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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  May 10, 2022 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at six. a queen's speech setting out the government's programme — but this time without the queen. my my lords and members of the house of commons. for the first time it was prince charles doing the honours — setting out how the government says economic growth,not government spending that will tackle the cost of living crisis. however great our compassion and ingenuity, we cannot simply spend our way out of this problem, we need to grow out of this problem it's the latest chapter in a pathetic response to the cost of living crisis. where there should have been support, it's been tax rise after tax rise on working people.
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we'll be talking to people in stoke, asking them to survive the cost of living crisis. also tonight. ukraine claims russia has used hypersonic missiles to target the port city of odesa — raising fears that the country's grain exports will be affected. vardy versus rooney, but this time in the high court — the so—called wagatha christie trial gets underway. for years, deborahjames has shown us what living with cancer can look like — now as herjourney draws to an close, her charity has raised more than a million overnight. it makes me feel utterly loved, but it makes me feel like we're all kind of in it at the end together. coming up on sportsday later in the hour on the bbc news channel. one of the world's top strikers is heading to manchester city. the 21—year—old erling haaland willjoin on a five year deal this summer.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the queen's speech had all the pomp we've come to expect from the occasion, but with one crucial difference — the queen did not deliver it. instead, it was prince charles who set out the government's legislative agenda. with rising costs hitting millions of households, the government says we cannot spend our way out of the crisis. instead, the prime minister said, the answer was economic growth. let's look at some key proposals. there will be measures to flesh out what the government calls levelling up — primarily driving regional growth by empowering local leaders. there will be bills to address housing — in particular strengthening tenants' rights in the social housing sector. and there will bills, which will strip away eu regulations which ministers claim will save £1 billion in red tape. but the labour leader,
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sir keir starmer, argued that none of the plans would relieve the immediate burden of rising costs, accusing ministers of burying their heads in the sand. here's our political editor, chris mason. it is an occasion grounded in near timeless ritual and ceremony. as a familiarity to it for even the occasional observer. don't forget your sword when you get off the bus. amid the familiar, a profound difference. this year, the national anthem in honour of a monarch not here. in her place, the prince of wales.
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depp piece —— deputising today, a glimpse of the future too. quiet weekend the prime minister jokes with the labour leader. next, ministers words read by the heir to the throne. her majesty's government priority is to grow and strengthen the economy, and help ease the cost of living for families. a bill will be brought forward to drive local growth, empowering local leaders to regenerate their areas, and ensuring everyone can share in the united kingdom's success. among the planned new laws building a chunk of the hs2 high speed rail line between crewe and manchester and helping those who live o in our rent social housing and ministers want to makes the most of brexit her ma'es 's want to makes the most of brexit he: majesty's government will want to makes the most of brexit he majesty's government will don't seize the opportunities of the
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united kingdom's departure from the european union. to support economic growth. regulations on businesses will be repealed and reformed. there was mention — will be repealed and reformed. there was mention too _ will be repealed and reformed. there was mention too of— will be repealed and reformed. there was mention too of new _ will be repealed and reformed. there was mention too of new police - will be repealed and reformed. there was mention too of new police powers over disruptive protests the and the hugely controversial plan to send some asylum—seekers to rwanda. her some asylum-seekers to rwanda. her ma'ori some asylum—seekers to rwanda. he majority cease minister also take action to prevent dangerous and illegal channel crossings, and tackle the criminal gangs who prophet from facilitating. order. after a morning _ prophet from facilitating. order. after a morning of _ prophet from facilitating. order. after a morning of ceremony - prophet from facilitating. order. after a morning of ceremony an | after a morning of ceremony an afternoon of politics. labour reckon the plans aren't up to the scale of an economic crunch getting worse. we an economic crunch getting worse. - need a government of the moment. with the ideas that make the aspirations of the british public. this thin address bereft of ideas or
