Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 6, 2022 10:00am-1:00pm BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news, i'mjo coburn. the headlines at 11. in local elections in england, the conservatives suffer some big losses in london, but across the country, labour only make modest gains. we've had some difficult results, and you can see that in london. i would say, though, that we are mid—term, and it's quite a mixed picture, cos you look elsewhere, whether that's in hartlepool or nuneaton or thurrock, we've actually made gains. believe you me, this is a big turning point for us. from the depths of 2019, that general election, back on track. elsewhere, the liberal democrats and greens are making gains. in hull, the liberal democrats won control of the council from labour. counting is getting under way
10:01 am
for the local elections in scotland and wales, and also in northern ireland — where voters have been having their say over forming a new government. and in other news, the un is attempting a new rescue mission in the ukrainian city of maruipol, where scores of civilians are trapped underground with little food or water. good morning and welcome to bbc news, with continuing coverage of the election results across the uk. so far, it's been a mixed picture for all the parties. in england, the conservatives have lost control of three flagship london councils — westminster, barnet and wandsworth — to labour. the liberal democrats and greens have also made gains across england.
10:02 am
counting has begun in council elections across scotland and wales — and in northern ireland, where voters have been electing members of the stormont assembly. so here's the state of play for the parties. 75 of the 146 councils in england declared, and labour, as you have heard, have gained three, taking their tally to 37, the conservatives have lost six, taking their total down to 18. the liberal democrats have added one, take up aid from labour, and residents and greens have none. the number with no overall control has gone up to 16. helen catt has the story so far. a symbolic win for labour — wandsworth in south london, tory for 44 years, until now.
10:03 am
even in an election about local services, having the lowest council tax in the country didn't keep it blue. the cost of living crisis did come up, as did the massive cuts from the government since 2010. and also boris johnson. borisjohnson was a vote winner for labour, as indeed was keir starmer as well. and i remind you, huw, in 1998, a year after our landslide victory, we didn't win this seat in wandsworth. in 2002, after our landslide victory in 2001, we didn't win this seat in wandsworth, and we've done it in 2022. wandsworth�*s former leader blamed the loss on the cost of living and said what he called the "issue of borisjohnson" was raised. that was echoed by tory councillors elsewhere. it's partygate, it's notjust partygate. there is the integrity issue. basically, ijust don't feel people any longer have the confidence that their prime minister can be relied upon to tell the truth.
10:04 am
ina in a surprising upset, the conservatives lost westminster council to labour, as well as southampton and barnet in north london, where the labour leader went to mark the result. this is a massive turning point for the labour party, we are back on track for the general election, showing the hard change we have done in the last two years, what a difference it has made. others maintain things are not as bad as they could be for the tories. we have had some difficult results, you can see that in london. i would say, though, that we are mid—term, and it is a mixed picture, cos you look elsewhere, whether that is in hartlepool or nuneaton or thurrock, we've actually made gains. and if you take the whole picture of this, it doesn't demonstrate labour has the momentum to form the next government. labour won the newly created cumberland council in the north west, but it is not expecting big gains, and it has had losses too. the liberal democrats, who've had a strong night, took hull council from it. and what was really interesting
10:05 am
about last night's results, in places like wimbledon and cheadle and elsewhere, we were winning seats where we need to win seats at the next general election. so it was a great night for those councillors. the greens too have made gains. also overnight, in bristol, voters chose to scrap their mayor in a referendum. this is only a partial picture. almost half of england's councils have yet to start counting and will do so later today. so too will all of the councils in wales and scotland. and counting will start for all 90 seats for the northern ireland assembly, with polls suggesting sinn fein could become the largest party for the first time. helen catt, bbc news. let's get some more detailed analysis with lewis goodall, who is at the touch screen. lewis, we will be talking to shadow home secretary yvette cooper shortly, she is in
10:06 am
wakefield, part of the north—west, take us through the importance of the former red wall, as we used to call it. ~ , ., the former red wall, as we used to call it. ~ , . , ., call it. well, shall we start with definin: call it. well, shall we start with defining what _ call it. well, shall we start with defining what it _ call it. well, shall we start with defining what it is? _ call it. well, shall we start with defining what it is? there - call it. well, shall we start with defining what it is? there mayl call it. well, shall we start with l defining what it is? there may be those who are not total obsessives who have not heard of the term, because it was a term that came along in the 2019 general election to describe the ribbon, really, of unbroken red stretching largely but not exclusively across the north of england, seats that had been labour often for generations, newcastle—under—lyme, hartlepool, stoke—on—trent — many of these places, as i said, wakefield and other of them, had not been conservative for at least a generation. borisjohnson won them, mainly leave voting areas, and that is essentially where the 2019 general election was won and lost, where the political geography changed. keir starmer�*s big pitch when he was running to be labour
10:07 am
leader was, when he was running to be labour leaderwas, i when he was running to be labour leader was, i am the man who can recover the red wall, i can get labour back in action, seats where it has romantic attraction, where in many ways the labour party was born. this is the labour performance in those areas, and i want you to notice something, this is comparing the change not with the 2019 general election, but the 2018 local election, but the 2018 local election, because that is all it is fair to compare it to come at the last time the seats were contested. in the high leave voting areas, the labour party is treading water, down 0.5%, the conservatives down 3%, the other parties making up the difference. in the conservative election gains of 2019, compared to 2018, it is nip and tuck, labour up 1% come smack down 1%. two ways of looking at that, and that is the battle for these election results so far. on one hand, the labour party
10:08 am
is treading water when they are supposed to be making progress, and that would be true if we were comparing it to the 2019 performance, but we are comparing it to the 2018 performance, and the labour party would say that in 2018, the red wall hadn't collapsed. it was not necessarily in the rudest of health, but it hadn't collapsed, so their argument would be, if we can replicate the 2018 performance, which is basically what they have done, if they could replicate that at the next general election, quite at the next general election, quite a few of those seats should tumble back into the labour column, going quite a way to providing keir starmer with the majority or at least the biggest party status that he so craves. but of course it is a risk, because if you only tread water in these places, there is a lot of conservative voters macro in these places who have stayed at home, they have decided to vote for the labour party, they may have voted in protest for an independent or another group, and what if they go back to the polls and say at a
10:09 am
general election i will vote for borisjohnson, the conservatives, and then all of that treading water starts to look dicey.— and then all of that treading water starts to look dicey. lewis goodall, thank ou starts to look dicey. lewis goodall, thank you very _ starts to look dicey. lewis goodall, thank you very much _ starts to look dicey. lewis goodall, thank you very much for _ starts to look dicey. lewis goodall, thank you very much for taking - starts to look dicey. lewis goodall, thank you very much for taking us i thank you very much for taking us through all that. we can speak now to labour's shadow home secretary, yvette cooper, who joins us from wakefield. good morning to you. you have done well in london, taking those key conservative councils, flagship councils of wandsworth and westminster and barnet, not done so well outside of london and in the north of england. in fact, you have lost hi, the council of hull, to the liberal democrats. what do you make of the results overall?— of the results overall? well, we have seen _ of the results overall? well, we have seen some _ of the results overall? well, we have seen some strong - of the results overall? well, we have seen some strong labourl of the results overall? well, we - have seen some strong labour results from cumberland down to southampton, from cumberland down to southampton, from the very north of the country to the very south, and we do see this as a turning point for labour,
10:10 am
because particularly since the 2019 election, we have had a real rebuilding of support right across the country in different areas, across the country, and if some of the results that we across the country, and if some of the resui places we across the country, and if some of the resui places ink across the country, and if some of the resui places in the country had different places in the country had been replicated in a general election, in terms of the vote share that we have got, then we election, in terms of the vote share that from ve got, then we election, in terms of the vote share that from the jot, then we election, in terms of the vote share that from the conservatives, back from the conservatives, including places like hartlepool or workington. so that is got a important. but we know we have got a lot of work still to do, we are rebuilding, we will carry on doing lot of work still to do, we are rebuilding sage will carry on doing lot of work still to do, we are - rebuildin-ill carry on doing lot of work still to do, we are - rebuildin- carry on doing lot of work still to do, we are - rebuildin_arry on doing lot of work still to do, we are - rebuildin_doing lot of work still to do, we are - re a ildin—doing lot of work still to do, we are - re a general _doing lot of work still to do, we are re a general election, ming doing lot of work still to do, we are re a general election, you 3 doing lot of work still to do, we are re a ger dozens ction, you 3 doing lot of work still to do, we are re a ger dozens of on, you 3 doing lot of work still to do, we are re a ger dozens of seats, | 3 doing lot of work still to do, we are re a ger dozens of seats, butoing actuallyjohn curtice says that it wouldn't be enough, actuallyjohn curtice says that it woul we be enough, actuallyjohn curtice says that it woul we have 1ough, actuallyjohn curtice says that it woul we have seen i, to actuallyjohn curtice says that it woul we have seem, to build a what we have seen so far, to build a at a majority for the labour party at a general election even enough the largest party. that is incredibly disappointing.
10:11 am
the largest party. that is incredibly disappoin one the largest party. that is incret result ;appoin one the largest party. that is incret result for min one the largest party. that is incret result�* and in one the largest party. that is incret result�* and we me the largest party. that is incret result�* and we have the largest party. that is incre( result �* and we have had we the largest party. that is incre( result �* and we have had a re the largest party. that is incre( result �* and we have had a lot rebuild, to earn thinki, to earn think that earn labour that earn country labour that earn country under our that earn country under keir that earn the country under keir starmer. we have made labour has support, to support, to keep support, to keep back ort, to keep back the and we have to keep turning back the people left and we have to keep turning back the and people left and we have to keep turning back the and other ople left and we have to keep turning back the and other people left and we have to keep turning back the and other people across and we have to keep turning back the a who her people across and we have to keep turning back the a who we people across and we have to keep turning back the a who we peo; to across and we have to keep turning back the a who we peo; to support country who we want to support labour ideas and policies, for example on the cost of living crisis, the issue that has come up time and again on the doorstep, and the things we put forward to cut energy bills. we will keep doing that, but having been campaigning through the 2019 election, and since then, we have really seen a very big turning point since then. mil then, we have really seen a very big turning point since then.— turning point since then. all right, but it is the _ turning point since then. all right, but it is the scale _ turning point since then. all right,
10:12 am
but it is the scale of _ turning point since then. all right, but it is the scale of the _ turning point since then. all right, but it is the scale of the turning i but it is the scale of the turning point, yvette cooper, because labour wants to be the next party of government. wejust wants to be the next party of government. we just heard from my colleague lewis goodall, saying keir starmer would recover so many of those seats lost across the heartlands, but the results do not show very much indication of that. in fact, i am just going to show our view is the key wards analysis in england, the change since 2018, when these seats were last contested, 470 out of 738 declared, labour down by 0.4%. you have gone slightly backwards. the conservatives have gone further backwards, the lib dems and the greens up, but labour has gone back. how does that show you are on your way back to potential government?— are on your way back to potential covernment? , ., government? because many of those areas that you _ government? because many of those areas that you are _ government? because many of those areas that you are talking _ government? because many of those areas that you are talking about - areas that you are talking about have that vote share that we got
10:13 am
yesterday, we would have won back many constituencies in a general election, including in wolverhampton, west bromwich, peterborough, stevenage, as well as the ones i referred to at the beginning, hartlepool and copeland as well. so constituencies that we lost in 2019 that we would now be winning back. we want to go further, we want to build more support. the tricky thing about comparing with the 2018 elections is that we had already won more than half the seats that were up, so there is a limit to what you can do compared to the 2018 elections, but for us, in terms of rebuilding and getting a labour government in place to tackle the cost of living crisis, to stand up for people, we have to rebuild from 2019, and we have seen a really substantial turnaround since then, and if you talk to us straight after the 2019 election, to have heard we would be able to make this progress in just over two years under keir starmer�*s leadership, people would
10:14 am
not have believed it was possible to make progress so quickly, but we have made progress, and we need to keep doing that and earning back support. it keep doing that and earning back su ort. , ., , keep doing that and earning back su--ort. , ., , ., keep doing that and earning back su ort. , ., , ., ., support. it is modest, though. you would accept _ support. it is modest, though. you would accept these _ support. it is modest, though. you would accept these modest - support. it is modest, though. you would accept these modest gains, | support. it is modest, though. you . would accept these modest gains, and the way it stands at the moment, you are not on course to win the next election. what does that tell you about keir starmer�*s leadership? he has turned it around in places like london, but the capital was already trending towards labour, and symbolically that is important. but john curtice, our elections expert, has said that labour is still struggling to make much progress in areas that voted brexit. do you agree with that? but areas that voted brexit. do you agree with that?— areas that voted brexit. do you agree with that? but we have 'ust been through fl agree with that? but we have 'ust been through this, i agree with that? but we have 'ust been through this, the i agree with that? but we have just been through this, the examples | agree with that? but we have just i been through this, the examples of hartlepool and copeland... there are as many examples — hartlepool and copeland... there are as many examples where _ hartlepool and copeland... there are as many examples where you - hartlepool and copeland... there are as many examples where you are - hartlepool and copeland... there are as many examples where you are notj as many examples where you are not making that progress. but as many examples where you are not making that progress.— making that progress. but you are makin: making that progress. but you are making the _ making that progress. but you are making the comparison _ making that progress. but you are making the comparison with - making that progress. but you arej making the comparison with 2018, making that progress. but you are - making the comparison with 2018, and the point is, look, in 2019, it was
10:15 am
a really difficult result for us in 2019, and it wasn'tjust about brexit, although it was really important for people, it was about our leadership as well. but labour has moved on, we have a new leader, we have made clear our approach is to make brexit work, and we are changing, i think, to make brexit work, and we are changing, ithink, as to make brexit work, and we are changing, i think, as a to make brexit work, and we are changing, ithink, as a party, rebuilding in terms of, in barnet, for example, we had a real problem, and it was really important to rebuild the support among jewish communities who understandably had felt very angry with labour, and keir has turned that around. i think you have seen huge changes, and as a result, compared to the 2019 election, we have seen a big increase in support for labour in a lot of those areas where we lost constituencies badly in 2019. let’s constituencies badly in 2019. let's stick with the — constituencies badly in 2019. let's stick with the issue _ constituencies badly in 2019. let's stick with the issue of _ constituencies badly in 2019. let's stick with the issue of brexit, because you yourself have said people in leave voting areas have
10:16 am
never heard what labour's post—brexit vision is, have never had a positive labour vision of building new partnerships across the world, that is what keir starmer is going to have to do. you called on him to do that a year ago. why hasn't he done it yet? so him to do that a year ago. why hasn't he done it yet? 501 him to do that a year ago. why hasn't he done it yet? so i think that keir has _ hasn't he done it yet? so i think that keir has been _ hasn't he done it yet? so i think that keir has been doing - hasn't he done it yet? so i think that keir has been doing a - hasn't he done it yet? so i think that keir has been doing a huge | that keir has been doing a huge amount of work and how we set forward a vision which is about making brexit work, but is also about supporting people in the british economy. you have heard the things that rachel reeves has been talking about, for example how we make, buy and sell more here in britain, we have heard about the work that nick thomas—symonds has been doing about getting better trade deals all around the world, and also, crucially, right now, when it is the cost of living crisis that is affecting people, our proposal is to have a windfall tax on the gas and oil companies that have seen record profits in the middle of this
10:17 am
crisis, putting that into cutting energy bills right across the country. we are setting out practical solutions, getting neighbourhood police on the streets, who have been cut so heavily since 2015, stop these huge sliding prosecutions, criminals getting away with it. ithink prosecutions, criminals getting away with it. i think across the board, labour has been setting out different things that we would do according to labour values. you are right, we have got a lot more to do, and we will keep doing that, because we want to earn back every possible vote and get votes for people who have never voted for us before, we want them to have trust in labour for the future, rather than this totally shambolic and shameful conservative government that is letting people down in the middle of a cost of living crisis. you letting people down in the middle of a cost of living crisis.— a cost of living crisis. you say it is a cost _ a cost of living crisis. you say it is a cost of _ a cost of living crisis. you say it is a cost of living _ a cost of living crisis. you say it is a cost of living crisis, - a cost of living crisis. you say it is a cost of living crisis, you - a cost of living crisis. you say it is a cost of living crisis, you are right it is the number one issue for pretty well every voter on the doorstep, and people might have thought, because it is a cost of living crisis and the conservatives
10:18 am
one way or another have been in power since 2010, and we have had the backdrop of the culture at westminster and the issue of parties, why isn't keir starmer cutting through even more? why isn't labour doing even better and having a better showing? iaccept labour doing even better and having a better showing? i accept what you said about 2019, but the issues that the government is grappling with, you would have thought benefit you, but in fact the liberal democrats seem to have done quite well and also the greens. it seem to have done quite well and also the greens.— also the greens. it has been different _ also the greens. it has been different in _ also the greens. it has been different in different - also the greens. it has been different in different parts . also the greens. it has been | different in different parts of also the greens. it has been - different in different parts of the country, but we have seen significant support for labour compared to 2019, and some of those important councils as well. but you are right, the cost of living crisis is going to get worse for people. i am worried about what it'll happen to people. one councillor here in wakefield has been on the phone while the account started trying to
10:19 am
coordinate foodbank parcel deliveries because people are being so heavily hit, and for people who have just started a family, mortgage holders, people on low incomes, everyone is being hit by the big increase in bills. that is what labour is going to keep pressing for, propersensible labour is going to keep pressing for, proper sensible action to tackle those problems and to help families across the country. so you are going to hear a lot more of us talking about this, because it is really important for people across britain. ,, ., ., ., ,, . ., , britain. shadow home secretary yvette cooper — britain. shadow home secretary yvette cooper there _ britain. shadow home secretary yvette cooper there at - britain. shadow home secretary yvette cooper there at the - britain. shadow home secretary. yvette cooper there at the county britain. shadow home secretary - yvette cooper there at the county in wakefield. joe twyman from the polling organisation deltapoll is here. what did you make of what you heard from yvette cooper? obviously, we are tussling over how much progress labour has actually made, it looks pretty modest — important gains in places like the capital and southampton, for example, but
10:20 am
certainly not universal. yeah, what we're hearing from yvette cooper is an example of the kind of stories that the party is always hope to spin the morning after results come in. each party will point to something that they see as a success, but the reality is that most of the time tends to be a mixed bag, and we have certainly seen a mixed bag for labour today, in areas like, as you talked about in london, barnet, wandsworth, particularly westminster, to see those go to labour is a big psychological success. but for labour not to go in sheffield, for instance, that is the kind of place the show to have and indeed would have hoped to have won. and so yvette cooper is presenting this as a turning point, but it may be more of a talking point, and i don't think we're quite yet at the stage where labour can say this is the beginning of ourjourney towards
10:21 am
electoral success, because the evidence is not there that that is the case. ., ., , evidence is not there that that is the case. , _ evidence is not there that that is the case. ., .,, _ ., the case. yvette cooper saying that keir starmer's _ the case. yvette cooper saying that keir starmer's leadership _ the case. yvette cooper saying that keir starmer's leadership has - keir starmer's leadership has detoxified the brand in some parts of the country, citing the issue of anti—semitism in issues cash in places like barnet, but around the rest of the country labour needs to win seats in the north of england, and we will come unto scotland in just a moment. there does obviously seem to be a lot of antipathy now towards boris johnson seem to be a lot of antipathy now towards borisjohnson and the conservative party, but are they embracing labour?— conservative party, but are they embracing labour? well, this is the key question _ embracing labour? well, this is the key question going _ embracing labour? well, this is the key question going into _ embracing labour? well, this is the key question going into the - embracing labour? well, this is the key question going into the next - key question going into the next election. it is all very well for people to be dissatisfied with the conservatives in those seats that they gained last time, that propelled them to such a large majority. but of course the crucial question is notjust whether they are voting conservative or not, but whether they are deciding to turn out or not at the next election, and what labour may find is that those people who were previously labour
10:22 am
