscow is boasting of its success, filming as it fires on its neighbour. it says it fires on its neighbour. it says it is targeting supply routes for weapons from the us and europe but hitting far more than that. so the european commission wants to ramp up the pressure on moscow. it's proposing that eu countries end russian oil imports, though not gas. the commissioner said vladimir putin should pay a high price for his brutal aggression. today we are addressing our dependency on russian oil and, let's be clear, it will not be easy because some member states are
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strongly dependent on russian oil. but we simply have to do it. so today, we will propose to ban all russian oil from europe. this will be... applause. but the sanctions need unanimous support. and while europe argues, these women's relatives are under fire. the last ukrainian fighters in mariupol. they're encircled by russian forces at a giant steelworks. mariupol�*s mayor believes there's up to 30 children among the civilians still with them. and across the donbas region, the fighting is relentless. the local governor says no city here is now safe. around kyiv, they know exactly how that feels. staff at this hospital near ukraine's capital
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talk of operating under fire, saving the lives of wounded civilians, but in terrible danger themselves. were these the missiles that hit the hospital? i ask the hospital director what she thinks about western sanctions. galina thinks some countries don't understand what is happening here. she says perhaps they don't believe it, but they should. hungary has already said it will veto the ban on oil imports. with the wreckage of war all around, many ukrainians struggle to understand why the west would even hesitate about sanctioning russia. because the point you hear time and again here is that every dollar spent on russian oil and gas is funding a military that's doing all this. ukraine did defend its capital, but russia's war has shifted focus now. it hasn't stopped. sarah rainsford, bbc news, kyiv.
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we can go live to our europe editor katya adler. if hungary is vetoing this plan, is that the end of the story? it this plan, is that the end of the sto ? ., , �* this plan, is that the end of the sto ? ., ,�* story? it doesn't sound good, because for— story? it doesn't sound good, because for any _ story? it doesn't sound good, because for any sanctions - story? it doesn't sound good, - because for any sanctions package to because for any sanctions package to be passed by the eu, it needs to be unanimously approved amongst member states but is hungary saying no or are they saying not this way? brussels thinks it is the latter and that it can have these oil sanctions approved, probably by the weekend, but there will be quite a lot of political ink and horse trading in between. we are on sanctions package six buy now from the eu and some member states like hungary are affected more than others so it's notjust them but slovakia and the czech republic and bulgaria, beginning to say to other member states, you have to help us out, you have to reassure our voters so it is not straightforward for the eu on one hand and on the other you have to say that even when these oil sanctions are passed, how effective
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are they going to be? how much will they change what vladimir putin is doing on the ground in ukraine? the answer has to be not very much in the short term because these are phased out oil sanctions and lasting until the end of the and that means there are critics inside the eu as well as outside who are saying that the eu should act much faster on energy sanctions. then you have germany and the us saying if the eu acts too fast, that could affect global energy crisis and they worry about that and it's not straightforward. infact, one about that and it's not straightforward. in fact, one eu diplomat said to be denied that the eu and the rest of the west really has to decide what price it is willing to pay to protect the liberal world order, as well as ukraine. . ,, liberal world order, as well as ukraine. . �* . , ., ukraine. katya adler, many thanks aaain with ukraine. katya adler, many thanks again with the _ ukraine. katya adler, many thanks again with the latest _ ukraine. katya adler, many thanks again with the latest from - ukraine. katya adler, many thanks| again with the latest from brussels. in virginia, amber heard has taken the stand in the defamation trial brought by her former husband, johnny depp. he originally sued for $50 million over an article in the washington post where amber heard claimed
