Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 5, 2022 6:00am-9:00am BST

6:00 am
it's thursday, 5th of may. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and victoria derbyshire. ukraine's president zelensky appeals to the united nations to save the lives of around 200 civilians, sheltering from russian bombardment in the besieged city of mariupol. more bumper profits for the oil giants. this morning, shell is expected to follow bp in announcing a huge increase in how much it made at the start of this year. i'll have the latest for you throughout the programme. heartbreak in madrid. manchester city were just minutes away from the champions league final, until one of the most remarkable turnarounds in footballing history.
6:01 am
a tearful amber heard takes the stand for the first time in the defamation trial brought by her former husband johnny depp — she alleges domestic abuse. he was the love of my life, but he was also this other thing. and the other thing was awful. iam in i am in coventry with the queen's favourite and a pack of corgis. these puppets have been revealed for the first time to celebrate the queen'sjubilee pageant. good queen's jubilee pageant. good morning, queen'sjubilee pageant. good morning, sam fog to watch out for especially in the south. in england and wales, largely dry and warm. in scotland and northern ireland, you have more cloud and also rain. all the details throughout the programme. it's thursday, 5th of may. our main story.
6:02 am
ukrainian officials say there's been heavy fighting with russian forces who have entered a steelworks plant in mariupol — the last holdout in the city. about 200 civilians are believed to be sheltering inside the plant, including children. ukraine's president zelenksy has appealed to the un to help rescue them. mark lobel reports. ten weeks in, russia testing ukraine's resolve at the azovstal steelworks, intensifying its assault as this footage released by pro—russian separatist shows. with what looks like thermobaric or vacuum bombs as the what looks like thermobaric or vacuum bombs as the regiment what looks like thermobaric or vacuum bombs as the regiment claims russians have entered the plant. translation:— russians have entered the plant. translation: ., ., , , , translation: there are heavy, bloody battles. i translation: there are heavy, bloody battles- i am — translation: there are heavy, bloody battles. i am proud _ translation: there are heavy, bloody battles. i am proud of _ translation: there are heavy, bloody battles. i am proud of my _ translation: there are heavy, bloody battles. i am proud of my soldiers - battles. i am proud of my soldiers who make superhuman efforts to maintain the pressure of the enemy. i am grateful to the world for the
6:03 am
colossal support to the garrison of mariupol. but colossal support to the garrison of mariu ol. �* . colossal support to the garrison of mariuol. �* . ., �*, mariupol. but that garrison's families are _ mariupol. but that garrison's families are worried - mariupol. but that garrison's families are worried and - mariupol. but that garrison's. families are worried and there mariupol. but that garrison's - families are worried and there are fears for the 200 trapped civilians including 30 children still hunkering in the plant alongside thousands of others in need of rescue from elsewhere in the shattered city. translation: , , ., translation: the second phase of the evacuation operation _ translation: the second phase of the evacuation operation in _ translation: the second phase of the evacuation operation in mariupol- evacuation operation in mariupol ended today with 344 people successfully evacuated from the city and outskirts of zaporizhia. 0ur and outskirts of zaporizhia. our team will greet them like the hundred and 50 who came from azovstal and they will get the necessary support from our state. russia's military says it will open humanitarian corridors out of the besieged steel complex for three days from thursday. but to pressure moscow to stop the fighting, the eu wants to stop the import of russian oil by the end of the year. but it
6:04 am
must have support from states heavily reliant on russian oil, such as slovakia and hungary, who say they cannot agree to that even with they cannot agree to that even with the offer of an extra year to comply. the offer of an extra year to coml . ~ . ., , the offer of an extra year to coml .~ . . , ., comply. what we have seen on the table is very _ comply. what we have seen on the table is very far _ comply. what we have seen on the table is very far from _ comply. what we have seen on the table is very far from what - comply. what we have seen on the table is very far from what we - comply. what we have seen on the table is very far from what we can l table is very far from what we can live with. not for the reasons of political hay store any issue but the hard physicalfacts on the ground, there is no substitute. but western countries are still intent on rearming ukraine. as russia continues its attacks in the east. these strikes in dnipro after an air raid siren, leaving residents a little time to scramble for cover. let's speak to our correspondent, joe inwood, who's in the western city of lviv. talk to me about the escalation of
6:05 am
fighting in the steelworks in mariupol. fighting in the steelworks in mariuol. ~ . fighting in the steelworks in mammal-— fighting in the steelworks in mariuol. ~ ., ~ ., , mariupol. what we know? if these re orts mariupol. what we know? if these reports are — mariupol. what we know? if these reports are true, _ mariupol. what we know? if these reports are true, it _ mariupol. what we know? if these reports are true, it seems - mariupol. what we know? if these reports are true, it seems we - mariupol. what we know? if these | reports are true, it seems we could be entering what would be the final phase of the battle for mariupol. for many of the fight for this southern port city has characterised the defiance of the ukrainians in the defiance of the ukrainians in the face of this invasion and they have held out ten weeks. but the defenders have been narrowed down to this small place called the azovstal steel plant we have spoken about so many dance. the russian said a couple of weeks ago they would try to starve them out but if these reports are true, and we should be careful, it is difficult to know what is going on on the ground, but if it is true they are going in for all—out assault, it will be bloody and very difficult. the commander on the ground said that it is. we could be entering the last days of the fight for mariupol. why does this matter? it is crucial because
6:06 am
securing this city is one of the strategic objectives. it gives them a land bridge to the crimean peninsula. more important, it will free up a large number of troops previously pinned down by the defenders in mariupol. it will free them up to continue the assault on them up to continue the assault on the rest of the east of ukraine. if the rest of the east of ukraine. if the steel plant falls it will be a big moment. the steel plant falls it will be a big moment-— the steel plant falls it will be a big moment. the steel plant falls it will be a bi moment. ., ., ., big moment. you are in lviv and i understand _ big moment. you are in lviv and i understand there _ big moment. you are in lviv and i understand there are _ big moment. you are in lviv and i understand there are missile - big moment. you are in lviv and i i understand there are missile strikes near where you are. yes understand there are missile strikes near where you are.— near where you are. yes that was 'ust over near where you are. yes that was just over a _ near where you are. yes that was just over a day — near where you are. yes that was just over a day ago, _ near where you are. yes that was just over a day ago, we _ near where you are. yes that was just over a day ago, we have - near where you are. yes that was | just over a day ago, we have three missile strikes, and more air raid sirens last night. this city has often felt removed from the war, a long way from the front line. but there was a reminder for people that this is a city and country at war. the mayor yesterday was angry and defiant but said what the city is going through is no different and no
6:07 am
worse than what many cities are going through here. what we see in the west is not the targeting of the city but of its rail infrastructure, the rail lines bringing in heavy equipment from the west to the east. if mariupol falls and troops equipment that comes through here can get to the ukrainian front lines. . ~ can get to the ukrainian front lines. ., ~' , ., amber heard has taken the stand for the first time in the defamation trial brought by her former husband johnny depp, telling the court he repeatedly struck her whilst he was drunk and taking drugs. mr depp is suing ms heard over a story she wrote in which she described herself as a domestic abuse victim. he denies the allegations. david sillito has been following their case. will you please state your name. yes, it is amber laura heard. amber heard — over the last three and a half weeks,
6:08 am
she has sat in the court each day and listen as a series and her ex—husband have described her as violent, emotionally unstable and a liar. this was finally her chance to give her side of the story. why are you here? i am here because my ex—husband is suing me for an op—ed i wrote. and how do you feel about that? i... i struggle to have the words. i struggle to find the words to describe how painful this is. this is horrible. this has been... this is the most painful and difficult thing i've ever gone through. this the beginning of her story of a marriage that she says left her injured and traumatised.
6:09 am
and sitting just feet away in front of her, the man who she says assaulted and abused her = johnny depp. do you remember the first time that he physically hit you? - yes. please tell the jury about it. she said johnny depp had been taking cocaine and it was a comment about one of his tattoos that led to abusive language and violence. he slapped me across the face. and i laughed. i laughed because i... i didn't know what else to do. i thought this must be a joke. he said, "do you think it's so funny?" and he slapped me again. it was, she says, just the beginning of years of abuse. and he was the love of my life. and he was. he was.
6:10 am
but he was also this other thing. he was also this other thing! and the other thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp sat head down with his notes and jellybea ns. all of it, he says, is untrue, but his ex—wife has much more to say. david sillito, bbc news. local elections are taking place today across england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. polling booths open at seven o'clock and our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. there are poles across all four nations today and it is complicated because not everybody has the same things. in because not everybody has the same thins. ., ., ., because not everybody has the same thin.s_ ., ., ., . ., , because not everybody has the same thins. ., ., _, , things. in scotland and wales you have elections _ things. in scotland and wales you have elections for _ things. in scotland and wales you have elections for all _ things. in scotland and wales you have elections for all local - have elections for all local councils. in northern ireland, it is the vote for the national assembly, 90 national assembly members being
6:11 am
elected. in england it is complicated because 146 councils are being elected stop for thousand seats in total up for grabs. there is a handy guide on the bbc website if you want to figure out in england if you want to figure out in england if you want to figure out in england if you should be voting today or not. as you say, the polls open at 7am and they are open till 10pm. the results will start to come in overnight. a lot of them will be tomorrow before we get the full picture. we are restrained in what we can say today. we cannot cover theissues we can say today. we cannot cover the issues or campaigns themselves. as i say, if you want to figure out if you are voting today, there is a guide on the bbc website.- if you are voting today, there is a guide on the bbc website. for more information on the latest developments and to find out what's happening in your area. visit... manchester city suffered a crushing champions league defeat last night
6:12 am
as they were knocked out by real madrid. mike's with us now. that is the result. it does not tell the story. the drama is the story. the timing is the story- _ the drama is the story. the timing is the story. one _ the drama is the story. the timing is the story. one of— the drama is the story. the timing is the story. one of the _ the drama is the story. the timing is the story. one of the most - is the story. one of the most remarkable collapses in timescales in champions league history. 0r in champions league history. or one of the most remarkable comebacks depending on your point of view. a . , , comebacks depending on your point of view. . , , , view. manchester city in complete control. view. manchester city in complete control- they _ view. manchester city in complete control. they had _ view. manchester city in complete control. they had won _ view. manchester city in complete control. they had won the - view. manchester city in complete control. they had won the first. view. manchester city in completej control. they had won the first leg 4-3 control. they had won the first leg 4—3 and they scored late on and in control of the second leg. and going into the 90th minute it meant they were two goals up in the tie on aggregate, on the 90th minute. you could be forgiven for going to bed, thinking it was over. there was injury time. real bring on a substitute, rodygo. to this point, they had not had a shot on target.
6:13 am
suddenly, rodygo comes on and scores twice in 90 seconds to take it to extra time. so it is level, aggregate. and you feel that knocks the stuffing out of manchester city. they conceded again. karim benzema scored another goal in this competition from the penalty spot to put madrid ahead in the time for the first time on the night and city could not recover and they were out. nobody could have seen that going into injury time at the end of normal time. and, well, the scenes at the end. pep guardiola, the manchester city manager picking his players off the floor. he said they have to process this. they do not have to process this. they do not have time to recover. the worst thing is they could be affected by this and it means they blow the premier league title race. they are only a point ahead. by the time they play newcastle on sunday, liverpool could be top because they play first over the weekend.—
6:14 am
could be top because they play first over the weekend. games like this do not ha en over the weekend. games like this do not happen often- _ over the weekend. games like this do not happen often. obviously, - over the weekend. games like this do not happen often. obviously, it - over the weekend. games like this do not happen often. obviously, it is - over the weekend. games like this do not happen often. obviously, it is a i not happen often. obviously, it is a disaster for manchester city but for neutral fans, disaster for manchester city but for neutralfans, this is drama played out. something you did not thing could happen. out. something you did not thing could happen-— could happen. pure theatre. unscripted. _ could happen. pure theatre. unscripted. nobody - could happen. pure theatre. unscripted. nobody could i could happen. pure theatre. - unscripted. nobody could foresee this. the commentators at that point in the game, oh, city could score again, they are so much on topics might vary action says it all. speechless at times. it goes back to the kind of nights we had in the european cup final 1999 when manchester united came back. 0le gunnar solskjaer scoring late on. it is one of those one—off occasions that live in the memory a long time. we will see more of it later on. thanks. now the weather with carol this morning not particularly a cold start. we have mist fog across devon
6:15 am
and cornwall and other parts of the south of england. mainly dry across england and wales today. some rain in scotland. if we start in scotland, the first batch moves to the north sea and then we have light rain coming into the west. northern ireland, a cloudy start but some bright intervals developed. in england and wales, a sunny start for many. some cloud developing. that might produce an isolated shower across south wales, south—west england and the midlands, but they will be the exception rather than the rule. you will notice it will feel quite warm. temperature 16 in aberdeen, 21, possibly 22 towards the south—east. this evening and overnight, some cloud around. clear skies. some mist fog forming. a new weather front skies. some mist fog forming. a new weatherfront in the skies. some mist fog forming. a new weather front in the north—west will introduce heavier rain across
6:16 am
western scotland and northern ireland. it will not be cold so not a cold start to the day. rain move south, turning heavy at times across north—west england. behind it, brighter skies with showers. ahead of it, although we start on a sunny note, the cloud will continue to build. but it will still be mild for the time of year. thank you very much. we've been following the story of martin hibbert on breakfast — he's the manchester arena bomb survivor who was told he would never walk again after suffering a serious spinal injury. since then, martin's taken on some massive fundraising challenges, but has also been an source of inspiration to others. graham satchell went to meet one of them. it was like something out of a movie. my head started spinning. it was awful.
6:17 am
it was this sinking feeling of what is life going to be like? people with this syndrome are left in a wheelchair. people can't walk. they can't live their lives. so it was utterly terrifying, absolutely terrifying. pete watts has always been fit and active. he served as a royal engineer in bosnia. when he left the army, he took up mountain biking. but everything changed for him in an instant. it was just a normal day. i'd been out for a walk, came home, bent over to pick up my shoes and felt a twinge in my back. as i stood up, i thought that didn't feel right. i'd had back problems in the past, but i thought i'd done it again. pete ended up in hospital and was told something he will never forget. i was lying in hospital in a&e and a doctor said to me, "you need to lie completely still, otherwise you are going to be paralysed and left incontinent for life."
6:18 am
"so you need an operation today." what followed was emergency surgery to fix a ruptured disc at the base of his spine. pete didn't know if he would ever walk again. the next morning, he was woken up by a nurse. she said, right, pete, let's see if you can stand up. so just for that couple of seconds between her saying that and me actually attempting it, again just terrifying. what happens if i don't stand up now? so i did stand up. and that was good. there start your hope. i can stand up. so i was better than i could have been. the worst outcome wasn't going to happen. pete was sent home with no guidance and no help. his back was fixed, but he had serious nerve damage in his legs. he admits there were very dark days. i wasn't able to work, i couldn't live my normal life. ifelt like i'd lost me. ifelt like i was missing myself, if you know what i mean. it was, it was just
6:19 am
an awful, dark time. but then, you start finding things that inspire you. because as i was scrolling through endless things on my phone, just trying to find something to find some hope from some inspiration from, here's this guy who's going to take a wheelchair up kilimanjaro. martin hibbert going up snowdon in his wheelchair. martin was left paralysed from the waist down after the manchester arena attack. but he is heading to africa in a few weeks to climb mount kilimanjaro. to see a guy who is so positive and so motivated, it is just brilliant. it does, it rubs off. and then i realised i can put one foot in front of the other, that is my thing, i can still do that, even if i can't get to the bottom of the street and back, at this time. i'll progress. spurred on by martin's example, pete started to get up and out. he has to concentrate on every step. his injury means messages from his brain to his legs don't work as well as they used to.
6:20 am
walking on a gravel or textured surface was just unbelievable. it was almost like my brain couldn't compute the information. there are times where i feel like my legs aren't my own and i have to remind myself right, right leg forward, left leg, and then it comes back. hello, martin, how are you doing? i'm really good, peter, how are you? i'm very well, thank you, it's great to see you. a quick surprise. we arranged for pete to have a video call with martin. i think the main thing that came across from the way you are and the things that you do is it's not about what i can't do, it's about what i can do. and that is what i really realised. 0k, there are things i can't do, but i can put one foot in front of the other. when people tell me i can't do something, it makes me more determined to do it. but all i'm trying to do isjust make my life as i did previously, and i don't see why
6:21 am
being in a wheelchair, or having a spinal—cord injury should change that. there is a funny side to this. for years and years, i have been joking about getting smiley faces tattooed on my toes. and, all of a sudden, i was like, hang on, i can't feel my feet any more. now is the time. so i have done it. i've had smiley faces tattooed on all my toes. nice, great, well done, mate. thank you very much and thank you so much, martin. ijust can't tell you what it means. and all the very best for your challenge. hopefully, we will meet up in person. when i'm back from kilimanjaro. all right, mate, look after yourself. will do, you, too. take care. so time for the big reveal. prepare yourself for pete's tattooed toes. ten smiley faces and a motto — it's all about life. it's just a funny thing. instead of looking at my feet and feeling sad, they make me happy now. i've got happy toes and yeah, i've got a message to remind me it's all about life.
6:22 am
that particular twist i was not expecting. but why not? absolutely. he is right, it is all about life, charlie. martin willjoin us later. he is one of those people, he is an inspiration. you can see that for a lot of people, but he plays it down, like people like that always do. that will be just after a day. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mail's front page features this image of amber heard after she took to the stand for the first time yesterday in a defamation trial her ex—husband johnny depp has brought against her. the telegraph reports that men with "spare tyres" of excess fat around their waist are at greater risk of dying from prostate cancer — that's according to a new study. the guardian features an image
6:23 am
of the hand of god moment after maradona's world cup shirt sold for £7.1 million. and on that same story — "the hand of wad" is the metro's headline. you get the picture. it is a lot of money. i think it was an anonymous bidder. i have found a story about the weather. i am desperate for decent weather and this in the daily express suggests britain will bask in the 73 fahrenheit sunshine next week possibly. a high of 70 fahrenheit on the cards according to the met office. i will read this quote, a frontal system is coming in around tuesday to wednesday. it will ride up tuesday to wednesday. it will ride up over the north giving a little bit of rain but underneath that a warm plume coming up from france and spain. we will have to fact check this with carol. is this across the uk? that is the
6:24 am
prospect, yes. very quickly, always interesting, insect life. apparently there are fewer insects than there have been for 17 years and the reason they know this... i think i knew this. they check this by setting cars off on journeys and seeing how many insects are splattered on the number plate. seriously? you would think it would be more scientific. that is the way they have done it. 700 people clean their number plates and they count how many are splattered and that is how they know. thank you. it may seem like spring comes round more quickly every year, i have not felt that this year. there's some evidence to back up that spring has indeed sprung earlier. a study of a woodland near 0xford suggests the timing of the season
6:25 am
has shifted forward by three weeks, compared to the 1940s. researchers have come to that conclusion because the great tit birds that live in wytham woods are laying their eggs earlier than ever. victoria gill reports. more than 500 plant species, 800 types of butterflies and moths, and, in one woodland site of about a square mile, there are 1,200 specially built nest boxes. because wytham woods near oxford is a very special site of scientific interest. is this officially the most studied woodland in the world, do you think? i mean, it certainly must be one of them. we published more than 350 papers just from the wytham tit project alone. oh, wow, that is impressive. this year marks the 75th anniversary of the wytham great tit project. scientists have systematically monitored every chick hatched in their nest boxes here since 1947. and we are about to meet the newest generation.
6:26 am
wow, how many are there? eight. that's a very standard size for a great tit. eight seems a lot. eight very hungry babies to feed. you can actually see most of their digestive systems. they are all transparent. transparent, mouths open, "feed me, feed me". now these parents have got a lot of work to do. they have got to find about 10,000 caterpillars for these. 10,000 to get them to fledge? that's a lot of work. so i guess mum and dad will be out just gathering caterpillars now and just repeatedly back to the nest. all day long. people are quite divided on whether they think they are cute or ugly. i think they are cute ugly. they are amazing. it is precisely because this has been a continuous study for all those decades that researchers have been able to see and to measure the change in the timing of spring here.