but switched to the conservatives now switch to simply staying at home, and in some constituencies, that will be enough to get labour over the line, but in others they need people to switch back to them if they are to secure anything approaching a majority. approaching a ma'ority. what about leadershi approaching a majority. what about leadership issues? _ approaching a majority. what about leadership issues? obviously, - approaching a majority. what about leadership issues? obviously, the l leadership issues? obviously, the allegations about parties and lawbreaking events going on in whitehall and downing street, directed at borisjohnson, we know because we have heard from some of the conservative former council leader is talking about the issues of trust and integrity, in terms of keir starmer's leadership, is it cutting through? the keir starmer's leadership, is it cutting through?— cutting through? the specific allegations — cutting through? the specific allegations about _ cutting through? the specific allegations about his - cutting through? the specific. allegations about his behaviour don't seem to have cut through very much. even before both sets of allegations came out, around one in ten thought senior conservatives members were sticking to the rules, but only a quarter thought that senior labour members were sticking to the rules, so it wasn't the case
10:23 am
that labour were always seen as behaving very well on covid and conservatives very badly. but what resonates badly with the electorate generally is that they will both found out that they came up with the rules in the first place and that puts things in a different context. we are going to speak to our political editor for the west of england, paul baltrop. liberal democrats had high hopes there? doom democrats had high hopes there? down in somerset. — democrats had high hopes there? down in somerset. the _ democrats had high hopes there? down in somerset, the lib _ democrats had high hopes there? down in somerset, the lib dems are, yes, optimistic. some is a classic two horse race between the lib dems and the conservatives, they dominated in paddy ashdown's day, somerset was the heartland with most of the parliamentary seats. they fell on hard times after the coalition era, went badly backwards, lost control of most of the councils. what is happening in somerset is that they are merging district councils and county council to trade one really
10:24 am
big unitary authority, so it is a big unitary authority, so it is a big election, come what may, and a really big test. the conservatives have run the county council for 13 years, and they were hoping to repeat that success at this election. the lib dems, though, had a good district council election three years ago, when they won three out of four districts. that sets the scene going into this election, and really big stakes, because, yes, somerset with a big new council, 110 members being elected, a big battle between the two. having been out and about over the last few weeks, it was sometimes hard to see the conservatives putting up posters and placards, talking to voters they might say they would normally vote conservative but not at the moment. going into the election, the lib dems talking about local issues, but happy to remind voters about the trials and tribulations of boris
10:25 am
johnson, partygate et cetera, and last night they locked the ballot papers away, they are counting today, that is just getting going, but one lib dem told me, look, they are feeling optimistic about how things are looking.— are feeling optimistic about how things are looking. paul, thank you very much. — things are looking. paul, thank you very much. in _ things are looking. paul, thank you very much, in bristol. _ i'm joined by the deputy leader of the liberal democrats, daisy cooper. a good time to talk to you, daisy, you have had a pretty good night and morning overall, what you think of your prospects in somerset? weill. morning overall, what you think of your prospects in somerset? well, as ou sa , your prospects in somerset? well, as you say. we — your prospects in somerset? well, as you say. we have _ your prospects in somerset? well, as you say, we have had _ your prospects in somerset? well, as you say, we have had a _ your prospects in somerset? well, as you say, we have had a good - your prospects in somerset? well, as you say, we have had a good night, i you say, we have had a good night, and we hope to get some more positive results as the day goes on. what we saw in north shropshire in the by—election last year is we are seeing a revival in rural areas, so we are optimistic that in places like somerset, westmorland and north yorkshire we can make more significant gains today. in yorkshire we can make more significant gains today. in terms of workin: significant gains today. in terms of working with _ significant gains today. in terms of working with the _ significant gains today. in terms of working with the labour _ significant gains today. in terms of working with the labour party, - significant gains today. in terms ofj working with the labour party, you know that there have been claims that there was some sort of pact between the two, denied by both sides. is it time to look at that,
10:26 am
though, if you feel you have had a reasonably strong performance, labour saying they are back in the capital and other parts of the country like southampton, is a time to work together to keep conservatives out? i to work together to keep conservatives out? i don't like acts, conservatives out? i don't like pacts. and _ conservatives out? i don't like pacts. and i — conservatives out? i don't like pacts, and i think— conservatives out? i don't like pacts, and i think it _ conservatives out? i don't like pacts, and i think it is - conservatives out? i don't like pacts, and i think it is a - conservatives out? i don't like pacts, and i think it is a bad i pacts, and i think it is a bad thing... pacts, and i think it is a bad thin... . , ., pacts, and i think it is a bad thin... ., ., ., thing... except for the coalition with the conservatives. - thing... except for the coalition with the conservatives. well, i thing... except for the coalition i with the conservatives. well, that is different. _ with the conservatives. well, that is different, isn't _ with the conservatives. well, that is different, isn't it? _ with the conservatives. well, that is different, isn't it? the - with the conservatives. well, that is different, isn't it? the pact- is different, isn't it? the pact might happen before an election, the coalition after, but what lib dems have shown in places like cheshire, amersham, north shropshire, where we did not need to do a patch, we worked hard to establish our position as the key challenges to the conservatives, and voters could make up their own minds. we have shown that in both areas, and in may's local elections, we are fighting labour in many places, but predominantly fighting the conservatives in many of the blue wall areas where we can target then at the next general election.- at the next general election. would ou enter at the next general election. would you enter into _ at the next general election. would you enter into another— at the next general election. would you enter into another coalition? i l you enter into another coalition? i think that is a long way off, isn't
10:27 am
it, let's be honest! the think that is a long way off, isn't it, let's be honest!— it, let's be honest! the election could be next _ it, let's be honest! the election could be next year, _ it, let's be honest! the election could be next year, it _ it, let's be honest! the election could be next year, it could - it, let's be honest! the election could be next year, it could be| could be next year, it could be 2024, but there has been talk of next year, you are sounding confident, would you rule out another coalition? mr; confident, would you rule out another coalition?— confident, would you rule out another coalition? my focus is to seak u- another coalition? my focus is to speak up for _ another coalition? my focus is to speak up for the _ another coalition? my focus is to speak up for the liberal- another coalition? my focus is to i speak up for the liberal democrats, liberal values, and to speak about our policies on the cost of living crisis, where we have called for a windfall tax to tackle energy bills, and an emergency vat cut. that is what voters are worried about right now, the public are very scared about these enormous bills that are increasing, £700 already on energy bills, these issues right now, and it is really frustrating that it falls to opposition parties to put for these concrete ideas, while the conservative government sits on its hands and does nothing. that conservative government sits on its hands and does nothing.— conservative government sits on its hands and does nothing. that is not a no, and hands and does nothing. that is not a no. and i — hands and does nothing. that is not a no, and i suppose _ hands and does nothing. that is not a no, and i suppose you _ hands and does nothing. that is not a no, and i suppose you would - hands and does nothing. that is not a no, and i suppose you would be i a no, and i suppose you would be foolish to rule it out completely. one of the policies you cited was a windfall tax on oil and gas companies, also a labour policy.
10:28 am
that is quite a lot of agreement, isn't there? if that is quite a lot of agreement, isn't there?— isn't there? if you look at the history books. _ isn't there? if you look at the history books, there - isn't there? if you look at the history books, there is - isn't there? if you look at the - history books, there is agreement with different parties at different times. with the local elections today, liberal democrats are in second place to the conservatives in 80 seats, around the country, and we have made no secret of the fact that we will focus our resources on trying to win as many as we can off the conservatives, and we do think we will play a significant role in helping to remove borisjohnson's conservatives. helping to remove boris johnson's conservatives.— helping to remove boris johnson's conservatives. ~ . ., , conservatives. what about the green pa ? conservatives. what about the green party? obviously. — conservatives. what about the green party? obviously, you _ conservatives. what about the green party? obviously, you champion - party? obviously, you champion everything around climate change and the environment, but the greens have had a pretty good performance thus far, are you losing votes to them? no, what we can see is that the green party may well have had a good night, but when it comes to the big test, underthis night, but when it comes to the big test, under this voting system, the green party has never won a seat from the conservatives in a general election, and it is the liberal democrats who can win seats off the
10:29 am
conservatives at a general election. it is the way our voting system works at the moment, the rules under which we have to play, and that is why liberal democrats are the key challenges to the conservatives in many places around the country. fishy many places around the country. any predictions you would like to make now? i know we haven't had results from scotland, wales or northern ireland, but any predictions, any targets that we should be looking at? ., ., �* ., ., ., �* at? not from me, i'm afraid, i don't like guessing _ at? not from me, i'm afraid, i don't like guessing at _ at? not from me, i'm afraid, i don't like guessing at numbers _ at? not from me, i'm afraid, i don't like guessing at numbers thing - at? not from me, i'm afraid, i don't like guessing at numbers thing is, l like guessing at numbers thing is, we should never take voters for granted, but there are a few surprises coming through, so i will be watching the results coming in, we will see what happens. [1.3ng we will see what happens. daisy coo er, we will see what happens. daisy cooper. thank — we will see what happens. daisy cooper, thank you. _ we will see what happens. daisy cooper, thank you. before - we will see what happens. daisy cooper, thank you. before we i we will see what happens. daisy cooper, thank you. before we move on, gel, it is interesting, this idea of coalition, you might argue that it has taken the liberal democrats this length of time to detoxify their brand following that coalition, even though they said they were very successful partners in it with the conservatives — but daisy cooper are not ruling it out again in the future.
10:30 am
you talked about the recovery of the lib dems. for the last seven years they have been in the political wilderness. they will be hoping to recover in areas like the south—west, where they were previously strong. that could be crucially important come the next election, because labour don't need to win a majority to keep boris johnson and the conservatives out of downing street, theyjust need to prevent the conservatives making that majority, and then they will form a coalition or partnership, potentially with the snp, the lib dems and whoever else, to get keir starmer into number 10. do dems and whoever else, to get keir starmer into number10._ dems and whoever else, to get keir starmer into number10. starmer into number 10. do you think one of the stories _ starmer into number 10. do you think one of the stories that _ starmer into number 10. do you think one of the stories that will _ starmer into number 10. do you think one of the stories that will come - one of the stories that will come out of this set of elections is that the conservatives are holding onto many of the gains they made in those former labour strongholds in the east midlands and the north of england, but, actually, the threat is growing in the south, notjust london, but the south of england and the south—west, in the way you have described. losing traditional tory
10:31 am
shire areas, to the liberal democrats, and borisjohnson will struggle to hold them both? there democrats, and boris johnson will struggle to hold them both? there is a lot of focus. _ struggle to hold them both? there is a lot of focus, quite _ struggle to hold them both? there is a lot of focus, quite rightly, - struggle to hold them both? there is a lot of focus, quite rightly, and - a lot of focus, quite rightly, and what people call the redwall, but what people call the redwall, but what the lib dems called the bluewall, this area of remain leading conservative seats is a prime battleground come next time around. it is inevitable that, in those areas of the south, the lib dems will want to pick it up. and labour want to pick up as well. we have seen success in southampton, portsmouth stayed no overall control, perhaps labour the lib dems would have wanted to take that. but it demonstrates there is a whole lot of difference in this country, and a lot of it is still around brexit, or what racks it represents. demographics are definitely changing. let's get the picture from birmingham, from our midlands political editor. elizabeth glinka. bring us up today? welcome to
10:32 am
birmingham. — bring us up today? welcome to birmingham, the _ bring us up today? welcome to birmingham, the count - bring us up today? welcome to birmingham, the count got - bring us up today? welcome to l birmingham, the count got under bring us up today? welcome to - birmingham, the count got under way about 45 minutes ago. we have been talking about a lot of the big metropolitan boroughs only being five thirds this time, that is not the case in birmingham. we have all elections across city, the biggest council in the city, 101 seats across 69 wards. as you can see behind me, a pretty huge undertaking. we are not expecting results until later into the afternoon. the council has been run ljy afternoon. the council has been run by labour for the last ten years. prior to that, it was a conservative and conservative and lib dem coalition. the labour party are saying 2018 for them was a great year, a high water mark, so they will be satisfied if they hold onto that position here in the city of birmingham. to be honest, we are not expecting big shifts. we expect labour to retain the majority for things to be pretty much as they were. there is some interest in seeing whether there could be, in some parts of the city, a resurgence for the liberal democrats who, as i said, in the past have helped run the council with conservatives. it will be interesting to watch that, and whether the greens can make any
10:33 am
progress here. elsewhere in the west midlands, there has been a lot of focus on the former redwall seats, in the black country, big, urban areasjust outside of in the black country, big, urban areas just outside of birmingham. because they were up by thirds, i keep telling people this, we were not expecting to see huge shifts. we were not expecting... the maths meant that labour was not going to sweep in and take control, take control back of some councils like dudley and walsall. just to give you an update on some of the results we had overnight, labour retain control in roehampton and coventry. dudley, very much still in conservative control. that is one of the areas that really went blue in terms of parliamentary votes. but labour are having their best result there since 2016. so, maybe a little green shoots for the labour party in party in dudley. in sandwell as well. this is an interesting one. west brom, the former stomping ground of tom watson, former deputy leader. that
10:34 am
area has three out of four mps as conservatives. in last year's local elections, from a position of zero, the conservatives took nine seats on sandwell council. talking to the conservatives in the run—up to the election, they were still thinking they could make gains. as it turns out, that is not the case. we are still in the same position. labour might look on that as being some kind of positive news, because the conservatives, that tide has maybe been stemmed in those areas. in other parts of the region, we had an interesting result in lost overnight. that counsel, run by the conservatives with a majority of just one after they took four seats from labour in the last local elections, it has gone back to non—overall control. some success for the greens. i know labour and the greens will be chatting about running it in coalition over the weekend. the greens having the balance of power on the council.
10:35 am
that is an interesting thing to see, the growth of the green vote on some of the more rural parts of the west midlands. finally, another interesting result. nuneaton, a little bit different in terms of the kind of people, nuneaton and bedworth, in north warwickshire, much closer to the redwall in terms of the people and the voters there. the conservatives doing much better. they took a seat from labour overnight. a bit of a mixed picture. some potential good news for labour in some areas, certainly not a massive sweeping in, a massive changing of the guard in the west midlands. . ~ changing of the guard in the west midlands. ., ~ , ., , . changing of the guard in the west midlands. . ~ , ., , . ., midlands. thank you very much for takint us midlands. thank you very much for taking us through _ midlands. thank you very much for taking us through what _ midlands. thank you very much for taking us through what is - midlands. thank you very much for taking us through what is a - midlands. thank you very much for taking us through what is a very i taking us through what is a very mixed picture. iam taking us through what is a very mixed picture. i am sure we will go back to you later when there are some more results. welcome to our continuing coverage of the election results across the uk. it has been a
10:36 am
mixed bag for the parties. in england, the conservatives have lost control three flagship london councils. the liberal democrats and the greens have also made gains across england, and counting has begunin across england, and counting has begun in those council elections. all of the councils are out in scotland and wales, and in northern ireland. voters there are electing members to the stormont assembly. that could be a very big result, when we have everything in. let's look at the state of play for the parties in england. just to remind you, 76 of 146 councils declared. the number of councillors for labour, up 33, tojust over 1200. for the conservatives, a loss of 120. the lib dems have gained 58 councillors. independents have not gained anything. they are on 40. the greens have added 23. bringing the total to 39. the picture as we heard
10:37 am
from birmingham, in the midlands, very difficult to tell exactly what each of the main parties can take away from this. the cost of living is the key issue for everybody on the doorstep, taxes going up, inflation figures are soaring, and the bank of england, worryingly, hinting that it could be in recession by the end of the year. but it doesn't look yet as if we are seeing a clear picture of where voters are putting their trust in overall? , , ., , . overall? yes, it is a mixed picture, as inevitably _ overall? yes, it is a mixed picture, as inevitably these _ overall? yes, it is a mixed picture, as inevitably these local _ overall? yes, it is a mixed picture, as inevitably these local elections. as inevitably these local elections tend to be. you can always point to something that is good news, and they will probably be a fair bit of bad news as well for each party. the conservatives came out from the very beginning, talking about how they were looking at a bad night. they knew that the cost of living was important, they knew that the partygate had damage to the position in the polls and they could see the
10:38 am
holes that have shown a labour lead nationally, of course, although not a whole nation is voting, for some weeks. the question is, where do we go from here? labour would to present this as the beginning of their journey towards present this as the beginning of theirjourney towards downing street. the conservatives want to present this as a great reset, an opportunity to start again. the difficulty they have is that the cost of living crisis for many people has onlyjust begun. nine out of ten people have seen the cost of living rise in the last few months. but eight out of ten worry it is going to rise further in the coming months. if you couple that with all of the difficult indicators coming in, it present a difficult position for the conservatives because economic management, historically, has been so important in determining who people vote for in a general election. , . ~ who people vote for in a general election. , ., ~ ., 1, , election. lets talk about boris johnson's _ election. lets talk about boris johnson's leadership. - election. lets talk about boris johnson's leadership. a - election. lets talk about boris johnson's leadership. a few i election. lets talk about boris - johnson's leadership. a few months ago, there were all sorts of
10:39 am
questions about his fate. we know letters of no confidence have gone in from a number of conservative mps, we don't know exactly how many. some have been taken out since the war in ukraine began. it has changed somewhat, but one of the factors has been that there is not, it seems, an obvious successor for conservative mps are unhappy with borisjohnson to coalesce around. we mps are unhappy with boris johnson to coalesce around.— to coalesce around. we were never ttoin to to coalesce around. we were never going to have _ to coalesce around. we were never going to have a _ to coalesce around. we were never going to have a situation _ to coalesce around. we were never going to have a situation that - to coalesce around. we were never going to have a situation that boris johnson was going to turn the steps of downing street this morning and say i am resigning as prime minister because the conservatives lost one is worth. itjust doesn't like that. the conservatives have the motive to replace him, but what they don't haveis replace him, but what they don't have is the replacement. rishi sunak pulls the highest in terms of the public choice to replace him, at 11%. 52% of people say they don't know. there is no obvious successor. in the absence of that, it is
10:40 am
difficult to see how change would take place. difficult to see how change would take lace. ,, , difficult to see how change would take place-— take place. stay with us. we are “oined b take place. stay with us. we are joined by amelia _ take place. stay with us. we are joined by amelia womack, - take place. stay with us. we are i joined by amelia womack, deputy leader of the green party. we were talking earlier, describing to viewers that you have added a fairly reasonable number of councillors to your tally. one might say that is unsurprising, bearing in mind climate change and environment is the number one issue for many more. do you think you could be doing better? ~ ., ., ., better? well, throughout today, we will see the — better? well, throughout today, we will see the results _ better? well, throughout today, we will see the results coming - better? well, throughout today, we will see the results coming in. - better? well, throughout today, we will see the results coming in. we l will see the results coming in. we will see the results coming in. we will be improving from here. what we are seeing is that people are seeing our policies, seeing what we can do, and working to ensure that they are getting that green representation we truly deserve. year upon year we have been beating expectations, and i expect that to continue on to the next few years. even into the next general election. we have been proving we can beat first past the post in these elections, and that is only set to continue. ii
10:41 am
post in these elections, and that is only set to continue.— only set to continue. if we look at the performance _ only set to continue. if we look at the performance so _ only set to continue. if we look at the performance so far— only set to continue. if we look at the performance so far of- only set to continue. if we look at the performance so far of left - only set to continue. if we look at the performance so far of left and centre—left parties, the liberal democrats have gained the most seats, around 60. labour gained just over 30. you, the greens have gained 32. it is a mixed picture, i must find another way of saying mixed picture, do you accept that in a general election if the left—wing vote is split between all these parties, it's probably going to give the conservatives another five years in power? i the conservatives another five years in tower? ., , ~ , ., in power? i actually think it is not about left and _ in power? i actually think it is not about left and right _ in power? i actually think it is not about left and right at _ in power? i actually think it is not about left and right at this - in power? i actually think it is not about left and right at this point, | about left and right at this point, when i have been talking to people on doorsteps, what they have been saying is that they have been failed by the other parties. what they have seen is that the greens have been working hard in their communities full stop there is no such thing as safe seats any more. only voters. people are questioning if they are a safe photo. looking on to the bigger picture, we need to be winning those arguments about the kind of future we can create. we need to make sure there is a green vision for the
10:42 am
