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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 5, 2022 10:45pm-11:01pm BST

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guardian, it does interesting in the guardian, it does state calls were growing yesterday for the government to announce a windfall tax on oil and gas companies to help struggling households in the government has maintained that it would be unwise to tax these companies because the money is needed for investment in green energy and renewables. do you think we might see a u—turn, though? potentially you could see public sentiment shifting. there is this horrible dilemma for the government because obviously you are facing these times where there is expectation that government should step in and obviously they have stepped in during the pandemic and they have stepped in and listen to some of the energy crisis and the expectation that should step in again but obviously they have got to actually get money coming into the exchequer, so very difficult dilemma. but what he is in this government if they do change tack quite regularly so you might do something again after this windfall tax and you can imagine the public
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will be quite so pathetic to going after some of these big oil giants erecting into record profits at a time when everybody else is being squeezed in the politics of it as you can seat it wouldst be seen to be quite popular and would not alienate too many members of the public either. alienate too many members of the public either-— public either. let's turn to a different — public either. let's turn to a different story. _ public either. let's turn to a different story. also - public either. let's turn to a different story. also in - public either. let's turn to a different story. also in the i different story. also in the telegraph actually, antilock down sweden among lowest for pandemic deaths but the world health organization has released estimates of excess deaths and these are those who both died directly and indirectly from covid—i9 showing nearly 15 million deaths worldwide which i think is about three times higher than the figure reported. interesting that they have chosen to pick out sweden, aubrey can be because of course a lot of attention certainly the pandemic that they did not lock down in quite the way of so many other countries.— not lock down in quite the way of so many other countries. yes, and they were criticised. _
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many other countries. yes, and they were criticised. the _ many other countries. yes, and they were criticised. the government - were criticised. the government advisers — were criticised. the government advisers said they were the outlier and there — advisers said they were the outlier and there this great curiosity in terms — and there this great curiosity in terms of— and there this great curiosity in terms of how a country and of the pandemic— terms of how a country and of the pandemic because they chose a different approach and i think that response — different approach and i think that response was it not going to like to but i did _ response was it not going to like to but i did change tack but it's been very interesting. so the staff that we have — very interesting. so the staff that we have from the world health organization to date reported in the telegraph— organization to date reported in the telegraph are that in 2020 22021, sweden _ telegraph are that in 2020 22021, sweden had to accept death rates of 56 per— sweden had to accept death rates of 56 per 100,000 which is dramatically 56 per100,000 which is dramatically lower— 56 per100,000 which is dramatically lower or— 56 per 100,000 which is dramatically lower or half of what the uk's was at lower or half of what the uk's was al109_ lower or half of what the uk's was al109 per— lower or half of what the uk's was at 109 per 100,000 lower or half of what the uk's was at 109 per100,000 in lower or half of what the uk's was at 109 per 100,000 in other european countries _ at 109 per 100,000 in other european countries they picked out had 111, in spain. — countries they picked out had 111, in spain, 116 in germany. and obviously— in spain, 116 in germany. and obviously they will be a great deal of debate — obviously they will be a great deal of debate about exactly why this is and it_ of debate about exactly why this is and it may— of debate about exactly why this is and it may be that it was the strategy _ and it may be that it was the strategy for suppressing the virus we also _ strategy for suppressing the virus we also know that there is quite a lot of— we also know that there is quite a lot of difference in terms of communities and in the uk that were
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infected _ communities and in the uk that were infected in _ communities and in the uk that were infected in terms of their vulnerability to it. so the scottish government adviser is quoted on the front page _ government adviser is quoted on the front page of the telegraph saint that really the main take away from her is _ that really the main take away from her is to— that really the main take away from her is to invest in population health— her is to invest in population health and have less inequality. so ithink— health and have less inequality. so i think also— health and have less inequality. so i think also the telegraph says it has lower— i think also the telegraph says it has lower rates for obesity and a better— has lower rates for obesity and a better and well resourced health care system so all those factors have _ care system so all those factors have to — care system so all those factors have to come in to account but i'm sure _ have to come in to account but i'm sure you will — have to come in to account but i'm sure you will hear a lot more about things like — sure you will hear a lot more about things like this in the public inquiry— things like this in the public inquiry that comes out because a lot of times— inquiry that comes out because a lot of times will be spent on the harms done by— of times will be spent on the harms done by lockdowns as well as by the benefits _ done by lockdowns as well as by the benefits and the gains achieved. interesting that britain had lower accept death rates in spain and germany and italy. it is interesting. _ germany and italy. it is interesting. i— germany and italy. it is interesting. i think - germany and italy. it is interesting. i think our| germany and italy. it 3 interesting. i think our retouch on something there and i think there is something there and i think there is something in this about a robustness in the health system. sweden having lower rates of obesity i think and there is been talk about certain pockets of the country with higher rates of levels of obesity and certainly communities whereby what you saw higher death rates but also