6:27 am
the 75 years that we have been studying the tits here, we have seen quite a marked shift in the timing of egg laying. so now they are laying about three weeks earlier than they were in the 1940s. that is a big shift. exactly, the tits here are actually managing to track the other members of their food chain quite well. so the caterpillars they feed on and the oak trees the caterpillars feed on. so both the caterpillars and the oaks have also shifted their timing earlier, so the whole sort of food chain has shifted earlier in the spring. the woods were bequeathed to oxford university by a wealthy local family back in 1942. since then, they have been the site of dozens of different scientific projects. but the longest running is the great tit study, which chris has been involved in for more than half a century. what has been your involvement with the studies here? i came in �*57. and it is changing, but, from year to year, it's
6:28 am
a lovely piece of woodland which is maintaining pretty much the same sort of thing. and what are your reflections on the seasonal shift? my thoughts are that is fine. unless it gets to limits where the trees or the caterpillars all the birds can't do that shift because it's too big. and that is still the question... that is still a big question to answer and a very interesting one. the work here goes on. and whenever spring happens, it's a busy season for the birds and the scientists, because, as our climate changes, these rare, decades—long studies that track exactly how the natural world responds become more important as time goes on. victoria gill, bbc news, wytham wood. time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins.
6:29 am
police have named the man who died after being found with stab wounds yards from st paul's cathedral in central london. from st paul's cathedral in central emmanuel 0dunlami, 32, from romford was discovered injured in gresham street at 11.30 on sunday evening. mr 0dunlami was taken to the royal london hospital, but later died from his injuries. muslim households in the capital have reported struggling to provide enough food for theirfamilies as they broke the fast during ramadan. according to the charity islamic relief, there's also been a significant increase in the use of food banks since the last two lockdowns, exacerbated by the rising cost of living and the pandemic. in case it's passed you by, londoners are heading to the polls this morning. all 32 london borough councils are taking part in local elections. for more information on the issues and how to vote, head to the bbc london website, the address is on your screen now. a deaf school in north london has enoyed a surprise visit from strictly come dancing winner rose ayling—ellis and her dance partner giovanni pernice.
6:30 am
the visit was to mark their nomination for a tv bafta for the must—see moment on the bbc show which included a section dancing in silence. the pair chatted with the pupils from the frank barnes school for deaf children in kings cross. it was really, really lovely because it was the first time i'd seen a group of deaf children for quite a long time. and it was so nice to see them looking really, really excited. it became like a big party. and so funny. deaf children are so funny. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. just the metropolitan line with minor delays 0nto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. the downpours from yesterday, welcomed by some, have cleared. high pressure has been building overnight squeezing everything out of the way.
6:31 am
it's also dragged in some warmer air and you can see by this yellow and orange colour, so temperatures set to rise. first thing this morning, a bit of mistiness into the west out towards berkshire but it will melt away. plenty of sunshine. a bit more cloud this afternoon and we could see an isolated shower, but fairly hit and miss and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. 0vernight, dry, largely clear and we could see a bit of mistiness developing and the minimum temperature between seven and 10 celsius. as we head into friday, it starts off clear with plenty of sunshine but you will notice this cold front starts to sink south. that will introduce a bit more cloud as we head through friday afternoon, but staying dry and temperatures tomorrow still warm. we still have a bit of sunshine. 21 celsius is the maximum. you will notice the rain sneaks in as we head into the evening, clearing through the early hours of saturday morning. high pressure is in charge all through the weekend so it's fairly settled. perhaps a bit more cloud on saturday but some sunny spells and temperatures throughout staying in the low 20s, and potentially getting warmer by the end of next week. i'm back with the latest
6:32 am
from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and victoria. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and victoria derbyshire. the oil company shell is expected to report massive profits when they release their latest financial results this morning — it follows bp's bumper profits which were released earlier this week. ben's here with the details. that's right, increases in oil and gas prices are translating into big profits. we had bp early in the week. we're expecting to hear from shell later on this morning about their profits. so what can we expect? lets take a look. last year shell reported an annual profit ofjust over £15 billion. for the first three months of that year it was around £2.5billion — and today we get figures for the equivalent period in this year.
6:33 am
but this year, world events are having a specific effect on profits. russia s invasion of ukraine in february and sanctions from western countries have pushed up the price of oil and gas. russia is the world s largest exporter of natural gas and second biggest exporter of crude oil. as a consequence, analysts thought that shell and bp would report combined profits of over £10.5 billion. actually, earlier this week bp revealed it made even more than was forecast. the question, are we just looking at a one—off bumper year? at the end of last year shell posted fairly decent numbers, largely through their integrated gas division and since then, gas prices have remained elevated and it's likely they will post even better numbers. i think what they want to
6:34 am
see from the energy companies is a willingness on their part to be seen to be investing in renewables. we saw that last week when he said bp would invest £18 billion in renewables by the end of the decade. shell has already outlined a project of £25 billion by the end of the decade, so as long as they keep banging that drum, they should keep the politicians on the back foot. this shows that despite having to pull out of russia, these companies are benefitting from higher oil and gas prices. meanwhile, households are facing extra financial pressures. the government has so far ruled out a windfall tax on the oil companies, despite calls from opposition parties for one to be imposed. the other big announcement today — which affects us all — is the bank of england decision on interest rates. it's widely expected the base rate will go up. that's the rate other banks pay to borrow money — and it's 0.75% at the moment. if that does go up, so does
6:35 am
the rate you pay on loans, credit cards and mortgages. and it would be the fourth rate rise we've seen in 6 months. we'll find out at midday. and we will get the results from shell at seven o'clock and i will have the details as soon as we get them. later this morning we'll be looking again at the issue of rising direct debits for energy bills — there's concern some have gone up more than necessary and lots of you contacted us about it yesterday. so we'll be speaking to a panel of experts about gas and electricity costs and if you want to put a question to them, get in touch on email at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk, or tweet us using the hashtag bbcbreakfast.
6:36 am
that is coming later. there is a tale to tell from a big game of football. b, tale to tell from a big game of football. �* ., ., ., . football. a tale of how cruel football. a tale of how cruel football can _ football. a tale of how cruel football can be _ football. a tale of how cruel football can be for- football. a tale of how cruel football can be for fans - football. a tale of how cruel - football can be for fans suddenly seeing _ football can be for fans suddenly seeing theirteam a football can be for fans suddenly seeing their team a snatch defeat from _ seeing their team a snatch defeat from the — seeing their team a snatch defeat from the jaws of victory, but for the neutral, how incredibly entertaining and dramatic football can he _ entertaining and dramatic football can be. when things turn around so quickly— can be. when things turn around so quickly in _ can be. when things turn around so quickly in a — can be. when things turn around so quickly in a short space of time. i was going — quickly in a short space of time. i was going to say, real madrid, the most _ was going to say, real madrid, the most successful club in the history of the _ most successful club in the history of the european cup. find most successful club in the history of the european cup.— of the european cup. and have a histo of of the european cup. and have a history of coming _ of the european cup. and have a history of coming back _ of the european cup. and have a history of coming back this - of the european cup. and have a i history of coming back this season. but you think, that pedigree, that must give them some mental strength. interesting with his manchester city have been— interesting with his manchester city have been in the champions league final before but have not won it yet and may— final before but have not won it yet and may he — final before but have not won it yet and may be the experience does come into piay~ _ and may be the experience does come into play. this was a different type of story— into play. this was a different type of story because they were two goals ahead _ of story because they were two goals ahead on— of story because they were two goals ahead on aggregate going into injury time, _ ahead on aggregate going into injury time, 90 _ ahead on aggregate going into injury time, 90 seconds left and then it all turns— time, 90 seconds left and then it all turns around, so it is liverpool
6:37 am
against _ all turns around, so it is liverpool against real madrid in the champions league _ against real madrid in the champions league final which throws us back to 2018 and _ league final which throws us back to 2018 and liverpool looking to avenge that day's _ 2018 and liverpool looking to avenge that day's defeat. but what drama. manchester city were cruising towards — manchester city were cruising towards the champions league final in the _ towards the champions league final in the hopes of lifting the trophy were _ in the hopes of lifting the trophy were very— in the hopes of lifting the trophy were very much alive until those 90 seconds _ were very much alive until those 90 seconds that changed everything. as they suffered one of the most dramatic— they suffered one of the most dramatic collapses in football history — dramatic collapses in football history. a stunning injury time come back from _ history. a stunning injury time come back from real madrid who went on to win 6-5— back from real madrid who went on to win 6-5 on— back from real madrid who went on to win 6—5 on aggregate. what an extraordinary night. manchester city had been just a few minutes away from another champions league final. yes, real madrid have won a record 13 european titles, but this will haunt city for a long time. yes, it's tough for us. we cannot deny it. we were so close to the champions league final. we didn't play much good in the first half. we didn't find our game, but it's normal, you know, in this competition, it's normal. in the second half,
6:38 am
it was much better. and unfortunately we could not finish when we were close. after last week's seven—goal spectacular, the first half fell strangely flat, like aymeric laporte and tensions rose quickly to the surface. city had the best of the first half chances but real were doing their best to rein them in. it was that type of match. inside the last 20 minutes, remember city only needed a draw, but riyad mahrez lashed in a goal that would surely see them safely through to the final. jack grealish could have put some added gloss on city's night. not to worry, time was almost up. there's always time. in the final minute the real substitute rodrygo gave them hope. a minute later, bedlam in the bernebau. rodrygo again. extra time and maybe penalties would have to separate them, but instead it was just one penalty. benzema fouled by diaz and the frenchman was the calmest amongst 60,000 who would go on to party long into the madrid night.
6:39 am
city can take absolutely no joy that they played their part to the full in one of the best european cup ties of all time. but this was supposed to be the season that they imposed their greatness on this competition. instead, it is the greatest, real who will take their place in the paris final against liverpool. well the papers were printed, late last night, as we waited for the final whistle. let's take a look at what they're saying. "kar crash" is the mirror's headline with karim benzima's celebrations, after his extra—time penalty, that confirmed real madrid's position in the final. that image again in the telegraph, which describes last night as "city's real nightmare" with pep guardiola admitting city, choked after real madrid's late comeback. and the guardian writes that city will need a few days
6:40 am
to come to terms with the defeat after what it describes as "mayhem in madrid". well the european semi final drama doesn't end there for the british clubs. there are two sides, who are 90 minutes away, from the europa league final — but both will start a goal down. rangers will have home advantage at least, as they take on rb leipzig, at ibrox, having lost the first leg 1-0. while west ham lost 2—1, to eintracht frankfurt at the london stadium last week — if they can get a result in germany, it'd be the first european final they've reached since 1976. if you get to the semifinal of the european competition, it is huge for anybody, and big for me as well. i want to take the team to the final. i'm preparing the team to go to the final. we believe that if we get it right, we can do so. we have to manage that and the players are in the same place as i am. we know that
6:41 am
frankfurt are in front and we have a bit to do. the women's super league title race, will go to the final day of the season after second placed arsenal, beat tottenham 3 nil. caitlin foord scored twice, her second was the goal of the game. arsenal are a point behind leaders chelsea. elsewhere birmingham have been relegated, after being thumped 6 nil, by manchester city . andy murray, faces world number one novak djokovic, in the 3rd round of the madrid 0pen today. its the first time the pair have faced each other in five years. also in action is fellow briton cameron norrie who plays carlos alcaraz garfia. norrie knocked out john isner yesterday. dan evansjoins him in the last 16, when he'll play number six seed andrey rublev. seeing the clay and reburied it is a warm up for the french open. and we have waited five years for novak djokovic and andy murray, and it will be at 11 o'clock today. we are auoin to will be at 11 o'clock today. we are going to talk _ will be at 11 o'clock today. we are going to talk to — will be at 11 o'clock today. we are going to talk to olly _ will be at 11 o'clock today. we are going to talk to olly who - will be at 11 o'clock today. we are going to talk to olly who saw - will be at 11 o'clock today. we are going to talk to olly who saw the | going to talk to 0lly who saw the whole thing unfold and i don't know if he got muchly. see you later,
6:42 am
mike. for many people fishing offers the chance to escape everyday life and be alongside nature. that can be particularly beneficial for people with health problems — and so a fishing school in north yorkshire is hosting special sessions for people living with cancer. phil bodmer went along to find out more. it's long been considered as a fine way to unwind. a few hours spent by a lake or river, freshwater fishing. this is your backstop, and you accelerate. now the well—known angler marina gibson has co—founded a charity to help people living with cancer discover the therapeutic benefits of fishing. it was inspired by the memoir of mick may, himself a keen angler, through his book, cancer and pisces. if you've read mick's book, you totally understand why fishing helped him through his cancerjourney. it's just a really tranquil and very relaxing environment.
6:43 am
and we hope that by offering these free fishing centres every month that people can come and enjoy, relax, de—stress and use this as escapism. the stunning swinton park in north yorkshire provides the backdrop for people to share their experiences. membership of the fishing club is free. it's been really nice to be able to talk to people who have gone through similar circumstances. when i was 34, i was diagnosed with breast cancer and i had a very young family and went through my treatment at leeds and i am very fortunate, that 18 years later, due to all of the specialist treatment that i had and all the care that i had, that i am still here today. nicky swann has stage four breast cancer. she says it is incurable but manageable. it's just something that we live with and we manage. it's quite full on with having a family of four children, but i feel i have been very
6:44 am
fortunate that i've had some very good treatment for that. for those closest to her the fishing club provides an important release. watching people dealing with cancer, it's always easier for them to talk to other people who have cancer, so the ability to meet like—minded people who are going through similar experiences is very important. it's a time for the two of us to have a day together and not be thinking about medication, treatment, cancer and just having that wonderful time in beautiful surroundings where we can lose yourself in the world of fishing. the charity hopes by casting out to cancer patients, more people may discover the benefits of this popular pastime. beginner or expert, organisers say no one will feel like a fish out of water. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. i don't know if you heard victoria early on talking about 73 degrees coming at the end of the week. right
6:45 am
or wrong? more or less. and today we could have 72 degrees, 22 celsius in new money, and what we have at the moment is a cool start to the day for many, especially where we have broken cloud and temperatures have fallen away overnight and there's also mist and fog across the south—west of england, devon and cornwall in particular and also southern parts, but that will lift and as you can see, many parts starting off with blue sky as we have this morning in northamptonshire. high pressure is in charge of the weather with the fronts toppling around the top of it meaning we will see more cloud for scotland and northern ireland at times with some rain but even so it should brighten up. you can see on the radar picture the first batch of rain moving across eastern scotland into the south of scotland and northern ireland and the isle of man and that will peter out as it goes eastwards and some more light and patchy rain coming across north—west scotland affecting northern ireland for a time as well but nonetheless
6:46 am
there will still be some sunny intervals at times but it is england and wales that will see the lion's share of the sunshine today. fairweather cloud bubbling up through the day and you might catch an isolated shower, no more than that, and it won't be like yesterday across the midlands, south wales and the south—west. temperatures up to 21 or 22 degrees in the south—east but feeling pleasant where ever you are, especially in the sunshine and the pollen levels today are high across the bulk of england and wales. we are talking tree pollen primarily but we are getting into the grass pollen season is well now. and as we had through the evening and overnight there will be clear skies and patchy mist and fog forming under new weather front will coming across parts of scotland and northern ireland bringing heavy and persistent rain with it. it will not be a cold night and in fact it will be a cold night and in fact it will be a cold night and in fact it will be a milder night than last night. so tomorrow southern area start with sunshine and the cloud will build through the day as the weather front sinks south and there will be heavy
6:47 am
rain at times across north—west england getting into north—west wales and behind that for scotland and northern ireland some sunshine but also showers. as i mentioned, the cloud building ahead of the weather front as it sinks south but weather front as it sinks south but we are still looking at 20 or 21 degrees into the south—east and 13 or 14 as we push further north. friday into saturday, you can see how the weather front sinks south so we will see rain getting into southern areas but we do have high pressure building in as well in a new area, so saturday morning, the rain should have cleared and where we will be looking at a lot of dry weather and one or two showers coming out of the thick cloud across parts of scotland and northern england and again temperatures up to about 20 degrees and a quick look at what is happening on sunday, again, a lot of dry weather but with weather fronts coming in across scotland and also northern ireland, at times you will see some rain, but temperature —wise we are still in pretty good shape, if you like it that bit milder and temperatures still above average which at this
6:48 am
time of year is between 12 and the north and 16 in the south. so, victoria, bang on. about time. yes, night to have a bit of warmth- — about time. yes, night to have a bit of warmth. she _ about time. yes, night to have a bit of warmth. she never _ about time. yes, night to have a bit of warmth. she never says - about time. yes, night to have a bit of warmth. she never says that - about time. yes, night to have a bit of warmth. she never says that to i of warmth. she never says that to me. that of warmth. she never says that to me- that has _ of warmth. she never says that to me. that has never— of warmth. she never says that to me. that has never happened. . of warmth. she never says that to i me. that has never happened. chalk it up. me. that has never happened. chalk it u -. . . me. that has never happened. chalk it u . _ ., , . ., me. that has never happened. chalk itu. ., , ., see me. that has never happened. chalk it up-_ see you i it up. that is so not true. see you later, it up. that is so not true. see you later. carol. _ the final preparations are underway for the queen's platinum jubilee celebrations and one of this most anticipated events of the bank holiday weekend will be the people's pageant. community groups from all over the country will take part in the procession, which tells the story of the queen s 70—year reign in four acts. fiona lamdin is in coventry for us this morning with one of the groups taking part. how's it looking fiona ? this is just this isjust one this is just one of the horses, and they had the brief of doing the queen's favourite things and they
6:49 am
have made ten horses and katie is the jockey riding that and if you come in here we have a boat, and this is possibly my favourite thing, the corgis. we have a pack of 20 corgis and this one here, they have individual names, this is susan, the queen's very first corgi when she was younger and they are going to be completely mischievous and they all have different facial expressions. some have tongues in tongues out and some have their tails up and we have this one is, very regal. all sorts of things going on which we will show you in a moment, but of course these are not the only group taking part in the pageant as groups up and down the country have been doing their thing to get ready and we've been taking a look what is going on. it's the carnival finale. the platinum jubilee people's pageant. on sunday the 5th ofjune, 10,000 performers will parade through the streets of westminster, up the mall, passing buckingham palace. the procession is split into four acts, bringing to life iconic
6:50 am
moments from the last seven decades of her majesty's reign. chapter one takes us back to her early years in the 1940s. so, our piece, the princess and the dragon, represents the queen before her coronation, so we see the young dancer dancing up the mall and we see behind her the huge dragon representing the power and the wisdom of the coronation. and she is currently kept in pieces in these two crates here in somerset just to get a sense of the scale, she is absolutely huge. these are her ears and here are the scales, six metres of them. so we call the dragon the hatchling. she is the size of a double—decker bus. her head is about the size of a small fiat, so she is huge, and completely human powered. she is very lightweight. the technology we are using is an amalgamation of kite technology and what we used in war horse, so our director is one
6:51 am
of the puppetry directors of war horse and we have amplified that technique 15—fold, so you have a cast of 30 puppeteers bringing her down the mall. with a wingspan of 20 metres, and to give you an idea of how that big is, that's about the size of the mall itself, so she is going to have an extremely grand presence when we see her out. the parade will also mark the queen's wedding to the duke of edinburgh, her love of nature and commitment to the commonwealth. chapter 11 of the procession brings us up to date. this large mobile float will be a stage for a diverse cast of 90 able—bodied and disabled circus performers. the centrepiece, an artist suspended beneath a huge helium balloon bearing the image of her majesty. we've got an amazing guy who does this whole breakdance piece on crutches, the wheelchair basketball team, trampolinists flying up and down the float and also other surprises as well. you might also spot a number
6:52 am
of national treasures. ed sheeran, sir cliff richard and gary lineker — just some of the celebrities who will also be taking part. it's thought hundreds of thousands will line the streets to enjoy this great spectacle. it is expected her majesty will watch from buckingham palace. we are in coverntry this morning and we willjust look at we are in coverntry this morning and we will just look at these amazing puppets. these are ten of the queens horses. tell me what your brief was. well, the brief was to think about the queen's favourite things in her life and what came to mind straightaway was her love of course and all of the horses she had an you will see some corgis and things and we wanted to have a lot of fun in our section with animals, swans, mayhem, really. find our section with animals, swans, mayhem. really-— our section with animals, swans, mayhem, really. and 'ust look at this detail. *
6:53 am
mayhem, really. and 'ust look at this detail. this _ mayhem, really. and 'ust look at this detail. this is _ mayhem, really. and just look at this detail. this is one _ mayhem, really. and just look at this detail. this is one of- mayhem, really. and just look at this detail. this is one of the - this detail. this is one of the jockeys. look at her costume. we have lovely gold coughs, red and purple, ever so regal. very royal. let's see the rest of it. we purple, ever so regal. very royal. let's see the rest of it.— purple, ever so regal. very royal. let's see the rest of it. we have a roblem let's see the rest of it. we have a problem with _ let's see the rest of it. we have a problem with the _ let's see the rest of it. we have a problem with the legs _ let's see the rest of it. we have a problem with the legs because . let's see the rest of it. we have a i problem with the legs because they are going backwards now. these horses are _ are going backwards now. these horses are galloping _ are going backwards now. these horses are galloping backwards. | are going backwards now. these - horses are galloping backwards. they will need a bit — horses are galloping backwards. they will need a bit of _ horses are galloping backwards. tue: will need a bit of tweaking. horses are galloping backwards. they will need a bit of tweaking. you - will need a bit of tweaking. you have a couple — will need a bit of tweaking. you have a couple of— will need a bit of tweaking. you have a couple of weeks. when you are asked to do it, you were delighted? i was delighted, but i was delighted because the whole outdoor arts sector are getting a real platform and i think it must be one of the first times that companies like imagine —— emergency exit are getting a voice and its carnival and street theatre and i think it's brilliant. �* . . street theatre and i think it's brilliant. �*, , street theatre and i think it's brilliant. ., brilliant. let's see some of the amazin: brilliant. let's see some of the amazing things _ brilliant. let's see some of the amazing things we _ brilliant. let's see some of the amazing things we are - brilliant. let's see some of the| amazing things we are making. brilliant. let's see some of the - amazing things we are making. good morning to you. some of the boats. yes, these are four of the bluebottle boats, and bluebottle was a present— bluebottle boats, and bluebottle was a present to prince philip and the queen— a present to prince philip and the queen for— a present to prince philip and the
6:54 am
queen for their wedding and prince philip _ queen for their wedding and prince philip had — queen for their wedding and prince philip had a nautical career in the navy— philip had a nautical career in the navy and — philip had a nautical career in the navy and it — philip had a nautical career in the navy and it went into disrepair and they had _ navy and it went into disrepair and they had it — navy and it went into disrepair and they had it repaired the year before he died _ they had it repaired the year before he died and it's quite significant. so you _ he died and it's quite significant. so you will— he died and it's quite significant. so you will have people walking down the mall in those. four so you will have people walking down the mall in those.— so you will have people walking down the mall in those._ i - the mall in those. four of them. i know you — the mall in those. four of them. i know you are _ the mall in those. four of them. i know you are not _ the mall in those. four of them. i know you are not meant - the mall in those. four of them. i know you are not meant to - the mall in those. four of them. i know you are not meant to have i know you are not meant to have favourites, but i am keen on the corgis. let's spend a bit of time with the corgis. they have all got different facial expressions and you have got different names for them. introduce us. t have got different names for them. introduce us— introduce us. i said to the designer that i introduce us. i said to the designer that i wanted _ introduce us. i said to the designer that i wanted them _ introduce us. i said to the designer that i wanted them to _ introduce us. i said to the designer that i wanted them to have - introduce us. i said to the designer that i wanted them to have a - that i wanted them to have a personality and i want some of them to he _ personality and i want some of them to be cheeky, some of them to be grumpy. _ to be cheeky, some of them to be grumpy, some of them to be bright and intelligent and of course, this i grumpy, some of them to be bright and intelligent and of course, - and intelligent and of course, this one is— and intelligent and of course, this one is susan. let's meet this one. tell us— one is susan. let's meet this one. tell us more — one is susan. let's meet this one. tell us more about susan. | one is susan. let's meet this one. tell us more about susan.- tell us more about susan. i think she was the _ tell us more about susan. i think she was the queen's _ tell us more about susan. i think she was the queen's first - tell us more about susan. i think she was the queen's first corgi i tell us more about susan. i think i she was the queen's first corgi and all of— she was the queen's first corgi and all of her_
6:55 am
she was the queen's first corgi and all of her life she has had a passion _ all of her life she has had a passion for the corgis and i think they are — passion for the corgis and i think they are known for being quite naughty — they are known for being quite naughty. so they are known for being quite nau:h . , , naughty. so they will be interacting with the audience. _ naughty. so they will be interacting with the audience. let's _ naughty. so they will be interacting with the audience. let's not - naughty. so they will be interacting with the audience. let's not forget| with the audience. let's not forget the swans. , ., , , , , ., , the swans. the swans, yes. the swans have always — the swans. the swans, yes. the swans have always been _ the swans. the swans, yes. the swans have always been connected _ the swans. the swans, yes. the swans have always been connected with - the swans. the swans, yes. the swans have always been connected with the l have always been connected with the royal family. and i got interested in the _ royal family. and i got interested in the swans because of the painter stantey— in the swans because of the painter stanley spencer who did paintings of swan upping which is a tradition that goes— swan upping which is a tradition that goes back to the 12th century where _ that goes back to the 12th century where you — that goes back to the 12th century where you count the swans to see how they have _ where you count the swans to see how they have survived over the year and it's quite _ they have survived over the year and it's quite a _ they have survived over the year and it's quite a comical ceremony but it's quite a comical ceremony but it's also— it's quite a comical ceremony but it's also got — it's quite a comical ceremony but it's also got that tradition which is very— it's also got that tradition which is very quirky and very british and very english. is very quirky and very british and very english-— is very quirky and very british and very english. talking about quirky i will have a go _ very english. talking about quirky i will have a go at _ very english. talking about quirky i will have a go at seeing _ very english. talking about quirky i will have a go at seeing what - very english. talking about quirky i will have a go at seeing what this l will have a go at seeing what this costume looks like. so, you have put special piping in. tt costume looks like. so, you have put special piping in-_ special piping in. it gives it riuidi , special piping in. it gives it rigidity. but _ special piping in. it gives it rigidity, but it _ special piping in. it gives it rigidity, but it is _ special piping in. it gives it rigidity, but it is flexible i special piping in. it gives itj rigidity, but it is flexible as well — rigidity, but it is flexible as well. .. .