people looking for an alternative. the hard work will be capturing peoples imaginations, as well as the vision for the future that means we are putting policies in place that makes a better country for our generation. but makes a better country for our generation-— makes a better country for our generation. makes a better country for our teneration. �* ., , ., ., , makes a better country for our teneration. �* ., ., , ., generation. but what you want is to tet some generation. but what you want is to get some of— generation. but what you want is to get some of those _ generation. but what you want is to get some of those policies - generation. but what you want is to get some of those policies actuallyl get some of those policies actually into government, will have some sort of representation. the greens, working with the snp in scotland. when it comes to the idea of some sort of electoral pact or agreement, something similar to perhaps exist is in scotland, is that something you would embrace? brute is in scotland, is that something you would embrace?— is in scotland, is that something you would embrace? we have talked about working _ you would embrace? we have talked about working with _ you would embrace? we have talked about working with other _ you would embrace? we have talked about working with other parties - you would embrace? we have talked about working with other parties in l about working with other parties in the past, and have actually led on that. but right now what were talking about is the fact that we can win. and we are proving we can win. so, right now what is important is that we are building from these council results, into the general election. ensuring we are getting more greens elected. i talked to people across the country and they believe that there should be more than one green mp. to tackle the biggest issues of our time. but
10:43 am
there hasn't — biggest issues of our time. but there hasn't been. the track record is that caroline lucas has been a very lonely person in parliament for many years, and many elections. while you are adding council seats, you haven't added any seats in a general election, any parliamentary seats. i'vejust spoken general election, any parliamentary seats. i've just spoken to daisy cooper, the liberal democrat deputy leader, she was very dismissive of the idea of working with the greens. she said, in effect, the greens are not capable of taking seats from the conservatives in general elections, you've never done so in the past, you've never done so in the past, you have, as we know, have caroline lucas. what do you say to her? if you look at areas like suffolk, where we have increased councillors, we are building ourfoundations. we are chipping away at the conservative vote there, we are taking votes from labour and conservatives, because people are looking for that integrity in politics, they see they can get that with the green party. yes, we are building in conservative areas like
10:44 am
suffolk, making sure we show what green contributions can do there. will you win more parliamentary seats at the general election? if gee seats at the general election? if we continue along _ seats at the general election? if we continue along this _ seats at the general election? if "the: continue along this trajectory, i don't see why we wouldn't. what we are seeing is that people are putting their faith in the green party. the more we prove that we can win, the more faith we get into the other elections coming to the general election, this is an exciting time for the party, and i think that what is possible from here forward is really exciting. that will be more seats in the general election, more councillors across the country, and increasing our vote share in other elections. will you stand to be an mp in the next election? i will you stand to be an mp in the next election?— will you stand to be an mp in the next election? i am hopefully going to stand to be _ next election? i am hopefully going to stand to be an _ next election? i am hopefully going to stand to be an mp. _ next election? i am hopefully going to stand to be an mp. where? - next election? i am hopefully going to stand to be an mp. where? we i next election? i am hopefully going i to stand to be an mp. where? we are currently working _ to stand to be an mp. where? we are currently working on _ to stand to be an mp. where? we are currently working on our— to stand to be an mp. where? we are currently working on our general- currently working on our general election strategy, we are currently targeting areas like bristol west and increasing brochure there. we have strong and clear voices across the country about what a green future will look like, that holds government and opposition to
10:45 am
account. we government and opposition to account. . ., ., ~' government and opposition to account. . ., ., ., ., account. we look forward to hearing when ou account. we look forward to hearing when you decide _ account. we look forward to hearing when you decide you _ account. we look forward to hearing when you decide you are _ account. we look forward to hearing when you decide you are going - when you decide you are going to stand. let's get more analysis of results coming in, with lewis goodall. he is at touch screen. just havint goodall. he is at touch screen. just having some _ goodall. he is at touch screen. itst having some results coming in, in the last few minutes, from swindon in wiltshire. not all of the results are in yet. we have eight of the seats out of the 19 to be counted. this has been a conservative borough since 2003, they have been gradually expanding, the conservatives, the majority of the council. i think they gained form of last time. the results we have had in from swindon, which is not all of them, the conservatives are making further gains. two, one from labourand conservatives are making further gains. two, one from labour and one from the lib dems. to book a parliamentary seat in swindon. swindon north is almost certainly beyond the labour party at the next election, a majority of 12,000. justin tomlinson, the deputy chair of the conservative party, almost certainly out of reach. swindon
10:46 am
south, the constituency of robert buckland, the formerjustice secretary, that has a majority between 5000 and 6000. if labour were looking to form a majority, it is the sort of seats they ought to have in their sites, but swindon is another of those places, we have been talking about the north and south, in swindon, the conservatives are doing better, 55% leave, not overwhelmingly so, but still a leaf borough. you might be wondering what is going on in my neck of the woods. if you go to the bbc news website, you can see for yourself, you can go to the website, enter your postcode, as you can see, see if you have elections in your area in england. not all areas do. when you do that, you're able to see the results where you're able to see the results where you are, or you could wait for us to tell you. i you are, or you could wait for us to tell ou. ., ._ , , you are, or you could wait for us to tell ou. ., , , , ., tell you. i will always be waiting for ou tell you. i will always be waiting for you to _ tell you. i will always be waiting for you to keep _ tell you. i will always be waiting for you to keep us _ tell you. i will always be waiting for you to keep us up-to-date l tell you. i will always be waiting i for you to keep us up-to-date with for you to keep us up—to—date with the latest results. thank you very much. let's discuss the results so
10:47 am
far. and what is to come. with anoosh cha kelian from the new statesman. also i'm joined by emily carver from conservativehome. those losses, i never thought they would fall from conservative control, they have been conservative for ever, it seems, and they have gone? is that borisjohnson to blame? gone? is that boris johnson to blame? , , ., , ., blame? yes, there is no denying that labour had blame? yes, there is no denying that labour had a — blame? yes, there is no denying that labour had a great _ blame? yes, there is no denying that labour had a great night _ blame? yes, there is no denying that labour had a great night in _ blame? yes, there is no denying that labour had a great night in london, | labour had a great night in london, and the tories have failed to keep those three major councils, which will be a massive disappointment, not only for those councillors before the tory party as a whole. is it because of borisjohnson? i imagine that there are many remainer tories who look at borisjohnson in a very negative light, they are fed up a very negative light, they are fed up with the sleaze allegations, the lies, what they perceive to be lies,
10:48 am
partygate, also people are not sure what boris johnson's partygate, also people are not sure what borisjohnson's real vision for the country is. i am sure that has lots to do with it. i also think that it lots to do with it. i also think thatitis lots to do with it. i also think that it is an incredibly difficult time for any government after this point, on the same day as the election, we heard from the bank of england that the economy is not looking good. we got inflation expected to reach 10%, all of this adds up. people are not able to get adds up. people are not able to get a gp appointment, there is a massive cost of living crisis, all of this will add up to losses, and i suppose for borisjohnson he will be hoping that people will come back to him, come a general election, and this was more a protest vote, or apathy from some tory voters, who will return in the future.— return in the future. london has been successful— return in the future. london has been successful for _ return in the future. london has been successful for keir- return in the future. london has. been successful for keir starmer, and the labour party. yvette cooper, earlier, the shadow home secretary, saying that in a way the brand has been detoxified in london. but that is london. keir starmer has to build a coalition of seats that can win a
10:49 am
majority at the next general election, whenever that is. so far, it is a bit anaemic, as did a question of it is a bit anaemic, as did a question o— it is a bit anaemic, as did a tuestion o’ ., , ., . question of that is right, a much more mixed _ question of that is right, a much more mixed picture _ question of that is right, a much more mixed picture in _ question of that is right, a much more mixed picture in the - question of that is right, a much more mixed picture in the rest i question of that is right, a much| more mixed picture in the rest of england — more mixed picture in the rest of england. of course, the symbolic victories — england. of course, the symbolic victories in — england. of course, the symbolic victories in london, wandsworth, westminster, barnet in particular, which _ westminster, barnet in particular, which has — westminster, barnet in particular, which has a — westminster, barnet in particular, which has a big jewish population, these _ which has a big jewish population, these will— which has a big jewish population, these will do a lot to boost the morale — these will do a lot to boost the morale of— these will do a lot to boost the morale of the labour party and make them _ morale of the labour party and make them feel— morale of the labour party and make them feel that they are, in those words. _ them feel that they are, in those words, detoxifying the brand, moving forward, _ words, detoxifying the brand, moving forward, away from the jeremy corbyn years _ forward, away from the jeremy corbyn years a _ forward, away from the jeremy corbyn years. a morale boost should not be underestimated, particularly in a party— underestimated, particularly in a party that— underestimated, particularly in a party that has been very used to losing _ party that has been very used to losing in— party that has been very used to losing in the past few years. what is important is that labour build small— is important is that labour build small boats across the country and what _ small boats across the country and what we _ small boats across the country and what we are seeing is a bit of a mixed — what we are seeing is a bit of a mixed performance in the redwall areas _ mixed performance in the redwall areas. having said that, victories in places— areas. having said that, victories in places like cumberland are a big surprise, _ in places like cumberland are a big surprise, and particularly significant. it is an area that covers — significant. it is an area that covers three conservative constituencies, symbolically one of those _ constituencies, symbolically one of those constituencies is workington, and i_
10:50 am
those constituencies is workington, and i am _ those constituencies is workington, and i am sure a lot of your viewers will remember the westminster obsession with workington man, the rugby— obsession with workington man, the rugby league, traditional labour voter, _ rugby league, traditional labour voter, that they were set to lose and the — voter, that they were set to lose and the conservatives should have been _ and the conservatives should have been gaining. there has been a win for labour— been gaining. there has been a win for labour there, been gaining. there has been a win for labourthere, and in been gaining. there has been a win for labour there, and in various other— for labour there, and in various other areas— for labour there, and in various other areas as well, gains in places like derby, — other areas as well, gains in places like derby, southampton, surely, even— like derby, southampton, surely, even dudley, which has been losing a lot of— even dudley, which has been losing a lot of labour support in the past few years — lot of labour support in the past few years-— few years. you think that keir starmer is — few years. you think that keir starmer is cutting _ few years. you think that keir starmer is cutting through i few years. you think that keir - starmer is cutting through enough, in enough places, that they could build some sort of coalition? john curtice has said at the moment they could not on these results so far. they would have to be winning in some of those areas that were labour strongholds in the east midlands, in the north of england. and we are yet to see what happens in scotland. at the moment, do you think keir starmer is capitalising the discomfort of the conservatives,
10:51 am
with cost of living issues and the issue of the culture and parties at westminster? i issue of the culture and parties at westminster?— westminster? i don't think it is. i was out reporting _ westminster? i don't think it is. i was out reporting in _ westminster? i don't think it is. i was out reporting in a _ westminster? i don't think it is. i was out reporting in a ward - westminster? i don't think it is. i was out reporting in a ward in - was out reporting in a ward in wolverhampton, a redwall seat, at the constituency level, which the conservatives won from labour overnight _ conservatives won from labour overnight. and in that constituency, people _ overnight. and in that constituency, people were telling me they were really _ people were telling me they were really unhappy with how boris johnson — really unhappy with how boris johnson had behaved, partygate came up johnson had behaved, partygate came up a lot, _ johnson had behaved, partygate came up a lot, it _ johnson had behaved, partygate came up a lot, it was notjust johnson had behaved, partygate came up a lot, it was not just a westminster issue, but it did not neatiy— westminster issue, but it did not neatly translate into support for the labour party. the overwhelming sentiment _ the labour party. the overwhelming sentiment i — the labour party. the overwhelming sentiment i had expressed to me was that they— sentiment i had expressed to me was that they are all as bad as each other, — that they are all as bad as each other, there was a real lack of enthusiasm for keir starmer, a lot of people — enthusiasm for keir starmer, a lot of people had not heard of him, for one thing — of people had not heard of him, for one thing i— of people had not heard of him, for one thing. i think there is a sense within— one thing. i think there is a sense within the — one thing. i think there is a sense within the labour party that they have _ within the labour party that they have not— within the labour party that they have not been capitalising on what is a particularly bad time for the conservative party, both in its culture — conservative party, both in its culture and the way does politics, but also _ culture and the way does politics, but also in — culture and the way does politics, but also in terms of the state the country _ but also in terms of the state the country is — but also in terms of the state the country is in and the economy. what
10:52 am
needs to change, _ country is in and the economy. what needs to change, emily? _ country is in and the economy. bingsgt needs to change, emily? because moving to a different part of the country, to the south of england, and the south—west, the conservatives look like they are in some trouble, from the liberal democrats and also from the labour party. southampton was cited as being taken by labour. what needs to change to when those voters back? because boris johnson change to when those voters back? because borisjohnson will struggle to hold a coalition together with enough support of the next general election if he loses traditional conservative areas in those parts of the country. conservative areas in those parts of the country-— the country. yes, i do think, first of all, it the country. yes, i do think, first of all. it is _ the country. yes, i do think, first of all, it is worth _ the country. yes, i do think, first of all, it is worth pointing - the country. yes, i do think, first of all, it is worth pointing out, i of all, it is worth pointing out, and i think this will be true, many conservative voters will not have turned out or they will have made protest vote as people often do in local elections, to give the government a kicking. i think the government a kicking. i think the government need to commit to getting back to some of those conservative values. they need to look at the cost of living and look at how the government can make things cheaper
10:53 am
for people, rather than adding to the costs that we constantly see. keir starmer is not appealing up north. he is not appealing to the midlands, the labour heartlands. he may be popular in the liberal, metropolitan seats, but he is failing to capitalise on this moment, when really he should be doing better than he is at this point to the election cycle. in terms of changes that emily is siting, going back to conservative values, a small estate, lower taxes, that doesn't look like that is going to happen, and it also poses a difficult problem for keir starmer, in a sense of where does he go in terms of an economic prospectus, apart from better, bigger, more? exactly, what you will hear from some _ exactly, what you will hear from some labour mps and members of the shadow— some labour mps and members of the shadow cabinet is that voters in some _ shadow cabinet is that voters in some parts of the country that we have _ some parts of the country that we have been— some parts of the country that we have been talking about don't actually — have been talking about don't actually see boris johnson as a tory. _ actually see boris johnson as a tory. they— actually see boris johnson as a tory, they see him as one of their own, _ tory, they see him as one of their own. partly— tory, they see him as one of their own, partly because he wants to
10:54 am
spend _ own, partly because he wants to spend more money than perhaps a traditional— spend more money than perhaps a traditional conservative government, with drier— traditional conservative government, with drier economics, would spend. he is— with drier economics, would spend. he is into _ with drier economics, would spend. he is into big infrastructure projects _ he is into big infrastructure projects. you can see the generosity during _ projects. you can see the generosity during the _ projects. you can see the generosity during the pandemic that helped people _ during the pandemic that helped people through that particular crisis — people through that particular crisis so. _ people through that particular crisis. so, if borisjohnson gets his way— crisis. so, if borisjohnson gets his way and _ crisis. so, if borisjohnson gets his way and manages the economy like that, it _ his way and manages the economy like that, it does _ his way and manages the economy like that, it does leave keir starmer with fewer places to go in terms of the tap— with fewer places to go in terms of the tap lines. they have been talking — the tap lines. they have been talking about the tax rise, but how would _ talking about the tax rise, but how would labour raise its own money to spend _ would labour raise its own money to spend on— would labour raise its own money to spend on its— would labour raise its own money to spend on its own policies if it didn't— spend on its own policies if it didn't raise taxes somewhere? it gives— didn't raise taxes somewhere? it gives it _ didn't raise taxes somewhere? it gives it a — didn't raise taxes somewhere? it gives it a little bit less wriggle room. — gives it a little bit less wriggle room, which makes it difficult. having — room, which makes it difficult. having said that, i think the big challenge is within the conservative party _ challenge is within the conservative party. there are so many internal disagreements, and about what the conservative party actually stands for if _ conservative party actually stands for if it _ conservative party actually stands for if it is — conservative party actually stands for if it is raising taxes to the highest — for if it is raising taxes to the highest point since the 1950s. sol think— highest point since the 1950s. sol think it _ highest point since the 1950s. sol think it does make it harder for boris _ think it does make it harder for borisjohnson in terms think it does make it harder for boris johnson in terms of think it does make it harder for borisjohnson in terms of his think it does make it harder for boris johnson in terms of his own backbenchers, than it does for keir starmen _
10:55 am
backbenchers, than it does for keir starmer. ., ., backbenchers, than it does for keir starmer. ., ~ , ., backbenchers, than it does for keir starmer. ., ~ . starmer. thank you both. we can catch u- starmer. thank you both. we can catch up with _ starmer. thank you both. we can catch up with lewis _ starmer. thank you both. we can catch up with lewis goodall- starmer. thank you both. we can catch up with lewis goodall at i starmer. thank you both. we can| catch up with lewis goodall at the touch screen, because you have results from scotland. they began counting a little while ago. tell us? ~ ., , counting a little while ago. tell us? . ., , ., ., us? we have been confined to england before now. — us? we have been confined to england before now. but _ us? we have been confined to england before now, but finally _ us? we have been confined to england before now, but finally we _ us? we have been confined to england before now, but finally we have - us? we have been confined to england before now, but finally we have our. before now, but finally we have our first results from north of the border. not lots of them, because they are still counting. since 2007, scotland has used a different electoral system for local elections and england and wales. it uses a proportional system that makes it harder to get overall control of a council, but it gives an accurate snapshot of what public opinion is in each place. let's start in the scottish borders. this is something of a conservative stronghold, both of a conservative stronghold, both of the parliamentary seats are conservative, one belonging to the former scottish secretary david mundell. the conservatives did well here in 2017, the last time these seats were contested, and they did well across scotland. they came second overall in the ruth davidson.
10:56 am
look at this, only three seats out of 34, a long way to go. in terms of the first preference vote share, we are looking at the conservatives down 16%. that is a really, really big loss. they won five seats from labour when these seats were last contested, and, funnily enough, it is the green party picking up there, despite the fact that this area is one of the strongest no voting regions of scotland in the 2014 referendum. and the green party is a pro—independence party in scotland. still, a long way to go, something of a pattern, in the relatively few council areas we have got. stirling, here we are again, it has been home since 2003, and we currently have 12 seats to get to the winning post, six seats counted. one seat the conservatives have lost, would labour gain, the important thing is the change in vote share. and again, we have 7% down for the conservatives. the winners this time i of the greens, a bettor to the snp, a bit too the labour party, a
10:57 am
pitch to the liberal democrats. aberdeenshire, another strong conservative area, one of those places where conservatives really started to make a comeback at a parliamentary level, in holyrood and westminster in recent years. we early had three seats counted come a long way to go. 70 altogether. no changes in terms of seats yet. here is the first preference share. what we are looking for is the share change. the conservatives are down 8%, snp up 7%, labour up 5%. from those, we can see that so far the results are coming in and we can see from the individual wards that the conservatives appear to be struggling. the reason for that is this. the vote share. from scotland in 2017, the conservatives, unlike in 2017, the conservatives, unlike in england, are defending a high water mark. they did extremely well in 2017, under ruth davidson. i suspect they could be in for quite a bit of pain in scotland today, perhaps in wales as well, where they had a similarly good result. so far, the story of england as the tories licking their wounds in london, you
10:58 am
might have scotland, perhaps wales to add to that list before the end of the day. to add to that list before the end of the day-— to add to that list before the end oftheda. ., , , q of the day. that is interesting. as ou sa , of the day. that is interesting. as you say. just _ of the day. that is interesting. as you say. just the _ of the day. that is interesting. as you say, just the start, _ of the day. that is interesting. as you say, just the start, not - of the day. that is interesting. as | you say, just the start, not looking very good for the conservatives in the seats you have shown so far on the seats you have shown so far on the first preferences, because it is a system of proportional representation. i will say goodbye to joe. thank you representation. i will say goodbye tojoe. thank you very much for joining me. a wet morning across scotland and northern ireland, but it should brighten up as we go through the afternoon. plenty more in the way of sunny spells across the far south and south—east of england, elsewhere, claudia through the afternoon, to northern england, north and west wales as we had toward school pick and evening rush hour, the rain starts to arrive. 22 degrees in the sunshine, 18 further north. cooler weather rain sets in this afternoon, in the evening across northern england, north and west wales, heavy at times. some are infringing into the midlands. it
10:59 am
will slide towards the south—east. many gardens will still stay dry. a few spots of rain through eastern parts of england. most will have a dry night, with clear skies around. a little bit cooler than recent nights. as we start the weekend, one or two ago shower is possible and eastern districts, a cool breeze of the north sea. the north and west, sunny spells and feeling very pleasant in the sunshine.