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purpose, without a guiding principle or a road map for delivery, shows just how far this government is from that. ~ , , , , , just how far this government is from that. ministers insist they are t in: to that. ministers insist they are trying to ease _ that. ministers insist they are trying to ease the _ that. ministers insist they are trying to ease the financial. that. ministers insist they are i trying to ease the financial pain felt by so many and create the conditions for things to get better. and above all we are tackling the economic chances with the best solution of all and that is an ever growing number of high wage, high skilled jobs. jobs, jobs, jobs. but skilled “obs. jobs, “obs, “obs. but listen skilled jobs. jobs, “obs, “obs. but listen to skilled jobs. jobs, jobs, jobs. but listen to this, a corus of consistency from the opposition parties claiming the government is not doing enough.— not doing enough. scottish people know the cost _ not doing enough. scottish people know the cost of _ not doing enough. scottish people know the cost of living. _ not doing enough. scottish people know the cost of living. we - not doing enough. scottish people know the cost of living. we know i not doing enough. scottish people i know the cost of living. we know the price we pay for the prime minister and the price of being stuck with a tory government we didn't vote for, it a price none of us in scotland can afford to pay any longer. families and pensioners across the united _ families and pensioners across the united kingdom are facing the biggest — united kingdom are facing the biggest squeeze on house budgets and
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livin- biggest squeeze on house budgets and living standards at any time during her majesty's whole long reign, going _ her majesty's whole long reign, going back to the 50s. yet the government's programme offered nothing _ government's programme offered nothing. the government's programme offered nothinu. ,., .., government's programme offered nothinu. ,., .. nothing. the political debate will march on, the _ nothing. the political debate will march on, the arguments - nothing. the political debate will march on, the arguments only i nothing. the political debate will. march on, the arguments onlyjust beginning, and the dividing lines very clear. but as for the ceremony, it's very clear. but as for the ceremony, its job very clear. but as for the ceremony, it'sjob done and very clear. but as for the ceremony, its job done and the bus very clear. but as for the ceremony, it'sjob done and the bus home. remember the state opening of parliament for all of of its colour is a shopping list delivered from a throne, that is the reality of it. it is not a budget. the very thing that labour are clamouring for, they say they would like to see an emergency budget. within government is a keen awareness of the economic precipice on which we stand that we could be plunged into recession, that prices are spiralling and they could spiralfurther, but that prices are spiralling and they could spiral further, but ministers say, there is a limit to what they can do now. they acknowledge they may be able do more in the autumn. the big question is whether the
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reality of the coming months compels them to act much sooner. one thing we have been reporting on a lot is northern ireland and its trading arrangement, i am not sure i saw anything about this in the speech. saw anything about this in the seech. . , saw anything about this in the seech. ., , ., , speech. there was the most deft reference to _ speech. there was the most deft reference to it, _ speech. there was the most deft reference to it, george, - speech. there was the most deft reference to it, george, there i speech. there was the most deft l reference to it, george, there was talk about preserving the economic bonds between the constituent parts of the uk, a nod gently towards the so—called protocol, the brexit teal that means northern ireland is closer economically to the european union than the rest of the uk, we know that he the foreign secretary liz truss is pretty keen that the process of trying to find a solution to that problem of the protocol is resolved soon. there are others in golden boot who want to be more cautious, it is essential to try and restore devolved government to northern ireland but the government has to maintain a relationship with the european union, not easy.