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she was a victim of abuse. he denies the allegations. amber heard then counter—sued depp for $100 million. a warning — there's some strong language in this report by our correspondent david sillito. thank you, your honour. will you lease thank you, your honour. will you please state _ thank you, your honour. will you please state your _ thank you, your honour. will you please state your name? - thank you, your honour. will you please state your name? it - thank you, your honour. will you please state your name? it is - thank you, your honour. will you - please state your name? it is amber laura heard- — please state your name? it is amber laura heard. amber _ please state your name? it is amber laura heard. amber heard. - please state your name? it is amber laura heard. amber heard. over - please state your name? it is amberj laura heard. amber heard. over the last three and _ laura heard. amber heard. over the last three and a half _ laura heard. amber heard. over the last three and a half weeks - laura heard. amber heard. over the last three and a half weeks she - laura heard. amber heard. over the last three and a half weeks she has l last three and a half weeks she has sat in court each day and listened as a series of witnesses and her ex—husband have described her as a violent, emotionally unstable and a liar. this was finally her chance to give her side of the story. em? liar. this was finally her chance to give her side of the story. why are ou give her side of the story. why are you here? — give her side of the story. why are you here? i _ give her side of the story. why are you here? i am — give her side of the story. why are you here? i am here _ give her side of the story. why are you here? i am here because - give her side of the story. why are you here? i am here because my. you here? i am here because my ex-husband _ you here? i am here because my ex-husband is _ you here? i am here because my ex-husband is suing _ you here? i am here because my ex-husband is suing me - you here? i am here because my ex-husband is suing me for - you here? i am here because my ex-husband is suing me for an . you here? i am here because my- ex-husband is suing me for an op ed ex—husband is suing me for an 0p ed i wrote. ex-husband is suing me for an op ed i wrote. ., ., i. ex-husband is suing me for an op ed i wrote. ., ., ,, ., ., i wrote. how do you feel about that? i wrote. how do you feel about that? i stru: ale i wrote. how do you feel about that?
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i struggle to — i wrote. how do you feel about that? i struggle to have _ i wrote. how do you feel about that? i struggle to have the _ i wrote. how do you feel about that? i struggle to have the words. - i wrote. how do you feel about that? i struggle to have the words. i - i struggle to have the words. i struggle to find the words to describe how painful this is. this is horrible. this has been, this is the most painful and difficult thing i've ever gone through this, the beginning of her story of a marriage she said left her injured and traumatised, and. find she said left her in'ured and traumatised, and. and sitting 'ust feet away in fl traumatised, and. and sitting 'ust feet away in front i traumatised, and. and sitting 'ust feet away in front of i traumatised, and. and sitting 'ust feet away in front of her, i traumatised, and. and sitting 'ust feet away in front of her, the h traumatised, and. and sitting just feet away in front of her, the man she says assaulted and abused her, johnny depp. d0 she says assaulted and abused her, johnny depp-— johnny depp. do you remember the first time he — johnny depp. do you remember the first time he physically _ johnny depp. do you remember the first time he physically hit - johnny depp. do you remember the first time he physically hit you? - first time he physically hit you? yes _ first time he physically hit you? yes. ., , , first time he physically hit you? yes. ., , ., yes. please tell the “my about it. she said yes. please tell the “my about it. she said johnny _ yes. please tell the jury about it. she said johnny depp _ yes. please tell the jury about it. she said johnny depp had - yes. please tell the jury about it. she said johnny depp had been i yes. please tell the jury about it. - she said johnny depp had been taking cocaine and it was a comment about one of his tattoos that lead to abusive language and violence. he: slapped me across the face. and i laughed. i laughed because i... i didn't know what else to do. i
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thought this must be a joke. he said, you think it's funny, you think you're a funny pitch? and he slapped me again. it think you're a funny pitch? and he slapped me again-— think you're a funny pitch? and he slapped me again. it was, she says, 'ust the slapped me again. it was, she says, just the beginning _ slapped me again. it was, she says, just the beginning of _ slapped me again. it was, she says, just the beginning of years - just the beginning of years of abuse. �* ., , ., ., just the beginning of years of abuse. �* .,, ., ., , abuse. but he was the love of my life. and abuse. but he was the love of my life- and he _ abuse. but he was the love of my life. and he was. _ abuse. but he was the love of my life. and he was. he _ abuse. but he was the love of my life. and he was. he was. - abuse. but he was the love of my life. and he was. he was. but - abuse. but he was the love of my life. and he was. he was. but he| abuse. but he was the love of my - life. and he was. he was. but he was also this other thing. he was also this other thing. and the other thing was awful.— this other thing. and the other thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp _ thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp sat — thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp sat head _ thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp sat head down - thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp sat head down with l thing was awful. throughout it all, | johnny depp sat head down with his notes and jelly beans, all of it, he says, is untrue, but his ex—wife has a much more to say. today was the last full day of campaigning ahead of local elections tomorrow in england, wales and scotland, and assembly elections in northern ireland.
