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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 14, 2022 3:00pm-4:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: russian troops have withdrawn from ukraine's second biggest city, kharkiv, according to its mayor. it's been under constant bombardment since the invasion began. finland tells president putin it plans to join nato, as russia stops supplying the country with electricity, accusing it of not paying for previous deliveries. a ban on "buy one, get one free" deals on unhealthy food in england is to be put on hold for a year. a former health minister warns that it undermines the country's commitment to healthy living. i worry that its commitment to health disparities, to the ten—year cancer programme, to the five more years of healthy life longevity commitment, to a whole commitment to making britain healthier.
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50 migrants are told that the government intends to send them to rwanda — the first to be removed under new immigration plans. police in india have arrested two people after a fire destroyed an office building in delhi and killed at least 27 people. can liverpool keep their quadruple hopes alive? they face chelsea this afternoon in the fa cup final at wembley. # up in space, man... # bookmakers are predicting a rare good result for the uk at tonight's eurovision. but will it be enough to hold back the favourites — ukraine? good afternoon. the mayor of kharkiv has told
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the bbc that russian forces have withdrawn from the kharkiv city area and are heading for the russian border. ihor terekhov said russian shelling had stopped and residents were gradually starting to return to ukraine's second largest city but warned that many residential areas were badly damaged or destroyed. our correspondentjoe inwood has the latest from lviv. a parting gift from russian forces in retreat. this used to be the palace of culture in dergachi, a small town on the outskirts of kharkiv. translation: we were hit by rockets. three floors were breached. as you can see, the palace of culture is almost completely destroyed. it has nothing to do with military infrastructure. it's a civilian facility. it's a scene replicated right across ukraine's second city, much of which has been reduced to rubble. but kharkiv is known
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as a fortress city. in this invasion, it has earned that name. its defenders have resisted and now repelled the russians. the battle for kharkiv, it seems, has been won. it's a very different story from that of mariupol, where russia seems confident enough of victory to be redeploying troops to the donbas region. the ukrainian government says it wants to arm a million men for what is increasingly looking like a long fight. translation: today nobody can l predict how long this war will last, but we are doing everything in order to free our land as soon as possible. this is our priority, every day to work towards making the war shorter. however, it doesn't depend only on our people, unfortunately. any diplomatic solutions would depend on russia, who today released these pictures showing their troops on the offensive. their top diplomat was
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also in combative mood. translation: the eu has turned from a constructive economic - platform, as it was created, into an aggressive militant player which is already declaring its ambitions far beyond the european continent. all over the kharkiv region, the scars of the battle for ukraine's second city. this is unlikely to be a turning point in this conflict, but with russian supply lines now in ukrainian sights, make no mistake — this is a major victory. joe inwood, bbc news, lviv. russia says it has no hostile intentions towards finland and sweden but has warned that their membership of nato would lead to the militarisation of the baltic region. finland is expected to formally announce its intention to join the western military alliance tomorrow. russia and finland share an 800—mile border. the finnish president is said to have told vladimir putin in a phone call earlier today that russia's invasion of ukraine
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had altered his country's security environment. russian state media claims mr putin replied that abandoning decades of neutrality would be a mistake and any changes to finland's foreign policy could be negative for bilateral relations. russia has cut off some electricity supplies to finland overnight, claiming it had not been paid for previous deliveries. both sweden and finland are attending an informal meeting of nato foreign ministers, with both expected to announce their intention to join. the g7 group of leading industrialised nations say they'll never recognise international borders that russia tries to alter through military aggression. in a statement following a meeting in germany, g7 foreign ministers reiterated their support for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine and other nations. the group promised to further increase political and economic pressure on russia and say they'll continue to provide ukraine with military support for "as long as necessary". let's speak to our europe correspondent nick beake.