11:00 am
this is bbc news. i'mjo coburn. the headlines at 11. in local elections in england, the conservatives suffer some big losses in london but across the country labour only make modest gains. we've had some difficult results, and you can see that in london. i would say, though, that we are mid—term, and it's quite a mixed picture, cos you look elsewhere, whether that's in hartlepool or nuneaton or thurrock, we've actually made gains. and believe you me, this is a big turning point for us. from the depths of 2019, that general election, back on track. it's the liberal democrats, who've gained the most seats, including winning hull from labour, and the greens have also been doing well. within the next hour, we're expecting to hear from the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the leader
11:01 am
of the liberal democrats, ed davey. counting is under way for the local elections in scotland and wales, and also in northern ireland, where voters have been having their say over forming a new government. good morning and welcome to bbc news, with continuing coverage of the election results across the uk. so far, it's been a mixed picture for all the parties. in england, the conservatives have lost control of three flagship london councils — westminster, barnet and wandsworth — to labour. keir starmer has called the results a "big turning point" despite only modest gains outside the capital. the conservative party chairman oliver dowden acknowledged the party had suffered some "difficult
11:02 am
results" but insisted it was no time to change leader. the liberal democrats and greens have also made gains across england. counting has begun in council elections across scotland and wales. and in northern ireland, where voters have been electing members of the stormont assembly. so here's the state of play for the parties. you can see here 77 out of 146 councils declared in england. hunting under way elsewhere in the uk. labouraround hunting under way elsewhere in the uk. labour around 1200 councillors because they have added their tipple. conservatives have lost 121 councillors are now total is 545. the liberal democrats have added 58, making bad total 261. the greens have added 23 councillors, their total is now 39. that is the state
11:03 am
of play so far. our political correspondent helen catt has the story so far. a symbolic win for labour — wandsworth in south london, tory for 44 years, until now. even in an election about local services, having the lowest council tax in the country didn't keep it blue. the cost of living crisis did come up, as did the massive cuts from the government since 2010. and also boris johnson. borisjohnson was a vote winner for labour, as indeed was keir starmer as well. and i remind you, huw, in 1998, a year after our landslide victory, we didn't win the seat in wandsworth. in 2002, after our landslide victory in 2001, we didn't win the seat in wandsworth, and we've done it in 2022. wandsworth's former leader blamed the loss on the cost of living and said what he called the "issue of borisjohnson" was raised. that was echoed by tory councillors elsewhere. it's partygate, it's notjust partygate. there is the integrity issue. basically, ijust don't feel people any longer have the confidence
11:04 am
that their prime minister can be relied upon to tell the truth. the conservatives lost barnet in north london to labour too, ina in a surprising upset, the conservatives lost westminster council to labour. the conservatives lost barnet in north london to labour too, what a difference it has made! we have had some difficult results, you can see that in london. i would say, though, that we are mid—term, and it is a mixed picture, cos you look elsewhere, whether that is in hartlepool, nuneaton or thurrock, we've actually made gains. and if you take the whole picture of this, it doesn't demonstrate labour has the momentum to form the next government.
11:05 am
labour won the newly created cumberland council in the north west, but it's not expecting big gains — and it's had losses too. the liberal democrats, who've had a strong night, took hull council from it. and what was really interesting about last night's results, in places like wimbledon and cheadle and elsewhere, we were winning seats where we need to win seats at the next general election. so it was a great night for those councillors. the greens too have made gains. also, overnight in bristol, voters chose to scrap their mayor in a referendum. this is only a partial picture. almost half of england's councils have yet to start counting and will do so later today. so too will all of the councils in wales and scotland. and counting will start for all 90 seats for the northern ireland assembly, with polls suggesting sinn fein could become the largest party for the first time. helen catt, bbc news. our deputy political editor,
11:06 am
vicki young, is here. she has just she hasjustjoined me here in the studio. we are hoping to catch up with davey, the liberal democrat leader, shortly, who is in wimbledon. we can see him here. he is riding to supporters. the liberal democrats will say they have had a pretty good night so far, he is in wimbledon. i think we can hear him. let's listen to what he has to say. the earthquake in north shropshire has turned into a shock wave across the country that can see the conservative government come tumbling down. it is a movement of millions of people, who are saying they have had enough, enough of energy bills going up, of tax bills going up, and the standards of living going down. they are saying they have had enough of this prime minister. and i think the tectonic plates of british politics are
11:07 am
shifting. now it is up to conservative mps to shove the prime minister into the abyss. there is a massive two conservative mps here, here in wimbledon and across our country, that if they do not get rid of borisjohnson as prime minister, if they do not start giving people support they need, struggling families and pensioners across our country, if they do not start listening to the british people, the liberal democrats are coming for you. you see, the liberal democrats are winning across the country again. yes, we won here in wimbledon. but didn't we do well across other parts of london? and then in tory heartlands... west oxfordshire, cameron's backyard. whole of the labour party. we are
11:08 am
winning across the country again. that is great news. many people. i want to thank you, liberal democrat councillors and campaigners because she had been at the heart of this success. —— you have been. you have worked hard all year round campaigning for your communities. that is what is different about the liberal democrats. we really care about our communities, we represent them. our community politics is what people are coming towards. they know if you elect a liberal democrat, you get a great liberal champion, people who will listen to you, will hear your concerns. people who will fight for a fair dealfor you, yourfamily for a fair deal for you, your family and for a fair dealfor you, yourfamily and your community, and people who will stand up for your community and for that the deal. the british people deserve far better than this
11:09 am
discredited prime minister and this out of touch conservative government. millions of pensioners and families deserve more support, not high tax, high unfair tax rises. they deserve nature and rivers and lakes that aren't being filled with sewage, filthy sewage, to companies that the government will not stand up that the government will not stand up to. they deserve an nhs where people are not having to wait for hours for an ambulance, wait for gp appointment. they deserve a prime minister who won't take them for granted, a prime minister who doesn't lie, he doesn't break the law. what the liberal democrats are saying, if you want better politics, if you want a stronger economy, if you want a more caring society, if
11:10 am
you want a more caring society, if you want a fair deal then choose the liberal democrats. come and join us. choose the liberal democrats and turn away from the shocking conservative government. thank you very much. conservative government. thank you ve much. ., ., from the lib dems leader, ed davey. apologies about the pictures. hopefully viewers could hear everything he was saying even though we did lose the pictures at times. yes, it is fighting talk. tectonic plates are shifting in politics. liberal democrats are always the party of local government. they were in coalition with the conservatives in government and then during the brexit referendum. why is he making such big pitch now and in that part of london? such big pitch now and in that part of london?—
11:11 am
of london? wimbledon was very mart inal of london? wimbledon was very marginal seat — of london? wimbledon was very marginal seat at _ of london? wimbledon was very marginal seat at the _ of london? wimbledon was very marginal seat at the last - of london? wimbledon was very | marginal seat at the last general election. the lib dems got close but not close enough. the council is actually martin anat is run by labour and will not change. what ed daveyis labour and will not change. what ed davey is doing is naming parliamentary constituencies, because they know that is their way back, picking up those areas. there was a bit of a pattern in south—west london, some of the affluent areas. notjust carshalton but esher, where the lib dems think they are the main contender. they think they are the ones who can take a seat against the tories, not labour. the liberal democrats starting to do better. later on we will hear from somerset they expect to do well there. all they expect to do well there. all the areas are used to be strong in, they fell back after the coalition. that could spell bad news for a lot of sitting conservative mps. they call it the blue wall. think of the
11:12 am
by—elections in chesham and amersham. people there, they say, have turned against borisjohnson, the kind of conservative who doesn't quite like what he is doing and they are willing maybe to look at the liberal democrats and potentially another by—election coming up in devon. d0 another by-election coming up in devon. ,, ~ another by-election coming up in devon. i. ~ , another by-election coming up in devon. ~ , , devon. do you think this is where the biggest _ devon. do you think this is where the biggest threat _ devon. do you think this is where the biggest threat is _ devon. do you think this is where the biggest threat is at _ devon. do you think this is where the biggest threat is at the - devon. do you think this is where i the biggest threat is at the moment for the conservatives? borisjohnson championed the idea of winning seats that they had never held, the conservatives, from labour in the north of england, the east midlands, the former red bull areas. has he neglected to some extent the seats the conservatives have held traditionally for decades? that is what they are — traditionally for decades? that is what they are rather _ traditionally for decades? that is what they are rather concerned l traditionally for decades? that is i what they are rather concerned tory mps sitting in those seats would say. they are worried there has been all this focus on the so—called red wall, seats in the north of england, the midlands and elsewhere. they are
11:13 am
worried voters in the south are saying can hang on a minute, why are you paying all the attention to there? part of the south—west are not particularly affluent. formerly a lib dems stronghold and now pretty much completely conservative. that is the concern and that is where the liberal democrats think they can come back and make it very difficult for borisjohnson. the question for him is, yes, there could be lots of seats they could lose but will it be enough to deprive him of his majority? if he can hold on, boris johnson, it does not spell the end for him. joining me now is the conservative mp for hitchin and harpenden, bim afolami. how concerned how concerned are how concerned are you for the liberal democrats in an area like yours? last year, the results were still pretty strong in hertfordshire and other areas. there were other
11:14 am
areas where it was less strong. what i can say is these results, and look i can say is these results, and look i did a lot of door knocking, not just in my own constituency but elsewhere, people said, i'm going to register a protest vote. and a lot of those votes went liberal or green. i think the reasons for that are obvious. some people were very annoyed about what they considered to be the chaos of westminster, with the parties and beers, whatever it is. lots of people said, i am sick of the lot of you and wanted to pick a smaller party. others were concerned about the bread—and—butter issues, whether local or energy prices, inflation, that sort of thing. it is mid—term. things do get difficult. looking at previous sets of local election results, we are seeing much bigger losses and gaining of seats in all parts of the
11:15 am
country than we are seeing now. that is not to say i am not concerned as all conservative mps will be concerned about losing any councillors, who will be good local councillors, who will be good local councillors, for what may be national concerns. we have a very good chance to show the public we are focusing on the issues that matter to them. the; are focusing on the issues that matter to them.— are focusing on the issues that matter to them. are focusing on the issues that matterto them. a ., matter to them. as you say you have talked to people _ matter to them. as you say you have talked to people and _ matter to them. as you say you have talked to people and they _ matter to them. as you say you have talked to people and they had - matter to them. as you say you have | talked to people and they had lodged a protest. what needs to change, the leader? ., ., .,. ., , leader? there are two macro things that need to — leader? there are two macro things that need to change. _ leader? there are two macro things that need to change. the _ leader? there are two macro things that need to change. the first - leader? there are two macro things that need to change. the first is - that need to change. the first is that need to change. the first is that we do need to show and demonstrate, notjust rhetorically but in our actions were that we are dealing with people's difficulty on the cost of goods, the cost of living, energy prices and the nhs as well. we need to show people we are dealing with those things. that is the first thing. some of the political difficulties in recent weeks and months haven't made it easy for us but we need to do it.
11:16 am
that is non—negotiable. the second thing, we do need to show everybody we are governing for the whole country with our programme. one difficulty is we have brexit, and we have got through the brexit morass and then we had coronavirus. it has not been easy to show our plans for the whole country. over the coming weeks and months, that is what we have to show them. tithe weeks and months, that is what we have to show them.— have to show them. one local councillor— have to show them. one local councillor said, _ have to show them. one local councillor said, i _ have to show them. one local councillor said, i do _ have to show them. one local councillor said, i do not - have to show them. one local councillor said, i do not think| have to show them. one local. councillor said, i do not think it was helpful to talk to george news —— george eustice saying people should buy value bands to help with their shopping. that comes over as patronising. people do not have the confidence the prime minister can be relied upon to tell the truth, is he right? he relied upon to tell the truth, is he ritht? , ., ., ., right? he is not right. in relation to the comments _ right? he is not right. in relation to the comments made - right? he is not right. in relation to the comments made by - right? he is not right. in relation. to the comments made by george eustice, i think he has been very hard done by by that. he was talking
11:17 am
about different ways to reduce bills and he has been pilloried for it. does it show he is out of touch with the way you have just set out the concerns of the cost of living? on the doorstep and how did you answer questions about, why am i taxes going up and why am i energy bills continuing to go up? —— why are my taxes going up? the bank of england thinks we are going to tip into recession. what does the tory party, the government might need to do? it is a really complex thing. as you know very well, this is to a large degree global issue. every single major western economy is facing similar things. you major western economy is facing similar things.— major western economy is facing similar things. you have chosen to tut u- similar things. you have chosen to put up what _ similar things. you have chosen to put up what we — similar things. you have chosen to put up what we did _ similar things. you have chosen to put up what we did was _ similar things. you have chosen to put up what we did was for - similar things. you have chosen to put up what we did was for a - put up what we did was for a specific issue or area, which was the nhs, where we needed to recover
11:18 am
after coronavirus and social care, we raised a specific amount of money to deal with those problems.- to deal with those problems. people are talkint to deal with those problems. people are talking about _ to deal with those problems. people are talking about the _ to deal with those problems. people are talking about the nhs _ to deal with those problems. people are talking about the nhs and - to deal with those problems. people are talking about the nhs and gp i are talking about the nhs and gp appointments and dating less, that is the first thing. we also said, right, we know people on the lowest incomes are having a tough time and we are going to raise the amount before which you have to pay any tax on national insurance to £12,500. we will give special support to the neediest through council tax rebates. i am neediest through council tax rebates. iam not neediest through council tax rebates. i am not saying that is it. what i am saying is we have not been blind to it. at the time we had to make that decision, it was several weeks ago. the situation is different now stop what we will do, and i have spoken to colleagues over recent days and weeks, we need to make sure we take the right action about where the cost of living will
11:19 am
go. about where the cost of living will t o, . ., about where the cost of living will to, . ., , about where the cost of living will u 0. ~ ., , , ., , about where the cost of living will 0. ~ ., , , ., , ., go. what is the next phase and doesnt go. what is the next phase and doesn't need _ go. what is the next phase and doesn't need to _ go. what is the next phase and doesn't need to happen - go. what is the next phase and doesn't need to happen now? i go. what is the next phase and - doesn't need to happen now? tories are saying there needs to be be reset and people need to be helped now. ., ., ., , , the now. there are various ways. the government _ now. there are various ways. the government can _ now. there are various ways. the government can spend _ now. there are various ways. the government can spend money. i now. there are various ways. the i government can spend money. what would you like to see? if government can spend money. what would you like to see?— would you like to see? if you do that, you _ would you like to see? if you do that. you have _ would you like to see? if you do that, you have to _ would you like to see? if you do that, you have to be _ would you like to see? if you do that, you have to be very - would you like to see? if you do. that, you have to be very careful. what we do not want to do is do what happened in the united states, which is the inflationary problem is worse than ours because of the amount of money the government has spent. we have to be careful about the whole package of what we do. what i want to see is us, as we have a better sense of energy bills in the autumn, which by the way we do not have yet, it is may. the orta motel are small. we know the energy cap will go up further. —— the autumn will tell us more. the idea of a windfall tax and
11:20 am
the massive profits they have made, has said time outcome? labour and the liberal democrats have proposed it. the head of bp said he will invest all the money into green energy and transition, even with the windfall tax. i5 energy and transition, even with the windfall tax. is it energy and transition, even with the windfall tam— windfall tax. is it time to do that? there are two _ windfall tax. is it time to do that? there are two reasons _ windfall tax. is it time to do that? there are two reasons why - windfall tax. is it time to do that? there are two reasons why this i windfall tax. is it time to do that? there are two reasons why this is| there are two reasons why this is not a good idea. let's take the comments from bp, what he is saying and the money he has already committed, he is not going to pull, if there is some sort of new tax on it. that is because that many are still there. il eddie has that money. he is not talking about the things we need to happen next year and the year after that because we are still committed to making our energy greener and dealing with climate change. that is one reason why a winter full tax is a bad climate change. that is one reason why a winterfull tax is a bad idea because that would mean we will not
11:21 am
get investment in the years to come. secondly, people talk about evil shareholders in bp who are going to get all this money. do you know who the shareholders of bp in large part? they are your pension funds. that is money that people receiving their pensions today and will receive it in the future will get. putting a tax on windfall, we had to bear those things in mind.— bear those things in mind. looking at it overall. _ bear those things in mind. looking at it overall, the _ bear those things in mind. looking at it overall, the conservatives - at it overall, the conservatives have lost over 100 council seats and control of six councils. would you agree, on the basis of that, boris johnson is not the electoral asset he was? i johnson is not the electoral asset he was? ., ., ~' johnson is not the electoral asset he was? ., ., ~ ., he was? i do not think local elections — he was? i do not think local elections are _ he was? i do not think local elections are about - he was? i do not think local elections are about the - he was? i do not think local l elections are about the prime minister, they are about a mixture of different things. you minister, they are about a mixture of different things.— of different things. you talked about the cost _ of different things. you talked about the cost of _ of different things. you talked about the cost of living, - of different things. you talked about the cost of living, which of different things. you talked i about the cost of living, which is very much partly the prime minister and the government, holy, i should
11:22 am
say. it and the government, holy, i should sa . , and the government, holy, i should sa , , ., and the government, holy, i should sa . , ., ., and the government, holy, i should sa. ., say. it is about what the government is doint. say. it is about what the government is doing- the — say. it is about what the government is doing. the prime _ say. it is about what the government is doing. the prime minister - say. it is about what the government is doing. the prime minister is - say. it is about what the government is doing. the prime minister is the i is doing. the prime minister is the leader. it is not about him personally. it is irrelevant who is in charge. it is not irrelevant. what i am trying to say is, if you compare back, for example, to lead to thousands, where the liberal democrats by the bay had several thousand more councillors than they had today or the 1980s, where we had very big swings in local election results and we still saw margaret thatcher or tony blair in the 2000 is getting re—elected with a comfortable majority. we are not in that territory. d0 comfortable ma'ority. we are not in that territory.— that territory. do you think your seat is under _ that territory. do you think your seat is under threat? _ that territory. do you think your seat is under threat? what - that territory. do you think your seat is under threat? what we i that territory. do you think your- seat is under threat? what we need to do, all conservative _ seat is under threat? what we need to do, all conservative mps - seat is under threat? what we need to do, all conservative mps need i seat is under threat? what we need to do, all conservative mps need to j to do, all conservative mps need to do, is work together and deal with the problems that come. that is what we need to do and people expect us to do. we should not let that divert us from the core task of making
11:23 am
peoples lives better in this country. peoples lives better in this count . ~ , peoples lives better in this count . ~ country. do you think boris johnson has neglected _ country. do you think boris johnson has neglected people _ country. do you think boris johnson has neglected people in _ country. do you think boris johnson has neglected people in seats - country. do you think boris johnson has neglected people in seats like i has neglected people in seats like yours that have allowed the liberal democrats and labour to make gains? i do not think it is that. for example, i look at what we are doing on the green agenda that i know resonates very strongly in the south of england. i am a child of the south, i grew up in the south, my constituency is in the south and that resonates very strongly. looking at the loss of chesham and amersham, i looked at that loss and the reaction to that was, the government listening on people's concerns around house—building and planning and concerns that we need to make that done in the correct way. —— make sure that is done in the correct way. way. -- make sure that is done in the correct way.—
11:24 am
the correct way. thank you for talkint the correct way. thank you for talking to _ the correct way. thank you for talking to us _ the correct way. thank you for talking to us today. _ the correct way. thank you for talking to us today. i - the correct way. thank you for talking to us today. i am - the correct way. thank you for talking to us today. i am sure| the correct way. thank you for i talking to us today. i am sure we will see you soon and talk again. let's get some more detailed analysis of the results so far. we can cross the newsroom to lewis goodall at the touchscreen. we had the first results coming in from scotland last time we talked to you. from scotland last time we talked to ou. ,, . y ., from scotland last time we talked to ou. ,, . , ., ., , from scotland last time we talked to ou. ,, . ., , ., ~ you. since you have been talking about the lib _ you. since you have been talking about the lib dems, _ you. since you have been talking about the lib dems, just - you. since you have been talking about the lib dems, just as - you. since you have been talking about the lib dems, just as well| you. since you have been talking i about the lib dems, just as well to focus on them at the moment. they are having a decent night and morning so far. he happened to be in wimbledon, part of the london borough of merton. it is an labour hold stock nearly all the seats have been counted. the lib dems are doing very well. they have gained 12 seats, particularly in areas like wimbledon and the conservatives have lost nine. wimbledon is a key target seat for the liberal democrats. very heavily remain voting area. other other examples where the lib dems
11:25 am
are giving the tories a fright? let's look at west oxfordshire. they did not have enough seats to take this borough. it is david cameron's backyard. it has been a conservative —controlled borough since 2000 but the lib dems were over the last few years, 54% remain, part of the realignment we have been seeing, chipping away at the conservative majority and it has now gone into no overall control. colchester is another hung borough, a hung council. the seat used to be liberal democrat. again conservatives dan four, lib dems up two and labour up two as well. we are expecting that trend to continue later. we are expecting results from somerset, a new unitary authority in somerset. tunbridge wells in kent is to be dominated by the conservative party.