6:56 am
rigidity, but it is flexible as well. 4' , ., rigidity, but it is flexible as well. ~ , ., ., ., well. so, i will keep hold of that. peole well. so, i will keep hold of that. people will _ well. so, i will keep hold of that. people will be — well. so, i will keep hold of that. people will be walking _ well. so, i will keep hold of that. people will be walking down - well. so, i will keep hold of that. people will be walking down the | well. so, i will keep hold of that. - people will be walking down the mall as swans, dancing. thea;r people will be walking down the mall as swans, dancing.— as swans, dancing. they will be swannin: as swans, dancing. they will be swanning down _ as swans, dancing. they will be swanning down the _ as swans, dancing. they will be swanning down the mall. - as swans, dancing. they will be swanning down the mall. and i as swans, dancing. they will be - swanning down the mall. and also, what will they _ swanning down the mall. and also, what will they be _ swanning down the mall. and also, what will they be doing _ swanning down the mall. and also, what will they be doing with - swanning down the mall. and also, what will they be doing with the - what will they be doing with the corgis? they are on wheels. thea;r corgis? they are on wheels. they will be trying _ corgis? they are on wheels. they will be trying to _ corgis? they are on wheels. they will be trying to control _ corgis? they are on wheels. they will be trying to control them. if they can — will be trying to control them. if the can. ~ ,.,,.,_ will be trying to control them. if the can. ~ , .,�* ., will be trying to control them. if the can. , .,�* ., ., they can. we probably won't have a swan and a — they can. we probably won't have a swan and a corgi _ they can. we probably won't have a swan and a corgi but _ they can. we probably won't have a swan and a corgi but it _ they can. we probably won't have a swan and a corgi but it will- they can. we probably won't have a swan and a corgi but it will be - they can. we probably won't have a swan and a corgi but it will be the i swan and a corgi but it will be the sort of effect and this is what people can expect to see but done a little more professionally than me. and just to say, if you cannot get to the mall, you can't get to london, it will be televised, so swans and corgis, the queen's favourite things in just a few weeks. well done, fiona, that's the first time i've seen a swan take a corgi for a walk. you are really getting into it. i can tell. you are getting into it. i can tell. you are getting into character. loving it. who is that gorgeous little boy where the camera keeps whizzing past? the little boy standing on a boat. i
6:57 am
don't know if you are able to talk to him or not, but he has given us the most delightful smile. tote to him or not, but he has given us the most delightful smile.- the most delightful smile. we can chat to him _ the most delightful smile. we can chat to him in _ the most delightful smile. we can chat to him in the _ the most delightful smile. we can chat to him in the next _ the most delightful smile. we can chat to him in the next one. - chat to him in the next one. perfect. ,., ., chat to him in the next one. perfect. chat to him in the next one. perfect-— chat to him in the next one. perfect. ., ., perfect. good point. fiona, we will see ou perfect. good point. fiona, we will see you later- _ perfect. good point. fiona, we will see you later. who _ perfect. good point. fiona, we will see you later. who knows - perfect. good point. fiona, we will see you later. who knows what - perfect. good point. fiona, we will. see you later. who knows what they will come up with next? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. police have named the man who died after being found with stab wounds yards from st paul's cathedral in central london. emmanuel 0dunlami, 32, from romford, was discovered injured in gresham street at 11.30 on sunday evening. mr 0dunlami was taken to the royal london hospital, but later died from his injuries. muslim households in the capital have reported struggling to provide enough food for theirfamilies as they broke the fast during ramadan. according to the charity islamic relief, there's also been a significant
6:58 am
increase in the use of food banks since the last two lockdowns, exacerbated by the rising cost of living and the pandemic. in case it's passed you by, londoners are heading to the polls this morning. all 32 london borough councils are taking part in local elections. for more information on the issues and how to vote, head to the bbc london website, the address is on your screen now. a deaf school in north london has enoyed a surprise visit from strictly come dancing winner rose ayling—ellis and her dance partner. the visit was to mark their nomination for a tv bafta for the must—see moment on the bbc show which included a section dancing in silence. the pair chatted with the pupils from the frank barnes school for deaf children in kings cross. it was really, really lovely because it was the first time i'd seen a group of deaf children for quite a long time. and it was so nice to see them looking really, really excited.
6:59 am
it became like a big party. and they're so funny. deaf children are so funny. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning this is how tfl services are looking right now... just the metropolitan line with minor delays. 0nto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. the downpours from yesterday, welcomed by some, have cleared. high pressure has been building overnight squeezing everything out of the way. it's also dragged in some warmer air and you can see by this yellow and orange colour, so temperatures set to rise. first thing this morning, a bit of mistiness into the west out towards berkshire but it will melt away. plenty of sunshine. a bit more cloud this afternoon and we could see an isolated shower, but fairly hit and miss and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. 0vernight, dry, largely clear and we could see a bit of mistiness developing and the minimum temperature between seven and 10 celsius.
7:00 am
as we head into friday, it starts off clear with plenty of sunshine but you will notice this cold front starts to sink south. that will introduce a bit more cloud as we head through friday afternoon, but staying dry and temperatures tomorrow still warm. we still have a bit of sunshine. 21 celsius is the maximum. you will notice the rain sneaks in as we head into the evening, clearing through the early hours of saturday morning. high pressure is in charge all through the weekend so it's fairly settled. perhaps a bit more cloud on saturday but some sunny spells and temperatures throughout staying in the low 20s, and potentially getting warmer by the end of next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning, welcome to breakfast with victoria derbyshire and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today. ukraine's president zelensky appeals to the united nations
7:01 am
to save the lives of around 200 civilians sheltering from russian bombardment in the besieged city of mariupol. more bumper profits for the oil giants. this morning, shell is expected to follow bp in announcing a huge increase in how much it made at the start of this year. i'll have the latest for you throughout the programme. a tearful amber heard takes the stand for the first time in the defamation trial brought by her former husband johnny depp — she alleges domestic abuse. thought he was the love of my life, but he was also this other thing. and the other thing was awful. heartbreak in madrid. manchester city were just minutes away from the champions league final, until one of the most remarkable turnarounds in footballing history. it isa it is a cool start with mist and fog in southern england but for much of
7:02 am
england and wales today, dry, sunny intervals and feeling warm. scotland and northern ireland have more cloud and northern ireland have more cloud and some rain at times but equally, you should see brightness. all the details later. it's thursday, the 5th of may. our main story. ukrainian officials say there's been heavy fighting with russian forces who've entered a steelworks plant in mariupol — the last holdout in the city. about 200 civilians are believed to be sheltering inside the plant, including children. ukraine's president zelenksy has appealed to the un to help rescue them. mark lobel reports. ten weeks in, russia testing ukraine's resolve at the azovstal steelworks, intensifying its assault as this unverified footage released by pro—russian separatists shows. with what looks like thermobaric or vacuum bombs as a ukrainian regiment claims russians have entered the southern port city's plant.
7:03 am
translation: there are heavy, bloody battles. i i am proud of my soldiers who make superhuman efforts to maintain the pressure on the enemy. i am proud of my soldiers who make superhuman efforts to contain the pressure of the enemy. i am grateful to the world for the colossal support to the garrison of mariupol. but that garrison's families are worried and there are fears, too, for the 200 trapped civilians, including 30 children still hunkering in the plant alongside thousands of others in need of rescue from elsewhere in the shattered city. translation: the second phase of our evacuation operation - in mariupol ended today with 344 people successfully evacuated from the city and the outskirts of zaporizhia. our team will greet them like the 150 who came from azovstal and they will get the necessary support from our state. russia's military says it will open
7:04 am
humanitarian corridors out of the besieged azovstal steel complex for three days from thursday. but to pressure moscow to stop the fighting, the eu wants to halt the import of russian oil by the end of the year. but it must have support from states heavily reliant on russian oil, such as slovakia and hungary, who say they cannot agree to that even with the offer of an extra year to comply. what we have seen on the table is very far from what we can live with and go with. not for the reasons of political taste store any taste—like issue, but it is simply the hard physical facts on the ground — there is no substitute. but western countries are still intent on rearming ukraine, as russia continues its attacks in the east. these strikes in dnipro five minutes after an air raid siren, leaving residents a little time
7:05 am
to scramble for cover. earlier, we spoke to our correspondent, joe inwood, who's in the western city of lviv and we asked him about the escalation in fighting at the azovstal steel plant in mariupol. if these reports are true, it seems we could be entering what would be the final phase of the battle for mariupol. for many, the fight for this southern port city has characterised the defiance of the ukrainians in the face of this invasion and they have held out for ten weeks. but the defenders have been narrowed down to this small place called the azovstal steel plant we have spoken about so many times. the russians said a couple of weeks ago they would try to starve them out but if these reports are true, and we should be careful, it is difficult to know what is going on on the ground, but if it is true they are going in for all—out assault, it will be bloody and very difficult.
7:06 am
the commander on the ground said that it is. but we could be entering the last days of the fight for mariupol. why does this matter? it is crucial because securing this city is one of the strategic objectives. it gives them a land bridge to the crimean peninsula. more important, it will free up a large number of their troops previously pinned down by the defenders in mariupol. it will free them up to continue the assault on the rest of the east of ukraine. if the steel plant falls, it will be a big moment. in the east of ukraine, many thousands are trapped on the front lines of the war. rescue operations are under way often led by volunteers taking risk to save others.
7:07 am
andrew harding reports. they sit in stunned silence on the school bus thatjust rescued them from hell. still weary with terror. two other buses with them did not make it back. "it was so scary," is all she can manage to say. thousands here are running the russian gauntlet, trying to escape from the kremlin's new offensive in eastern ukraine. but imagine escaping this. and then going back in again and again. that is what a group of remarkable volunteers are doing here in the donbas, including the man who filmed this. a british maths teacher, guy 0sborne, who came out last month to lend a hand. we have been going quite close to the front and evacuating huddled, bedridden people, a couple of blind
7:08 am
people, people with zimmer frames, people who otherwise may not be reached by perhaps bigger charities. it is quite a risk you are taking? i am quite scared most of the time. who wouldn't be? this footage was filmed by the driver of another school bus, one of the two that went missing. mikhail is a local history teacher. last friday, he left for a rescue mission and never came back. his daughter took to social media to beg for information. "please, bring my dad home," she said. and then, a surprise announcement on russian television. he has been captured alive. the rules of war prevent us from showing him being interrogated by russian forces, who accused him forces, who accused him of being a spy
7:09 am
for the ukrainian army. then another surprise. while we are speaking to his wife, her phone rings. it is her husband, still held captive, but calling with important news. "he spoke about a prisoner exchange," she says. "my husband said the russians might swap him for prisoners held by our government. soon, i hope. so maybe everything will work out." perhaps it will. but for others still trapped in the town, no help at hand. this is as close as we can get to the town right now. the boom of artillery in the distance and shells landing the other side of this field. we are told all rescue efforts have now been suspended because of the danger, but that still leaves something like 2000 civilians trapped in this town, and we are told many more civilians
7:10 am
caught in other front line towns. all evidence of conflict with no end in sight. andrew harding, bbc news, eastern ukraine. in the last few minutes we've had the latest profit results in from the oil company shell. ben's here to talk us through it. all the energy companies under enormous scrutiny. but making huge profits. the figure for shell�*s profits. the figure for shell�*s profits in the first three months, £7.25 billion. that is thought to be one of the highest ever quarterly profits shell has reported. to put it in context, it is almost triple what they made in the equivalent period a year before. this is all because oil and gas prices are at such high levels. that is connected to what is going on in the world.
7:11 am
when pandemic restrictions were lifted, the oil and gas price went up lifted, the oil and gas price went up and there was a spike in demand as factories opened and we started travelling, offices opened up again. a sudden demand for oil and gas and the price went up. then we had russia's invasion of ukraine. russia is a huge exporter of oil and gas. when sanctions came in by the west it limited how much was supplied by russia to the rest of the world and that puts pressure on supplies elsewhere, demand goes up, the price follows. that has contributed to these huge profits. shell is not alone. earlier in the week we had bp reporting results. it also exceeded expectations and its profits were up a huge amount. expectations and its profits were up a huge amount-— expectations and its profits were up a hue amount. , ., , ., a huge amount. double what they made last ear a huge amount. double what they made last year between _ a huge amount. double what they made last year between january _ a huge amount. double what they made last year between january and _ a huge amount. double what they made last year between january and march. i
7:12 am
last year between january and march. bp 5 billion. the first three months of this year. tt bp 5 billion. the first three months of this year-— of this year. it is not 'ust a one-way fl of this year. it is not 'ust a one-way street i of this year. it is not 'ust a one-way street whati of this year. it is notjust a one-way street what is i of this year. it is not just a i one-way street what is going of this year. it is not just a - one-way street what is going on in one—way street what is going on in russia and ukraine for these companies. they had to step back from investments and projects. they had to write those down to the value of several billion pounds. but still, you disregard those because they are one—off costs. look at the underlying profit. this is the second year in a row we are seeing these vast profits. if people have pensions invested in the stock market, shell is a big part of the ftse 100, so that market, shell is a big part of the ftse100, so that benefits people with a pension, but that is little consolation to the cost pressure people are feeling through what they are paying for oil and gas, fuel and energy for homes and cars.- energy for homes and cars. those firures energy for homes and cars. those figures are _ energy for homes and cars. those figures are just — energy for homes and cars. those figures are just in _ energy for homes and cars. those figures are just in and _ energy for homes and cars. those figures are just in and we - energy for homes and cars. those figures are just in and we will i energy for homes and cars. those j figures are just in and we will give you a moment to look through and make more sense of them. but the reality of this are the bills you
7:13 am
are playing at home. we are spending time on that. just after 8am we have an expert panel looking at immediate issues you might be facing about whether you can afford your bill and if you can't, what you can do. local elections are taking place today across england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. polling has just opened and our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. what lies ahead ? polls just what lies ahead? polls just opened and they are open until 10pm. there are elections taking place in all four nations. although slightly different. in scotland and wales, all local authorities are being elected today. in northern ireland, people are voting for the assembly, 90 members being chosen. in england,
7:14 am
about half of councils will be elected today. 4000 councillors in all. there is a guide on the bbc news website where you can put in your postcode and work out if there is an election in your area. and we can talk about the issues today. the facts about when you can vote. from now, 7am, until10pm tonight. results will start to come in overnight. we will have a better picture tomorrow.— overnight. we will have a better picture tomorrow. thank you. full covera . e picture tomorrow. thank you. full coverage tomorrow _ picture tomorrow. thank you. full coverage tomorrow morning - picture tomorrow. thank you. full coverage tomorrow morning on i coverage tomorrow morning on breakfast. for more information on the latest developments and to find out what's happening in yourarea — visit here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this morning is mixed fortunes. in scotland and northern
7:15 am
ireland, more cloud. like this picture taken by a weather watcher. further south into england and wales, this is more representative of what you will see. there is mist fog across devon and cornwall this morning and other parts of southern england. that will lift. pushing further north, cloud will break in parts of scotland. the rain pushing eastwards to be replaced by more rain in the west later. showers in northern ireland and cloudy. more cloud across northern england at times but there will be breaks. further south through the midlands, east anglia and wales, when the fog lift southern england, we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine. cloud building through the day which could be thick enough for shower in the midlands, south wales and south west. again, rain continuing in north—west scotland. it will be warm
7:16 am
as we come further south. 19—22. warmer than it has been as we push further north. 15—17. 0vernight, some clear skies and mist fog forming. heavy rain comes in across scotland and into northern ireland. not a cold night. and not a cold start tomorrow. rain move south turning heavy across north—west england and north wales. sunshine and showers behind it. cloud building ahead of it. still mild or warm depending on what end of the country you are in. amber heard has taken the stand for the first time in the defamation trial brought by her former husband johnny depp, telling the court he repeatedly hit her whilst he was drunk and taking drugs. mr depp is suing ms heard over a story she wrote in which she described herself as a domestic abuse victim. he denies the allegations. david sillito has been following their case.