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nick, let's talk first of all, if we may, about the foreign ministers�* meeting. a bit of unease because of turkey�*s apparent suggestion that it was prepared to veto these applications unless they do something about some of the organisations that turkey says are terrorist. hi. organisations that turkey says are terrorist. , , ~ terrorist. hi, yes, i think there will be a _ terrorist. hi, yes, i think there will be a degree _ terrorist. hi, yes, i think there will be a degree of— terrorist. hi, yes, i think there will be a degree of concern - terrorist. hi, yes, i think there i will be a degree of concern from some members of the nato alliance when they arrive here in an hour or so, you can see they are rolling out the blue carpet, this being nato, and the americans in particular have said they are trying to work out what this apparent turkish opposition represents, because we have at present saying yesterday that he doesn�*t want sweden or finland tojoin, and that is that he doesn�*t want sweden or finland to join, and that is because both countries, in his view, have terrorist organisations. we take from that he is talking about kurdish militant groups, the pkk in particular. i think the americans
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and the british will be trying to work out whether this is an attempt by president erdogan to get some concessions from the process, because remember, they need the existing —— the agreement of the existing —— the agreement of the existing 30 members for them to join. whether it is a policy on behalf of the turks are represents more fundamental opposition to the expansion of nato. in more fundamental opposition to the expansion of nato._ expansion of nato. in terms of the timetable, — expansion of nato. in terms of the timetable, what _ expansion of nato. in terms of the timetable, what are _ expansion of nato. in terms of the timetable, what are we _ expansion of nato. in terms of the timetable, what are we looking . expansion of nato. in terms of the timetable, what are we looking at| timetable, what are we looking at for finnish and swedish applications and accession?— and accession? well, interesting, there is. over— and accession? well, interesting, there is. over the _ and accession? well, interesting, there is. over the weekend, - and accession? well, interesting, i there is. over the weekend, sweden in particular, the governing party there, the social democrats, they have been meeting, the prime minister and otherfigures have been meeting, the prime minister and other figures within the party have been talking about whether this is a good thing for sweden, because traditionally the party has been against sweden joining nato, so the indications are that they will be changing their policy on that. it is not every day
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you say that, apologies for the noise there. but in terms of finland, we think in the coming days, there will be a decision. the way it all works, assuming there are no major stumbling blocks in the form of turkish opposition, the thinking is, when there is a big nato summit in madrid, that would be the moment at which the countries join. so that is how it is looking for now. interesting that the finnish president spoke to vladimir putin and explained why finland wants to join, putin and explained why finland wants tojoin, he putin and explained why finland wants to join, he says because of the attack on ukraine, but also the way that vladimir putin has suggested that no more country should be allowed to join nato, suggested that no more country should be allowed tojoin nato, and the finnish president suggesting it is not acceptable, that individual countries have sovereign decision making in this sort of process. yeah, it did sound like a wonderful understatement, he said he would tell president putin that quite a lot of things have changed and that that explains why finland is now felt it needed to join nato. 0ne felt it needed to join nato. one
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would love, i�*m sure, to be a fly on the wall for that particular phone conversation, it must have been an interesting one. it is a paradox, given that the war was apparently about preventing nato encroaching on russia�*s borders, and apparent aggressive moves by nato, as moscow put it, that the consequence of it has been to move nato even closer to russia. ~ ., , ,., , has been to move nato even closer to russia. ~ ., , , ,, russia. well, absolutely. if you look at the _ russia. well, absolutely. if you look at the map _ russia. well, absolutely. if you look at the map of _ russia. well, absolutely. if you look at the map of what - russia. well, absolutely. if you look at the map of what the - russia. well, absolutely. if you i look at the map of what the nato footprint would look like, you know, with those two countries joining, you have the likes of sweden and finland right in the north, all the way down along the russian border, you know, obviously belarus is an ally of russia, but president putin will be faced with this wall of nato, really, and something he was talking about at the end of last year as being completely unacceptable. many people have made the point that it is diametrically
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opposite to what he was hoping to achieve, and incredible over the last few months how public opinion has changed in finland and sweden. for decades, in sweden�*s case, 200 years, they were content with being neutral, certainly in a military capacity. and now public opinion has changed, people think they will be safer within the western military alliance, within nato, and that has changed so quickly, and president putin, you would imagine, surely didn�*t envisage that or, as we have been hearing over the past few months, he thought that his troops�* progress on ukraine would be much more rapid than it has turned out to be. . ~ �* ., ~ more rapid than it has turned out to be. u" . ~' . more rapid than it has turned out to be. �* .,~ ., ., ., more rapid than it has turned out to be. �* ., ., ., ., ., , be. nick beake at nato headquarters there in brussels, _ be. nick beake at nato headquarters there in brussels, thank _ be. nick beake at nato headquarters there in brussels, thank you - be. nick beake at nato headquarters there in brussels, thank you very - there in brussels, thank you very much for that update. a ban on "buy one, get one free" deals for unhealthy food and drinks in england is being put on hold for a year. another part of the government�*s obesity strategy, to restrict uk television advertising ofjunk food before 9pm, is also being postponed.