11:26 am
the lib dems have been chipping away, chipping away, chipping away. that will put the fear of god into some conservative mps. the lib dems have not been a factor at parliamentary level for many years. if it looks like there is going to be a new threat from the lib dems just rising again, that is certainly something they will be very concerned about in the old southern strongholds. it is notjust the conservative party the lib dems have been giving trouble too. the result in hull, somewhere the lib dems used to be strong until pre—coalition years. they lost it in 2011. they took control from labour in hull. it is a very leave stating place, one of the top leave voting places in the uk. there lib dems are very pleased thinking that they can move
11:27 am
on from the coalition years and the brexit years, where it disadvantages them. let's have a look at the that task for the lib dems. this is a local election performance. the high water mark before they entered government. after that it was a disaster after disaster for them, being punished by the electorate at every electoral event skirting along the bottom. some recovery in the brexit years as they started to hoover up some of the programming sentiment. they hover now around 18% since 2021. —— some of the pro remain sentiment. just before i go, i promised you we would have a look at what is going on in scotland. some really interesting results coming in. a theme or have come in.
11:28 am
let's have a look at angus, near arbroath. this is a hung council since 2017. the conservatives did quite well. they used to have the parliamentary seat in angus. he you go. we can see their first preference share. they had the seat until 2017. the conservatives are down 17% and it is being heated up by a variety. the more results we are getting in scotland, the clearer the trend. the conservatives are having a bad night and day and there will be a lot of uncomfortable faces in the conservative party. they will look at not their leader but boris
11:29 am
johnson for that.— johnson for that. thank you for brinttin johnson for that. thank you for bringing us _ johnson for that. thank you for bringing us up-to-date - johnson for that. thank you for bringing us up-to-date with i johnson for that. thank you for| bringing us up-to-date with the bringing us up—to—date with the early results in scotland. more from scotland and wales throughout the day. our deputy political editor vicki young is here. we had the victory speech from ed davey, following some promising results for the party. the interesting thing is whether this recovery can translate in councils in england into parliamentary seats. that is always the focus on the picking of those seats and going back to the seats they have had before and lost. that is what they will want to do, the liberal democrats. they will build up council representation and ban that they hope will lead to parliamentary seats. for borisjohnson, that of course is a problem. in the affluent
11:30 am
areas mainly in the south of england, that is where the liberal democrats seem to be doing well against the conservatives. they call it the blue wall and they are chipping away against that. how well can they do in terms of numbers? borisjohnson has to make this calculation. if they can hold onto other places in england, can they sacrifice others in the south? it is all about how many. in the end what we have to remember as he won a huge election victory ended his labour who are having to make up a lot of background and they have got a huge amount of ground to make that they would need to win over 100 seats, again no seats. they are talking about 20 or or so so far they say they would be able to gain in parliamentary terms. that is nowhere near enough. although they are having a decent night, labour, people are pointing to the fact it needs to be brilliant for them to win the next general election.
11:31 am
one tory mp said he had registered the protest, a lot of it around the cost—of—living. that is going to be a problem for borisjohnson, particularly from within his own party and opposition from some conservative mps that actual think whole idea of big state increasing taxes is not something they feel will protect their seats. yes taxes is not something they feel will protect their seats.- taxes is not something they feel will protect their seats. yes and a lot of unhappy — will protect their seats. yes and a lot of unhappy about _ will protect their seats. yes and a lot of unhappy about the - will protect their seats. yes and a lot of unhappy about the national| lot of unhappy about the national insurance rise. that is what is interesting, for opposition parties it couldn't be better, there has been a scandal around the prime minister. he has been found to be broking the law of his own covid laws. there is a crisis in the economy and that is going to be the problem. a lot of conservatives do know this. that this may not be the worst part of all of this in terms of economy. those suggestions yesterday from the bank of england
11:32 am
predicting innation of 10 —— inflation of 10. the government needs a plan and what is worrying conservatives is there isn't one. they're pleased although it is not going well, it could have been a lot worse and what happens in the next two years is crucial to all of this. it is not about brexit being delivered, although people are delighted that happened and not what about the prime minister did about ukraine, or covid, but what comes next and has he got a plan to deal with that? a lot of conservatives are not sure he does.— are not sure he does. there is a suggestion. _ are not sure he does. there is a suggestion. we _ are not sure he does. there is a suggestion, we have _ are not sure he does. there is a suggestion, we have heard - are not sure he does. there is a | suggestion, we have heard from are not sure he does. there is a i suggestion, we have heard from it are not sure he does. there is a - suggestion, we have heard from it a lot of conservatives, that they will have come to —— to come back with more help. in scotland it looks as if labour will overtake the conservatives and the leader there of the scottish tories douglas ross called for borisjohnson to go and when the war started in ukraine, he reversed that position. but it is
11:33 am
still precarious in terms of unionism for borisjohnson? yes still precarious in terms of unionism for boris johnson? yes he has a lot of— unionism for boris johnson? yes he has a lot of problems _ unionism for boris johnson? yes he has a lot of problems there. - unionism for boris johnson? yes he has a lot of problems there. last i has a lot of problems there. last time, ruth davidson, managed to get the conservatives to that second position. but i think we have got to remember we are talking about coming second. no one is talking about anyone knocking the snp over. everyone always used to say we are going to win. everyone always used to say we are going to win-— everyone always used to say we are going to win. no, they're scrabbling for second place. _ going to win. no, they're scrabbling for second place. the _ going to win. no, they're scrabbling for second place. the you _ going to win. no, they're scrabbling for second place. the you would - going to win. no, they're scrabbling for second place. the you would be| for second place. the you would be in a position by the end of today or tomorrow, where the conservatives are going backwards in scotland, wales and parts of england. so of course that is a precarious position for borisjohnson. whether it is enoughin for borisjohnson. whether it is enough in the end to prompt conservative mps to try and oust him, i'm not sure it is going to be. there is a lot of talk about would more letters go in, they probably will. is it so disastrous they
11:34 am
decide they need to act? i'm not sure. i think the short—term he is ok. so what he does next is important, what he and his chancellor do next, because he will be judged on that. chancellor do next, because he will bejudged on that. you chancellor do next, because he will be judged on that.— chancellor do next, because he will be judged on that. you mentioned the chancellor and _ be judged on that. you mentioned the chancellor and we _ be judged on that. you mentioned the chancellor and we are _ be judged on that. you mentioned the chancellor and we are going _ be judged on that. you mentioned the chancellor and we are going to - chancellor and we are going to remind our viewers of the seats that have changed hands and councils that have changed hands and councils that have been won and lost. rishi sunak was very much seen as the natural successor to borisjohnson, if there were to be a leadership contest and vote of no confidence that the prime minister lost. that has always changed the dynamic, hasn't it, because unless there is somebody automatically for tory mps to gather around, that makes the challenge for difficult? yes around, that makes the challenge for difficult? , ., ., , ., difficult? yes and that is what has been helping _ difficult? yes and that is what has been helping boris _ difficult? yes and that is what has been helping boris johnson. - difficult? yes and that is what has been helping boris johnson. whatj been helping borisjohnson. what conservatives are going to calculate, because they are ruthless, is borisjohnson still a winner? that is why they elected him. some because of brexit, but
11:35 am
some who were against brexit thought he can win us an election and my seat. so that is what they have got to calculate. is he still a winner? or is he a liability? now, i think thatis or is he a liability? now, i think that is obviously that they're going to calculate. one said i'm keen on him as a leader, but there is no one clear cut to take over. at the moment that is helping him and rishi sunak, you can't write him off forever, the fact that a year ago even said he would be the next leader, now he is not. that shows how volatile things are. the big test of the what is happening with the economy is rally going to —— really going to be difficult. fin really going to be difficult. on tarties, really going to be difficult. on parties, law—break being, the prime minister has been given one fixed penalty notice, breaking his own covid rules. unprecedented in terms of that position. bide covid rules. unprecedented in terms of that position.— of that position. we have yet to hear the full outcome _ of that position. we have yet to
11:36 am
hear the full outcome of - hear the full outcome of investigation from the police, which could change everything again? not just that but sue grey's report, the civil servant going into the detail, the police, the top line is he has been fined, he broke his own rules, the details of what went on at the events could be more politically embarrassing and then that investigation by the parliamentary committee about whether he misled parliament. there is a lot of things to come that could be uncomfortable for borisjohnson. so he is not out of woods yet. but he will probably think, look it is a bad night, but we will say it could have been worse. ~ �*, ., we will say it could have been worse. �*, ., ., worse. well, look, let's go back to our coverage _ worse. well, look, let's go back to our coverage of _ worse. well, look, let's go back to our coverage of election _ worse. well, look, let's go back to our coverage of election results i our coverage of election results across the uk. so far it is mixed for the parties. in england the conservatives have lost control of three flagship london councils, westminster, barnet and wandsworth to labour. the liberal democrat and greens have made gains in england.
11:37 am
and counting has begun in scotland and wales. we are getting the first results in scotland. and in northern ireland, voters have been electing members of stormont assembly. here is the state of play. english councils, 77 of the 146 councils declared. labour is on 38. so they have added three. this is a net gain for labour. the conservatives are on 19, they have lost six councils. the liberal democrats have gained one. hung councils, you can see another two. bringing the total to 16. let's look at the key ward analysis, that can tell us about the state of party. in england the changes since 2018, 504 of the 738 declared so far
11:38 am
and you can see that labour has gone down slightly. minus 0.4%. so they have made gains, significant ones in london, but if you're looking at the key wards, they have gone down. not as much as the conservatives, who have dropped 4%. the liberal democrats are up 1%. and the greens are up 3%. so that is the state of play in england at the moment. andrew kerr is at the count in aberdeen with with a picture of the situation in the north—east of scotland. andrew? situation in the north-east of scotland. andrew?— situation in the north-east of scotland. andrew? hello, yes, this count covers _ scotland. andrew? hello, yes, this count covers the _ scotland. andrew? hello, yes, this count covers the whole _ scotland. andrew? hello, yes, this count covers the whole corner - scotland. andrew? hello, yes, this count covers the whole corner of i count covers the whole corner of north—east scotland, with aberdeenshire and aberdeen city. they started counting at 9 o'clock. we have had a number of results. but now they're starting to come thick and fast. we have had barney
11:39 am
crockett, the outgoing lord provost of aberdeen re—elected as a labour councillor. aberdeen city has been interesting, the last time the snp were the largest party here. but labour and the conservatives formed a coalition, very controversially to keep the snp out of local government. the labour councillors who did that were suspended by the party after doing that. now there was some rumours that turnout is said to be lore here than it had been previously around 47% at the last election. there are concern there is a could affect the tory vote among the conservatives here. they have been worried about the so—called party—gate affair. one tory said they had been speaking o”en the phone, a supporter who has been raising concerns about the party—gate affair. but he said what about nicola sturgeon? that
11:40 am
conservative supporter said, yes, and that means of course tory supporters here wouldn't be switching their votes, because of the constitution, independence is such an important issue. speaking about that the former first minister of scotland, alex salmond is at this count as well. in particular for the aberdeenshire region. he runs the alba party now of course. and one of his best hopes for a candidate, brian topping has not made it through. so perhaps not much hope for alba in this area at the moment at least. bide for alba in this area at the moment at least. ~ ., for alba in this area at the moment at least. . ., , ., ~ ., at least. we have been talking about how times have _ at least. we have been talking about how times have changed _ at least. we have been talking about how times have changed in - at least. we have been talking aboutj how times have changed in scotland. i was interviewing anas sarwar, the labour leader, talking i was interviewing anas sarwar, the labour leader, talk ing about honest and saying that we are aiming for second place, the objective will be to overtake the conservatives. it
11:41 am
looks like that will happen? yes. to overtake the conservatives. it looks like that will happen? yes, i think it probably _ looks like that will happen? yes, i think it probably does _ looks like that will happen? yes, i think it probably does in _ looks like that will happen? yes, i think it probably does in terms - looks like that will happen? yes, i think it probably does in terms of| think it probably does in terms of big national picture. of course, the snp, all—powerful in local government and holyrood, where they have an agreement with the green party. the race for second place is crucial in this. so that is what the conservatives are worried about, they might be pushed out of the second place into third place in local government. but at holyrood perhaps where it matters more in the scottish parliament, they still remain in that second place spot. but they will be worried about what the future holds for them, i think, if labour do push them into second place and under anas sarwar as you mentioned, that leader, he has been in post for about 15 months, perhaps a renewed sense revitalisation in the scottish labour party with the
11:42 am
scottish conservative leader buffeted by the party—gate row. he called for borisjohnson to go. but in mar when borisjohnson was here he changed his mind and said boris johnson should stay. that is a problem for the conservatives at the moment. {in problem for the conservatives at the moment. _, , ., ., , , moment. on the constitutional issue, second independence _ moment. on the constitutional issue, second independence referendum, i moment. on the constitutional issue, | second independence referendum, the snp will say they have a mandate and they continue to have a mandate and probably will continue to do after these results, the guarantee of holding that second independence referendum by the latest at the end of 2023, but still no sign of any movement from the government at westminster? d0 movement from the government at westminster?— westminster? do you know, it is interesting _ westminster? do you know, it is interesting you _ westminster? do you know, it is interesting you say _ westminster? do you know, it is interesting you say that, - westminster? do you know, it is| interesting you say that, because this formed part of campaign, it formed part of snp's campaign. they say they co—do have mandate for that
11:43 am
referendum. no change from the government at westminster and the prounion parties here say sit is not what people —— say it is not what people want. one poll suggested it is not what people want here either. but now we are come through the elections, in the coming weeks with an snp party conference injune, i think nicola sturgeon will want to do something about independence, want a bit of forward momentum on that, throw some red meat as the cliche goes, to her supporters to prove she is trying to act on that. i mentioned the alba party of alex salmond were set up to try and drive moment tun on independence. now with the elections out of way, it is likely we will see movement from nicola sturgeon, her next step. but the uk government continue to say no to that. ., ., the uk government continue to say no to that. ., ~ , ., the uk government continue to say no to that. ., ~ ., ,, to that. thank you. perhaps we will 'oin ou to that. thank you. perhaps we will join you later _ to that. thank you. perhaps we will join you later when _ to that. thank you. perhaps we will join you later when there _ to that. thank you. perhaps we will join you later when there are - to that. thank you. perhaps we will join you later when there are more | join you later when there are more results coming in.
11:44 am
our deputy political editor vicki young is here. this deadline that nicola sturgeon has set for the end of 2023, it is still very difficult to know how thatis still very difficult to know how that is going to play out when boris johnson's government still insists that they're not going to give is in so—called permission to allow a second independence referendum, because they don't think it what is people want. at the moment the poms are still split —— polls are still split, it is difficult, but it is an important part of the make—up for borisjohnson and the conservative and unionist party. yes boris johnson and the conservative and unionist party.— and unionist party. yes they would have hoped. _ and unionist party. yes they would have hoped, the _ and unionist party. yes they would have hoped, the conservatives, i have hoped, the conservatives, having clawed their way back in scotland that would stay there. but that has not happened. what is interesting is the division twen —— between the scottish conservatives
11:45 am
and douglas ross being an outspoken critic of borisjohnson and calling for him to resign. that is a pattern you can see in other parts. the scottish conservatives want to be seen to be separate and they feel borisjohnson is dragging their hopes down. you have seen that in local elections, in some parts the leaflets from the conservatives it is hard to tell they were conservatives, thern coloured green and called local conservatives. it is different in different parts. but this is the problem they have, the conservatives. its all very well the tories in scotland trying to show themselves to be separate, just not sure how successful that will be. in terms of referendum, i think the interesting thing for nicola sturgeon is obviously she only wants to call when when she thinks she is going to win, it is basic politics. the polls suggesting that is not the case. of course the party very
11:46 am
popular at all levels of government as that is showing, in scotland. whether that translates into a desire for referendum now, which they would win easily, well that isn't the case. so you're stuck in this position where the westminster government will continue to say no and basically say to nicola sturgeon, what are are —— what are you going to do. hagar sturgeon, what are are -- what are you going to do-— sturgeon, what are are -- what are you going to do. now picking up the theme of the _ you going to do. now picking up the theme of the patchwork _ you going to do. now picking up the theme of the patchwork of - you going to do. now picking up the theme of the patchwork of results i you going to do. now picking up the | theme of the patchwork of results in england. lewis goodall is at the newsroom. b0 england. lewis goodall is at the newsroom-— england. lewis goodall is at the newsroom. . ,, ., newsroom. bo we focussed on the successes of _ newsroom. bo we focussed on the successes of labour _ newsroom. bo we focussed on the successes of labour in _ newsroom. bo we focussed on the successes of labour in london - newsroom. bo we focussed on the successes of labour in london and| successes of labour in london and cumberland. it isjust successes of labour in london and cumberland. it is just as well to look at where labour perhaps haven't done so well as they might have hoped. here is bolton. bolton, full of classic bar weather parliamentary seat. i think the labour party would
11:47 am
hope all things being equal, they might do well in a borough like bolton. but conservatives up one, labour static, independent lost one. labour static, independent lost one. labour have a greater percentage of the vote. you can see the change. labour down a per cent in bolton, by comparison to 2018. it comes back to about the thing we have been talk about the thing we have been talk about a lot, we have been talking about a lot, we have been talking about for many years, the realignment in places like bolton away from the labour party to the conservative. it was 58% leave. the bolton the only conservative—controlled borough in greater manchester. it is hung, but the conservatives are going to stay in control. dudley, not so long ago had a labour seat up 2019. at a borough level it went conservative in 20/20 the one. it —— 2021. real
11:48 am
not great progress by what you might be hoping if labour were on the precipice of power. hartlepool interesting, you remember the by—election and the delayed red wall, the slew of seats that the labour party lost in 2019. the conservatives up two. but if you go ward by ward, the labour party is up in most of its ward and the conservative is down. it emphasises what we have been talking, it all depends on when you're comparing to and from. the labour party in comparison to 21 and 19 both
11:49 am
drubbings. now it is doing about the same. outside of london it is doing worse. that is not great for the labour party, considering jeremy corbyn was not the most popular labour leader. it was a high water mark forjeremy corbyn. but that wasn't saying a great deal. the biggest lead in opposition, for each opposition leader in a set of local elections. it doesn't necessarily mean that you do well that you are going to win the general election. tory did in 1995. he got 46% of the vote. he went on to a landslide victory in 97. william hague, beat tony blair in 2000, he gained one seat net in the 2001 general election. an appalling result for him. became the first conservative leader of the opposition since neville chamberlain not to become prime minister. 2008 david cameron beat gordon brown. he does become
11:50 am
prime minister. 2012 ed miliband beat david cameron. doesn't become prime minister. 2016jeremy corbyn just about beat david cameron, 31%, in 2016, pre—brexit, he didn't on to become prime minister. although he did wellish in the general election. the local elections are not a sure fire thing for predicting success for the leader of the opposition. but keir starmer will hope at least he comes out on top at this set of local elections. but the margin may be thin. ., ., local elections. but the margin may be thin. ., ~ i. now local elections are also about who runs your local services.