7:17 am
will you please state your name. yes, it is amber laura heard. amber heard — over the last three and a half weeks, she has sat in court each day and listen as a series of witnesses and her ex—husband have described her as violent, emotionally unstable and a liar. this was finally her chance to give her side of the story. why are you here? i am here because my ex—husband is suing me for an op—ed i wrote. and how do you feel about that? i struggle to have the words. i struggle to find the words to describe how painful this is. this is horrible. this has been... this is the most painful and difficult thing i've ever gone through.
7:18 am
this the beginning of her story of a marriage that she says left her injured and traumatised. and sitting just feet away in front of her, the man who she says assaulted and abused her = johnny depp. do you remember the first time that he physically hit you? - yes. please tell the jury about it. she said johnny depp had been taking cocaine and it was a comment about one of his tattoos that led to abusive language and violence. he slapped me across the face. and i laughed. i laughed because i... i didn't know what else to do. i thought this must be a joke. he said, "do you think it's so funny?" and he slapped me again. it was, she says, just the beginning of years of abuse. thought he was the love of my life.
7:19 am
and he was. he was. but he was also this other thing. he was also this other thing! and the other thing was awful. throughout it all, johnny depp sat head down with his notes and jellybea ns. all of it, he says, is untrue, but his ex—wife has much more to say. david sillito, bbc news. we'rejoined now by ryan baker, a los angeles lawyer who has represented clients in defamation cases. this is the first time we have heard from amber heard. how do you respond to what she has been saying on the stand? ,., ., ., , , stand? good morning. this is the very beginning — stand? good morning. this is the very beginning of _ stand? good morning. this is the very beginning of her _ stand? good morning. this is the very beginning of her case. -
7:20 am
stand? good morning. this is the i very beginning of her case. notably, the first witness her teen called was a doctor i think to rebut the testimony of a doctor who had things to say about amber heard before. after that, she took the stand herself. i think she will be on the stand several days. she has a deficit she is working from because as we know the trial has been going on over three weeks and a lot of the effortjohnny depp's team has taken so far is to besmirch amber heard and to paint her as a liar and one with severe emotional problems. her testimony today seemed earnest and sincere. she obviously had a lot of detail, she has a lot to say that contradicts the testimony provided byjohnny depp. i interested to see how the next days will go. she will probably be under direct examination through till next week, when she
7:21 am
will be cross—examined byjohnny depp's team. will be cross-examined by johnny depp's team-— will be cross-examined by johnny deu'steam. ~ ., , . ., depp's team. would you expect her to brina depp's team. would you expect her to bring forward — depp's team. would you expect her to bring forward more _ depp's team. would you expect her to bring forward more of _ depp's team. would you expect her to bring forward more of her _ depp's team. would you expect her to bring forward more of her own - bring forward more of her own experts? t bring forward more of her own exerts? ., �* .. ., bring forward more of her own exerts? ., �* ~ ., ~' experts? i don't know. ithink robabl experts? i don't know. ithink probably yes- _ experts? i don't know. ithink probably yes. the _ experts? i don't know. ithink probably yes. the witness i experts? i don't know. i thinkl probably yes. the witness lists experts? i don't know. i think- probably yes. the witness lists on either side are very long. it is hard to say. johnny depp's team did not call a lot of witnesses on their list which is not uncommon. 0ften list which is not uncommon. often these cases boil down to battles of these cases boil down to battles of the experts. in this case, having listened to the three and a half weeks ofjohnny depp's side, now hearing a day and a half of amber heard's, it is hard to say there will be a winner because what... 0ne will be a winner because what... one way to describe the case is this is a couple that was in a relationship and they have now had a legal proceeding over twice as long as their marriage and they are nowjust basically in the street throwing dirty laundry everywhere and it is
7:22 am
on tv all the time. it is hard to say there will be any winners. but it matters to _ say there will be any winners. but it matters to both of them. johnny depp has said it means everything to him. it is about who is telling the truth. tt him. it is about who is telling the truth. . him. it is about who is telling the truth. , ., , ., ., truth. it is. ultimately, again, you will have the _ truth. it is. ultimately, again, you will have the jury _ truth. it is. ultimately, again, you will have the jury of _ truth. it is. ultimately, again, you will have the jury of seven - truth. it is. ultimately, again, you will have the jury of seven who i truth. it is. ultimately, again, you| will have the jury of seven who will deliberate and they may or may not find a winner. then you have the court of public opinion which i think is more important for both johnny depp and amber heard to the extent they want a career going forward. they have to try to rehabilitate their image, especially i thinkjohnny depp feels like he has to do that more so than amber heard. after the three and a half weeks of testimony we heard from johnny depp's team, amber heard has some rehearsal of dash that has some rehabilitation to do as well. because over the three and a half
7:23 am
weeks of testimony, you heard things basically painting amber heard to be dishonest, and emotionally manipulative person. a doctor described her as having borderline personality disorder as well as histrionic personality disorder. those are things i do not think anybody wants to be described as. she has certainly got some character to re—establish herself. i think thatis to re—establish herself. i think that is what she started today when she took the stand and talked about her history of abuse. i think that is a theme we heard from johnny depp when he first took the stand. you have a couple with histories of abuse. and let's not forget the therapist who saw both of them for time describing it as a mutually abusive relationship, so i think thatis abusive relationship, so i think that is what we are seeing. thank ou. some unusualfishing
7:24 am
some unusual fishing now. many fishermen dream of landing a big catch like a pike, or a carp — but not many will haul in a safe full of cash. that's what happened to 15—year—old george when he was magnet fishing in the river witham in grantham. simon spark reports. what's that, then? an old plug. this is george. he's 15 years old and loves magnet fishing. magnet fishing is basically where you throw a big magnet in a river, like this one down here. this is the one we use. it's a big one. it pulls around 1600 kilos. we just chuck the magnet in and pull it back in and, hopefully, there should be something good on the end. hopefully, there is something left in there. there is something there. you see how it looked on? look at this. what's that? it's a big old pulley, look. but as nice as this pulley find is, it's nothing compared
7:25 am
to what he pulled out of the river just a few weeks ago. we were dragging the magnet in and we came across a safe. that's just about where the safe was, just there. we pulled the safe out the river. the door was sort of seized shot on it so we opened the door on it. and we tipped it out and obviously it was full of slop, still, but amongst all the slop there were some wallets. oh, dear, wallets. oh, god, look at all the england notes in it, look. and the last thing we pulled out it was like a wallet this big. and it was full of australian dollars. 0h, dad! oh, dear. it's full of money! 0pening that wallet, it wasjustjaw—dropping. there were 2500 australian dollars in this wallet. the safe was stolen from businessman robert everett 22 years ago. no! well it was a huge shock. i mean, if you take the story-
7:26 am
where a couple of teenage urchins broke into the office, i stole the safe and ransacked the office, and then you have got another teenager who gives i it all back. it's a beautiful story. i mean, how could anybody feel, being robbed 22 years ago, and then you get a phone call saying somebody�*s been magnet fishing in the river and found your safe and it's got $2500 in it? we'd like to give it back. i mean that is an odd request, isn't it? it is just so good to see the warmth and the effort that denise - and george and the family went to find me _ robert says the returned money will go to charity and george, as well as a small reward, has been the offered experience with robert in the future. but, for now, he is happy seeing what he can find next. a big old bit of metal. a big old piece of metal not quite so exciting, i think we all agree. george is fabulous. 0bviously so exciting, i think we all agree. george is fabulous. obviously i got the river name wrong.
7:27 am
that was simon spark reporting. time now to get the news, travel and weather where this good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. police have named the man who died after being found with stab wounds yards from st paul's cathedral in central london. emmanuel 0dunlami, 32, from romford was discovered injured in gresham street at 11.30 on sunday evening. mr 0dunlami was taken to the royal london hospital, but later died from his injuries. muslim households in the capital have reported struggling to provide enough food for theirfamilies as they broke the fast during ramadan. according to the charity islamic relief, there's also been a significant increase in the use of food banks since the last two lockdowns, exacerbated by the rising cost of living and the pandemic. in case it's passed you by, londoners are heading to the polls this morning. all 32 london borough councils are taking part in local elections.
7:28 am
for more information on the issues and how to vote, head to the bbc london website, the address is on your screen now. the uk s first national lgbtq+ museum is opening its doors today in kings cross. the museum, in granary square, will display award winning artworks and an art award on the theme queer creativity. created by the charity queer britain — the museum hopes to tell the stories of the community. a team of cheerleaders from sutton have won two globes in the cheerleading worlds competition in florida. this is the moment they found out they'd won. cheering. the unity allstars black team took gold in the ? international open coed non tumbling level 7 category, a first for a british club. and we'll be speaking to some of them our 6.30 programme this evening. dojoin us then. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning,
7:29 am
this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. just the metropolitan line with severe delays. 0nto the weather now with kate kinsella good morning. the downpours from yesterday, welcomed by some, have cleared. high pressure has been building overnight squeezing everything out of the way. it's also dragged in some warmer air and you can see by this yellow and orange colour, so temperatures set to rise. first thing this morning, a bit of mistiness into the west out towards berkshire but it will melt away. plenty of sunshine. a bit more cloud this afternoon and we could see an isolated shower, but fairly hit and miss and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. 0vernight, dry, largely clear and we could see a bit of mistiness developing and the minimum temperature between seven and 10 celsius. as we head into friday, it starts off clear with plenty of sunshine but you will notice this cold front starts to sink south. that will introduce a bit more cloud as we head through friday afternoon, but staying dry and temperatures tomorrow still warm. we still have a bit of sunshine. 21 celsius is the maximum.
7:30 am
you will notice the rain sneaks in as we head into the evening, clearing through the early hours of saturday morning. high pressure is in charge all through the weekend so it's fairly settled. perhaps a bit more cloud on saturday but some sunny spells and temperatures throughout staying in the low 20s, and potentially getting warmer by the end of next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and victoria derbyshire. bill gates has urged world leaders to do more to prevent future pandemics. the microsoft co—founder is calling for greater sharing of information and a faster response to stop such large—scale disease outbreak happening again. he's been speaking to the bbc�*s mishal husain. she started by asking him how ready we should be for another pandemic.
7:31 am
the risk is there every year, and definitely going up as people travel around the world more. shes. definitely going up as people travel around the world more.— around the world more. as climate chan . e around the world more. as climate change causes _ around the world more. as climate change causes species _ around the world more. as climate change causes species to - around the world more. as climate change causes species to seek i around the world more. as climate j change causes species to seek new habitats and population growth, particularly in asia and africa, means we are invading more natural habitats. it's very unlikely that we will go 20 more years without another outbreak that has a chance of becoming a global pandemic. which of becoming a global pandemic. which is soberin: , of becoming a global pandemic. which is sobering. and _ of becoming a global pandemic. which is sobering, and a _ of becoming a global pandemic. which is sobering, and a hard _ of becoming a global pandemic. which is sobering, and a hard thing to think about, at a point psychologically when there is a joy to getting back to the things that we couldn't do for such a long period, but you essentially want us all to think about preparing for the next one, which is kind of a tough ask at a time like this. filth. ask at a time like this. oh, definitely _ ask at a time like this. oh, definitely and _ ask at a time like this. oh, definitely and this i ask at a time like this. ot definitely and this pandemic is ask at a time like this. t definitely and this pandemic is not completely over. we could have a surprise variant. i don't think that is high probability, but yes, people are ready for this one to end, no doubt. hopefully they keep in mind
7:32 am
how awful it has been so we take the reasonably modest measures that are required to reduce the chance of it happening again. required to reduce the chance of it happening again-— required to reduce the chance of it happening again. which are spending on ractice, happening again. which are spending on practice, modelling, _ happening again. which are spending on practice, modelling, on _ happening again. which are spending on practice, modelling, on proper- on practice, modelling, on proper active preparedness.— on practice, modelling, on proper active preparedness. yes, practice will be key. _ active preparedness. yes, practice will be key. and — active preparedness. yes, practice will be key, and having _ active preparedness. yes, practice will be key, and having a - active preparedness. yes, practice| will be key, and having a dedicated team that helps manage that practice and makes sure that every little outbreak gets a quick investigation, including genetic sequencing, so we can understand, is this a respiratory virus that is threatening to become another covid. covid itself, the thing you just hinted at, i think you are saying it is possible that the worst is even yet to come if we get a new, more dangerous variant than what we have seen? plat dangerous variant than what we have seen? ., ~' , ~ .
7:33 am
dangerous variant than what we have seen? ., ~ , . ., ., ., ., seen? not likely. we have a lot of immunity- — seen? not likely. we have a lot of immunity- the _ seen? not likely. we have a lot of immunity. the variant _ seen? not likely. we have a lot of immunity. the variant escapes i seen? not likely. we have a lot of i immunity. the variant escapes some of that immunity, particularly if we get the elderly to keep up—to—date on boosters, then the amount of severe disease and death is dramatically less, so, we can't completely ignore this pandemic. but we do not yet have the tools where you take the vaccine once and you are protected for life and it stops you getting infected, that is the kind of tool that we need to really put this behind us and for future pandemics. d0 put this behind us and for future pandemics— put this behind us and for future andemics. i. ,, ., , ., pandemics. do you think any of the preparedness _ pandemics. do you think any of the preparedness you _ pandemics. do you think any of the preparedness you would _ pandemics. do you think any of the preparedness you would like i pandemics. do you think any of the preparedness you would like to i pandemics. do you think any of the j preparedness you would like to see is really going on as you look around the world now? the is really going on as you look around the world now? the idea of buildin: a around the world now? the idea of building a global _ around the world now? the idea of building a global group _ around the world now? the idea of building a global group that i i around the world now? the idea of building a global group that i call. building a global group that i call germ, a global economic response and mobilisation, at the who level,
7:34 am
there is not yet a consensus, but there is not yet a consensus, but the debate is beginning and my book i think will help kick off the debate. i would love to see in the next year that funded, because the costis next year that funded, because the cost is pretty small, yet that is the central group that will make sure that we practice and have dramatically less impact. what did ou think dramatically less impact. what did you think about _ dramatically less impact. what did you think about novak _ dramatically less impact. what did you think about novak djokovic i you think about novak djokovic saying that he was not vaccinated because it is essentially about his freedom of choice on the choice of what he puts in his body. i wonder if you think if someone in the public eye, is there a wider responsibility than just your own body? responsibility than 'ust your own bod ? �* ., . . ., responsibility than 'ust your own bod ? �* ., .. ., , body? being vaccinated help the community _ body? being vaccinated help the community you _ body? being vaccinated help the community you are _ body? being vaccinated help the community you are in. _ body? being vaccinated help the community you are in. they i body? being vaccinated help the community you are in. they are | body? being vaccinated help the i community you are in. they are not perfect at locking infection but they do reduce infection. —— blocking infection. it's important —— concerning someone's health concerns are so extreme that feel they cannot participate in that
7:35 am
community protection. if they are an inspiration and trusted person, then they are spreading that and itjust makes it tougher to get the vaccination levels that we really need. so, iadmire him in a vaccination levels that we really need. so, i admire him in a lot of ways, but! need. so, i admire him in a lot of ways, but i wish his views on vaccines weren't that way. {lin ways, but i wish his views on vaccines weren't that way. on you personally. _ vaccines weren't that way. on you personally. you — vaccines weren't that way. on you personally, you have _ vaccines weren't that way. on you personally, you have had i vaccines weren't that way. on you personally, you have had a i vaccines weren't that way. on you personally, you have had a big i personally, you have had a big change in your life in the last year with the end of your marriage. how has that affected you?— with the end of your marriage. how has that affected you? well, my life is very different. _ has that affected you? well, my life is very different. my _ has that affected you? well, my life is very different. my kids _ has that affected you? well, my life is very different. my kids are i has that affected you? well, my life is very different. my kids are gone i is very different. my kids are gone from the house, the last one left for college a year ago. the divorce is a big change. although there is one part of my relationship that i treasure a great deal which is our work together at the foundation, and that continues and i'm very happy with that. the divorce was very hard. it was a tough year. this year
7:36 am
is a lot more upbeat. she hard. it was a tough year. this year is a lot more upbeat.— hard. it was a tough year. this year is a lot more upbeat. she seemed to have seen something _ is a lot more upbeat. she seemed to have seen something in _ is a lot more upbeat. she seemed to have seen something in jeffrey i have seen something injeffrey epstein on the occasion that she met him that you didn't in your meetings with him. is that right? she said that she met him once and as soon as she walked in the door she felt he was abhorrent and evil personified. i made a mistake ever meeting with jeffrey epstein. maybe her instincts on that were keener than mine, but any meeting i had with him could be viewed as almost condoning his evil behaviour. you know, that was a mistake. ibiilii behaviour. you know, that was a mistake. �* , ., ~ behaviour. you know, that was a mistake. , ., , mistake. bill gates, thank you very much. mistake. bill gates, thank you very much- let's — mistake. bill gates, thank you very much. let's talk _ mistake. bill gates, thank you very much. let's talk about _ mistake. bill gates, thank you very much. let's talk about the i mistake. bill gates, thank you very much. let's talk about the sport i mistake. bill gates, thank you very l much. let's talk about the sport and a spectacular collapse by manchester city but it means real madrid are in their 17th european final. yes
7:37 am
city but it means real madrid are in their 17th european final.— their 17th european final. yes a com - lete their 17th european final. yes a complete contrasting _ their 17th european final. yes a complete contrasting emotions their 17th european final. yes a i complete contrasting emotions and their 17th european final. t'ezs a. complete contrasting emotions and no one saw this coming until it was into injury time and manchester city had been in complete control, two goals ahead on aggregate, and suddenly, in an instant it all changes. really one of the most remarkable turnarounds in remarkable turna rounds in footballing remarkable turnarounds in footballing history. it means that there will be no all english final in the champions league this year after manchester city suffered one of the most dramatic collapses in the history of the competition as real madrid scored twice in injury time to whole —— turn the semifinal on its head. 0llie foster watched the action. what an extraordinary night. manchester city had been just a few minutes away from another champions league final. yes, real madrid have won a record 13 european titles, but this will haunt city for a long time. yes, it's tough for us. we cannot deny it. we were so close to the champions league final. we didn't play much good in the first half. we didn't find our game, but it's normal, you know,
7:38 am
in this competition, it's normal. in the second half, it was much better. much, much better. and unfortunately we could not finish when we were close. after last week's seven—goal spectacular, the first half fell strangely flat, like aymeric laporte, and tensions rose quickly to the surface. city had the best of the first half chances but real were doing their best to rein them in. it was that type of match. inside the last 20 minutes, remember city only needed a draw, but riyad mahrez lashed in a goal that would surely see them safely through to the final. jack grealish could have put some added gloss on city's night. not to worry, time was almost up. there's always time. in the final minute the real substitute rodrygo gave them hope. a minute later, bedlam in the bernebau. rodrygo again. extra time and maybe penalties would have to separate them, but instead it was just one penalty. benzema fouled by diaz and the frenchman was the calmest
7:39 am
amongst 60,000 who would go on to party long into the madrid night. city can take absolutely no joy that they played their part to the full in one of the best european cup ties of all time. but this was supposed to be the season that they imposed their greatness on this competition. instead, it is the greatest, real who will take their place in the paris final against liverpool. well, lets cross live to madrid where 0lly foster, is taking it all in. see how you are, the morning after that night before. not too many places you could get a good nights sleep last night. it was noisy, bedlam outside the stadium. what a match. they say, who remembers a
7:40 am
losing semifinalist, well, city will remember this for months, perhaps years. it will haunt them. so much to talk about in this semifinal against real madrid and with me is the spanish football writer and broadcaster on all things football. where do we start? an incredible match how it unfolded. yes. where do we start? an incredible match how it unfolded.— match how it unfolded. yes, it's impossible _ match how it unfolded. yes, it's impossible to — match how it unfolded. yes, it's impossible to explain, - match how it unfolded. yes, it's impossible to explain, so ii match how it unfolded. yes, it's i impossible to explain, so i cannot help you. should ijust go now? fitt help you. should i 'ust go now? off ou help you. should ijust go now? off you go, yes. was it freakish, or was it brilliant from real madrid? you cannot explain — it brilliant from real madrid? you cannot explain it _ it brilliant from real madrid? tm, cannot explain it with logic. this was the third time in a row in the knockout stages in the champions league this season in which real madrid where the inferior team and everybody had given up, around me, and you were sitting close to me and everybody was going well, it was a good run, and all of a sudden, at a time where their rival cannot react, they scored the goals that take them to the next stage, in this case the extra time. how did they do that? it
7:41 am
explains why they won 13 champions league but it has to do with the fact they had very good players and that they can conjure magic and that is what happens as well and the fact that they have a blind faith in themselves. it is like they have the memory of a fish. they think what has happened before does not matter, what we need? two goals. let's go. and they did it again in the same way as psg and chelsea. liiti;r and they did it again in the same way as psg and chelsea. city have the most amazing _ way as psg and chelsea. city have the most amazing players i way as psg and chelsea. city have the most amazing players and i way as psg and chelsea. city have| the most amazing players and real madrid, luka modric said about when we wear the colours, we believe we can achieve anything for real madrid. is it that lack of european pedigree that affected manchester city even though they've won so many premier league titles and fa cup stanley cups? tt premier league titles and fa cup stanley cups?— premier league titles and fa cup stanle cu s? �* ., , . stanley cups? it didn't affect them. the were stanley cups? it didn't affect them. they were the _ stanley cups? it didn't affect them. they were the better _ stanley cups? it didn't affect them. they were the better side. i stanley cups? it didn't affect them. they were the better side. they - they were the better side. they scored four goals at home and had six chances, remember that. that explains a bit. mahrez had three very clear chances and they hit the post twice in the first leg and they could have killed it then and they