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in england, elections are being held for 146 councils, mainly in towns and cities. there are also some mayoral elections. in scotland, all 32 local authorities are being contested. all seats in 22 local councils across wales are up for election. in northern ireland, voters will elect all of the 90 members of the legislative assembly at stormont. in a moment, we'll hear from vicki young at westminster, james cook in glasgow and hywel griffith in barry. but first to emma vardy, who's at stormont. what that state in terms of that in stormont? . ., , ., ., stormont? elections here are often seen as a battle _ stormont? elections here are often seen as a battle between _ stormont? elections here are often seen as a battle between those - stormont? elections here are often | seen as a battle between those who want to remain part of the uk and those who want a united ireland and this is being called the most important election for a generation. that is because the polls are
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indicating that for the first time indicating that for the first time in northern ireland's history, a nationalist party might win the most seats. sinn fein are hoping they are on course to beat the democratic unionist party and be entitled to claim the first minister role. the dup has been telling voters that it is the only party that can safeguard the union, that voting for the dup is the only way to prevent a border poll, that referendum on a united ireland that is sinn fein's ultimate aim but sinn fein has not put this front and centre of its campaign. it has been focusing on those doorstep issues like the cost of living but no matter what happens here, it is unlikely we will end up with a fully functioning government after the elections are over because the dup has said it is not going to back into power sharing unless it gets changes to the brexit arrangements, the irish sea border it dislike so much. but a final thought, even though this is sometimes seen as a divided place, elections in recent years have shown as more and more people are voting for the middle
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ground cross community parties but how many votes they get will also tell us a lot about how northern ireland is changing. {lilia tell us a lot about how northern ireland is changing.— tell us a lot about how northern ireland is changing. ok, thank you, and now from _ ireland is changing. ok, thank you, and now from stormont _ ireland is changing. ok, thank you, and now from stormont to - ireland is changing. ok, thank you, and now from stormont to glasgow| ireland is changing. ok, thank you, - and now from stormont to glasgow and james cook. they used to call this red clydeside, the heartland of the labour movement, but exactly 25 years to the week since tony blair swept, the snp run the city council. will that change tomorrow? that is a matter of course for the voters. more than 1200 councillors will be elected and the election system that is used is not first past the post but proportional representation where voters rank candidates by order of preference, in order. local services have featured prominently,
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as has the cost of living, but there may be something we can reach into the results, perhaps an indication of the current level of support for scottish independence and perhaps an indication of how the conservative party has been damaged by lockdown parties in whitehall, in downing street in particular, not least because the scottish conservative party leader douglas ross first called for the prime minister to go and then withdrew that call. perhaps we will also learn something about whether labour is able to stage a resurgence, particularly in glasgow. thanks, james. let's go to barry and hywel griffith. labour is in charge in cardiff bay in the welsh government, what is at stake in the local authorities?— local authorities? labour has been the dominant _ local authorities? labour has been the dominant force _ local authorities? labour has been the dominant force across - local authorities? labour has been the dominant force across welsh l the dominant force across welsh politics for a century now but in the last local elections in 2017 the tight grip was loosened a little. it lostjust over 100 councillors and
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ended up with only control of seven of 22 local authorities in wales. lodge can be had one counsel, the conservatives had one but the rest of the political map in wales was shaded in grey, no overall control, coalitions and group of independents have been running those for the last few years. —— plaid cymru had one counsel. this place has changed hands between labour and the conservatives in the past. people will be voting on local issues like schools and the rate of council tax, they will also want to look at national leadership issues like how he first minister of wales, labour's mark drakeford, performed during the pandemic and borisjohnson's pandemic and boris johnson's reputation after partygate. the voting will take place tomorrow but celtic will not begin until friday.