11:51 am
joining me is the labour mp for st helens north, conor mcginn. you're the deputy national campaign coordinator for the labour party. what do you think these results tell you about the state of your party as a growing electoral force, you about the state of your party as a growing electoralforce, having looked at those past leaders and will they do translate gains at a general election? i’m will they do translate gains at a general election? i'm interested in the here and _ general election? i'm interested in the here and now, _ general election? i'm interested in the here and now, i'm _ general election? i'm interested in the here and now, i'm a _ general election? i'm interested in the here and now, i'm a realist. i the here and now, i'm a realist. this was a turn around election for the labour party. the comparison i'm interesting is with where we were in 2019 when a catastrophic election defeat led to a near death experience for the labour party. the very existence and future of the party was in question. two years into keir starmer's leadership, we are making progress in the places we would want to and where we need to win seats. we won a council in southampton and we won in cumberland
11:52 am
and we won workington. if workington man won the conservatives the general election. now they are voting labour. we are making the progress we wanted to make. we had tremendous results in london. but we have work to do. i would be the first to acknowledge that. we have got to continue the momentum and keep the change under way. let’s keep the change under way. let's concentrate _ keep the change under way. let's concentrate on _ keep the change under way. let's concentrate on the _ keep the change under way. let's concentrate on the here - keep the change under way. let's concentrate on the here and now, if you don't want to look at whether or not these results show that you could be a potentialforce not these results show that you could be a potential force at the next general election. you have gained 37 seats. that is less than the liberal democrats so far, who have gained 60 seats, nearly double what you have achieved. labour has only within for seats than the greens. its its far from its farfrom a its far from a strong performance. the share of the popular vote in
11:53 am
places like great grimsby show us winning that seat. in hartlepool, which we lost in a by—election, show us winning that seat. ipswich show us winning that seat. ipswich show us winning that seat. ipswich show us winning that seat. the wolverhampton and west bromic seats, key, core labour seepts that went under the last leadership. they are coming back to it. it is farfrom a done deal. people are frustrated with the government, they don't like being lied to, they're also facing a huge cost—of—living crisis, which our campaign focussed on. we ran a good campaign talking to people about the issues that matter and from southampton to ipswich to cumberland we show can win. there is no huge celebration, but i don't want to denigrate the results in london and i don't think people should do that. that was not a given. the hard work of her
11:54 am
candidates to win councils that the conservatives have held since 1964, thatis conservatives have held since 1964, that is a huge achievement and i don't accept the false binary that says if you win in london you can't do well elsewhere. i says if you win in london you can't do well elsewhere.— do well elsewhere. i take the successes — do well elsewhere. i take the successes in _ do well elsewhere. i take the successes in london, - do well elsewhere. i take the successes in london, they're| successes in london, they're important for the labour party, symbolically and substantially, but there are parts that you need to win back from the conservatives if you are to have a chance at forming the next government. you cited places, of course you would, where labour has dope well. butjohn curtice said that the gains are modest. you could look at amber valley and where the conservatives held strongly. you have won four councils, three in london and all in the south—east. you have lost one council in hull. would you accept
11:55 am
you're struggling to cut through outside london and the south, apart from a new notable examples? ida. outside london and the south, apart from a new notable examples? ha. i from a new notable examples? no, i bow and show _ from a new notable examples? no, i bow and show great _ from a new notable examples? my, i bow and show great deference to professorjohn curtis. but his comparison is a statistical one between 2018 and today. mine is a political one between where the labour party was in 2019. bide political one between where the labour party was in 2019. we are comparing _ labour party was in 2019. we are comparing the — labour party was in 2019. we are comparing the seats _ labour party was in 2019. we are comparing the seats to _ labour party was in 2019. we are comparing the seats to 2018. - labour party was in 2019. we are comparing the seats to 2018. i i labour party was in 2019. we are i comparing the seats to 2018. i know you want to look at 2019 and that general election performance. it is not general election performance. it 3 not unreasonable, given we lost all those seats to identify it as a significant event that might have had some impact on the electorate. but as i say, i'm the first to acknowledge and i'm back at work today along with the rest of our elections team, and with keir starmer, focussed on continuing the momentum and continuing to win. there are big challenges. there is a
11:56 am
legacy that we have needed to change. look at barnett, ifeel particularly strongly and emotional about a result in barnet, the stain of anti—semitism is one we have fought hard to address and the result in barnet shows that keir starmer's pledge to do that is one he has kept. starmer's pledge to do that is one he has kept-— he has kept. briefly, we are going to tet he has kept. briefly, we are going to get results _ he has kept. briefly, we are going to get results from _ he has kept. briefly, we are going to get results from northern - to get results from northern ireland. and the election there to stormont assembly. they're not local elections, what do you think will happen? elections, what do you think will ha- ten? �* ., elections, what do you think will hat-en?�* ., . elections, what do you think will hauen?�* ., . i , happen? i'm a participant in british elections. happen? i'm a participant in british elections- it _ happen? i'm a participant in british elections. it is _ happen? i'm a participant in british elections. it is won _ happen? i'm a participant in british elections. it is won we _ happen? i'm a participant in british elections. it is won we will - happen? i'm a participant in british elections. it is won we will look - happen? i'm a participant in british elections. it is won we will look at. elections. it is won we will look at closely. the priority for the labour party is that the executive is restored and people get the health and education and services they need to be improved and that are required. the conservative government needs to work with the irish government and get that institution restored.— irish government and get that institution restored.
11:57 am
if you want to find out the result in your area, head to the bbc news website or bbc news app and enter your postcode. you ll also find lots of election analysis and the latest reports from our teams around the country. now the weather. hello, whilst many a garden in southern parts of england will stay dry yet again, there's certainly been a bit more rain about today. that rain heading its way southwards. it does mean it is now going to be brighterfor the afternoon across parts of scotland and northern ireland, as this weather front starts to push its way across other parts of england and wales. but notice how it's running into an area of high pressure in the south. it will fade as we go the evening, as it reaches those gardens where you desperately need the rain at the moment. so, here is where we stand into the beginning part of the afternoon. still rainy to the south—east of northern ireland, but that rain getting heavier across northern england, north and west wales. brightening up through scotland and northern ireland. isolated showers, but feeling warm in the sunny spells, especially east of the high ground, 18 in aberdeenshire. whilst we will see more cloud through the midlands,
11:58 am
east anglia, southern parts of england, still some sunny spells here, highs of 21 or 22. but rain for the afternoon, early evening, parts of northern england and wales, spreading through the midlands. there will be a few splashes of rain across southern counties, but not much. some gardens will stay completely dry and most will be dry into tomorrow morning. clea rest of skies to the north and west, feeling a little bit cooler than it did this morning. so into the weekend we go. saturday, there will be cloud at times, especially in eastern areas, producing the odd isolated shower. north and western parts it's going to be a dry and bright day, certainly a much sunnier day for parts of scotland and northern ireland, north—west england and north—west wales. and even though the air mass is a little bit cooler, air temperatures down a touch on today's values, you will probably notice that mostly across those eastern coastal counties, it will actually feel very pleasant in that strong sunshine. high pressure is certainly in charge as we finish saturday, it holds on into sunday. as it slips eastwards though we do allow a weather front to just to graze in to the north and west. and that will introduce a little bit more cloud at times. sunshine a bit on the hazy side across northern and western area and parts
11:59 am
of western scotland, even northern ireland, could catch the odd spot of rain. much of england and wales, a good part of scotland will stay dry. starting to feel warmer again away from some of these eastern coasts and warmer still for england and wales on monday. more of a southerly airflow here. sunny spells for the most part. a greater chance of rain though for scotland and northern ireland once again. but temperatures climbing more widely into the 20s where you've got the sunshine. and that warmer air will be with us for much of next week. still very little rain across some southern areas, but to parts of scotland and northern ireland there will be further rain at times.
12:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... in local elections in england, the conservatives suffer some big losses in london but across the country labour only make modest gains. we've had some difficult results, and you can see that in london. i would say, though, that we are mid—term, and it's quite a mixed picture, cos you look elsewhere, whether that's in hartlepool or nuneaton or thurrock, we've actually made gains. and believe you me, this is a big turning point for us. from the depths of 2019, that general election, back on track. the prime minister called it a tough night for the tories. we're expecting to hear from him in the next few minutes. success for the greens and the liberal democrats who've
12:01 pm
gained the most seats so far, including taking hull from labour. the british people deserve far better than this discredited prime minister, and this out of touch conservative government. counting is underway for the local elections in scotland and wales, where all council seats are upfor grabs. we are four hours into the count in northern ireland. still a long way to go. i am at one of three count centres for the northern ireland elections. join me for the latest updates and analysis.
12:02 pm
asi as i said, we are expecting to hear from borisjohnson, the prime minister. he has been talking to actavis ny slip and putting it down to mid—term challenges. ttiming actavis ny slip and putting it down to mid-term challenges. going into this election _ to mid-term challenges. going into this election year _ to mid-term challenges. going into this election year said _ to mid-term challenges. going into this election year said he _ to mid-term challenges. going into this election year said he would - this election year said he would take personal responsibility for the results. you have lost 120 councillors so far. you might lose 200 to 300. flagships, conservative councillors are very angry at you and think you are the reason. thus double i and think you are the reason. thus double i want _ and think you are the reason. thus double i want to _ and think you are the reason. thus double i want to pay _ and think you are the reason. thus double i want to pay tribute to conservative councillors up and down the land. conservative councillors who have won and those who have sadly lost. they do a fantasticjob, delivering better value for lower council tax up and down the country.
12:03 pm
you are right, it is mid—term and a mixed set of results. we had a tough night in some parts of the country. in other parts of the country you are still seeing conservatives going forward and making quite remarkable gains in places that have not voted conservative for a long time, or if ever. leaving aside the commentary, the big lesson i take from this is this is a message from voters that what they want us to do above all is focus on the big issues that matter to them, taking the country forward and making sure that we fix the postcode economic after—shocks, the postcode economic after—shocks, the post covid economic after—shocks. keep going with our agenda of high wage, high skilljobs. these are big
12:04 pm
losses. in westminster and wandsworth, no conservative leader in decades has lost theirs seats. david simmons said a lot of people were very angry about you and your lawbreaking in downing street. you have to face up to that. {iii lawbreaking in downing street. you have to face up to that.— have to face up to that. of course. this has been _ have to face up to that. of course. this has been a _ have to face up to that. of course. this has been a tough _ have to face up to that. of course. this has been a tough night - have to face up to that. of course. this has been a tough night for. this has been a tough night for conservatives in some parts of the country. in other parts of the country, we are moving forward. for mid—term it is quite interesting it is a mixed set of results. i think the lesson that i take is that you know, write quote the views from the doorstep, but the lesson is we have to get on with stuff that matters. —— you rightly quote. we have to deliver on our agenda putting more police on the streets and putting more nurses in hospitals, continuing
12:05 pm
with the biggest programme of infrastructure investment this country has seen in more than 400 years. country has seen in more than 400 ears. , , , , country has seen in more than 400 ears. , ,. ~ country has seen in more than 400 ears. , ,. years. just yesterday the bank of en t land years. just yesterday the bank of england said _ years. just yesterday the bank of england said we _ years. just yesterday the bank of england said we are _ years. just yesterday the bank of england said we are facing - years. just yesterday the bank of england said we are facing 10% i england said we are facing 10% inflation, a recession. that is all coming down the track. what is coming down the track. what is coming down the track. what is coming down the track is much more painful people. what are you going to do to address that? that painful people. what are you going to do to address that?— to do to address that? that is completely — to do to address that? that is completely right _ to do to address that? that is completely right but - to do to address that? that is completely right but that - to do to address that? that is completely right but that is i to do to address that? that is. completely right but that is the lesson we'll need to take. what is going on right now is the local economy, we have seen inflation spiking in the us, in europe, and in australia and new zealand. it is driven by the cost of energy. that is what we must focus on. for decades we have failed to invest sufficiently in uk energy security.
12:06 pm
we let our industry completely collapse. we have not done enough to put in renewables at a pace. that is where we want to go. i am not going to pretend to you that the answer is... there is not going to be difficult period as we come through the after—shocks of covid, that is. what i'm going to tell you is this government is absolutely determined to keep going with every ounce of compassion and ingenuity that we have, get people through the economic after—shocks, help people with the costs, make sure we address the supply side issues, particularly energy, in orderfor the the supply side issues, particularly energy, in order for the economy to keep growing. you energy, in order for the economy to keep growing-— energy, in order for the economy to keep growing. you say you are going to hel- keep growing. you say you are going to help people _ keep growing. you say you are going to help people with _ keep growing. you say you are going to help people with their— keep growing. you say you are going to help people with their costs. - to help people with their costs. what is coming down the track is recession and 10% inflation, which will erode everybody�*s spending
12:07 pm
power. you say you will help everyone with energy costs, what you could do is a windfall tax. hath? could do is a windfall tax. why don't you _ could do is a windfall tax. why don't you do — could do is a windfall tax. why don't you do that? _ could do is a windfall tax. why don't you do that? had - could do is a windfall tax. bigiug' don't you do that? had the could do is a windfall tax. ibieg don't you do that? had the head of shell don't you do that? had the head of sheuin don't you do that? had the head of shell in yesterday and the head of bp and talked to them both. our message to them, and what is very, very clear, dies, this is a moment when we need you as a country to invest massively in clean, green renewables, in stuff that will make a difference to people. that renewables, in stuff that will make a difference to people.— a difference to people. that will not reduce _ a difference to people. that will not reduce bills _ a difference to people. that will not reduce bills this _ a difference to people. that will not reduce bills this year? - a difference to people. that will not reduce bills this year? what a difference to people. that will. not reduce bills this year? what we don't want to _ not reduce bills this year? what we don't want to do _ not reduce bills this year? what we don't want to do is _ not reduce bills this year? what we don't want to do is make _ not reduce bills this year? what we don't want to do is make mistakes | not reduce bills this year? what we i don't want to do is make mistakes of previous governments. fail to invest in our energy supply. that is the message that we are giving to the big energy companies. it is frankly betterfor big energy companies. it is frankly better for them big energy companies. it is frankly betterfor them to take big energy companies. it is frankly better for them to take back hash, put it in to wind farms, put it into
12:08 pm
hydrogen, put it into stuff that will make a big difference to our ability to cope with the global energy price spike. above all, make sure that this country is protected in the future, so we have more long—term energy security. that is what we are going for. one thing about this government, it does difficult things. we need to fix our energy supply. we can do it. it will take some tough decisions. in order to do that, you need investment in energy supply, t° d° that, you need investment in energy supply, investment to do that, you need investment in energy supply, investment for the long—term in uk nuclear, in winter... it long-term in uk nuclear, in winter---— long-term in uk nuclear, in winter... , i �*, ., winter... it is bell's right now that people — winter... it is bell's right now that people are _ winter... it is bell's right now that people are worried - winter... it is bell's right now. that people are worried about, winter... it is bell's right now- that people are worried about, not the future. fin that people are worried about, not the future. ., ., ., ., the future. on that and do not fortet the future. on that and do not forget what — the future. on that and do not forget what we _ the future. on that and do not forget what we are _ the future. on that and do not forget what we are already - the future. on that and do not. forget what we are already doing. the future. on that and do not - forget what we are already doing. i appreciate that. i know how tough it is to cope with the energy price. we
12:09 pm
are putting £22 billion of taxpayer money to support people with the energy price spike. you know about the council tax rebate. that energy price spike. you know about the council tax rebate.— the council tax rebate. that is t oin t the council tax rebate. that is ttoin to the council tax rebate. that is going to be — the council tax rebate. that is going to be a _ the council tax rebate. that is going to be a tiny _ the council tax rebate. that is going to be a tiny fraction. i the council tax rebate. that is i going to be a tiny fraction. there are other things _ going to be a tiny fraction. there are other things we _ going to be a tiny fraction. there are other things we are - going to be a tiny fraction. there are other things we are doing. i going to be a tiny fraction. ii.. are other things we are doing. the point i'm to make to you this government got exit done, had the fastest vaccine roll—out in europe. i think a lot of viewers would like to know why i am taking this approach. i think what the country needsis approach. i think what the country needs is a government which will take a big decision about how to fix our energy supply. the do not do that by clobbering the companies that by clobbering the companies that we need to make investment in our domestic energy security stop thatis our domestic energy security stop that is why we are taking this approach. that is why we are taking this approach-— that is why we are taking this a-troach. , , approach. one place where this election could _ approach. one place where this election could have _ approach. one place where this election could have a _ approach. one place where this election could have a very - election could have a very significant result is northern ireland. projections have been going into the vote and we could see sinn
12:10 pm
fein emerge as the majority. in northern ireland, if that happens, the majority of people have voted for parties that support the arrangement you setup with the eu, the protocol, the trading arrangement, if the majority of people back parties that support that, will you work with those parties to make those trading arrangements work? the most important _ arrangements work? the most important thing _ arrangements work? the most important thing is _ arrangements work? the most important thing is we - arrangements work? the most important thing is we continue | arrangements work? the most i important thing is we continue to support the balance of the good friday agreement across all communities in northern ireland. that is what we are going to do. whatever arrangements we have, they have got to have cross community support. that is what the good friday agreement is all about. that is what the government will do. as for the rest of it we will have to wait and see what the results are in northern ireland.—
12:11 pm
that was boris johnson, in ruislip in west london. the prime minister's seat is in that area, of uxbridge. try to concentrate on the energy bills which had soared and asking why the government has not done more to help. we didn't hear anything concrete from boris johnson about whether he or rishi sunak will concrete from borisjohnson about whether he or rishi sunak will come back and promise more help for people. back and promise more help for theole. , ., , , , people. they are under huge pressure to do so, people. they are under huge pressure to do so. not — people. they are under huge pressure to do so. notjust _ people. they are under huge pressure to do so, notjust from _ people. they are under huge pressure to do so, notjust from customers - to do so, notjust from customers who are really feeling the pinch, but also from their own mps. he wants to talk and go back over things he feels he has done right, which is delivering brexit, the vaccine roll—out and what he has done over ukraine. what will dictate his future at the next general election is what he does now in terms of the cost of living crisis.