7:42 am
were superior for 89 minutes. could have killed it then and they were superiorfor 89 minutes. it could have killed it then and they were superior for 89 minutes. it was just that the first shot on target for real madrid goes in on the second shot goes on as well in less than two minutes. try to explain that. i think pep guardiola tried to explain it and he said they scored, and we didn't, and at the end, that is what it was. pep and we didn't, and at the end, that is what it was.— is what it was. pep guardiola, you know him very _ is what it was. pep guardiola, you know him very well _ is what it was. pep guardiola, you know him very well and _ is what it was. pep guardiola, you know him very well and you've - know him very well and you've written books about him and he spoke to him last night. what did he say? i asked him, to him last night. what did he say? iasked him, try to him last night. what did he say? i asked him, try to explain it with logic and he was saying, well, at a time we were confident and playing well, things were going our way and well, things were going our way and we wanted to finish the game and then the goals were scored. that's it. ., ., , w then the goals were scored. that's it. ., ., , ., then the goals were scored. that's it. how does he react and how does he aet it. how does he react and how does he get this — it. how does he react and how does he get this team, _ it. how does he react and how does he get this team, their _ it. how does he react and how does he get this team, their mind - he get this team, their mind straight again, because they still have so much to play for. for more games and they have their noses in front of the premier league but will this derail them? he has a big job in the next few days. i this derailthem? he has a big “0b in the next few daysi in the next few days. i absolutely a . ree in the next few days. i absolutely agree with _ in the next few days. i absolutely agree with yom _
7:43 am
in the next few days. i absolutely agree with you. and _ in the next few days. i absolutely agree with you. and what - in the next few days. i absolutelyl agree with you. and what happens with managers is when everybody is down, and they were on the floor and you saw the players, they were sobbing and crying, and he has to be here and he has to be saying, now we have to focus on the job in hand. there are only whatever many games left and we can do it.— left and we can do it. finally, cuickl , left and we can do it. finally, quickly. real _ left and we can do it. finally, quickly, real madrid, - left and we can do it. finally, i quickly, real madrid, liverpool, paris, may the 28th.— quickly, real madrid, liverpool, paris, may the 28th. smells of glory and history- — paris, may the 28th. smells of glory and history- 19 _ paris, may the 28th. smells of glory and history. 19 champions _ paris, may the 28th. smells of glory and history. 19 champions league i paris, may the 28th. smells of glory and history. 19 champions league isj and history. 19 champions league is won by the two of them and liverpool really want to beat real madrid. mo salah admitted it, but it will be a great final. it salah admitted it, but it will be a great final-— salah admitted it, but it will be a treat final. ., , , , great final. it really will be. many thanks for your _ great final. it really will be. many thanks for your thoughts - great final. it really will be. many thanks for your thoughts on - great final. it really will be. many thanks for your thoughts on this | thanks for your thoughts on this madrid morning. it will be a great final but we are about three weeks away from that or so and they will be talking about this semifinal for a long time, mike.— a long time, mike. indeed. great stuff. a long time, mike. indeed. great stuff- thank— a long time, mike. indeed. great stuff. thank goodness _ a long time, mike. indeed. great stuff. thank goodness he - a long time, mike. indeed. great stuff. thank goodness he did - a long time, mike. indeed. great| stuff. thank goodness he did stick around and it was fascinating because you can't explain it and it's even got charlie, who is so
7:44 am
interested in the football like never before. i interested in the football like never before.— interested in the football like never before. , ., , never before. i listened last night and i love a _ never before. i listened last night and i love a big _ never before. i listened last night and i love a big occasion - never before. i listened last night and i love a big occasion football| and i love a big occasion football match. that's what i like. and this delivered at the end. be honest, and... �* , ., delivered at the end. be honest, and... �* ,, delivered at the end. be honest, and... �* ., ., and... are you saying you are a football tourist. _ and... are you saying you are a football tourist. i'm _ and... are you saying you are a football tourist. i'm not - and... are you saying you are a l football tourist. i'm not ashamed and... are you saying you are a - football tourist. i'm not ashamed to sa so. football tourist. i'm not ashamed to say s0- but — football tourist. i'm not ashamed to say s0- but last _ football tourist. i'm not ashamed to say so. but last night _ football tourist. i'm not ashamed to say so. but last night delivered - football tourist. i'm not ashamed to say so. but last night delivered the| say so. but last night delivered the drama. you are sitting there and it's right at the end of the game, and where you the same? were you thinking, we are all done here, i will write my piece and do my work and thejob is done? will write my piece and do my work and the job is done?— and the “0b is done? yes. i had to ut a and the job is done? yes. i had to put a hold — and the job is done? yes. i had to put a hold on _ and the job is done? yes. i had to put a hold on the _ and the job is done? yes. i had to put a hold on the drinks _ and the job is done? yes. i had to put a hold on the drinks at - and the job is done? yes. i had to put a hold on the drinks at the - and the job is done? yes. i had to| put a hold on the drinks at the bar. there was shock and bewilderment in there. it was one of those moments and i've seen a few of them, but all of us were saying, how we have seen anything like this? i think it was the atmosphere, the emotion and those fans of real madrid who are something special. of course, they have seen so much glory and there is
7:45 am
so much history but that has written itself very large in the history of this club and of course they will go on and want to win a 14th european title, something amazing. they won their 35th league title over the weekend and it was just a truly, truly special occasion and we were privileged to actually be there and watching it. privileged to actually be there and watchin: it. , ., , , . privileged to actually be there and watchin: it. , . , ' ~ ., privileged to actually be there and watchin it. ., , ' . ., ., watching it. great stuff. we have to leave it there. _ watching it. great stuff. we have to leave it there. if _ watching it. great stuff. we have to leave it there. if liverpool - watching it. great stuff. we have to leave it there. if liverpool are - watching it. great stuff. we have to leave it there. if liverpool are 3-1 i leave it there. if liverpool are 3—1 up leave it there. if liverpool are 3—1 up with minutes to go in the final, no one will turn off. we are set for potentially more european drama tonight. there are two british sides who are 90 minutes away from the europa league final — but both will start a goal down. rangers will have home advantage at least, as they take on rb leipzig, at ibrox, having lost the first leg i-o. while west ham lost 2—1, to eintracht frankfurt at the london stadium last week —
7:46 am
if they can get a result in germany, it'd be the first european final they've reached since 1976. the women's super league title race will go to the final day of the season after second placed arsenal, beat tottenham 3—0. caitlin foord scored twice, her second was the goal of the game. arsenal are a point behind leaders chelsea. elsewhere birmingham have been relegated, after being thumped 6 nil, by manchester city . for the first time in five years a clash of the old friends and rivals, andy murray faces world number one novak djokovic today. it's in the third round of the madrid open. also in action is cameron norrie. he plays carlos alcaraz garfia. norrie knocked out john isner yesterday. dan evansjoins him, in the last 16, when he'll play number six seed andrey rublev. a bit ofa a bit of a warm up for the french open later this month. thank you, mike. after that excitement, can we have a look at a calm scene? look at that. ., , , have a look at a calm scene? look at that. ., ,, , h, have a look at a calm scene? look at that. ., ,, , ,., ., ., that. calmness personified, carol. this is the lake _
7:47 am
that. calmness personified, carol. this is the lake district _ that. calmness personified, carol. this is the lake district and - that. calmness personified, carol. this is the lake district and if- that. calmness personified, carol. this is the lake district and if you | this is the lake district and if you needed a moment. it this is the lake district and if you needed a moment.— this is the lake district and if you needed a moment. it looks serene. let's not speak— needed a moment. it looks serene. let's not speak for _ needed a moment. it looks serene. let's not speak for five _ needed a moment. it looks serene. let's not speak for five seconds. i let's not speak for five seconds. oh, it is nice. i5 let's not speak for five seconds. oh. it is nice-— let's not speak for five seconds. | oh, it is nice._ we oh, it is nice. is carolthere? we are 'ust oh, it is nice. is carolthere? we are just letting — oh, it is nice. is carolthere? we are just letting her _ oh, it is nice. is carolthere? we are just letting her breathe - oh, it is nice. is carolthere? we are just letting her breathe for i oh, it is nice. is carolthere? we are just letting her breathe for a | are just letting her breathe for a moment. look at that, carol. what a lovely day. how is it looking? iam very i am very well and i hope you are too. for many of us a call start to the day with temperatures around the borders at 5 degrees at the moment and parts of southern england, a similar thing, and parts of southern england, a similarthing, around and parts of southern england, a similar thing, around five or 6 degrees and today for england and wales, despite the early cloud, it is going to be a fine and dry day but there is some patchy rain in scotland and you can see on the satellite picture the extent of our cloud cover. the thickest cloud is in northern ireland and also in scotland and this is where we have a couple of weather fronts moving from the west towards the east bringing in some rain but this know is of high pressure across england and
7:48 am
wales is keeping things fairly quiet weather—wise and also settled. there is mist and fog in devon and cornwall this morning and across other southern areas but it is patchy but that will lift and then a lot of dry weather, but the rain across eastern scotland is clearing allowing it to brighten up around the moray firth and you can see more rain coming in across western scotland and at times it will fringe into northern ireland but nonetheless we should see sunny intervals at times. temperatures ranging between ten in lerwick to 21 or 22 down in the south—east, and thatis or 22 down in the south—east, and that is 72 fahrenheit in old money. if you have an allergy to tree pollen the levels across england and wales today are going to be high and we arejust starting wales today are going to be high and we are just starting to get into the grass pollen season but for northern ireland and northern england and scotland they are either low or moderate. through the evening and overnight, under clear skies, we see patchy mist and fog form and the weather front coming in across northern ireland will bring in some persistent and heavy rain.
7:49 am
temperatures tonight not falling away too far so it won't be a cold night for most of us and it will be a mild one, so i'll start tomorrow. any mist and fog for meaning england and wales lifting quickly and here we start with sunshine but already rain across scotland and northern ireland are pouring into northern england and north wales and it will be heavy in the west. ahead of that mcleod will build and behind it we see sunshine and showers and still a pleasant day if you are in the sunshine, looking at 11 in lerwick up sunshine, looking at 11 in lerwick up to 21 in norwich. as we head into the weekend, friday into saturday overnight, the front will sink south and high pressure establishes itself across our shores into the weekend although on we could see fronts topple across the north of scotland bringing in rain but saturday first of all we say goodbye to the weather front early doors in the rain clears and then we are looking at a lot of dry weather and one or two showers in eastern scotland and north—east england and they will be the exception rather than the rule and temperatures between nine and 20
7:50 am
degrees. into sunday still a lot of dry weather for most of us but the weather fronts will come in across northern ireland and also scotland and will introduce more cloud at times and also some rain. temperature wise, we are still in good shape and a bit milder and looking between ten and 20 degrees and it looks at the moment like next week, especially towards the end of the week, it will get milder still. thank you very much. see you later on. the pandemic put a stop to many social activities but things have slowly been returning to normal — and there's a group of adults with learning disabilities in sheffield who could not be happier. the charity, under the stars, hosts several club nights a year and delighted dancers have been overjoyed to make a return to the dancefloor for the first time in two years. cathy booth reports. letting loose on the dance floor for the first time in more than two years. the charity under the stars helps
7:51 am
adults with learning disabilities to enjoy music, whether it is dropping beats, playing an instrument or simply dancing. before covid, they ran several club nights a year but lockdown pulled the plug and now the dance floor is open again. tonight's superstar djs were all taught by the charity, and to get to this point has taken a lot of work. let's rewind. the journey to the dance floor starts here in sheffield at under the stars hq in hillsborough. colour—coded usb sticks and touch screens make finding the right tracks easier, but djing is still a tough skill to master. everybody has music that they love and it's really nice to be able to develop that into something you can share with other people. it's also a form of communication. if you find verbal communication a bit difficult, being able to share those songs and have the impact on the dance floor to get them
7:52 am
enjoying what you are doing and listening is really powerful. it's the ramones! sheena is a punk rocker. yes! michael has been planning his punky set list all week. it's all part of the performance, because when i'm doing it, i often look out on the dance floor and seeing people just having a good time gives me a buzz. back to the club, and the high spirits are contagious. so the djs have got the tunes pumping, the dance floor is packed and it's only 735 in the evening. are you having a good time? yeah, brilliant. 2019, last time. oh, my goodness, does it feel good? yes, it feels great to be back.
7:53 am
it's the first time i've been back and it's great. and are you feeling happy? i am feeling up there. blending songs together, bringing people together. this is a night to remember, and this time it should not be such a long wait until they can do it all again. that is one room full of very happy people. that report was from cathy booth. we showed you the serene pictures from buttermere and that is where we are going next. in any medical emergency the most important thing is to get help to people quickly — but for paramedics in the lake district that can be made a lot harder if the casualty is up a mountain. well now they're hoping to literally fly to the rescue using jet suits. it's thought to be a world first and our reporter sharon barbour is with the team testing them out. morning, sharon. tell us more. yes, they have been
7:54 am
testina tell us more. yes, they have been testing out — tell us more. yes, they have been testing out the _ tell us more. yes, they have been testing out the jet _ tell us more. yes, they have been testing out the jet packs _ tell us more. yes, they have been testing out the jet packs here - tell us more. yes, they have been testing out the jet packs here for l testing out the jet packs here for the last few days in the lake district, so walkers here might have seen some flying paramedics for the very first time, as you say, a world first. the lake district, as you have been seeing, is exceptionally beautiful but it is hazardous as well. look at some of these hills, every year there are hundreds of rescues and in last year alone nearly 700 sadly a number of deaths. and the north air ambulance are having to respond nearly every day but now the great north air ambulance paramedics are training to fly here and jamie walsh, one of the critical care paramedics, you've been flying. what has it been like to fly here? it been flying. what has it been like to fly here?— to fly here? it has been a privilege. _ to fly here? it has been a privilege, really, - to fly here? it has been a privilege, really, to - to fly here? it has been a privilege, really, to fly i to fly here? it has been a i privilege, really, to fly across such a peaceful place. the real thing is that this is a very innovative idea and we are still very much in the trial phase of seeing how we can operationalise this amazing piece of technology to
7:55 am
help people and it's been a bit of an honour to produce this kind of response for the people of cumbria. you are one of the few people to fly, and a paramedic flying, so talk us through what it felt like, taking off and flying up these hills? it was pretty amazing, really but you have to keep your eyes on what the objective here is. when we respond in a vehicle and have to hike up a hill to get to a casualty, it can take over an hour, so yesterday we managed to get to the top of helvellyn in three and a half minutes to provide life—saving treatment to an injured or ill patient on a mountain could save lives. ~ ., , . patient on a mountain could save lives. ~ ., ' . ., ~ lives. what difference will it make com ared lives. what difference will it make compared to _ lives. what difference will it make compared to the _ lives. what difference will it make compared to the many _ lives. what difference will it make compared to the many search i lives. what difference will it make compared to the many search and j compared to the many search and rescue teams that operate here and are out so often? this rescue teams that operate here and are out so often?— are out so often? this is all about workin: are out so often? this is all about working as _ are out so often? this is all about working as part — are out so often? this is all about working as part of— are out so often? this is all about working as part of the _ are out so often? this is all about working as part of the system i are out so often? this is all about| working as part of the system with are out so often? this is all about i working as part of the system with a mountain rescue teams. if we can get that first line of care to the
7:56 am
patient quickly, we are still going to need mountain rescue there to aid and assist getting patients off the mountain, but it is getting that care to patients quickly and this can offer us in the lake district. for instance, if someone is on a hilltop in cardiac arrest, how can it make a difference? it hilltop in cardiac arrest, how can it make a difference?— hilltop in cardiac arrest, how can it make a difference? it can make a difference by _ it make a difference? it can make a difference by getting _ it make a difference? it can make a difference by getting a _ difference by getting a defibrillator to them, instead of within an hour, we can get it with them in the sort of three and a half orfour minutes to them in the sort of three and a half or four minutes to the top of helvellyn. when you are talking about numbers in times like that, you really are talking about a game changing bit of technology, potentially, to this sort of environment in this region. jamie, thank you. — environment in this region. jamie, thank you. and — environment in this region. jamie, thank you, and of— environment in this region. jamie, thank you, and of course - environment in this region. jamie, thank you, and of course the i environment in this region. jamie, j thank you, and of course the plan, the hope is that by the summer time that the jet suit wearing paramedics will be responding to patients for real and offering their urgent assistance. if i could come to you, richard, you invented thesejets. how has the trial gone in the last
7:57 am
few days? how has the trial gone in the last few da s? , , ., , how has the trial gone in the last fewda s? , , , few days? yes, this has been the latest in a _ few days? yes, this has been the latest in a number _ few days? yes, this has been the latest in a number of _ few days? yes, this has been the latest in a number of different i latest in a number of different medical— latest in a number of different medical response exercises and what is unique _ medical response exercises and what is unique this time is that jamie, having _ is unique this time is that jamie, having trained with us, only six days— having trained with us, only six days of— having trained with us, only six days of training has been flying for the first_ days of training has been flying for the first time in the lake district and has — the first time in the lake district and has to— the first time in the lake district and has to keep practising and building — and has to keep practising and building up but alongside that, we did the _ building up but alongside that, we did the exercise we described where we got _ did the exercise we described where we got to— did the exercise we described where we got to the summit of helvellyn and that's— we got to the summit of helvellyn and that's a 2000 feet height gain, two kilometres in a straight line and it_ two kilometres in a straight line and it was— two kilometres in a straight line and it was super foggy as well. we had to— and it was super foggy as well. we had to use — and it was super foggy as well. we had to use the navigation system because — had to use the navigation system because it — had to use the navigation system because it was that difficult to see where _ because it was that difficult to see where you're going and compared to walking _ where you're going and compared to walking over an hour where you're going and compared to walking overan hour up where you're going and compared to walking over an hour up there and this actually got to the summit faster— this actually got to the summit faster than any other way of getting there _ faster than any other way of getting there. if— faster than any other way of getting there. if i _ faster than any other way of getting there. . ., faster than any other way of getting there. _, _, ,., . ~ faster than any other way of getting there. _, _, . ~ ., ,., there. if i could come back to you, jamie, there. if i could come back to you, jamie. people _ there. if i could come back to you, jamie, people must— there. if i could come back to you, jamie, people must have - there. if i could come back to you, jamie, people must have been i jamie, people must have been watching in order to see you flying around the lakes these last few days, but how do you feel about reaching your very first patients,
7:58 am
hopefully, this summer. hopefully. as - iration hopefully, this summer. hopefully. aspiration early _ hopefully, this summer. hopefully. aspiration early we _ hopefully, this summer. hopefully. aspiration early we are _ hopefully, this summer. hopefully. aspiration early we are looking i hopefully, this summer. hopefully. aspiration early we are looking to l aspiration early we are looking to get this operational by the summer. there is still a lot of logistical and practical hurdles to overcome an kit that we need to carry, but yes, it's an exciting prospect and the great north air ambulance is always looking to be innovative with how we deliver care, and now we are taking it to the next step of how we deploy that care. , ., ., ~ it to the next step of how we deploy that care. , . ., ~' ,, it to the next step of how we deploy that care. , ., ., ~ i. , that care. jamie, thank you very much. that care. jamie, thank you very much- from _ that care. jamie, thank you very much. from the _ that care. jamie, thank you very much. from the beautiful, i that care. jamie, thank you very much. from the beautiful, but l much. from the beautiful, but potentially dangerous lake district if you are upon the hills, it is back to you. if you are upon the hills, it is back to yon-— if you are upon the hills, it is back to you. if you are upon the hills, it is back to ou. ~ ., ., back to you. we need to point out, because everybody _ back to you. we need to point out, because everybody watching i back to you. we need to point out, because everybody watching you i back to you. we need to point out, i because everybody watching you and listening to the guys is thinking the same thing, can he take off now? can we see him take off? just to explain to people, we cannot do it live on air now. we explain to people, we cannot do it live on air now.— live on air now. we can't do this live. i live on air now. we can't do this live- ithink— live on air now. we can't do this live. i think richard _ live on air now. we can't do this live. i think richard is _ live. i think richard is probably the best to explain why we can't take off alive right now.- the best to explain why we can't take off alive right now. yes, we were here _ take off alive right now. yes, we were here really _ take off alive right now. yes, we
7:59 am
were here really to _ take off alive right now. yes, we were here really to focus - take off alive right now. yes, we were here really to focus on i take off alive right now. yes, we l were here really to focus on doing exercises — were here really to focus on doing exercises for a couple of days, so we only— exercises for a couple of days, so we only brought a small amount of equipment. a bit like the spark plug on a car, _ equipment. a bit like the spark plug on a car, sometimes the starting system, — on a car, sometimes the starting system, very rarely and we come back from trips— system, very rarely and we come back from trips in— system, very rarely and we come back from trips in the us and it has been fine but _ from trips in the us and it has been fine but that one is on starting, but to— fine but that one is on starting, but to he — fine but that one is on starting, but to be honest you have a great footage _ but to be honest you have a great footage of— but to be honest you have a great footage of what we did yesterday with flying up helvellyn, so we are not flying — with flying up helvellyn, so we are not flying around this morning and we are _ not flying around this morning and we are heading back this afternoon. i think— we are heading back this afternoon. i think what— we are heading back this afternoon. i think what he is saying that there is a bit of a spark plug problem today, but they are working on that. a very good explanation makes perfect sense. fascinating, isn't it? those pictures are amazing. stay with us, headlines coming up.
8:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with victoria derbyshire and charlie stayt. our headlines today. record profits for the oil and gas giants — shell announces a huge increase in how much money it made at the start of this year. surging oil and gas prices are the big factor behind shell's £7.2 billion profit. it comes just a few days after bp also reported record results. i'll have all the reaction. ukraine's president zelensky appeals to the united nations to save the lives of around 200 civilians, sheltering civilians sheltering from russian bombardment in the besieged city of mariupol
8:01 am
one of the most remarkable turnarounds in champions league history as manchester city's place in the final was snatched away from them in dramatic fashion, as real madrid scored twice in injury time. we are starting with mist fog in the south. a cool start. generally in england and wales, mostly dry with sunshine. in scotland and northern ireland, more cloud, light rain, but it will brighten up at times. all the details later. it's thursday, the 5th of may. our main story. in the past hour, the oil and gas company shell has reported profits of £7.25 billion in the first three months of the year. it comes after bp reported soaring profits earlier this week, at a time when uk households are grappling with rising bills. ben's got the latest.
8:02 am
the driving factor is the surging oil and gas prices. that has driven these profits that, as we say, a record quarterly profit for shell, the biggest amount reported for a three month period and bp reported strong results. shell reported a massive £7.25 billion profit for the first three months of this year. that is almost triple what they made in the same period the year before. and world events are having a specific effect on profits. russia s invasion of ukraine in february and sanctions from western countries have pushed up the price of oil and gas. russia is the world's largest exporter of natural gas and second biggest exporter of crude oil. as a consequence, analysts thought that shell and bp would report combined profits
8:03 am
of over £10.5 billion. as we've now seen, it's much more than that — closer to £12 billion, after bp announced it had made even more than expected this week. meanwhile, households are facing extra financial pressures. the government has so far ruled out a windfall tax on the oil companies, despite calls from opposition parties for one to be imposed. let's speak now to the bbc�*s business editor, simonjack, who's in our london newsroom. this is an extraordinary figure, a record for shell. i this is an extraordinary figure, a record for shell.— this is an extraordinary figure, a record for shell. i think you summed it u- record for shell. i think you summed it up pretty — record for shell. i think you summed it up pretty well _ record for shell. i think you summed it up pretty well yourself. _ record for shell. i think you summed it up pretty well yourself. these i it up pretty well yourself. these profits were always going to be big. oil and gas prices already high at the end of last year, as the world economy emerged from a covid related coma, were sent surging higher by the russian invasion of ukraine.
8:04 am
people thought either supplies might be shut off, all, as we are seeing, widespread eventual boycotts of some energy supplies which means people are scrabbling around for other sources, pushing prices up. we expected it to be high but this has surpassed expectations of some. the most profitable three months in shell's history and if you add that to what bp announced on tuesday, the oil and gas sector is doing very well out of these surging prices. it was not without cost to the conflict in russia to bp and shell. bp in particular had to write off, both of them had to write off 19 billion. shell the cost, 3 billion, so they have had to get out ofjoint ventures, but their underlying business is doing well. but will they invest that back in to securing supply? we found out from bp on tuesday they want to invest £18
8:05 am
billion by the end of 2030 in uk mainly renewable stuff, green technology, but some new oil and gas. shell have put a range of 20-25,000,000,000 gas. shell have put a range of 20—25,000,000,000 investment in the north sea. i call for a windfall tax but the government has resisted that even though it was called for by opposition parties.— opposition parties. people are wondering _ opposition parties. people are wondering how _ opposition parties. people are wondering how this _ opposition parties. people are wondering how this is - opposition parties. people are| wondering how this is relevant opposition parties. people are i wondering how this is relevant to me watching at home. and anyone with a pension invested in the stock market, good profits for shell is one thing but the same high oil prices put pressure on household bills. it prices put pressure on household bills. ., , . prices put pressure on household bills. ., ,. . bills. it does cut both ways. we should point— bills. it does cut both ways. we should point out _ bills. it does cut both ways. we should point out it _ bills. it does cut both ways. we should point out it is _ bills. it does cut both ways. we should point out it is a - bills. it does cut both ways. we should point out it is a global. should point out it is a global issue, they are high prices all over the world, particular gas, in places in europe which is reliant on russia for supplies. in europe which is reliant on russia forsupplies. shell in europe which is reliant on russia for supplies. shell paid out 11.3 billion in the first three months of
8:06 am
the year to shareholders but that includes millions of pension savers who rely on dividends and payouts from oil and gas companies to meet obligations to people who have saved for pensions. they are eye—catching results, but the oil and gas companies would point out it was not long ago they were making record losses. the energy business is volatile. and so when people talk about a windfall tax, people say when we made record losses i don't remember people saying they would help us out. those are the discussions from the companies pastoral point of view, but the government resisting calls despite a demand for a win for tax from opposition parties. the other big announcement today — is the bank of england decision on interest rates. it's widely expected the base rate will go up. currently it's 0.75% at the moment. if that does go up —
8:07 am
so does the rate you pay on loans, credit cards and mortgages. and it would be the fourth rate rise we've seen in 6 months. we'll find out at midday. they are desperately trying to control high inflation. it is worth saying that the numbers are mind—boggling. the numbers you deal with in terms of bills are very worrying. we will have a panel at 8:30am looking at how people can do... what you can do to help with those bills. we can move onto ukraine. ukrainian officials say there has been heavy fighting with russian forces who have entered a steelworks in mariupol. about 200 civilians are believed to be sheltering inside that plant, including children. the ukrainian president has appealed to the un to
8:08 am
help rescue them. let's speak to our correspondent, joe inwood, who's in the western city of lviv. if it is true russian troops are going into this steelworks, it will be hideous?— be hideous? yes, absolutely. literally this _ be hideous? yes, absolutely. literally this second, - be hideous? yes, absolutely. literally this second, an i be hideous? yes, absolutely. | literally this second, an alarm be hideous? yes, absolutely. i literally this second, an alarm has gone off here. i think we are ok to steal the roof but if we need to go when we will have to tell you. to answer the question, it will be bloody and brutal and that was the warning from the commander of the azovstal battalion holding out inside and is the reason why president putin called off the storming of the steelworks a couple of weeks ago. it seems now it is back on. we have seen bombardment, huge batteries from sea, land, air, over the last 48 hours. but the fighters inside say they are holding off and holding their ground and say they will not surrender. hate
8:09 am
off and holding their ground and say they will not surrender.— off and holding their ground and say they will not surrender. we can hear air raid sirens. _ they will not surrender. we can hear air raid sirens. why _ they will not surrender. we can hear air raid sirens. why aren't _ they will not surrender. we can hear air raid sirens. why aren't you i air raid sirens. why aren't you going straight down to the basement? well, to explain the background. they are quite regular. we do not know, is the honest truth, what will be happening. we hear them regularly and people have got used to them. but given events of a couple of days ago, they will probably take them more seriously now. i think i mentioned to viewers yesterday, this city had been lulled into a sense of full security because of regularity of these alarms yet 36 hours ago we did have missile strikes around the city. i guess the reason is that at the moment, the russians, although sirens are going off, what they are targeting is infrastructure around the city, not the city centre. that
8:10 am
does give us a sense of confidence. the reason they are targeting areas around the city is because of the strategic value of those targets. you have electricity substations. those are important to target the rail networks which russia has moved to. it is not here targeting civilians, we understand, it is targeting crucial infrastructure, the rail networks. the reason they do that is because hannes seifert them the most important thing to do is to stop the flow of weapons coming to the front and that is happening on rail networks. —— because it allows them to stop that. the areas being targeted are more industrial areas on the outskirts. understood. thank you, take care. local elections are taking place today across england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. polling have just opened and our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster.
8:11 am
tell us what is happening. good morning. polls in all four nations of the uk today. slightly different depending on where you are. in scotland and wales, local elections across the country are being... local councils across the country are being chosen today. in northern ireland, it is the assembly elections, 90 members will be chosen. in england, slightly more complicated. half of local authorities, 4000 councillors in all. they are being chosen. there is all. they are being chosen. there is a handy guide on the bbc website where you can put in your postcode and it will tell you if you have a local council being elected, a mare being elected or something like that. polls opened at seven and are open till 10pm. plenty of time to get to polling stations. there will be counting overnight so we will get some results overnight and more into
8:12 am
tomorrow. we will bring you the latest results on breakfast. unlocked broadcasters cannot say on polling day so we cannot talk about the but there is always lots of pictures of dogs at polling stations. that tends to be popular. a live page on the website and plenty of those pictures over the course of the day. it is plenty of those pictures over the course of the day.— plenty of those pictures over the course of the day. it is one of my favourite bits _ course of the day. it is one of my favourite bits of _ course of the day. it is one of my favourite bits of social _ course of the day. it is one of my favourite bits of social media i course of the day. it is one of my favourite bits of social media on | favourite bits of social media on election day. hashtag dogs at polling stations. we have all done it. for more information on the latest developments and to find out what's happening in your area — visit... here's carol with the weather. good morning, this morning for many a dry start. sunshine in birmingham. cloud around and the thickest in northern ireland and scotland. here, it is producing rain. the first band
8:13 am
of rain moving east. if you follow it all the way south it is bringing cloud pushing south—eastwards and you might find you catch the odd shower later in the day in the midlands, south wales and south west. as it clears it will brighten up west. as it clears it will brighten up in parts of scotland. we have more rain coming into the west. northern ireland will see sunny spells in the afternoon after a cloudy start. in england and wales, here is the weather front. some cloud in the afternoon but still a lot of dry weather and some sunny intervals. temperatures ten in the north, up to 22 as we move further south. overnight, under clearskies, south. overnight, under clear skies, mist south. overnight, under clearskies, mist and fog forming. a weather front in scotland and northern ireland will introduce heavy rain. with this going on it will not be a cold night. tomorrow, eventually dry
8:14 am
and sunny in much of england and wales. as the weather front sync south, cloud will build and behind it bright sunny skies and showers. temperatures, ten in the north, up to 21 further south. we've been following the story of martin hibbert on breakfast. he's the manchester arena bomb survivor who was told he would never walk again after suffering a serious spinal injury. since then, martin's taken on some massive fundraising challenges, but has also been an source of inspiration to others. graham satchell went to meet one of them. it was like something out of a movie. my head started spinning. it was awful. it was this sinking feeling of what is life going to be like? people with cauda equina syndrome are left in a wheelchair. people can't walk. they can't live their lives. so it was utterly terrifying,
8:15 am
absolutely terrifying. pete watts has always been fit and active. he served as a royal engineer in bosnia. when he left the army, he took up mountain biking. but everything changed for him in an instant. it was just a normal day. i'd been out for a walk, came home, bent over to pick up my shoes and felt a twinge in my back. as i stood up, i thought that didn't feel right. i'd had back problems in the past, but i thought i'd done it again. pete ended up in hospital and was told something he will never forget. i was lying in hospital in a&e and a doctor said to me, i "you need to lie completely still, otherwise you are going to be paralysed and left incontinent for life. "so you need an operation today." what followed was emergency surgery to fix a ruptured disc at the base of his spine. pete didn't know if he would ever walk again. the next morning, he was woken up by a nurse.
8:16 am
she said, "right, pete, let's see if you can stand up." so just for that couple of seconds between her saying that and me actually attempting it, again just terrifying. what happens if i don't stand up now? so i did stand up. and that was good. there starts your hope. i can stand up. so i was better than i could have been. the worst outcome wasn't going to happen. pete was sent home with no guidance and no help. his back was fixed, but he had serious nerve damage in his legs. he admits there were very dark days. i wasn't able to work, i couldn't live my normal life. ifelt like i'd lost me. ifelt like i was missing myself, if you know what i mean. it was, it was just an awful, dark time. but then, you start finding things that inspire you. because as i was scrolling through endless things on my phone, just trying to find something to find some hope from some inspiration from, here's this guy who's going to take a wheelchair up kilimanjaro.
8:17 am
martin hibbert going up snowdon in his wheelchair. martin was left paralysed from the waist down after the manchester arena attack. but he is heading to africa in a few weeks to climb mount kilimanjaro. to see a guy who is so positive and so motivated, it is just brilliant. it does, it rubs off. and then i realised i can put one foot in front of the other, that is my thing, i can still do that, even if i can't get to the bottom of the street and back, at this time, i'll progress. spurred on by martin's example, pete started to get up and out. he has to concentrate on every step. his injury means messages from his brain to his legs don't work as well as they used to. walking on a gravel or textured surface was just unbelievable. it was almost like my brain couldn't compute the information.
8:18 am
there are times where i feel like my legs aren't my own and i have to remind myself right, right leg forward, left leg, and then it comes back. hello, martin, how are you doing? i'm really good, peter, how are you? i'm very well, thank you, it's great to see you. a quick surprise. we arranged for pete to have a video call with martin. i think the main thing that came across from the way you are and the things that you do is it's not about what i can't do, it's about what i can do. and that is what i really realised. ok, there are things i can't do, but i can put one foot in front of the other. when people tell me i can't do something, it makes me more determined to do it. but all i'm trying to do isjust make my life is just live my life as i did previously, and i don't see why being in a wheelchair, or having a spinal—cord injury should change that. there is a funny side to this. for years and years, i have been joking about getting smiley faces tattooed on my toes. and, all of a sudden,
8:19 am
i was like, hang on, i can't feel my feet any more. now is the time. so i have done it. i've had smiley faces tattooed on all my toes. nice, great, well done, mate. thank you very much and thank you so much, martin. ijust can't tell you what it means. and all the very best for your challenge. hopefully, we will meet up in person. when i'm back from kilimanjaro. all right, mate, look after yourself. will do, you, too. take care. so time for the big reveal. prepare yourself for pete's tattooed toes. ten smiley faces and a motto — it's all about life. it's just a funny thing. instead of looking at my feet and feeling sad, they make me happy now. i've got happy toes and yeah, i've got a message to remind me it's all about life. martin hibbertjoins us now. i bet you agree with that, it is all about life?—
8:20 am
i bet you agree with that, it is all about life? , , ., ~ , , ., about life? definitely. it makes you stronuer. about life? definitely. it makes you stronger. certainly _ about life? definitely. it makes you stronger. certainly in _ about life? definitely. it makes you stronger. certainly in my— about life? definitely. it makes you stronger. certainly in my case, i about life? definitely. it makes you stronger. certainly in my case, to l stronger. certainly in my case, to appreciate life. i came so close to not being here. and living life to the full everyday. when i started on this journey, the full everyday. when i started on thisjourney, i wanted the full everyday. when i started on this journey, i wanted to the full everyday. when i started on thisjourney, i wanted to inspire, motivate and educate and that is what i do every day. it is great to see and hear stories like peter's, that i am changing people's lives are having an impact. that that i am changing people's lives are having an impact.— are having an impact. that is massive. _ are having an impact. that is massive, that _ are having an impact. that is massive, that you _ are having an impact. that is massive, that you are i are having an impact. that is l massive, that you are inspiring others. ., ., , massive, that you are inspiring others. ., ., others. how does that make you feel? yes, after yesterday, _ others. how does that make you feel? yes, after yesterday, mixed _ others. how does that make you feel? yes, after yesterday, mixed emotions| yes, after yesterday, mixed emotions about it. on one hand, i am delighted i have an impact on people. i was the same. when i was in the spinal unit, other than the doctors and nurses and other people with spinal—cord injuries, there was no one to inspire you. so you do google to get that and there was nobody there. you are in this world on your own. seven people a day,
8:21 am
whilst we are talking, and by the close of today, seven people will be told they have a spinal—cord injury and might not walk again and it will be seven tomorrow and the day after. to know i am accessible and they can see me living life to the fall, climbing kilimanjaro, snowden, driving a car, working, flying to australia. skiing down the alps in italy. to see i can have an impact. a spinal—cord injury is life changing but not life ending. but there is also the frustrating side. should peter have had to go online to get that information? now i am vice president of the spinal injuries association, out of the 2500 who will be told they have a spinal—cord injury, the association will have less than half of that
8:22 am
referred to them. that is the frustration, why isn't everyone told about the association? it should not take me being on the bbc to do that. that is what we want to get across. we have a ready—made charity, fantastic charity, that can help in all aspects of life when you have a spinal—cord injury. it is notjust about not being able to walk. there are bladder regimes, mental health support, and we have a charity working so hard to give that. and to help people like me live fulfilled lives, so mixed emotions. i help people like me live fulfilled lives, so mixed emotions. i need to the official— lives, so mixed emotions. i need to the official verdict _ lives, so mixed emotions. i need to the official verdict on _ lives, so mixed emotions. i need to the official verdict on the _ lives, so mixed emotions. i need to the official verdict on the toes. i the official verdict on the toes. you have not seen them on the call. you have not seen them on the call. you looks like you were slightly phased, what does he mean? and you looks like you were slightly phased, what does he mean? and you saw it. we talked _ phased, what does he mean? and you saw it. we talked about _ phased, what does he mean? and you saw it. we talked about tattoos. i i saw it. we talked about tattoos. i have them all over because i cannot feel anything so i thought i may as
8:23 am
well have a big tattoo where i can't feel it so i have a few. it is great. little things that celebrate life. you have a spinal—cord injury, you cannot walk, but life is still great and there is a lot to achieve. have you heard many people like peter contacting you? yes. especially _ peter contacting you? yes. especially when _ peter contacting you? yes. especially when i _ peter contacting you? yes. especially when i am i peter contacting you? yes. especially when i am on i peter contacting you? yes. | especially when i am on bbc breakfast, we are inundated with messages. people ring the association. it is great. it shows that there are a lot of people who do not know about the spinal injuries association. i know at first hand the great work they do. they are with you for life. they are with you 24/7 the rest of your life. so it is an important part of living that fulfils life, knowing about
8:24 am
this charity. the fact people are not being told about it, i get upset about it and sometimes angry that there are people being sent home without that support. i look at people getting cancer diagnoses, the other major diseases, they would not be sent home with no information, support, referrals, but in the world of spinal—cord injuries, they are sending people home without support and i get frustrated and angry about it, which is why it is great to be on today. it, which is why it is great to be on toda . �* it, which is why it is great to be on today-— it, which is why it is great to be ontoda . �* ,., , on today. and tell us about this. you do not _ on today. and tell us about this. you do not hang _ on today. and tell us about this. you do not hang around. - on today. and tell us about this. you do not hang around. in i on today. and tell us about this. you do not hang around. in four| you do not hang around. in four weeks, you do not hang around. in four weeks. we _ you do not hang around. in four weeks, we will _ you do not hang around. in four weeks, we will already - you do not hang around. in four weeks, we will already be i you do not hang around. in four weeks, we will already be there \ you do not hang around. in four- weeks, we will already be there and getting ready to climb kilimanjaro. just over two years ago i had a crazy idea about raising £1 million. during covid, we had to cancel a lot of events. like a lot of charities
8:25 am
we rely upon donations and big events. we estimated to probably lose £1 million, it was probably more than that, sol lose £1 million, it was probably more than that, so i wanted to plug the gap and came up with a crazy idea. at first i said may be getting to base camp to mount everest which they came back and said was impossible but the next hardest was kilimanjaro. i was, impossible but the next hardest was kilimanjaro. iwas, let's impossible but the next hardest was kilimanjaro. i was, let's do it. it has taken time. we should have done it last year but because of covid we cancelled. in four weeks, we will be climbing kilimanjaro.— climbing kiliman'aro. incredible. as art of climbing kiliman'aro. incredible. as ”humming,— climbing kilimanjaro. incredible. as part of training, you _ climbing kilimanjaro. incredible. as part of training, you went _ climbing kilimanjaro. incredible. as part of training, you went up - part of training, you went up snowdon. and you got really emotional because you were thinking about your mum who died. she unexnectedly — about your mum who died. me unexpectedly passed away about your mum who died. s“u;=: unexpectedly passed away in about your mum who died. sue unexpectedly passed away in october. i did not realise until i saw it, i thought i had got away with it. i thought i had got away with it. i thought it was just my best mate steven with neighbour graham had
8:26 am
caught it on camera and a lot of the team were around me, consoling i think it wasjust... i have been in training 12 months. there is pressure with it. beautiful weather, we were halfway up, and i looked around and saw these beautiful people who had given up time and their weekends to be with me. and i thought of my mum and was really upset she is not here to see me do these great things. she was so proud of me doing it. and i heard her voice saying, i am proud of you. that is really emotional. i could not stop it. just this wave of emotion came over me. it was probably needed. because i have been focused on this climb. i probably have put things to one side. it probablyjust came out. it was beautiful. afterwards, it was, come on, let's get back to the top. i
8:27 am
felt a lot better. i think it was just my mum telling me that even though she is not here, she is with me. and i will take some of her ashes to kilimanjaro. so me. and i will take some of her ashes to kilimanjaro.— ashes to kiliman'aro. so this icture ashes to kiliman'aro. so this picture of h ashes to kiliman'aro. so this picture of your _ ashes to kilimanjaro. so this picture of your mum, - ashes to kilimanjaro. so this picture of your mum, what l ashes to kilimanjaro. so this| picture of your mum, what is ashes to kilimanjaro. so this - picture of your mum, what is her name? , . ~ �* picture of your mum, what is her name? g ., . ~ ., picture of your mum, what is her name? ., . ~ ., , ., , name? janice. and that is me and my brothers. name? janice. and that is me and my brothers- a — name? janice. and that is me and my brothers. a lovely _ name? janice. and that is me and my brothers. a lovely woman. _ name? janice. and that is me and my brothers. a lovely woman. my - name? janice. and that is me and my brothers. a lovely woman. my total i brothers. a lovely woman. my total inspiration. i miss her. me and my two brothers, we were at their house at the weekend clearing things out. very hard. i do not think i will get used to it. but i know she is with me. �* , , ., ., used to it. but i know she is with me. ., , me. and very proud. i am pleased you are able to — me. and very proud. i am pleased you are able to think— me. and very proud. i am pleased you are able to think about _ me. and very proud. i am pleased you are able to think about her _ me. and very proud. i am pleased you are able to think about her that - me. and very proud. i am pleased you are able to think about her that way i are able to think about her that way because you get comfort out of it. good luck. we will follow and find out. . ~ good luck. we will follow and find out. ., ~ , ., good luck. we will follow and find out. ., ~ ., good luck. we will follow and find out. ., ., , good luck. we will follow and find out. . ., , ., out. thank you for your support. to uive me out. thank you for your support. to give me this _ out. thank you for your support. to give me this platform _ out. thank you for your support. to give me this platform to _ out. thank you for your support. to give me this platform to share - out. thank you for your support. to give me this platform to share my i give me this platform to share my story, it is changing people's live so thank you so much. j story, it is changing people's live so thank you so much.— so thank you so much. i have no doubt you _ so thank you so much. i have no doubt you will— so thank you so much. i have no doubt you will do _
8:28 am
so thank you so much. i have no doubt you will do it. _ time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. an investigation into allegations of misconduct at one of london's top state schools has found it failed vulnerable children and that there was bullying and discrimination towards both students and staff. more than 100 former students and staff at holland park school submitted evidence to the investigation, covering 2004 to 2021. it found there was a culture of fear, favouritism and inequality. the board of governors says the findings will "lead to lasting cultural change". police have named the man who died after being found with stab wounds yards from st paul's cathedral in central london. emmanuel 0dunlami, 32, from romford was discovered injured in gresham street at 11.30 on sunday evening. he was taken to the royal london hospital, but later died from his injuries. the polls have opened in the local elections.