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we don't still know the full picture in this is where it will have to be the inquiry and really get together at the full picture because there are so many different mitigating and competing factors in obviously seven people died from the flu each year, winter flu and how many of those will have sadly died anyway but were recorded as covid—19 desk was met all the sort of unknowns which need to be mapped out so i think we are still a long way off from getting complete clarity.— still a long way off from getting complete clarity. only one minute left of this means _ complete clarity. only one minute left of this means 30 _ complete clarity. only one minute left of this means 30 seconds - complete clarity. only one minute| left of this means 30 seconds each tops on the fact that the times is reporting only 300 migrants face being sent to rwanda each year with a headline thoughts. yes, being sent to rwanda each year with a headline thoughts.— being sent to rwanda each year with a headline thoughts. yes, i had seen estimates of — a headline thoughts. yes, i had seen estimates of only _ a headline thoughts. yes, i had seen estimates of only 200 _ a headline thoughts. yes, i had seen estimates of only 200 and _ a headline thoughts. yes, i had seen estimates of only 200 and actually i estimates of only 200 and actually there _ estimates of only 200 and actually there were lots of conservative in peace _ there were lots of conservative in peace with — there were lots of conservative in peace with the policy was announced who while _ peace with the policy was announced who while they applauded the aim of it for this _ who while they applauded the aim of it for this risk drawing attention to initiative they got the government was not capable of solving — government was not capable of solving. and while they thought it was a _ solving. and while they thought it was a good idea it was reallyjust a
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quick fix— was a good idea it was reallyjust a quick fix potentially the prime minister— quick fix potentially the prime minister but actually the consequences were not bear out the reality— consequences were not bear out the reality of— consequences were not bear out the reality of what had been planned. it looks _ reality of what had been planned. it looks like _ reality of what had been planned. it looks like that be more to bear. briefly— looks like that be more to bear. briefly in— looks like that be more to bear. briefly in of course more shots and announced the ramona policy that tens of thousands will be removed. yeah, and controversial policy to some and i think it plays very well with the tory base in place what will the public and will be a time lag in getting this sorted out as it happens quickly but people would want. but i do think there will a firm in a public support for this policy, but will take time to see it through. i policy, but will take time to see it throu~h. ., policy, but will take time to see it throu~h. . ,., ,, policy, but will take time to see it throu~h. . ,, , , through. i admire both your brevity. thank ou through. i admire both your brevity. thank you both _ through. i admire both your brevity. thank you both so _ through. i admire both your brevity. thank you both so much. _ through. i admire both your brevity. thank you both so much. great- through. i admire both your brevity. thank you both so much. great to i thank you both so much. great to happy with this and thanks again. that's it for the papers. there won't be a second review as there normally is. instead, huw edwards will be presenting elections 2022 from 11:40pm through the night until 6am tomorrow morning. so, it's goodbye from us this evening.
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good evening. this is your update from the bbc sport centre. rangers are into the europa league final thanks to a late third goal against rb leipzig. it was incredible performance at ibrox, the side coming back from a first—leg deficit. but a night to forget for west ham, who had a man and their manager sent off in their loss to frankfurt. joe wilson reports. fireworks in frankfurt, british teams everywhere, three european semifinals, two different competitions. one deep breath. right, first to glasgow, to rangers... they began this match against leipzig 1—0 down after the first leg. they began with inspiration, with their captain... commentator: james tavernier! whatever expectations ibrox possessed, they were exceeded. glen kamara kept his composure, which meant that fans
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could lose theirs — joy. rangers lead. but with 20 minutes left to play, leipzig responded — it was all equal. rangers persevered, just like they've done throughout this competition. john lundstram's winning goal, a night to rival any, and a european final to look forward to. in frankfurt, west ham lost a defender to a red card in the 19th minute and conceded a goal soon after. that left them two behind in their europa league semifinal. there were no more goals, but after tempers frayed on the touchline, west ham's manager david moyes was sent off and his team went out. the europa conference league meant little to leicester city until they began to excel in it. now a semifinal, soon this... commentator: fabulous goal! that was tammy abraham, the englishman reborn in roma. there's one roman forever idolised in leicester. yeah, it's you, claudio ranieri. but a european final was a dream too far.
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2—1 overall, leicester's run all over. joe wilson, bbc news. chris kirchner is a step closer to completing the takeover of derby county. the efl board has today been advised that a deal to take the club out of administration and under the ownership of the american businessman is nearing completion. evidence of sufficient funds has been confirmed, but a significant issue remains still about the status of the stadium and its ownership. andy murray pulled out of his match against novak djokovic in the third round of the madris masters through illness. meanwhile, british number one cameron norrie is out after he lost to spanish teenage sensation carlos alcaraz, going down 6—3 in the deciding set. the 19—year—old will face his idol countryman rafael nadal in the next round. dan evans was also knocked out. he lost in straight sets to andrey rublev. the british number two had his chances.