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the central argument was economic growth can deal with the cost of living crisis. sea, growth can deal with the cost of living crisis-— growth can deal with the cost of living crisis. a queen's speech is about the medium _ living crisis. a queen's speech is about the medium term, - living crisis. a queen's speech is about the medium term, the - about the medium term, the legislative priorities over a year, takes a year to put in law, same amount of time for that to affect the economy. what the government is hoping is things like regional development. reforms bringing transport into greater government control, the railways in particular, the funding for it from an infrastructure bank, on top of using post—brexit freedoms, things like high growth area, financial service, the use of data, signing trade deals, put thaw in a pot and it gets the economy to grow further but there is a timing issue here, the difference if you like between parliamentary bills to take years and household bills that affect everybody right now. and as chris said the treasure rib is pointing towards the autumn when we will have clarity as to how much bill also go up clarity as to how much bill also go up further. we know that households have been affected by huge rises in
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direct debits. people on pre—payment meters are finding it is only lasting one week when it lasts three. the queen's speech isn't designed to deal with that, but all the while you have the bank of england saying notjust there could be double digit inflation and a recession, but after that, the growth will be sluggish, that is what the speech is designed to deal with. many governments have tried before and their policies haven't worked. as we've heard, today was the first time in nearly 60 years that the queen was unable to deliver the speech at the state opening of parliament. she decided not to attend because of what buckingham palace described as mobility problems. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports on a symbolic day for the monarchy. he's been waiting for his destiny for longer than any other
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heir to british throne. and while no—one is suggesting that a major change is imminent, the inescapable fact is that a transition is under way. and this, today, was the most tangible sign of it. as prince charles took his place on the consort�*s throne, the imperial state crown, the symbol of the monarch�*s authority, was placed on a table beside him. the prince studied it closely, and then, with lords and commons assembled, a prince who has never been short of his own opinions took on the discipline required of a monarch. reading out the words written by the government. the continued success and integrity of the whole of the united kingdom is of paramount importance to her majesty's government. it was this, the regency act of 1937 that the palace used to delegate the power to open parliament. yet nobody is suggesting a permanent transfer of the monarch�*s powers. the queen is still busy with her paper work and virtual audiences. changes are happening, but they are gradual. for the queen, it has always been very important to carry out
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all her public duties in public whenever she can. she's famously said "to be seen is to be believed," and she believes the monarchy must be seen, but in future it is likely what we will see is other members of the royal family carrying out royal duties on her behalf. for seven decades, britain has had a highly visible head of state. those days are over, realities are having to be faced, the burden is shifting. nicholas witchell, bbc news. today's queen speech saw a renewed commitment to the government's flagship policy of levelling up — its plan to address regional inequalities. but with a background of soaring energy bills and rising prices, are people noticing any tangible benefits to their lives or is there a lot more work to be done? our political correspondent, alex forsyth, has been in stoke, one of the cities already receiving millions of pounds as part of the levelling up strategy.
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stoke—on—trent�*s heritage is imprinted on the skyline. shaped by ceramics industry its economic fortunes have waxed and waned. deprivation levels here are high, it is one of the places the government's promised to improve opportunity. but with rising prices on so many minds, not many are are feeling the benefit. h0. on so many minds, not many are are feeling the benefit.— feeling the benefit. no, it is never auoin to feeling the benefit. no, it is never going to be _ feeling the benefit. no, it is never going to be level. _ feeling the benefit. no, it is never going to be level. the _ feeling the benefit. no, it is never going to be level. the north - feeling the benefit. no, it is never going to be level. the north and l going to be level. the north and south divide will be there. it is simple as that. the south divide will be there. it is simple as that.— south divide will be there. it is simple as that. the cost of live noes simple as that. the cost of live goes on. _ simple as that. the cost of live goes on. the — simple as that. the cost of live goes up, the poverty _ simple as that. the cost of live | goes up, the poverty increases. simple as that. the cost of live - goes up, the poverty increases. no feelin- goes up, the poverty increases. feeling the goes up, the poverty increases. hr? feeling the benefits. goes up, the poverty increases. no feeling the benefits. there - goes up, the poverty increases. no feeling the benefits. there are - feeling the benefits. there are lans to feeling the benefits. there are plans to regenerate _ feeling the benefits. there are plans to regenerate stoke, - feeling the benefits. there are - plans to regenerate stoke, hoardings are up, setting out the vision. heritage sites back in use. foot fall in the city centre, housing, education, skills, backed by government funding and in the queen's speech a promise to tackle empty high street shops but for all the plans some here feel there is not much progress.—