12:12 pm
it is possible it will get a lot worse. will he cut taxes and so many of his mps will do? why not do something bold like that. other people saying there should be a windfall tax on those companies, he is not doing that. their risk for the chancellor and borisjohnson is they look complacent. they would say they look complacent. they would say they are not. if they do not come up with concrete action scene, they are talking about autumn and a budget then, they are saying this needs to be done now. by not acting now it makes it look like you do not understand what people are going through. understand what people are going throuth. i, , understand what people are going throuth. 1, _., understand what people are going throuth. through. boris johnson was asked about the situation _ through. boris johnson was asked about the situation in _ through. boris johnson was asked about the situation in northern i about the situation in northern ireland. it could be a historic result if sinn fein becomes the largest party for the first time. one area, when it comes to brexit, that critics would argue has not gone well in any sense is northern ireland protocol, part of the brexit
12:13 pm
agreement that leaves northern ireland in the single market for goodsin ireland in the single market for goods in the eu single market. the democratic unionist party pulled the power—sharing agreement at stormont, which was pretty seismic. they do not want to go back into power sharing unless something radical is done to that agreement and protocol. this will be potentially an enormously significant moment. sinn fein is a party that ultimately wants a united ireland. for them to be the biggest party for the first time with each incredibly important, a huge moment for northern ireland. then explaining the power—sharing, one can't be there without the other. it is a very unusual situation that was introduced. sinn fein would potentially be first minister but there has to be a deputy. jeffrey donaldson for the
12:14 pm
dup has said he will notjoin that. that could throw up all sorts of issues for power—sharing. they want a functioning assembly so they can spend many unimportant things. they have a cost of living crisis as well. the northern ireland protocol, the whole point of adding checks on goods going from great britain to northern ireland is causing a huge problem. i was told by someone very close to all of this there would be something in the queen's speech, a specific bill which would potentially give ministers the power to override the northern ireland protocol, incredibly controversial and something the unionists in northern ireland would like. we have since been told that will not happen. a lot has been going on around us about what exactly the government in westminster can do about it all. and as they do something it is hard to see has still not get back up and running again. still not get back up and running atain. �* , ., , ,
12:15 pm
still not get back up and running atain. �*, ., , , again. let's remind ourselves about the state of — again. let's remind ourselves about the state of the _ again. let's remind ourselves about the state of the parties _ again. let's remind ourselves about the state of the parties so - again. let's remind ourselves about the state of the parties so far- again. let's remind ourselves about the state of the parties so far with i the state of the parties so far with councils that have been called in england. labour has 38 council so far. they have added three. this is a net gain. overall, conservatives on 20 councils with a net loss of six. the liberal democrats have four councils, they have added one to their tally. you can see the number of councillors as well for labour. that has meant 1235 councillors. they have added 36. the conservatives have lost 128 councillors. they are down to 526. the liberal democrats have added more than labour, on plus 61. they have 273 councillors. residents groups have made the strongest showing. the greens have added as
12:16 pm
well. luke walton is in newcastle for us. tell us what has been happening. h0 us what has been happening. in? dramatic changes here in the north—east. starting with tyne and weir labour has long run the five councils and looks set to be in control still. overall i would say labour's performance solid but not sensational. perhaps that is not surprising because they were defending most of the seat up for grabs and did not have much room for progress, if you like. one of the more interesting contests was in sunderland. labour has lost a swathe of seats over the last few years and it was nervous. the prime minister actually went to sunderland on monday. in the end labour hang on, it lost only one councillor to the lib dems. the conservative group leader said he felt potential tory supporters had been put off by the
12:17 pm
parties in westminster. much more promising for the conservatives in hartlepool. they picked up an extra two councillors. they will remain in a coalition with independence. that is where the conservatives made the sensational by—election victory last year. it has become totemic for the conservatives. that was a big psychological boost for the conservatives. some progress from the lib dems, he picked up a couple of seats. modest gains for the lib dems. still quite a way of getting parliamentary seat in this part of the world. a real boost for the greens, they doubled their representation on south tyneside and will become the official opposition. the most significant result is over in the west, in cumbria, in the new cambrian authority, where labour won by a clear majority. this is in the part of cumbria where the
12:18 pm
conservatives have a lot of mps and a lot of councillors. they lost 14 councillors. this is a new cumberland council. compared to the councils it replaces, the conservatives are well down. they were extremely disappointed and the conservative leader in carlisle blamed the cost of living and partygate, people no longer had confidence that the pm could be relied upon to tell the truth. fin relied upon to tell the truth. on the doorstep, is it cost of living across the board? how important has partygate been? the across the board? how important has partygate been?— partygate been? the cost of living has been huge. _ partygate been? the cost of living has been huge. they _ partygate been? the cost of living has been huge. they do _ partygate been? the cost of living has been huge. they do see - partygate been? the cost of living has been huge. they do see that. partygate been? the cost of living. has been huge. they do see that as the number one issue. the north—east has the lowest take—home pay in the country, so it is perhaps even more important here. it is also true that partygate has really damaged the
12:19 pm
conservative government's reputation here. it is well known that boris johnson had almost a personal connection with voters in some parts of the north—east. he was thought to be a prime minister that could reach some parts of the region and others could not manage. when i had been out doing vox pops in the last few months, people have been coming up to me telling me what they think that what has been going on in downing street. no doubt that has had a real impact.— had a real impact. thank you for that update- _ our political editor in the east midlands, tony roe, joins us from nottingham. what can you tell us? actually, i am in office of amber valley borough council. the council year went against trend because labour lost three seats on the council. last year they were running it. they had a disaster last year and the conservatives have now increased
12:20 pm
their majority. we were talking about the effect of partygate. this is when nigel mills, the amber valley mp has his seat. he was the first two core on borisjohnson to quit after a partygate fine. local conservatives here say it probably helped them because it was no longer an issue on the doorstep because they did not have to defend it because the mp had said it was indefensible. i think that made a difference. labour, on the other hand, although disappointed they lost seats, when you add up the number of votes cast in they say the conservatives were down by 2300 and the vote was up by 600. they are taking some consolation there. thank ou for taking some consolation there. thank you for bringing _ taking some consolation there. thank you for bringing us — taking some consolation there. thank you for bringing us up-to-date - taking some consolation there. thank you for bringing us up—to—date but also in amber valley, an important bellwether as to how the parties are doing. vicki young is still with me.
12:21 pm
you have a result from wokingham. that is very much a true blue tory area. bad news for the conservatives. the lib dems think because they have gained several seats, the tories have lost that council. the area is not as closely fought as places like wimbledon. it is the seat ofjohn fought as places like wimbledon. it is the seat ofjothohn redwood. it was bought at the last election by philip lee. they were not that close but they were close enough they feel it was now in their sites. it is a pattern in surrey in south—west london, places like esher, wimbledon and others whether liberal democrats think they can make gains. the first place they can do that is through councils. they will probably be into no overall control. more bad news for the conservatives. let's get some more detailed analysis of the results so far.
12:22 pm
we can cross the newsroom to lewis goodall at the touchscreen. lewis. let's stay in the south of england and welwyn hatfield, the constituency of grant shapps. it has been conservatives since 2005 when grant shapps won it from labour. it is a really good illustration of kind of where the labour party and the conservatives are at. this is the conservatives are at. this is the result we had him. the conservatives returned a majority, they essentially had it for ages, there was a brief period of no overall control in 2019. labour up one, lib dems up one. in 2021 when they took control of the council again, the conservatives had a really good night, taking four seats from the labour party at a period when he would not really expect them to do so. that is the story overall. labour has recovered from a really bad year in 2021 but it has not recovered so spectacularly it is making fantastic games, it is making
12:23 pm
solid gains in places you might expect it to do so. in hatfield it is and leave the voting area in hertfordshire. the sort of place where you would not necessarily expect labour to win the next election but hope they will be doing better than that. another area, we talked about swindon. the same story as i learn. the conservatives have held the council. when we spoke before it looked like the conservatives were up. only one seat left to declare and now labour are up. in 2021 here, the conservatives did really well and it was a bad result for labour. this time labour are doing a bit better. not making spectacular gains but decent games. this encapsulates where we're at. we
12:24 pm
do not have the full result from wokingham yet. let's see where we are. seven seats counted, 11 yet to declare. the lib dems are up one at the moment. in terms of vote share, 46-30. the moment. in terms of vote share, 46—30. under half of the seating at the moment. it adds to the sense of sudden discomfort that has been tilting up with this set of election results, that has been doing fulsome years now. bide results, that has been doing fulsome ears now. ~ ., results, that has been doing fulsome ears now. . ., ., ., ., ., , years now. we have not had that many results from — years now. we have not had that many results from scotland _ years now. we have not had that many results from scotland yet. _ i'm joined by ian blackford, the snp's westminster the important story for scotland is the fact that the tories have been rejected, the vote is down. what is important is that voters have sent a message to borisjohnson. there are
12:25 pm
two things that count. one is the cost of living crisis, more needs to be done, and the other issue of partygate. people in scotland have made it very clear they want no more of this from boris johnson made it very clear they want no more of this from borisjohnson and his conservatives. you will find it is a very clear message and i am sure this will be a day to celebrate the fact the tories have got the message we expected. fine fact the tories have got the message we expected-— fact the tories have got the message we ex-ected. ., ~ , , , we expected. one of your key pledges is another referendum _ we expected. one of your key pledges is another referendum on _ we expected. one of your key pledges is another referendum on scottish - is another referendum on scottish independence. latest by the end of next year. how will you deliver that? �* , . ., , next year. how will you deliver that? �*, . ., , ., ., that? let's get the elections out of their way and _ that? let's get the elections out of their way and then _ that? let's get the elections out of their way and then we _ that? let's get the elections out of their way and then we can - that? let's get the elections out of. their way and then we can move on. this is a central part of the snp, what you are there to deliver and promise your supporters. i am interested how it can happen. itig’hat interested how it can happen. what ou see interested how it can happen. what you see that _ interested how it can happen. bingsgt you see that government doing is bring out a number of papers, setting out a vision to create a greener scotland go how to develop
12:26 pm
energy resources and deliver a fairer scotland and provide investment into the economy. that means scotland becoming an independent country and leaving the european union. we will engage with voters in scotland and asked those on the unionist side to debate those issues as well. one very clear message, whether to borisjohnson or anyone else, they have to respect democracy. in the elections for the scottish parliament last year, there was a pro—independence majority. we are now seeing the cost of brexit, the damage that has done to industries. the impact of information we have had from brexit. westminster has to realise voters have a right to have a vote on independence.— have a right to have a vote on independence. you say having a debate and _ independence. you say having a debate and you _ independence. you say having a debate and you say _ independence. you say having a debate and you say you - independence. you say having a debate and you say you are - independence. you say having a. debate and you say you are doing their work around the economic prospectus of an independent
12:27 pm
scotland. an independent scotland wants to rejoin the eu and make that application. then there is the issue of the border between an independent scotland and the rest of the uk, as well as setting out the currency. there is a lot of work that needs to be done between now and the end of 2023. can you give a cast—iron guarantee this will happen? bide 2023. can you give a cast-iron guarantee this will happen? we fully intend to make _ guarantee this will happen? we fully intend to make sure _ guarantee this will happen? we fully intend to make sure it _ guarantee this will happen? we fully intend to make sure it happens. - guarantee this will happen? we fully intend to make sure it happens. we | intend to make sure it happens. we need westminster to recognise people in scotland have a sovereign right to have that referendum. all the questions that we put now, we will happily answer in detail over the course of the coming months. it is about having a positive vision to sell to the people of scotland. the; sell to the people of scotland. as ou sell to the people of scotland. as you know, westminster continued chuka umunna i am happy to answer the questions you have asked. ==
12:28 pm
the questions you have asked. -- westminster continued... you will know the information commissioner has challenged the scottish government and we had to respond by the 10th ofjune, i think it is. the first minister will do that. any difficulties the government has any legal advice... difficulties the government has any legaladvice... i5 difficulties the government has any legal advice. . ._ legal advice... is that a yes or a noo? the _ legal advice. .. is that a yes or a noo? the first— legal advice. .. is that a yes or a noo? the first minister- legal advice. .. is that a yes or a noo? the first minister will- legal advice... is that a yes or a | noo? the first minister will give her answer _ noo? the first minister will give her answer by — noo? the first minister will give her answer by the _ noo? the first minister will give her answer by the 10th - noo? the first minister will give her answer by the 10th of - noo? the first minister will give her answer by the 10th ofjune. | noo? the first minister will give i her answer by the 10th ofjune. the information — her answer by the 10th ofjune. the information commissioner has said, publish the legal advice. you information commissioner has said, publish the legal advice.— publish the legal advice. you know the scottish _ publish the legal advice. you know the scottish government _ publish the legal advice. you know the scottish government will - publish the legal advice. you know the scottish government will look| publish the legal advice. you know i the scottish government will look at the scottish government will look at the determination the commissioner has made and has a right to appeal. the fundamental issue out of all of this is the right of people in scotland to have a referendum and for westminster to respect the sovereign wishes of the scottish people. in sovereign wishes of the scottish teo . le. ., people. in the meantime, if the government _ people. in the meantime, if the government and _ people. in the meantime, if the government and it _ people. in the meantime, if the government and it shows - people. in the meantime, if the
12:29 pm
government and it shows no i people. in the meantime, if the i government and it shows no signs people. in the meantime, if the - government and it shows no signs of moving away from its position of saying there has been an independence referendum and i will not be another one coming will you take the uk government to court over this? i take the uk government to court over this? , . ,, , this? i expect the snp will be the [art est this? i expect the snp will be the largest party- _ this? i expect the snp will be the largest party. what _ this? i expect the snp will be the largest party. what is _ this? i expect the snp will be the largest party. what is your - this? i expect the snp will be the largest party. what is your plan? | this? i expect the snp will be the i largest party. what is your plan? if boris largest party. what is your plan? if iitoris johnson _ largest party. what is your plan? if boris johnson or _ largest party. what is your plan? if boris johnson or anyone _ largest party. what is your plan? if boris johnson or anyone else - largest party. what is your plan? if boris johnson or anyone else in - borisjohnson or anyone else in number 10, borisjohnson or anyone else in number10, are borisjohnson or anyone else in number 10, are they really going to deny democracy? fin number 10, are they really going to deny democracy?— number 10, are they really going to deny democracy? on the basis of what we know so far. _ deny democracy? on the basis of what we know so far, the _ deny democracy? on the basis of what we know so far, the answer _ deny democracy? on the basis of what we know so far, the answer is - deny democracy? on the basis of what we know so far, the answer is yes. - we know so far, the answer is yes. what are you going to do in the meantime?— what are you going to do in the meantime? ., ., . ., ., meantime? you win an election on prospectus — meantime? you win an election on prospectus of _ meantime? you win an election on prospectus of having _ meantime? you win an election on prospectus of having a _ meantime? you win an election on| prospectus of having a referendum, you have someone else in another parliament in westminster seeking to frustrate democracy, that is a serious issue. the question for borisjohnson and others, why were they not respect the results of a democratic election?—
12:30 pm
they not respect the results of a democratic election? maybe it is because a lot — democratic election? maybe it is because a lot of _ democratic election? maybe it is because a lot of people - democratic election? maybe it is because a lot of people in - democratic election? maybe it is i because a lot of people in scotland say, focus less on the issue of another independent selection and focus more on the cost of living and issues that the scottish government has. one second. i'm going to show our viewers, and i will take you through this latest graph. there is an indication of whether people are happy with the snp government. it has gone up 1% for labour since the last time it was contested. a critical council in glasgow. it has gone down 7% for the snp. you canjudge you can judge us you canjudge us at you can judge us at the end of day. let's just you can judge us at the end of day. let'sjustjudge you on you can judge us at the end of day. let's justjudge you on glasgow, because it us important in the battle between you and snp. bide because it us important in the battle between you and snp. we are earlive in the — battle between you and snp. we are earlive in the declaration _ battle between you and snp. we are earlive in the declaration and - battle between you and snp. we are earlive in the declaration and we - earlive in the declaration and we are pick up seats. when you talk about the cost of living crisis,
12:31 pm
what we have done is increased benefits by 6%. doubled what has been done by westminster. the child payment, initially £10 and then £20 and then 25. we are taking meaningful action to seek to protect people. its the fact that boris johnson and rishi sunak are asleep at the wheel that people have to make choices about whether to put food on the table or heat their homes. westminster needs to recognise they're in a crisis and action is required now. next week when we have the queen's speech debate the government should have measures now that put cash in people's pockets. the idea of giving people's pockets. the idea of giving people a loan doesn't cut it. westminster needs to accept its responsibility. we are doing our bit and if scotland was independent we would be doing more to protect people from the cost—of—living crisis.
12:32 pm
people from the cost-of-living crisis. ~ ., ., ., «g crisis. well we will have to talk a t ain crisis. well we will have to talk again about — crisis. well we will have to talk again about that _ crisis. well we will have to talk again about that prospectus i crisis. well we will have to talk i again about that prospectus about independence. thank you. the snp's leader at westminster. our deputy political editor vicki young is here. it isa it is a stalemate on the issue of the second independence referendum, a lot of people will be shouting at the screen, what about the issues that the scottish government does have control over and these elections are also a referendum on how local services are run?- how local services are run? that's ritht, how local services are run? that's right. that — how local services are run? that's right. that is _ how local services are run? that's right, that is often _ how local services are run? that's right, that is often lost _ how local services are run? that's right, that is often lost in - how local services are run? that's right, that is often lost in the - right, that is often lost in the debate, we talk about the referendum and the future of scotland and its place in the united kingdom. but of course for the snp, who have been in power now for so long, i think it is changing a bit. there is more focus on what they have done and what they haven't done with education and we saw during the covid pandemic, that focus on health and what decision were being made in scotland. i think they're coming under more pressure
12:33 pm
they're coming under more pressure the snp about what they're delivering in terms of domestic circumstances and on the issue of referendum, i can't see any scenario in which borisjohnson will allow that happen. i think there is a question for the snp about when they want it to happen, the timing, because of course for obvious reasons they want to have it at a time when they think they can win it. it isn't clear cut at the moment that that is the case.— it. it isn't clear cut at the moment that that is the case. thank you. we continue with _ that that is the case. thank you. we continue with coverage _ that that is the case. thank you. we continue with coverage with - that that is the case. thank you. we continue with coverage with the - continue with coverage with the local elections. lewis goodall joins us. this is main lewis goodall “oins us. this is main stone, lewis goodall “oins us. this is main met the — lewis goodall joins us. this is main stone, the tories _ lewis goodall joins us. this is main stone, the tories have _ lewis goodall joins us. this is main stone, the tories have lost - stone, the tories have lost maidstone in kent. they have lost
12:34 pm
two seats. labour up one. and that sense of southern discomfort, england will continue to be a theme. one part of lancashire, a key part, the labour party lost this council to no over all control in 2021. labour were one short, the conservatives were four short. labour have won two seats. this was a council that the labour party had long controlled. again that dire performance last year. stemming that loss to some extents and back in control of council. the labour party will be pleased with that. they will have their eye on rossing dale and darwen. we have solihull, that has come in, in the west midlands, long a conservative stronghold, but there has been a bit of loss, mainly to
12:35 pm
the liberal democrats. i has been a bit of loss, mainly to the liberal democrats.— has been a bit of loss, mainly to the liberal democrats. i have lost lewis! we have lost the sound from lewis goodall. he was giving us an update on the seepts he seats that have been called. it looks as if the conservatives are struggling in some former conservative southern heartlands. we will go back to lewis goodall shortly. heartlands. we will go back to lewis goodallshortly. i heartlands. we will go back to lewis goodall shortly. i was talking to our political editor about northern ireland. northern ireland is likely to be the big story of the coming days — annita mcveigh is at the count centre in belfast. how is it looking there? we are read for how is it looking there? we are ready for you — how is it looking there? we are ready for you jo. _ how is it looking there? we are ready for you jo, absolutely - how is it looking there? we are. ready for you jo, absolutely slam ly! it is arley day —— early days
12:36 pm
here. it is one of the counting centres. if we look at the picture so far, it is difficult to predict, because of the voting system, it is a form of proportional representation, the single transferable vote, every voter can tra nsfera ble vote, every voter ca n choose transferable vote, every voter can choose their first preference and then a series of preferences for other candidates, as many or as few as they like. it can take a while for the overall picture to emerge. let me tell you more about what is happening here. we have the counts for the four belfast constituency and south down and strangford. it is and south down and strangford. it is a real sea of activity here. a snapshot of turn out from two constituencies, in north and south belfast the turn out was just over 61% and 54%. that is similar to
12:37 pm
2017, the last assembly elections that were the high point in almost two decades in turn out. that is not necessary think picture across the board. what is going to happen in this election is that northern ireland's 90mlas will be elected. the parties with a right to nominate the positions of first and deputy first ministers will be decided. whether that actually happens, well thatis whether that actually happens, well that is one of big talking points of the election campaign. more on that injust a moment. but let me bring injust a moment. but let me bring in our ireland correspondent chris page. early doors, what is catching your eye? fist page. early doors, what is catching oure e? i , page. early doors, what is catching oure e? . , ., , page. early doors, what is catching ouree? ,., your eye? at this early stage, the -a your eye? at this early stage, the party which _ your eye? at this early stage, the party which is _ your eye? at this early stage, the party which is the _ your eye? at this early stage, the party which is the happiest - your eye? at this early stage, the party which is the happiest with i your eye? at this early stage, the i party which is the happiest with how things— party which is the happiest with how things are _ party which is the happiest with how things are going is the cross community alliance community, that defines—
12:38 pm
community alliance community, that defines itself as neither unionist or nationalist. judging by the way things— or nationalist. judging by the way things are — or nationalist. judging by the way things are going, party activists are confident they're picking up seats— are confident they're picking up seats where they have never had representation before, places like north— representation before, places like north belfast and south down and they think in the constituencies where — they think in the constituencies where they have one seat, they may pick up _ where they have one seat, they may pick up an— where they have one seat, they may pick up an extra one. that is a possibility— pick up an extra one. that is a possibility in south belfast. so, that would be a major change in the political— that would be a major change in the political landscape, maybe a good day moving into second place. so how will that— day moving into second place. so how will that affect the votes of the dup and — will that affect the votes of the dup and sinn fein? in effect this election— dup and sinn fein? in effect this election could come down to which of the parties _ election could come down to which of the parties will lose the most seats — the parties will lose the most seats. neither expects to make gains — seats. neither expects to make gains |— seats. neither expects to make tains. ., ., ., , gains. i alluded to it, after this count is done, _ gains. i alluded to it, after this count is done, the _ gains. i alluded to it, after this count is done, the three - gains. i alluded to it, after this| count is done, the three counts gains. i alluded to it, after this - count is done, the three counts are done, what will happen next? will we
12:39 pm
have another stalemate. it done, what will happen next? will we have another stalemate.— have another stalemate. it does feel that wa . have another stalemate. it does feel that way- if — have another stalemate. it does feel that way- if the _ have another stalemate. it does feel that way. if the polls _ have another stalemate. it does feel that way. if the polls are _ have another stalemate. it does feel that way. if the polls are correct - that way. if the polls are correct in suggesting sinn fein will be the largest— in suggesting sinn fein will be the largest party. michelle o'neill will be entitled to be first minister. but the — be entitled to be first minister. but the biggest unionist party have to agree _ but the biggest unionist party have to agree to go into coalition. the dup said — to agree to go into coalition. the dup said it— to agree to go into coalition. the dup said it won't go back into the devolved — dup said it won't go back into the devolved government unless the brexit— devolved government unless the brexit trade board border with the rest of— brexit trade board border with the rest of the — brexit trade board border with the rest of the uk is scrapped. sammy wilson— rest of the uk is scrapped. sammy wilson has— rest of the uk is scrapped. sammy wilson has been referred to the protocol — wilson has been referred to the protocol as a poison. that is one block _ protocol as a poison. that is one block to — protocol as a poison. that is one block to the _ protocol as a poison. that is one block to the formation of a stormont executive _ block to the formation of a stormont executive. both of the main unionist parties _ executive. both of the main unionist parties have — executive. both of the main unionist parties have not confirmed whether they would go back in a situation where _ they would go back in a situation where sinn fein was the largest party _ where sinn fein was the largest party. hardly anybody thinks that we are going _ party. hardly anybody thinks that we are going sbob a position where a government is formed soon. if
12:40 pm
government is formed soon. alliance do government is formed soon. if alliance do well, people talk of the need for a change in the way the assembly rules work. so that there is more weighting given to centre ground parties. is more weighting given to centre ground parties-— ground parties. that's right if alliance are _ ground parties. that's right if alliance are in _ ground parties. that's right if alliance are in a _ ground parties. that's right if alliance are in a good - ground parties. that's right if| alliance are in a good position there — alliance are in a good position there will— alliance are in a good position there will be more talk of that. they— there will be more talk of that. they want— there will be more talk of that. they want the rules reformed. legislation continue be decided by a cross vote _ legislation continue be decided by a cross vote and cross vetoes would not be _ cross vote and cross vetoes would not be available to unionist and nationalist parties.— not be available to unionist and nationalist parties. thank you. so i would say look _ nationalist parties. thank you. so i would say look out _ nationalist parties. thank you. so i would say look out for _ nationalist parties. thank you. so i would say look out for those - nationalist parties. thank you. so i | would say look out for those centre ground parties and see how they do. particularly the alliance. for many years people were either in the nationalist or unionist camp and are green or orange, but that seems to be changing that and could be one of big stories from is in election. thank you. turn out, you said it is similar to the last time the seat
12:41 pm
were contested. still high in the 60s. let's look at the picture in wales. our correspondent, tomos morgan, is in cardiff. yeah, counting has begun here. we haven't had anything declared yet. i was at the count in cardiff in 2017 and there were rumours that labour would lose the capital, but they won it. now labour are confident and hope they will take two thirds of the seepts seats in the council. what we are hearing is labour seem more confident in wales than in england and the tories feel less confident than in england. in monmouthshire they hold the majority, the tories, they hope to hang on. what will be an interesting watch is the three councils in the south, merthyr tydfil and the ones
12:42 pm
that labour lost, they're confident of taking them back. in north wales, the other heartland of labour, denbighshire and wrexham, flintshire, historically labour, but votes have been moving to the tories. again labour confident there. possibly not winning a majority in all the three local authorities, but at least flintshire you would have thought, a good chance in wrexham. that could be the outcome here, they might do better in wales than england and it might replicate what we saw last year in the senedd elections where labour had a good result, getting 30 of the seats. mark drakeford exceeding expectations. plaid cymru, ithink very mixed in cardiff, not that happy here. not that happy push and win another council, possibly on the isle of angly si a
12:43 pm
and two green councillors may have won a seat in denbighshire. showing the tory votes that were won in 2017 might not all go to labour, they may be split between the other parties such as plaid cymru and the greens. thank you. we haven't had results coming in yet in their large numbers from scotland or wales, or in fact northern ireland. i would like to show you two results in english councils. walsall is a conservative hold. 38 for the conservatives. 20 for labour. if we have a look at the seat change, they have added one, the conservatives. and so have labour. so there hasn't been a
12:44 pm
particularly big move. here is swindon, another hold for the conservatives in an english council. the conservatives are on 34. and labour on 23. a straight fight between the two big parties. here labour have improved. never gone up three. the conservatives, although they held it, have dropped by two. as have the liberal democrats. we could look at the share, the all—parent —important share of vote. the conservatives on 43ers be. labour has —— conservatives on 43%. labour has —— conservatives on 43%. labour has —— conservatives on 43%. labour has gone up 46%. you can see where the change is since 2018, and it has gone up 4% for labour. but 1% for the conservatives too.