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he broke rublev in the opening game of the match, and then had setpoint in the tie—break, but couldn't capitalise, losing the opening set. rublev took the second set 7—5 to win in just under two hours, 30 minutes. essex have been fined £50,000 by the england and wales cricket board after pleading guilty to two charges relating to a racist comment made at a board meeting in 2017. the club were charged over the comment itself and their failure to conduct an appropriate, orany, investigation. former chairmanjohn faragher has denied making the comment. it's day one of the british masters golf at the famous belfry course near birmingham. but there is a distinct lack of british interest at the top of the leaderboard, with the lead shared by denmark's thorbjorn olesen and australian ryan fox. they are both on 6—under par. england's women lost 4—1 to germany in monchengladbach in their final away fixture of the pro league. the result leaves england in fifth place in the table, eight points
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behind germany in fourth. england's men also lost to germany in the same competition 3—2, and they lie in seventh. formula 1 world champion max verstappen took time out of his preparations for this weekend's miami grand prix to throw the first pitch in the mlb game between miami marlins and phoenix diamondbacks. he didn't help miami, as they lost 8—7. and verstappen wasn't the only driver flirting with another sport. lewis hamilton, the man he beat to the f1 title last season, has been out playing golf with nfl quarterback tom brady. they were in a team together at a charity event. this weekend's race is the first of two in the states this year. it'll be at the hard rock stadium. there is a part that you're excited and then there is the nervous part. it is a new circuit.
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there's not a lot of time to practice, so it's exciting when you get out on a new course. you are discovering all the different features of the circuit and surroundings, and it's been a dream for our sport to be in miami. we've been here to see other sports, but our sport will hopefully earn its right to be here this week and put on a great show for everyone. reminder, rangers into theirfirst european final since 2008. and that's all the sport for now. while most places stayed dry on thursday, during friday, we're going to see some wetter weather slowly moving southwards across the uk. before you rub your hands with glee if you're in an area that's been very dry of late, the further south you are, the system will be weakening and there won't be much rain left for you by the time we get into friday night. here's the weather system, though. here it is moving southwards out of scotland and northern ireland during the day, but this
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is where we will begin with the rain, a stiff breeze and a very mild start to the day. it will slowly move away from scotland, northern ireland, and with brighter skies and a few showers following on behind as the rain heads into northern england and wales. and in fact, even ahead of it, through wales and south west england, some low cloud, mistiness, some drizzle, especially around coasts and hills. much of eastern and south east england will stay dry during daylight hours with sunny spells before it gradually clouds over. this is where see the day's higher temperatures, whereas we're going to, of course, be cooler where you have the rain. but notice how it does weaken through friday evening and night. maybe something half—decent into east anglia, but for much of southern england, a splash and no more as it moves on through to leave high pressure building in behind itand a mainly dry start to the weekend. there will be some sunny spells around, but there will also be some cloud building and a few showers breaking out through central and southern scotland, northern, central, eastern and south east england during the day, though very few and far between. for many, it'll feel warm
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in the sunny spells, though cooler with an onshore breeze around north—eastern coasts before temperatures recover here on sunday. for part two of the weekend, high pressure keeping most places settled, but weather fronts do make some progress towards scotland and northern ireland once again. and it does mean there'll be some cloudier skies occasionally. though there's a chance of seeing a little rain on sunday, it doesn't look like anything more than that. and it will still feel pleasantly warm where you get to see those sunny spells. on monday, a greater chance of some wetter weather again in scotland and northern ireland as we see an area of low pressure pushing a more active weather front in here with a strengthening breeze. may turn a bit breezier through wales and england, too, but a lot of fine weather to come and turning warmer. it is a sign of things to come in the week ahead. now, for scotland and northern ireland, it looks to be staying quite unsettled. there'll be rain at times, and temperatures still perhaps on the warm side of average. but turning much warmer through parts of wales and england, and perhaps the warmest weather of the year so far.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm mariko oi. the headlines... russia's president putin says ukrainian fighters still holding out in mariupol�*s steel plant must surrender. it's thought 200 civilians are also trapped — in hellish conditions. millions of people across the uk have cast their votes in local elections and for the northern ireland assembly — it's seen as a test of support for prime minister borisjohnson. in the philippines, final campaigning is under—way ahead of next week's landmark presidential election. and i'm karishma vaswani reporting live from manila — polls suggest the son of late strongman ferdinand marcos —
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who was overthrown in street protests 36 years ago —

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