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the plans some here feel there is not much progress. look, you have waste blowing _ not much progress. look, you have waste blowing around, _ not much progress. look, you have waste blowing around, shops - not much progress. look, you have i waste blowing around, shops boarded up, windows, behind us, window smashed. , , up, windows, behind us, window smashed. , ., , up, windows, behind us, window| smashed._ look smashed. basically a dump. look round at how— smashed. basically a dump. look round at how many _ smashed. basically a dump. look round at how many shops - smashed. basically a dump. look round at how many shops have i smashed. basically a dump. look. round at how many shops have had smashed. basically a dump. look- round at how many shops have had it. addressing entrenched inequality doesn't happen overnight but boris johnson has made it a central plan of his leadership. he is bringing his cabinet to this region on thursday, but funding promises and policy plans don't mean much unless they start to make a difference to people's day to day lives. stoke's leaders acknowledge real change will take time but they say it has started.— it has started. think it's a long-term _ it has started. think it's a long-term vision, - it has started. think it's a long-term vision, we - it has started. think it's a long-term vision, we are | it has started. think it's a . long-term vision, we are not it has started. think it's a - long-term vision, we are not going long—term vision, we are not going to level up places like stoke in 12 months but to date what we have see across the things we prioritise is starting to slowly make a difference but certainly, i can see change on the streets of stoke, hoardings going up on sites that were empty
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and activity starting to happen in the business community. at this one thriving pottery factory work is under way to bring it back to use, for chris who runs an education course on site. there is cause for cautious optimism. people willjudge it on the evidence. not only there within government ministers can change, what i want to see is a commitment to development of provincial towns and cities over time. nationally that is what we should bejudging it on, regionally and here in stoke, we should be collectively dreaming of a better future. �* , ., future. but in the short-term the challenges are _ future. but in the short-term the challenges are clear. _ future. but in the short-term the challenges are clear. and - future. but in the short-term the challenges are clear. and the - challenges are clear. and the political risk is despite all the plans, people don't end up feeling better off any time soon. perfect to the confliuct in ukraine now, and russia has targeted the black sea port of odesa,
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using what the ukrainians say were hypersonic missiles, which fly at five times the speed of sound. the missiles struck a shopping centre and a depot in the port, which is a major hub for the export of agricultural products, including wheat and corn. as russia celebrated victory day, odesa burned. this was one of the city's shopping centres, shopping centres, incinerated, by a missile strike. the ukrainian authorities say seven missiles were launched at the city yesterday, killing one person and injuring five more. this morning, the smell of burning plastic still hung in the air. last night when we were here, it was difficult to see the full extent of the damage, but this morning you can. the rocket has completely ripped into the back of the shopping centre here. you can see it has completely folded. there are still fires that the fire brigade here are trying to put out and the electricity wires on this side have been ripped away. russia has been targeting
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the port city of odesa on ukraine's southern coast. it's strategically important. before the war, it was a key international port, taking ukrainian products to the world. president zelensky appealed again to end the war, so that the port can reopen. missile strikes don't only destroy infrastructure. they shake lives. this eight—year—old boy lives 300 metres from the strike. as we talk, he fiddles nervously with two pieces of blackened metal that he found. shards of the missile. "i heard a loud explosion," he says, "i fell out of bed and started to cry. "then i ran down the corridor to find my dog, max." "mum tried to calm me down, but there were more explosions." "we don't know what will happen next." the force of the blast smashed many of the windows in this block of flats. fortunately, most were unoccupied. katarina and her two—year—old daughter arina, were on the other side of the courtyard. "we were about to go to bed when the air alert began," she tells me.