12:45 pm
the conservatives have lost almost one in four of the seats they've been trying to defend in the english local elections. earlier i spoke to conservative mp for hitchin and harpenden, bim afolami, about whether the tories were offering enough support on the cost of living as you know, this is a global issue, every major economy is facing similar things every major economy is facing similarthings in every major economy is facing similar things in relation to energy and food prices. but similar things in relation to energy and food prices.— similar things in relation to energy and food prices. but you have chosen to tut and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes — and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes up _ and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes up what _ and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes up what we _ and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes up what we did - and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes up what we did for - and food prices. but you have chosen to put taxes up what we did for a - to put taxes up what we did for a s-ecific to put taxes up what we did for a specific area. _ to put taxes up what we did for a specific area, the _ to put taxes up what we did for a specific area, the nhs, _ to put taxes up what we did for a specific area, the nhs, where i to put taxes up what we did for a specific area, the nhs, where we needed to recover after covid and social care, we raised a specific amount to deal with those problem and people were talking about the nhs and gp appoint pments and waiting list. we also said we know people on lowst incomes are having a tough time, so we will raise the amount before which you have to pay any tax or national insurance. we
12:46 pm
will give special support to the neediest through local authorities, council tax rebate and other things. i'm not saying that is it. whatever happens we won't do anything else. but we have not been blind to it. it is at the time we had to make that decision, that was several weeks ago. the situation is different now and the situation may change. what we have to do and i'm doing and i will be speaking to all my colleagues over the coming days and week is make sure we take the right action for the next phase. what is that next phase? does it need to happen now? because senior tories are saying there needs to be a reset and taxes need to be cut and people helped now? there are different ways of helping people. one way of course, you could the government can spend money. course, you could the government can spend money-— spend money. what would you like to see? let me — spend money. what would you like to see? let me answer _ spend money. what would you like to see? let me answer the _ spend money. what would you like to see? let me answer the question. i see? let me answer the question. you've to do _ see? let me answer the question. you've to do it _ see? let me answer the question. you've to do it in _ see? let me answer the question. you've to do it in a _ see? let me answer the question. you've to do it in a careful -
12:47 pm
see? let me answer the question. you've to do it in a careful way. i see? let me answer the question. | you've to do it in a careful way. we don't want to do what happened in the united states, their inflationary problem is worse than ours, because of amount the government has spent. we have got to be careful about the whole package of what we don't. what i want to see is us, as we have a better sense of energy businessmans in —— bill in the autumn. we have to wait to see the autumn. we have to wait to see the what happens. igate the autumn. we have to wait to see the what happens.— the autumn. we have to wait to see the what happens. we know the energy ca i the what happens. we know the energy ca- will to the what happens. we know the energy cap will go up — the what happens. we know the energy cap will go up further. _ the what happens. we know the energy cap will go up further. we _ the what happens. we know the energy cap will go up further. we don't - cap will go up further. we don't know to what _ cap will go up further. we don't know to what level. _ cap will go up further. we don't know to what level. people - cap will go up further. we don't| know to what level. people have cap will go up further. we don't - know to what level. people have just know to what level. people have 'ust tot to know to what level. people have 'ust get to struggte fl know to what level. people have 'ust got to struggle on. i know to what level. people have 'ust got to struggle on. so i know to what level. people have 'ust got to struggle on. so the idea h know to what level. people have just got to struggle on. so the idea of. know to what level. people have just got to struggle on. so the idea of a i got to struggle on. so the idea of a wind fall tax on the oil and gas companies, has that, its time has come, laboured and labourand companies, has that, its time has come, laboured and labour and the liberal democrat said it. we have heard them say they will still invest in green energy even with a wind fall. ., ., ., ,., , , wind fall. there are two reasons why it isn't a good _ wind fall. there are two reasons why
12:48 pm
it isn't a good idea. _ wind fall. there are two reasons why it isn't a good idea. what _ wind fall. there are two reasons why it isn't a good idea. what bern - wind fall. there are two reasons why it isn't a good idea. what bern ard i it isn't a good idea. what bern ard loony is saying is the money he has committed, which is 18 billion for investment he won't pull if there is a new tax. that is because that money is already there. he already has that money. you money is already there. he already has that money.— money is already there. he already has that money. you haven't changed our mind. has that money. you haven't changed your mind. nonchts _ has that money. you haven't changed your mind. nonchts he _ has that money. you haven't changed your mind. nonchts he is _ has that money. you haven't changed your mind. nonchts he is not - has that money. you haven't changed your mind. nonchts he is not talking | your mind. nonchts he is not talking about what needs _ your mind. nonchts he is not talking about what needs to _ your mind. nonchts he is not talking about what needs to happen - your mind. nonchts he is not talking about what needs to happen next. about what needs to happen next year, we are still committed to making our energy greener and dealing with the issues of climate change. that is the first reason it is a bad idea. that would mean we wouldn't get invest income support —— investment in the years to m co. the reason they're getting this money, the shareholders are largely your pension funds. that is people receiving their pensions today will receive it in the future will get. so it important people don't think
12:49 pm
you put a tax on wind fall it doesn't affect them. we have to bear those things in mind.— those things in mind. looking at it over all, those things in mind. looking at it over all. the _ those things in mind. looking at it over all, the conservative - those things in mind. looking at it over all, the conservative have i those things in mind. looking at it| over all, the conservative have lost over all, the conservative have lost over all, the conservative have lost over a hundred council seats, would you agree for some of the reasons we have discussed the borisjohnson isn't the electoral asset he was? i don't think local elections are about a prime minister, they're about a prime minister, they're about a prime minister, they're about a mixture of things. you you have talk about _ about a mixture of things. you you have talk about the cost—of—living, which is the government. it is have talk about the cost-of-living, which is the government. it is about what is the — which is the government. it is about what is the government _ which is the government. it is about what is the government is _ which is the government. it is about what is the government is doing - which is the government. it is about| what is the government is doing and the prime minister is the leader of the prime minister is the leader of the the government. it not about his person and... it is the the government. it not about his person and- - -— person and... it is irrelevant who is in charge? _ person and... it is irrelevant who is in charge? it _ person and... it is irrelevant who is in charge? it is _ person and... it is irrelevant who is in charge? it is not _ person and... it is irrelevant who is in charge? it is not irrelevant. | is in charge? it is not irrelevant. but what is in charge? it is not irrelevant. iztut what i'm _ is in charge? it is not irrelevant. but what i'm trying _ is in charge? it is not irrelevant. but what i'm trying to _ is in charge? it is not irrelevant. but what i'm trying to say - is in charge? it is not irrelevant. but what i'm trying to say is - is in charge? it is not irrelevant. but what i'm trying to say is if i is in charge? it is not irrelevant. i but what i'm trying to say is if you compare back for example to the 20005, compare back for example to the 2000s, where the liberal democrats had several thousand more councillors than they have now, or
12:50 pm
the 1980s, where we had very big swings in local election results and you still saw margaret thatcher or tony blair get re—elected. we are not in that territory. tony blair get re-elected. we are not in that territory.— not in that territory. raise labour have made _ not in that territory. raise labour have made significant _ not in that territory. raise labour have made significant gains - not in that territory. raise labour have made significant gains in - have made significant gains in london, but outside the capital, the party is down by three seats. i spoke to labour's shadow home secretary yvette cooper who was in wakefield and told me labour have made gains since 2019 but still have a lot of work to do.. well, we started in 2019 with one of worst results for labour for generation. we have had a lot of work to do to rebuild to earn back trust. i think that is what you have seen labour doing across the country
12:51 pm
under keir starmer. we are building start and we have to keep earning back the support for people who left us in 2019 and other people across the country who we want to support labour's ideas and policies, for example on the cost—of—living crisis, the issue that has come upton doorstep and things we are proposing. for us, having been campaigning through 2019 and since then they have seen a big turning point. it then they have seen a big turning toint. , then they have seen a big turning toint, , , . ., ., point. it is the scale of the turnint point. it is the scale of the turning point, _ point. it is the scale of the turning point, because - point. it is the scale of the i turning point, because labour point. it is the scale of the - turning point, because labour wants to be the party of the next government. keir starmer, we heard, from our colleague lewis goodal, said he would recover the seats lost in former labour heartlands. the results so far don't show very much indication of that. in fact i'm going to see our viewers, the key
12:52 pm
wards analysis in england, the change since 2018 when the seats were last contested. 470 out of 728 declared, labour have gone down by 0.4%. so you have gone backward, the conservatives have gone further back. but labour have gone back. tell me how that shows that you're on your way back to potential government?— on your way back to potential government? on your way back to potential tovernment? , ., government? because many of those areas that you're _ government? because many of those areas that you're talking _ government? because many of those areas that you're talking about - government? because many of those areas that you're talking about have i areas that you're talking about have that vote share that we got yesterday been replicated in a general election we would have won back many constituencies, such as hartlepool and copeland. constituencies that we lost in 2019 that we would now be winning back. we want to go further and build more
12:53 pm
support. t we had in the 2018 elections already won more than half of the seats, so there is a limit in what you can do compared to 2018. in terms of rebuilding, and getting a labour government that stand up for working people, we have to rebuild from 2019. we have seen a really substantial turn around since then and for many of us if you talk us to after the 2019 election, to have heard we could make this progress in just over two years, i think people would not have believed it would have been possible to make this progress so quickly. we have made that progress and we have to keep making progress. its that progress and we have to keep making progress-— that progress and we have to keep making progress. its modest though, ou acce ht making progress. its modest though, you accept these _ making progress. its modest though, you accept these are _ making progress. its modest though, you accept these are modest - making progress. its modest though, you accept these are modest gains i you accept these are modest gains and the way it stands at the moment you're not on course to win the next election. what does that tell you about keir starmer's leadership. you say he has turned it around,
12:54 pm
certainly in places in london, although the capital was already trending to labour and that is important, butjohn curtice our elections expert said that labour is still struggling to make much progress in areas that voted brexit. do you agree with that? but progress in areas that voted brexit. do you agree with that?— progress in areas that voted brexit. do you agree with that? but we have 'ust been do you agree with that? but we have just been through _ do you agree with that? but we have just been through this _ do you agree with that? but we have just been through this and _ do you agree with that? but we have just been through this and the - do you agree with that? but we have just been through this and the exam | just been through this and the exam prime minister —— examples of hartlepool. prime minister -- examples of hartlepool-— prime minister -- examples of hartle-ool. ., ., , ., , , hartlepool. there are many examples where you're — hartlepool. there are many examples where you're not _ hartlepool. there are many examples where you're not making _ hartlepool. there are many examples where you're not making that - where you're not making that progress. where you're not making that ttroress. ., �* where you're not making that progress-— progress. you're making the comparison _ progress. you're making the comparison with _ progress. you're making the comparison with 2018 - progress. you're making the comparison with 2018 and i progress. you're making the i comparison with 2018 and the progress. you're making the - comparison with 2018 and the point is in 2019, look, it was a difficult result for us in 2019. that wasn't just about brexit, although that was important for people, it was also about our leadership and both on thoseissues about our leadership and both on those issues labour has moved on and we have a new leader, we have made clear our approach is to make brexit work and we are changing as a party.
12:55 pm
we are rebuilding in term of in barnet for example, where we had a real important and it was important to rebuild the vote and support among jewish communities who understandably had felt very angry with labour and keir has turned that around. so i think you have seen huge changes and as a result compared to 2019 we have seen a big increase in support for labour in a lot of those areas where we lost constituencies badly in 2019. yvette coo her, constituencies badly in 2019. yvette cooper. the — constituencies badly in 2019. yvette cooper, the shadow _ constituencies badly in 2019. yvette cooper, the shadow home - constituencies badly in 2019. yvette | cooper, the shadow home secretary talk accuse labour's performance. here are some pictures of keir starmer visiting carlisle. here he is congratulating activists and councillors there in what looks like a wet carlisle. it was just a few minutes ago. celebrating that labour has won the new unitary authority in
12:56 pm
cumberland. we will have much more coverage of all the election seat and councillors right across england. we are waiting for many more results in scotland and wales. they have just started coming in more results in scotland and wales. they havejust started coming in in scotland. all the authorities are been contested in both wales and scotland, where 16 and 17—year—olds are also voting. in northern ireland we haven't had results from there yet. but it could be one of big consequential results of this set of elections as people vote for people to sit in stormont. if you want to find out the result in your area ? head to the bbc news website or bbc news app ? and enter your postcode. you ll also find lots of election analysis and the latest reports from our teams around the country. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. hello. lots of sunshine in the south of the country today, but further
12:57 pm
north, with the thick cloud, many of us have been saying hello to the rain. but it is rain that we do need, the last few weeks have been pretty dry across many parts of the uk. here's the weather front, you can see the thick cloud increasing and it's moving southwards. so, middle of the day it's around the irish sea, moving into wales, northern parts of england, north of that actually high pressure builds in, so skies for clear for the afternoon in places like glasgow. but it is raining around the irish sea into yorkshire, certainly around wales outbreaks of rain through the afternoon. notice this front moves into the midlands, eventually eastern england, eastern and the south—east by the early hours of saturday morning. then it clears up to the west. temperatures first thing on saturday, six degrees in belfast, a little build milder there with the cloud and rain in norfolk and suffolk closer to 12 degrees. tomorrow starts off fairly cloudy around eastern areas. also a bit of a breeze
12:58 pm
off the north sea. but out towards the west and the north there will be more sunshine. one thing i will point out a few showers are possible tomorrow. particularly forming across parts of england here. temperatures, pretty decent in the lowlands of scotland, up to 17 degrees, in the south around 19. so that was saturday. here is a look at sunday and high pressure across the uk centred in the north sea, that means pleasant conditions for most of us. i don't think it will be clear blue skies every where, in fact far from it out towards the extreme north—west with a front approaching, low pressure and increasing amounts of cloud. but i think elsewhere it's just fair weather clouds with temperatures decent enough inland around the high teens. a lot fresher around the coast. into monday that low pressure out to the north—west of our neighbourhood swings in, rain for northern ireland, scotland and northern england and wales. the best and warmest weather on monday will be the further south—east you are. then about this weather into next week, how warm will it get? i think we will reach the low 20s just in
12:59 pm
the south—east. but elsewhere across the country it could actually be fairly unsettled, breezy at times, rain expected too from time to time.
1:00 pm
today at one — in local elections in england, the conservatives suffer big losses in london, but labour make modest gains across the rest of the country. the prime minister says the party is facing mixed results. we've had a tough night in some parts of the country, but on the other hand, in other parts of the country, you're still seeing conservatives going forward and making quite remarkable gains. and believe you me, this is a big turning point for us. from the depths of 2019, that general election, back on track! the liberal democrats make significant gains, and the green party has also been doing well.
1:01 pm
and the first results are coming in for wales and scotland,

72 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on