8:29 am
all 32 london borough councils are taking part. for more information on the issues and how to vote, head to the bbc london website, the address is on your screen now. a deaf school in north london has enoyed a surprise visit from strictly come dancing winner rose ayling—ellis and her dance partner. the visit was to mark their nomination for a tv bafta for the 'must see�* moment on the bbc show which included a section dancing in silence. the pair chatted with the pupils from the frank barnes school for deaf children in king's cross. it was really, really lovely because it was the first time i'd seen a group of deaf children for quite a long time. and it was so nice to see them looking really, really excited. it became like a big party. and so funny. deaf children are so funny. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's a good service
8:30 am
on the tubes this morning. just the metropolitan line with minor delays. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. the downpours from yesterday, welcomed by some, have cleared. high pressure has been building overnight squeezing everything out of the way. it's also dragged in some warmer air and you can see by this yellow and orange colour, so temperatures set to rise. first thing this morning, a bit of mistiness into the west out towards berkshire but it will melt away. plenty of sunshine. a bit more cloud this afternoon and we could see an isolated shower, but fairly hit and miss and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. overnight, dry, largely clear and we could see a bit of mistiness developing and the minimum temperature between seven and 10 celsius. as we head into friday, it starts off clear with plenty of sunshine but you will notice this cold front starts to sink south. that will introduce a bit more cloud as we head through friday afternoon, but staying dry and temperatures tomorrow still warm. we still have a bit of sunshine. 21 celsius is the maximum. you will notice the rain sneaks in as we head into the evening, clearing through the early hours
8:31 am
of saturday morning. high pressure is in charge all through the weekend so it's fairly settled. perhaps a bit more cloud on saturday but some sunny spells and temperatures throughout staying in the low 20s, and potentially getting warmer by the end of next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and victoria derbyshire. yesterday morning we talked about direct debits for energy bills rising more than necessary. it's something the regulator 0fgem is looking into — they've given companies three weeks to explain what is happening. since then, lots of you have been in touch with your own experiences, so we've decided to put your questions to the experts. we're joined now by dhara vyas, the deputy director of energy uk,
8:32 am
which is the body that represents the suppliers, abbyjitendra, from citizens advice and dr richard fitton, an energy efficiency lecturer. welcome to everyone. i cannot think of a subject about which we have had more questions because it is very real and everyone is feeling it. let's kick off straightaway and we have had a question from malcolm, and this gets to the heart of it straightaway. my 85—year—old father—in—law. .. how is he supposed to afford that? it's a really worrying situation and he's not going to be the only one who has a parent or is in themselves
8:33 am
in that situation and with so few fixed tariffs available it is something a lot of people are worrying about and energy suppliers do completely understand and that's why the majority go above and beyond what they are required to do. it is important malcolm's father let's him know his situation that he speaks with the supplier and they can help with the supplier and they can help with benefits checks, extra support and energy companies do put millions of pounds into working with charities and third parties to try and help and support people who are struggling with this sort of unprecedented price rise. maybe it is a direct debit _ unprecedented price rise. maybe it is a direct debit that _ unprecedented price rise. maybe it is a direct debit that has _ unprecedented price rise. maybe it is a direct debit that has gone - unprecedented price rise. maybe it is a direct debit that has gone up l is a direct debit that has gone up too much that is necessary. that miaht too much that is necessary. that might well— too much that is necessary. that might well be — too much that is necessary. that might well be the _ too much that is necessary. that might well be the case. - too much that is necessary. twat might well be the case. it's really important to recognise that direct debits are quite individual and it really depends on what the circumstances are, so for example, he might have come off a fixed rate and onto standard variable which means he's on a price cap tariff, and all of them are price caps, but it is so individual and depends on
8:34 am
the circumstances and it does seem like an awful lot but there are probably reasons for it. also important to recognise that direct debits are about smoothing the price over the whole year so you do overpay in summer and a bit less in winter and try to keep the steady payment. it suits some people, not others, but that is a lot and it's really important to work out why that happened. d0 really important to work out why that happened-— really important to work out why that happened. do you want to pick u . that happened. do you want to pick u- on that happened. do you want to pick up on that? — that happened. do you want to pick up on that? the — that happened. do you want to pick up on that? the reality _ that happened. do you want to pick up on that? the reality is _ that happened. do you want to pick up on that? the reality is that - that happened. do you want to pick up on that? the reality is that the l up on that? the reality is that the cost of energy _ up on that? the reality is that the cost of energy has _ up on that? the reality is that the cost of energy has gone _ up on that? the reality is that the cost of energy has gone up - up on that? the reality is that the cost of energy has gone up by - up on that? the reality is that the | cost of energy has gone up by 5496 cost of energy has gone up by 54% 'ust cost of energy has gone up by 54% just between march and april, so that could — just between march and april, so that could explain some of the increase. _ that could explain some of the increase, but for many people that citizens _ increase, but for many people that citizens advice are seeing, some of the increases they are seeing with the increases they are seeing with the price — the increases they are seeing with the price cap increase and some of the price cap increase and some of the direct— the price cap increase and some of the direct debit increases we see, realty— the direct debit increases we see, really difficult. people living in one room _ really difficult. people living in one room of their house to save money— one room of their house to save money and _ one room of their house to save money and people having to make realty _ money and people having to make really difficult decisions between feeding — really difficult decisions between feeding their kids and giving them a hot bath _ feeding their kids and giving them a hot bath. what i would urge is to make _ hot bath. what i would urge is to make sure — hot bath. what i would urge is to make sure that your energy company has given— make sure that your energy company has given you a good reason for putting — has given you a good reason for putting up— has given you a good reason for putting up your direct debit and it's something they have to do and it's something they have to do and it's best _ it's something they have to do and it's best practice for them to give
8:35 am
you some — it's best practice for them to give you some notice before they do that and if— you some notice before they do that and if you _ you some notice before they do that and if you look at your bill and think— and if you look at your bill and think this _ and if you look at your bill and think this is either way too much for me _ think this is either way too much for me to — think this is either way too much for me to pay and you won't be able to afford _ for me to pay and you won't be able to afford it. — for me to pay and you won't be able to afford it, or it looks like they are putting up your direct debit above — are putting up your direct debit above your usage, get in touch with your energy— above your usage, get in touch with your energy company. he above your usage, get in touch with your energy company.— your energy company. he is 85 this cu . your energy company. he is 85 this au . it's your energy company. he is 85 this guy- it's gone _ your energy company. he is 85 this guy- it's gone up — your energy company. he is 85 this guy. it's gone up from _ your energy company. he is 85 this guy. it's gone up from 83 - your energy company. he is 85 this guy. it's gone up from 83 up - your energy company. he is 85 this guy. it's gone up from 83 up to - your energy company. he is 85 this | guy. it's gone up from 83 up to 243. why is the onus on him to contact the energy company to ask what is going on? it’s the energy company to ask what is auoin on? v ., , the energy company to ask what is auoin on? h . , the energy company to ask what is hoinon? �*, ., , �*, going on? it's really tricky. it's artl going on? it's really tricky. it's partly because _ going on? it's really tricky. it's partly because energy - going on? it's really tricky. it's partly because energy prices . going on? it's really tricky. it's i partly because energy prices have gone _ partly because energy prices have gone up _ partly because energy prices have gone up already and also that your direct— gone up already and also that your direct debit is supposed to smooth your payments, but again, you are completely— your payments, but again, you are completely right. some of these payments are unaffordable for people to pay— payments are unaffordable for people to pay and _ payments are unaffordable for people to pay and energy companies should be doing _ to pay and energy companies should be doing everything they can to make sure that _ be doing everything they can to make sure that people are able to pay their— sure that people are able to pay their direct debits and energy companies have obligations to find those _ companies have obligations to find those people who cannot afford to pay and _ those people who cannot afford to pay and proactively offer support so that is— pay and proactively offer support so that is something we want to see energy— that is something we want to see energy companies do more of and we want to— energy companies do more of and we want to see _ energy companies do more of and we want to see off gm do more to make
8:36 am
sure empoti — want to see off gm do more to make sure empoli —— energy companies do it. sure empoli -- energy companies do it. . ., , ., sure empoli -- energy companies do it. . ., ~ ., sure empoli -- energy companies do i advocated the use of in—home displays and said i think these will
8:37 am
be far more important. stand displays and said i think these will be far more important.— displays and said i think these will be far more important. and here we are, and be far more important. and here we are. and they _ be far more important. and here we are, and they are _ be far more important. and here we are, and they are free. _ be far more important. and here we are, and they are free. every - be far more important. and here we are, and they are free. every smart | are, and they are free. every smart meter installation. 52% of the smart meter installation. 52% of the smart meter roll—out. 16,000 homes a day. we should be trying to view the information on here. then we have something to counter the energy supplies with inasmuch as this is how much energy i am consuming. this is your response to the direct debit heights. last week we talked about parasitic loans, money we could save by switching things off.— by switching things off. although that research _ by switching things off. although that research was _ by switching things off. although that research was debunked - by switching things off. although that research was debunked a i by switching things off. although | that research was debunked a bit. absolutely, but these will give you a good idea of what you are doing and when you try new things out, turning heating down. and then you can see how much energy you should
8:38 am
be saving and this is a representation of how much you are paying. june says... this is one for you. i cannot pay, i am not going to pay it, what happens next? i am not going to pay it, what happens next? , , ., , next? i might be repeating things we have said. suppliers _ next? i might be repeating things we have said. suppliers have _ next? i might be repeating things we have said. suppliers have to - next? i might be repeating things we have said. suppliers have to take - have said. suppliers have to take into account the ability to pay other customer when they set a direct debit as well as making sure the direct debit will be enough to prevent the customer from ending the direct debit will be enough to prevent the customerfrom ending up in debt. due to the scale of the issue, it is hard to balance those things. issue, it is hard to balance those thins. , . , , ., things. the principle is, as jean has done. _
8:39 am
things. the principle is, as jean has done, she _ things. the principle is, as jean has done, she has _ things. the principle is, as jean has done, she has challenged l things. the principle is, as jean l has done, she has challenged her supplier about the amount of the direct debit. she said i could only afford to pay x, and they accepted that. you advise people to challenge energy suppliers? i that. you advise people to challenge energy suppliers?— energy suppliers? i advise people to make sure the _ energy suppliers? i advise people to make sure the energy _ energy suppliers? i advise people to make sure the energy supplier- make sure the energy supplier understands. i do not know if the £55 a month is enough but if it is what she can afford it is what she can afford. energy is an essential service and it is important people keep warm and keep the lights on. there are different types of support supplies can help particularly with people in vulnerable circumstances. if people are struggling, you have to say what you can afford. the scale of the crisis underlines the need of the government to think about whether there is potential for more intervention above the £350 committed. more intervention above the £350 committed-— committed. what about citizens advice, committed. what about citizens advice. are _ committed. what about citizens advice, are you _ committed. what about citizens advice, are you hearing - committed. what about citizens advice, are you hearing similarl advice, are you hearing similar stories? that sounds positive, it sounds like the supplier has listened. will she owe the money in
8:40 am
the future, is it held back? but you hear companies being helpful. i hear companies being helpful. i think whatjune has done, given she cannot afford to pay, that is the right thing to do. energy companies should take into account whether you can afford to pay. it is an essential service. people should be able to keep eating and lights on. we hear that people are not currently able to keep heating on and that is likely to get worse in winter when prices might rise again. energy companies are not being quite so good on billing issues. we have seen an increase of people coming to us with billing issues and people coming with being able to contact their supplier. coming with being able to contact their supplier-— coming with being able to contact their supplier. what is important is ener: their supplier. what is important is energy companies _ their supplier. what is important is energy companies are _ their supplier. what is important is energy companies are available - their supplier. what is important is energy companies are available forj energy companies are available for their customers, particularly now when energy prices have gone up. they want someone at the other end of the phone to be able to support them and we are not saying that as
8:41 am
much as we should. fin them and we are not saying that as much as we should.— much as we should. on that point about challenging _ much as we should. on that point about challenging the _ much as we should. on that point about challenging the direct - much as we should. on that point| about challenging the direct debit, sue said they used to pay £148... we have another question from bristol. what can people do if they cannot get through to their supplier? this is more on — get through to their supplier? this is more on the _ get through to their supplier? this is more on the supply side issues. but there — is more on the supply side issues. but there are specific ways of doing this. but there are specific ways of doing this it _ but there are specific ways of doing this it has — but there are specific ways of doing this. it has happened to a lot of people — this. it has happened to a lot of people and might happen to a lot more _ people and might happen to a lot more. , ., , people and might happen to a lot more, , ., ,, people and might happen to a lot more. , ., , , ., people and might happen to a lot more. , .,, ., , , ., ., , more. this has happened to millions of --eole more. this has happened to millions of people across _ more. this has happened to millions of people across the _ more. this has happened to millions
8:42 am
of people across the uk. _ more. this has happened to millions of people across the uk. we - more. this has happened to millions of people across the uk. we have i of people across the uk. we have seen almost 30 suppliers fail in the last eight months and so it is a massive what we call market meltdown. the first thing to do is make sure your energy supplier is someone you have an account with. it sounds like this new supplier has not done what they should which is proactively get in touch with their customers so it might be the customers so it might be the customer then has to get in touch themselves. but again, it is partly because of the difficulties in the market we are seeing so much chaos. and few tariffs people are able to switch to. i want to go back to these bills. from paying £183 per month, a quote of £758 per month. and they ask how are they supposed to pay this, we are pensioners. just
8:43 am
auoin back to pay this, we are pensioners. just going back to the issue we were talking about, if allen or someone else offers to pay something, picks a figure and says i can pay £300 but i cannot pay 750, is the energy company obligated to let them carry on being a customer and having energy? they are certainly obligated to consider— they are certainly obligated to consider what customers can afford ~~ _ consider what customers can afford... p, h p, ' consider what customers can afford... . �*, . , ., , afford... that's a different answer to a different _ afford... that's a different answer to a different question. _ afford... that's a different answer to a different question. they - afford... that's a different answer to a different question. they are i to a different question. they are obliged to consider it. but are they allowed, if you cannot pay your bill, if you can't pay your bill, they have to talk to you about what you can afford. i they have to talk to you about what you can afford-— you can afford. i will say the sorts of fiuures you can afford. i will say the sorts of figures are difficult and you - of figures are difficult and you need — of figures are difficult and you need to— of figures are difficult and you need to enter into that dialogue. energy— need to enter into that dialogue. energy companies are dealing with a lot of— energy companies are dealing with a lot of money and there are lots of
8:44 am
different — lot of money and there are lots of different reasons that direct debits are increasing. and that doesn't mean _ are increasing. and that doesn't mean there is an bad practice out there _ mean there is an bad practice out there and — mean there is an bad practice out there. and it means they are so dependent on individual circumstances and it depends whether allen came _ circumstances and it depends whether allen came off fixed rate debit, but i want _ allen came off fixed rate debit, but i want to— allen came off fixed rate debit, but i want to say on the other thing is about— i want to say on the other thing is about metre readings and it builds on the _ about metre readings and it builds on the point about smart metres. important— on the point about smart metres. important to be taking metre readers if you _ important to be taking metre readers if you don't— important to be taking metre readers if you don't have a smart metre and that applies — if you don't have a smart metre and that applies if your company has gone _ that applies if your company has gone out — that applies if your company has gone out of business as well. and with the _ gone out of business as well. and with the amount of turmoil in the market. — with the amount of turmoil in the market, new energy supplies have taken _ market, new energy supplies have taken over— market, new energy supplies have taken over 4 million customers from bill bias— taken over 4 million customers from bill bias and — taken over 4 million customers from bill bias and they are trying to do it as _ bill bias and they are trying to do it as quick— bill bias and they are trying to do it as quick as they can with the onboarding process for the new customers. and we completely and frustrated — customers. and we completely and frustrated by energy suppliers that there _ frustrated by energy suppliers that there might be agreements needed to be rich _ there might be agreements needed to be rich with the administrators put in place _ be rich with the administrators put in place and it's a really tricky process _ in place and it's a really tricky process. and really important to
8:45 am
consider— process. and really important to consider the communication channels and if— consider the communication channels and if youra— consider the communication channels and if you're able to e—mail and text, _ and if you're able to e—mail and text, and— and if you're able to e—mail and text, and you can contact energy supplies— text, and you can contact energy supplies and it's important to think about— supplies and it's important to think about the _ supplies and it's important to think about the way that is suiting you to. p, about the way that is suiting you to. . . ., about the way that is suiting you to. . ., ., , ., to. can i add one thing. if you cannot get — to. can i add one thing. if you cannot get in _ to. can i add one thing. if you cannot get in touch _ to. can i add one thing. if you cannot get in touch with - to. can i add one thing. if you cannot get in touch with your| to. can i add one thing. if you - cannot get in touch with your energy supplier or they haven't solved your problem, get in touch with citizens advice, because we can give you that support either through the website or on the phone. it’s support either through the website or on the phone.— support either through the website or on the phone. it's something we will revisit- — or on the phone. it's something we will revisit. thank _ or on the phone. it's something we will revisit. thank you _ or on the phone. it's something we will revisit. thank you for _ or on the phone. it's something we will revisit. thank you for helping l will revisit. thank you for helping out and thank you for getting in touch with us and we will make sure we keep on top of the story. the final preparations are underway for the queen's platinum jubilee celebrations and one of this most anticipated events of the bank holiday weekend will be the people's pageant. community groups from all over the country will take part in the procession, which tells the story of the queen 5 70—year reign in four acts. fiona lamdin is in coventry for us this morning with one of the groups taking part — how's it looking fiona?