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the government said the delay would allow a better understanding of the impact on household finances as the cost of living continues to rise. earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent david wallace lockhart. he explained what was happening to plans to ban multibuy offers on unhealthy food from october. that has been pushed back by a year. there was also going to be a ban on the time thatjunk food can be advertised on television, it was going to have to be watershed, but that has been pushed back to 2024, but the separate part of the strategy about positioning unhealthy goods in shops will come into force, so not at checkouts and the end of the aisle. the government say this is all to do with the cost of living, they want to delay aspect of these to get an idea of the impact on household budgets. that has gone down well with the food and drink federation, representing manufacturers, but it has not gone down so well with one of borisjohnson�*s previous health ministers, lord bethell, who says that such
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delays are unconservative, he points out that the money that the taxpayer and the nhs has to spend on the excessive consumption of these foods is a burden on the taxpayer, and he questioned what it said about the government�*s overall strategy to health. if the government doesn't see through these relatively straightforward measures, which are in line with where history is taking us, i worry that its commitment to health disparities, to turn you cancer programme, the five more years of healthy life longevity commitment, to our whole commitment to making britain healthier. there are other health experts agree who with him, saying it was a missed opportunity, and something else he said that was quite interesting, he said all the evidence points towards multi—buy deals on unhealthy food actually being bad
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for people�*s household budgets, it leads to them making the wrong decisions. however, at this point in time, when we are hearing some pretty horrible stories about people struggling with inflation and the cost of living, it would have been difficult for the government to sell the idea of people not being able to buy these offers, because many people feel it will help them quite a lot with budgeting. but, overall, what this shows is the cost of living is largely the key issue the government is facing with at the moment, and i suspect there could be other policies that could fall by the wayside in order to deal with this. and we are already getting it tagged onto other things, so for example yesterday�*s announcement on job savings in the civil service, helping the cost of living crisis. it is hard to see how that is a direct correlation, because presumably getting rid of these jobs will take several years, people will be entitled to redundancy payments, and i guess those people might be worse off, so it is curious how it is popping up all over the place.
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what the government is essentially doing, we know borisjohnson has asked his ministers to come up with ideas to help on the cost of living, but ones that do not cost the taxpayer money, do not cost the government money. so cutting down the civil service, he believes, could be one of those strategies, but you are quite right in saying it will not get money into people�*s pockets immediately, it is a medium—term strategy. it might allow cutting taxes further down the line. and there is the idea of telling people they only need to get their mot done every two years, and this is one of those areas where boris johnson feels instinctively there could be an immediate benefit to people if those multi—buy deals are allowed to stay for some time yet, but quite crucially, we should point out that the british retail consortium, which represents a lot of supermarkets, they are saying it will not make much of a difference, because supermarkets largely have moved away from these
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deals in recent years. 50 migrants have been told they will be the first to be sent to rwanda, under the government�*s controversial resettlement policy. the figure includes some people who had crossed the channel in small boats. it�*s widely expected that the plans will face a legal challenge, but borisjohnson said in a newspaper interview that the government would "dig in for the fight". the government is cutting ties with the national union of students because of accusations of anti—semitism within the organisation. the union will be removed from government liaison groups and won�*t be eligible for state funding, although it doesn�*t currently receive any government money. last month the nus announced an independent investigation following complaints byjewish students about a lack of support and claims of inflammatory language. in response to today�*s announcement a spokesperson for the union, which says it represents seven million students, said it was disappointed the universities minister had put the news in a press release rather than speak to it directly.