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"i heard a very loud explosion, and i grabbed two pillows "and covered my daughter's ears with them. "i didn't want her to hear the sound of the explosion "and be frightened by it. the whole house was shaking." then she asked her daughter, "what do we do when we hear the air raid siren?" "we run," she says. "we run away." young minds already used to living with the constant threat of war. caroline davies, bbc news, odesa. the time is 18 minutes past six. our top story this evening. for the first time prince charles delivers the queen's speech in parliament — setting out the government's plans to tackle the cost of living crisis. coming up — ukraine's dream of a eurovision win. we hear from their entry, the kalush orchestra, ahead of tonight's semifinal in turin. coming up on sportsday in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel, there could be another
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title twist tonight, but can former anfield favourite steven gerrard derail liverpool in the premier league? the podcaster and campaigner deborahjames has revealed she's now having end—of—life care at home for her terminal bowel cancer. the presenter of the bbc podcast �*you, me and the big c�* urged followers to donate to herfundraising page for clinical trials and research, which, as we came on air, had raised £1.5 million in 2a hours. james, who's 40, was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2016, and has documented her operations and treatment on social media. our health correspondent, catherine burns, has this report. she says it's the message she never wanted to write, last night deborahjames posted on instagram, "we have tried everything but my body simply isn't playing ball. simply
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isn't playing ball." she used the message to set up a fund for cancer research and to help the charities that have supported her. today she gave this update to the bbc. 2a hours and i'm absolutely mind—blown and ijust cannot think people enough for their generosity because itjust means so much to me. it makes me feel utterly loved. but it also makes me feel like we are all kind of in it at the end together. the full episode will be shown on bbc breakfast tomorrow morning. she continues to share every step of the reality of living with and now dying from cancer. most people with bowel cancer are diagnosed in their 60s. she was just 35 when she found out in 2016. since then, she's raised awareness with a savvy, cheeky charm, including dressing up as a poo
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and posing on the toilet. and of course she has danced her way through chemotherapy with a not—so—secret ambition to be invited on strictly come dancing. deborah has been an inspiration, the lives that she has saved, is saving, will continue to save, _ is nothing short of incredible. hello and welcome to you and me and the big c. she's never shied away from the grimmer realities especially on the you me and the big c podcast. crying's not what we need right now. funny at times but also raw, honest and frank. when rachel died in 2018 deborah paid tribute to her friend. what she is shown is that she has lived and she has lived absolutely a worthwhile, purposeful, amazing life that's had an impact on so many people.
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over the last months, deborah has looked increasingly frail. earlier this year she was rushed into hospital and nearly died. i never planned for it to be like that. i thought i would have a day, a moment, a week, whatever, to say goodbye. now deborah is getting hospice at home care with her loved ones, including her two children. i think really it is ultimately about giving deborah and her family that death they can feel comfortable with and allow a very difficult time to be slightly easier. deborah says no—one knows how long she has left that she hopes that the money she's raising will prevent anyone else going through what she's had to endure. catherine burns, bbc news. and deborah's latest recording of her podcast you, me and the big c has been released tonight and is available on bbc sounds. the duke of cambridge first met those affected by the manchester arena attack within
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days of the bombing. the duke of cambridge first met those affected by the manchester arena attack within days of the bombing. today he returned with catherine, to open the memorial to the 22 people who were killed. as someone who lives with his own grief, i also know that what often matters most to the bereaved is that those we have lost are not forgotten. the memorial, known as the glade of light, is filled with british plants and is described as a place to reflect and to remember. on the 22nd of may, it will be exactly five years since the manchester arena attack, this ceremony is the city's main commemoration of that anniversary. memory capsules have been embedded in the stone, filled with precious mementos by bereaved families. in private, the royal couple were introduced to relatives including the grandparents of 15—year—old olivia campbell—hardy.