8:46 am
good morning. we are in coventry with the queens favourites, so there will be four boats coming down the mall. come and meet the corgis, a pack of them, 20. and this is the queen's favourite, her first one, susan, and then we have the swans and then the water next to them for them to bobber on but this is not them to bobber on but this is not the only group taking part. many other groups up and down the country are preparing and we've been finding out what they have been doing. it's the carnival finale. the platinum jubilee people's pageant. on sunday the 5th ofjune, 10,000 performers will parade through the streets of westminster, up the mall, passing buckingham palace. the procession is split into four acts, bringing to life iconic moments from the last seven decades of her majesty's reign. chapter one takes us back to her early years in the 19405. so, our piece, the princess and the dragon, represents the queen before her coronation,
8:47 am
so we see the young dancer dancing up the mall and we see behind her the huge dragon representing the power and the wisdom of the coronation. and she is currently kept in pieces in these two crates here in somersetjust to get a sense of the scale, she is absolutely huge. these are her ears and here are the scales, six metres of them. so we call the dragon the hatchling. she is the size of a double—decker bus. her head is about the size of a small fiat, so she is huge, and completely human powered. she is very lightweight. the technology we are using is an amalgamation of kite technology and what we used in war horse, so our director is one of the puppetry directors of war horse and we have amplified that technique 15—fold, so you have a cast of 30 puppeteers bringing her down the mall. with a wingspan of 20 metres, and to give you an idea of how that big is, that's about the size of the mall itself, so she is going to have an extremely
8:48 am
grand presence when we see her out. stop the parade will also mark the queen's wedding
8:49 am
there are ten of these going to be coming up the mall. teiiii there are ten of these going to be coming up the mall.— coming up the mall. tell us what ou've coming up the mall. tell us what you've created. _ coming up the mall. tell us what you've created. we _ coming up the mall. tell us what you've created. we have - coming up the mall. tell us what you've created. we have been i you've created. we have been creating the queens favourites and working with arts and engineering to do this and showcase the coventry and west midlands ingenuity and working with local groups as well as professional artists. we have produced all sorts of things. boats and corn is produced all sorts of things. boats and corgis in _ produced all sorts of things. boats and corgis in all _ produced all sorts of things. boats and corgis in all sorts. _ produced all sorts of things. boats and corgis in all sorts. the - produced all sorts of things. boats and corgis in all sorts. the queen's favourites, you were given a broad range. favourites, you were given a broad ranue. ~ . y ., favourites, you were given a broad ranue. ~ . ,, ~ range. what did you think? we thouuht range. what did you think? we thought about _ range. what did you think? we thought about her _ range. what did you think? we thought about her love - range. what did you think? we thought about her love of- range. what did you think? we - thought about her love of animals. corgi chaos came to mind. she is loved and had so many corgis. horses
8:50 am
also, we have an encyclopaedia so we thought horses has got to be in there. and then we started researching and came up with other things. we wanted to include something for the duke of edinburgh, something for the duke of edinburgh, so that has become the boats. there will be a four— so that has become the boats. there will be a four of— so that has become the boats. there will be a four of these. _ so that has become the boats. there will be a four of these. sailing - so that has become the boats. there will be a four of these. sailing on - will be a four of these. sailing on a beautiful _ will be a four of these. sailing on a beautiful ocean _ will be a four of these. sailing on a beautiful ocean which - will be a four of these. sailing on a beautiful ocean which i - will be a four of these. sailing on a beautiful ocean which i think i will be a four of these. sailing on | a beautiful ocean which i think you can see in the distance. goad can see in the distance. good morning- _ can see in the distance. good morning. how _ can see in the distance. good morning. how heavy - can see in the distance. good morning. how heavy is - can see in the distance. good morning. how heavy is that? | can see in the distance. good l morning. how heavy is that? it can see in the distance. good i morning. how heavy is that? it is pretty— morning. how heavy is that? it is pretty tight — morning. how heavy is that? it is pretty light but after a little bit pretty light but after a little hit my arm — pretty light but after a little hit my arm start to ache. pretty light but after a little bit my arm start to ache.- pretty light but after a little bit my arm start to ache. what is your favourite thing _ my arm start to ache. what is your favourite thing in _ my arm start to ache. what is your favourite thing in this _ my arm start to ache. what is your favourite thing in this procession? | favourite thing in this procession? the corgis because i like the design and how— the corgis because i like the design and how they are made. we the corgis because i like the design and how they are made.— the corgis because i like the design and how they are made. we can meet the corn is and how they are made. we can meet the corgis because _ and how they are made. we can meet the corgis because there _ and how they are made. we can meet the corgis because there is _ and how they are made. we can meet the corgis because there is a - and how they are made. we can meet the corgis because there is a pack- the corgis because there is a pack of 20. this is susan. she is slightly older. her eyebrows are slightly older. her eyebrows are slightly gone. this was the queen's first and possibly the queen's favourite. good morning. you designed these. it favourite. good morning. you designed these.— favourite. good morning. you
8:51 am
desiuned these. . , . ~' designed these. it has taken weeks. we have been _ designed these. it has taken weeks. we have been working _ designed these. it has taken weeks. we have been working on _ designed these. it has taken weeks. we have been working on these - designed these. it has taken weeks. | we have been working on these since january full—time. it has taken a lot of work, a lot of repetition, but lovely to make.— lot of work, a lot of repetition, but lovely to make. shall i give you susan? we — but lovely to make. shall i give you susan? we have _ but lovely to make. shall i give you susan? we have a _ but lovely to make. shall i give you susan? we have a clay _ but lovely to make. shall i give you susan? we have a clay head. - but lovely to make. shall i give you susan? we have a clay head. i - but lovely to make. shall i give you j susan? we have a clay head. i took but lovely to make. shall i give you l susan? we have a clay head. i took a attern susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from — susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from a _ susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from a clay _ susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from a clay head. _ susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from a clay head. we - susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from a clay head. we made l susan? we have a clay head. i took a pattern from a clay head. we made a j pattern from a clay head. we made a pattern from a clay head. we made a pattern so they are from the same pattern so they are from the same pattern but then had to make them individual and quirky and all their own characters. this individual and quirky and all their own characters.— own characters. this one has its tonaue own characters. this one has its tongue out- _ own characters. this one has its tongue out. some _ own characters. this one has its tongue out. some are _ own characters. this one has its tongue out. some are in. - own characters. this one has its tongue out. some are in. and i own characters. this one has its i tongue out. some are in. and the tales are different. _ tongue out. some are in. and the tales are different. we _ tongue out. some are in. and the tales are different. we looked i tongue out. some are in. and the tales are different. we looked at| tales are different. we looked at pictures of corgis for inspiration. you spent weeks looking at the queen's corgis?— you spent weeks looking at the queen's corgis?_ a i you spent weeks looking at the - queen's corgis?_ a lovely queen's corgis? definitely. a lovely 'ob to do. queen's corgis? definitely. a lovely job to do- they _ queen's corgis? definitely. a lovely job to do. they looked _ queen's corgis? definitely. a lovely job to do. they looked so _ job to do. they looked so impressive. i job to do. they looked so impressive.— job to do. they looked so impressive. job to do. they looked so imressive. . , , ., impressive. i am sure she will love them. impressive. i am sure she will love them- let's — impressive. i am sure she will love them. let's meet _ impressive. i am sure she will love them. let's meet trudy. _ impressive. i am sure she will love them. let's meet trudy. you - impressive. i am sure she will love them. let's meet trudy. you have | them. let's meet trudy. you have made the swans. i them. let's meet trudy. you have made the swans.— them. let's meet trudy. you have made the swans. i designed the swans which have a — made the swans. i designed the swans which have a big _ made the swans. i designed the swans which have a big connection _ made the swans. i designed the swans which have a big connection with - made the swans. i designed the swans which have a big connection with the i which have a big connection with the royal— which have a big connection with the royal family. and i looked at the
8:52 am
history— royal family. and i looked at the history of— royal family. and i looked at the history of swan upping, a ceremony that happens every year on the river thames _ that happens every year on the river thames. they count all the swans to see how— thames. they count all the swans to see how they are surviving and coping — see how they are surviving and coping. and it is about caring about the countryside and the water life. so we _ the countryside and the water life. so we will— the countryside and the water life. so we will see 20 ones swanning around — so we will see 20 ones swanning around. �* , , , around. and they will 'ust be dancin: around. and they will 'ust be dancing at i around. and they will 'ust be dancing at the t around. and they will 'ust be dancing at the mall? _ around. and they willjust be dancing at the mall? yes, i around. and they willjust be dancing at the mall? yes, in| around. and they willjust be i dancing at the mall? yes, in the beautiful water. _ dancing at the mall? yes, in the beautiful water. a _ dancing at the mall? yes, in the beautiful water. a bit _ dancing at the mall? yes, in the beautiful water. a bit of - dancing at the mall? yes, in the beautiful water. a bit of velcro i dancing at the mall? yes, in the i beautiful water. a bit of velcro has 'ust come beautiful water. a bit of velcro has just come loose. _ beautiful water. a bit of velcro has just come loose. and _ beautiful water. a bit of velcro has just come loose. and you - beautiful water. a bit of velcro hasj just come loose. and you designed them so the wings move out beautifully.— them so the wings move out beautifully. them so the wings move out beautifull . , . ., .. ., beautifully. they have a cane that is flexible but _ beautifully. they have a cane that is flexible but it _ beautifully. they have a cane that is flexible but it gives _ beautifully. they have a cane that is flexible but it gives it _ beautifully. they have a cane that is flexible but it gives it that - is flexible but it gives it that illusion _ is flexible but it gives it that illusion of wings. we is flexible but it gives it that illusion of wings.— is flexible but it gives it that illusion of wings. we want to give ou a illusion of wings. we want to give you a sense _ illusion of wings. we want to give you a sense of — illusion of wings. we want to give you a sense of what _ illusion of wings. we want to give you a sense of what it _ illusion of wings. we want to give you a sense of what it might - illusion of wings. we want to give you a sense of what it might look| you a sense of what it might look like. everyone here will take a
8:53 am
corgi. let's proceed and pretend we are on the mall. a little rehearsal. go, go. this is what it might look like. coming up the mall you will see some swans. you might see some barking corgis. mine is behaving beautifully. very noisy, these corgis. we have a wave, we have more swans behind us. that is being incredibly naughty. you have two here. what a sight. these will be in the mall. we haven't got many weeks now. ., the mall. we haven't got many weeks now. u, the the mall. we haven't got many weeks now— the horse - the mall. we haven't got many weeks now._ the horse has i now. four weeks left. the horse has a view problems. _ now. four weeks left. the horse has a view problems. going _ now. four weeks left. the horse has a view problems. going backwards i now. four weeks left. the horse has| a view problems. going backwards at the moment — a view problems. going backwards at the moment but _ a view problems. going backwards at the moment but we _ a view problems. going backwards at the moment but we will— a view problems. going backwards at the moment but we will be _ a view problems. going backwards at the moment but we will be forward i the moment but we will be forward soon. ii the moment but we will be forward soon. , ., the moment but we will be forward soon. i. ., ., ., soon. if you cannot get to the mall, do not worry- _ soon. if you cannot get to the mall, do not worry. you _ soon. if you cannot get to the mall, do not worry. you have _ soon. if you cannot get to the mall, do not worry. you have had - soon. if you cannot get to the mall, do not worry. you have had a - soon. if you cannot get to the mall, do not worry. you have had a taste| do not worry. you have had a taste here. it will be on bbc being stream
8:54 am
so you will be able to watch it. this is what it looks like. it is amazing, fake corgis. on wheels down the mall. after six decades, 11 grammys, and huge hits like "9—to—5" and "jolene", the country star dolly parton will take her place in rock and roll hall of fame. that's despite initially rejecting the honour. the singer thought she hadn't "earned the right" to be counted as a rock star — but she has been accepted. she'll be inducted alongside the likes of eminem and duran duran. we are not speaking to dali but we will try to celebrate. lucy is with
8:55 am
us this morning. see if you can guess what lucy does for a living. she is a legendary figure. this guess what lucy does for a living. she is a legendary figure.- she is a legendary figure. this is me, she is a legendary figure. this is me. lucy. _ she is a legendary figure. this is me, lucy, speaking _ she is a legendary figure. this is me, lucy, speaking now. - she is a legendary figure. this is me, lucy, speaking now. not i she is a legendary figure. this is i me, lucy, speaking now. not dolly parton. i am from derbyshire. me, lucy, speaking now. not dolly parton. iam from derbyshire. my accent is different. dolly is parton. iam from derbyshire. my accent is different. d what makes her inspirational person. what makes her so special. she has had a long career which is one of the things. she is like a force of nature. what makes her special is that it is her heart. she has come from absolutely nothing to build this multi—million dollar empire. whilst keeping her
8:56 am
roots and keeping grounded the whole way through. why do you think it has taken so long? she has covered led zeppelin and the beatles. i was thinkin: zeppelin and the beatles. i was thinking today _ zeppelin and the beatles. i was thinking today she _ zeppelin and the beatles. i was thinking today she is _ zeppelin and the beatles. i was thinking today she is a - zeppelin and the beatles. i was thinking today she is a humble person — thinking today she is a humble person. she does not always think that she _ person. she does not always think that she deserves these accolades that she deserves these accolades that come — that she deserves these accolades that come her way. but if you look back— that come her way. but if you look back on— that come her way. but if you look back on rock — that come her way. but if you look back on rock and roll music through the decades, it does originate from country— the decades, it does originate from country music and rhythm and blues. ithink— country music and rhythm and blues. i think that _ country music and rhythm and blues. i think that is — country music and rhythm and blues. i think that is what the rock and roll hall— i think that is what the rock and roll hall of— i think that is what the rock and roll hall of fame were giving her that nomination. | roll hall of fame were giving her that nomination.— that nomination. i think you are auoin to that nomination. i think you are going to sing — that nomination. i think you are going to sing for _ that nomination. i think you are going to sing for us. _ that nomination. i think you are going to sing for us. i _ that nomination. i think you are going to sing for us. i can - that nomination. i think you are going to sing for us. i can do i that nomination. i think you are going to sing for us. i can do anj going to sing for us. i can do an excert going to sing for us. i can do an excerpt of— going to sing for us. i can do an excerpt of a _ going to sing for us. i can do an excerpt of a song. _ going to sing for us. i can do an excerpt of a song. i _ going to sing for us. i can do an i excerpt of a song. i will introduce it for— excerpt of a song. i will introduce
8:57 am
it for you — excerpt of a song. i will introduce it for you i— excerpt of a song. i will introduce it for you. i wrote this song about 20 years— it for you. i wrote this song about 20 years ago about a woman down in nashville _ 20 years ago about a woman down in nashville. she was trying to take care of— nashville. she was trying to take care of my— nashville. she was trying to take care of my husband while i was on the road — care of my husband while i was on the road. women do that kind of thing. _ the road. women do that kind of thing, right? well, anyway, ifought like a _ thing, right? well, anyway, ifought like a woman like a wildcat. she took— like a woman like a wildcat. she took my— like a woman like a wildcat. she took my wig and beat me with it. can you tell— took my wig and beat me with it. can you tell me _ took my wig and beat me with it. can you tell me what that redheaded woman's— you tell me what that redheaded woman's name is? | you tell me what that redheaded woman's name is?— you tell me what that redheaded woman's name is? i think it might be jolene. i woman's name is? i think it might be jolene- i think _ woman's name is? i think it might be jolene. i think you _ woman's name is? i think it might be jolene. i think you could _ woman's name is? i think it might be jolene. i think you could be _ woman's name is? i think it might be jolene. i think you could be right. i jolene. i think you could be right. #jolene. — jolene. i think you could be right. # jolene, jolene, _ jolene. i think you could be right. # jolene, jolene, jolene, - jolene. i think you could be right. # jolene, jolene, jolene, jolene. | # jolene, jolene, jolene, jolene. # jolene, jolene, jolene, jolene. # i'm_ # jolene, jolene, jolene, jolene. # i'm begging ourview, please # jolene, jolene, jolene, jolene. # i'm begging our view, please don't take my— # i'm begging our view, please don't take my manner. sing it with me. # jolene — take my manner. sing it with me. #jolene, jolene... take my manner. sing it with me. # jolene, jolene... join
8:58 am
take my manner. sing it with me. # jolene, jolene. . ._ take my manner. sing it with me. # jolene, jolene. .. join in with me. you are ioking- _ # jolene, jolene. .. join in with me. you are joking i — # jolene, jolene. .. join in with me. you are joking. i love _ # jolene, jolene. .. join in with me. you are joking. i love it, _ # jolene, jolene. .. join in with me. you are joking. i love it, but- # jolene, jolene. .. join in with me. you are joking. i love it, but when i you arejoking. i love it, but when i've had a few drinks! well done. well done. it is so tough. when we ask people to give us a burst of a song like that, at 8:55am, well done. what is the first rule for anyone doing a dolly parton impersonation? rule number one is to have big boots — rule number one is to have big boots. rule two, it is the wig and rule three — boots. rule two, it is the wig and rule three is— boots. rule two, it is the wig and rule three is to have a voice that matches— rule three is to have a voice that matches dolly parton. and also to have the _ matches dolly parton. and also to have the heart of dolly parton. how lona has it have the heart of dolly parton. how long has it taken _ have the heart of dolly parton. time long has it taken you to get ready? five minutes. seriously? i got stuck in the _ five minutes. seriously? i got stuck in the traffic— five minutes. seriously? i got stuck in the traffic on the bridge. sol ran into — in the traffic on the bridge. sol ran into the disabled toilet and it took me — ran into the disabled toilet and it took me five minutes. you ran into the disabled toilet and it took me five minutes.— ran into the disabled toilet and it took me five minutes. you have done well. took me five minutes. you have done well- thank — took me five minutes. you have done well. thank you. _ well. thank you. and thank you for coming in and singing for us. maybe one day you
8:59 am
will get to meet her. iitufha singing for us. maybe one day you will get to meet her.— will get to meet her. who knows? please, if will get to meet her. who knows? please. if you _ will get to meet her. who knows? please, if you are _ will get to meet her. who knows? please, if you are watching - will get to meet her. who knows? please, if you are watching this, i please, if you are watching this, dali, _ please, if you are watching this, dali. can— please, if you are watching this, dali, can we sing together? i would like to see that _ dali, can we sing together? i would like to see that happen. _
9:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines. ukrainian officials say russian forces have launched an all—out assault on the azovstal steelworks in mariupol, as president zelensky calls for the un to help civilians still trapped there. we'll also explore how russian targeting of key infrastructure across ukraine is impacting western weapons arriving into the country, with strikes on roads and railways and polls are open across the uk. voters in scotland, wales and much of england, are electing local councillors and mayors in some areas. meanwhile, people in northern ireland are choosing a new assembly. energy giant, shell, has reported its highest
9:01 am
ever quarterly profits — making over £7 billion

67 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on