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as hywel was saying, vicki young in westminster, the eternal conundrum is whether people will vote based on local issues or whether they will look at the leadership issues in westminster and elsewhere? where these elections _ westminster and elsewhere? where these elections are _ westminster and elsewhere? where these elections are taking _ westminster and elsewhere? where these elections are taking place - westminster and elsewhere? where these elections are taking place in i these elections are taking place in england is important, they focus very much on urban areas and almost half of the seats up for grabs are in london. local elections do not tell as much about what might happen in a general election because far fewer people vote and in large swathes of the country there will be no elections. that you can always see patterns, the conservatives are certainly trying to manage expectations, saying they expect to lose seats, potentially into the hundreds. labourand lose seats, potentially into the hundreds. labour and the green party expect gains, the liberal democrats want to show they are the main challenger to the tories in the south and south—west of england but
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it can affect national politics too, especially for those two men who want to be prime minister. many of borisjohnson's mps will be looking to see whether he is still a winner of the keir starmer, whose party will be looking to see whether he is putting them on the road to power. thanks to vicki young, hywel, james and emma. for more information on the latest developments and to find out what's happening in your area, visit bbc.co.uk/news or the bbc news app. the prospect of hugely controversial changes to america's law on abortion is causing deep divisions in us society. the state of oklahoma is the latest to pass new legislation. the state governor has approved a ban on abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. the background to these changes is an expected ruling by the us supreme court. a leaked document suggests that the court is set to overturn the famous ruling on roe v wade
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in 1973, the ruling which, in effect, legalised abortion in the usa. 0ur correspondent sophie long has been speaking to opponents and supporters in mississippi, the state which asked the supreme court to reconsider the law. sophie long has been speaking to opponents and supporters in mississippi. your hands are soaked in the blood of children you've murdered! this is the reception that doctors receive as they arrived for work in the last abortion clinic in the whole state of mississippi. christ can offer you forgiveness! even in your blood guiltiness! a baby is a gift from god, a baby has a heartbeat. . those who come here to preach and protest have no idea why people have come to terminate their pregnancies, how heartbreaking or how easy that decision have been to make. they don't know whether they were victims of incest or rape or whether theyjust made a mistake. you will know the word of the lord...
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they say abortion at any stage, under any circumstances, is murder. essentially the question is, is it ok to murder a baby in the womb when — fill in the blank. no. it wasn't the baby's fault if it is an issue of rape or incest. it's a baby. mississippi is known as a trigger state. if the supreme court does overturn roe v wade, it will implement a law banning almost all abortions, but there will be exceptions, so what these protesters call their work, their calling, will continue. once this is gone, they are going to move right up the food chain with all of the things that we value, evangelical christians don't like. this is the beginning, not the end. abortion, contraception, gay marriage, equality, all of these things they are looking to get rid of and they will tell you that themselves. so there is a 50 state strategy for them to get rid of all these things. pro—choice campaigners say it is people here in mississippi's poor
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communities that will suffer. in the united states, we have medicaid which is government health care, and we were supposed to extend it for postpartum mothers for up to a year after pregnancy. that was raised in the legislature this session, it had bipartisan support from both pro—life and pro—choice factors. but it was killed by the speaker of the house who yesterday tweeted in celebration of this draft. as night falls, anti—abortion activists reflect on the ruling they are now confident it will be confirmed. the pro—life movement is not over by any means. we have still got a lot of work to do in all 50 states, and babies will still be losing their lives to abortion for many years to come, even under this ruling. he will give your soul rest. but it was another typical day at a health centre which has become the front line in america's battle over abortion. if the court's final ruling goes as indicators suggest it will, its doors will close but the fight outside will continue