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i said, i don't really do handshakes, i do hugs. and so, i hugged a princess. she hugged back? and she hugged me back. you can't fake anything in that. that, for me, is that they are feeling your sentiments as well. steve also gave the couple a souvenir of his charity. yes, i managed to squeeze them both a free wristband. it might not be the height of fashion down there, yet, but it will be! kate wore earrings featuring manchester's bumble bee emblem, a nod to the strength the city has shown since the attack. judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. the high court has heard that rebekah vardy "had no choice" but to bring the libel claim against coleen rooney to "establish her innocence". the long—awaited trial involving the two footballers' wives is under way, following claims mrs vardy leaked false stories about mrs rooney to the press. as our correspondent
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colin paterson reports, this case is all about reputation. coleen rooney arrived in court wearing a surgical boot. shades of her husband wayne rooney's metatarsal injury before the 2006 world cup, the very tournament at which the term wags, meaning wives and girlfriends, of footballers, was created. rebekah vardy strode in a minute later. both women very used to banks of cameras, but not courtrooms. inside, coleen rooney sat next to her husband on one end of the front bench. no more than ten feet away was rebekah vardy. there was almost zero eye contact between the two former friends. at the 2016 euros, they had cheered on england together from the stands, but everything changed in october 2019, when coleen rooney did some online detective work to find out who was leaking information about her to the press. she wrote three fictitious tales on her private instagram stories, including returning to the tv, and the basement flooding, to see to see if they would end up
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in the sun, and indeed they did. only then did coleen reveal, after the use of ten dots to ramp up the tension that the one account she had allowed access to read them was rebekah vardy�*s. in court today we heard the details of rebekah vardy�*s case, that she had been left with no choice but to bring this libel claim to establish her innocence and validate her reputation. it was stressed that this legal battle was being reported as entertainment but, in fact, it had had a hugely damaging impact on rebekah vardy�*s life. and then it was the turn of coleen rooney's legal team to set out her case. they claimed that rebekah vardy�*s agent had leaked the stories, and that this was like hiring a hit man — although rebekah vardy hadn't pulled the trigger, she was still responsible. they also accuse rebekah vardy�*s team of widespread and significant loss of evidence, including a phone being dropped into the north sea. towards the end of the day rebekah vardy was questioned
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and denied being the leak, before being accused of having a history of selling stories to newspapers, for money. the trial may have finally kicked off, but there's a long way to go, with wayne rooney himself being expected to be called as a witness next week. in one of the biggest transfers of the year, manchester city have reached an agreement to sign norway striker erling haaland from borussia dortmund. the 21—year—old is seen as one of the brightest prospects in world football, scoring 85 goals in 88 appearances for dortmund. it's believed his wages will be around £a00,000 a week. thousands of eurovision fans have gathered in italy for this year's song contest. the first semifinal takes place in turin this evening — and all eyes are on ukraine, who are currently favourites to win. there are flashing images in this report from david sillito. welcome to turin, and after two covid—restricted years the eurovisionjamboree is back... ..in its full glory.
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its strange, joyful musical formula — fun, serious and silly. this is norway. their song, give that wolf a banana. and latvia's eat your salad. making, they say, veganism sexy through the medium of eurovision. the excitement is mounting here in turin and there is already a runaway favourite for the final on saturday. it is about more than just the song because the country we are talking about is ukraine. ukraine's kalush orchestra has been travelling europe, and we spoke to band leader oleh during a brief lull in their pre—eurovision tour. you made it through! how does it feel to have got this far? translation: it's just another aspect of us i being useful for the country, and we consider this to be the biggest, the highest use that we can be for the whole country. they've been given special
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permission to leave ukraine, however one member has been left behind and is now serving with the ukrainian military. for the rest of the band, eurovision is part of something much bigger. what does being in song contest at a moment like this mean for you personally? translation: for our country, it is so important to have - victories in all ways, so if we win it will be another opportunity to show ukraine to the world, to remind people about ukraine and increase morale in the whole country. while they may be firm favourites, it is perhaps worth noting another front runner in the betting — sam ryder, representing the uk. no one is expecting nul points this year. david sillito, bbc news, turin.
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time for a look at the weather. here's stav da naos. thank you, george. we are keeping a theme of sunshine and showers for theme of sunshine and showers for the next few days, with even some more persistent rain expected across england and wales into tomorrow, good news for gardeners and growers and it will remain on the breezy site with low pressure continued to be close by, sitting to the north of the uk, with showers moving on from the uk, with showers moving on from the west. this is the feature that will move across england and wales tomorrow to bring outbreaks of persistent rain. we have some rain and cloud across the far south—east of england this morning. that cleared, plenty of centring around as you can see from the later satellite and radar picture. some showers across scotland and northern ireland heavy, some rumbles of thunder in places, and they will continue through this evening, some of them merging to give longer spells of rain, and they will be quite heavy for a time, easing down by the end of the night. towards the end of the night, in the south—west we have this area rain pushing into south—west england and wales which
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will be persistent towards the end of the night.

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