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on a different street, in a different state. sophie long, bbc news, jackson, mississippi. britain's richest man, sirjim ratcliffe, says he's had positive conversations with the government regarding his offer to buy chelsea football club. sirjim is the founder and co—owner of the chemical group ineos, which has invested heavily in other sports, including formula 1, cycling and sailing. the bid for chelsea came weeks after the march deadline, and was rejected. but he says he remains committed to buying the club. he's been speaking to our sports editor dan roan. he's already a serial investor in sport, but now sirjim ratcliffe has his sights set on one of the world's biggest football clu bs. the tycoon has made a last—gasp £4 billion bid for chelsea. and today in madrid, in his first interview since his audacious move, the ineos chief told me why he wants to take over at stamford bridge. we're not interested in making money off chelsea. so the investment in chelsea
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is a long—term thing. it's just whether. .. can we run that club really, really well and turn it into one of the finest clubs in europe? that's our ambition with chelsea. we make lots of money in chemicals. we don't need to make money off of them. chelsea was part up for sale in march before owner roman abramovich was sanctioned for his alleged links to russian president vladimir putin following the invasion of ukraine. a group headed up by us investor todd boehly has emerged as the preferred bidder of the bank overseeing the sale. ratcliffe missed two deadlines, so is he now out of the running? don't discount our offer. i think we are very british, we've got great intentions for the chelsea club. we've had positive conversations with the government, because there's been, i suppose, a lot of angst about chelsea finishing up in the hands of people who don't have a long—term vision for it. you were late. isn't it yourfault? no, we were late. that's our fault. i would agree with that, but...
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why were you late, out of interest? it's a big decision to buy a national asset with the importance of a club like chelsea. we are not there for five years or ten years. we are there for the long term and that's quite a commitment. and that's quite a lot of responsibility to take on and it takes time to reach a decision where you feel fully committed to that. you're a manchester united fan, are you not? i have a split allegiance, effectively, really. when i was in london for many, many years, chelsea, i could go and watch. it was quite difficult to go and watch united. some would argue you should be trying to buy the club you grew up supporting? yes, i can understand that, but manchester united's not for sale. there are concerns a takeover of the european champions could be jeopardised if abramovich reconsiders a pledge to write off more than £1 billion that he's owed by the club. a licence to operate expires at the end of this month, with ministers warning the club is on borrowed time. i can't imagine for a moment chelsea would go out of business, but i think they could suffer next
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season if they're not fully active in the transfer market. and in football, obviously, that's an important part, because you can't win tournaments if you don't have good players. whether ratcliffe takes over or not, chelsea's proposed deal is set to become the most expensive in sporting history. but for now, the club's future remains uncertain. dan roan, bbc news, madrid. football and manchester city have xx real madrid in the second leg of their champions league semifinal. —— manchester city were cruising into the champions league final after taking the lead against real madrid, but two goals from rodrigo forced the game into extra time. 0ur sports correspendent natalie pirks reports from the bernabeu stadium in madrid a champions league semifinal in the spanish sunshine. city fans had plenty to crow about. but the nerves of them were jangling. the prospect of an all english final was the least of their worries. come on, city! its so hard, we are so nervous. we are city fans, you know, nerves, we're used to it! we are not even thinking about the final. -
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we can't. we don't want to jinx it. but we kept the weekend free! a hug for luck from two giants of the game. pep guardiola said before the match that football is unpredictable but if there is one thing we could all foresee, it it was that this would be lively. city were successfully frustrating the express train that was coming at them but both sides were yet to take their chances. but a double substitution in the second half brought instant rewards. silva found acres of space, riyad mahrez delivered the knockout blow. or was it? semifinal hero last season! real�*s first shot on target came in the 90th minute, from substitute rodrygo. talk about a super sub. mere seconds later, he was at it again. it's in for another one! they've scored again! somehow, real madrid had clawed their way to extra time.
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he wasn't wrong when he said football is unpredictable. football, well, it has got even worse for city and extra time because karim benzema slotted away a penalty, it is 6—5 on aggregate to madrid, city have a few minutes left to score to try to take this to penalties. they have never won this trophy and liverpool lie in wait in the final. thank you for the last minute news, natalie pirks in madrid. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. this is bbc news. the headlines — ukrainian officials say russian
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forces have launched an all—out assault on the steelworks which is the last ukrainian

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