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a member of the red arrows, the aerobatic display team of the royal air force, has returned to the uk amid claims of inappropriate behaviour. a spokesperson for the group, who are currently in preseason training in greece, confirmed one member of the squad had returned to britain but said their event preparations would continue, including for the queen�*s platinumjubilee injune. sport now, it is football, isn�*t it? holly hamilton, are you all set for the big matches! we are all a bit nervous! it�*s one of the biggest days in the football calendar, as we count down to the fa cup final in an hour and a half�*s time. it�*s always an occasion, but for liverpool and chelsea, there�*s a lot at stake here. nesta mcgregor is at wembley. 0h, oh, you know, it is empty behind you, i know those seats will fill up
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very quickly with red and blue, but let�*s be honest, we are talking about liverpool, all this talk of the quadruple, today that dream could continue, or it could come crashing down.— could continue, or it could come crashing down. yeah, absolutely, listen, crashing down. yeah, absolutely, listen. 729 _ crashing down. yeah, absolutely, listen, 729 teams _ crashing down. yeah, absolutely, listen, 729 teams started - crashing down. yeah, absolutely, listen, 729 teams started out - crashing down. yeah, absolutely, listen, 729 teams started out on | crashing down. yeah, absolutely, i listen, 729 teams started out on the journey to wembley, only two remain, and one of them will climb those steps and pick up the famous trophy. the weather is perfect, the pitch is perfect, and the fans, a lot in front of me, maybe not behind, are in great voice. for liverpool, at stake is the chance to win a second trophy of the season, and they are chasing four. jurgen klopp has won the premier league, the champions league, neverthe the premier league, the champions league, never the fa cup, and he says he doesn�*t take days like this for granted, and he knows the fans can be the difference as well. his team play heavy metal football, we know it is entertaining, and behind me, world famous dj peter tong will
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be doing the premature entertainment, so if he does come on, you might see me too stepping! in about an hour, we should get the team news. —— you might see me two—stepping. team news. -- you might see me two-stepping-_ team news. -- you might see me two-stepping. this is chelsea's only chance for a — two-stepping. this is chelsea's only chance for a bit _ two-stepping. this is chelsea's only chance for a bit of— two-stepping. this is chelsea's only chance for a bit of silverware - two-stepping. this is chelsea's only chance for a bit of silverware this i chance for a bit of silverware this season, and you can�*t imagine they would lose another final. season, and you can't imagine they would lose another final.— would lose another final. yeah, but when ou would lose another final. yeah, but when you say _ would lose another final. yeah, but when you say that, _ would lose another final. yeah, but when you say that, a _ would lose another final. yeah, but when you say that, a third - when you say that, a third consecutive fa cup final, and they will not need reminding they have lost the previous two or that liverpool beat them in the league cup earlier this season. thomas tuchel, that will be his team talk, saying, our season relies on this, they have already qualified for the champions league, but days like this are special, 150 years of the fa cup, some memorable moments, paul gascoigne�*s free kick, wimbledon winning in 1988, he will be saying to his players, make sure that your story will be told for generations
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to come. chelsea�*s only chance for silverware this season, and the two teams met earlier this season, and liverpool were winners, surely that is all the incentive that chelsea and their fans need to get behind their team and turn this around. for 40 5-m their team and turn this around. for 40 5pm kick—off, the seats will be picking up quickly, we will catch up with you later. —— 4:45pm kick—off. celtic finished their title—winning season in style with a 6—0 win against motherwell. kyogo furuhashi capped off a fine first season in scotland, scoring twice as celtic led 3—0 at half—time. giorgos giakoumakis got two of his own in the second half, including this bicycle kick, as celtic got their hands on the trophy that they lost to rangers last year. ange postecoglou�*s side haven�*t lost in the league since last september. elsewhere, rangers beat hearts 3—1, and dundee united secured fourth place with that 2—1 win
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for ross county. wasps were beaten 20—18 by lyon in their european challenge cup semifinal. wasps had led at the break after scrum—half dan robson�*s try. but the french side proved too strong, two converted tries seeing them through despite a late fightback, denying wasps the chance of a first european final in 15 years. it was victory in the world triathlon championship series for great britain�*s men and women�*s teams. in the men�*s, alex yee outsprinted new zealand�*s hayden wilde in the final straight to earn victory in a tightly fought contest. and in the women�*s, georgia taylor—brown moved to the top of the event standings with her impressive victory after passing leader maya kingma to open up a huge lead. that�*s all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
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the championship play—off semifinal between sheffield united and nottingham forest is under way, forest one up already. follow that and everything else on bbc.co.uk/sport. so much to talk about, and hopefully lots to talk about when we get the results and, holly hamilton, thank you. there are growing concerns over global food supplies after india banned the export of wheat with immediate effect a month after promising to feed the world, following the shortfall in supplies from ukraine. meanwhile, germany�*s foreign minister has accused russia of waging a wheat war. with me is our business reporter ramzan karmali. let�*s start with this indian announcement, what has caused the change of heart by narendra modi? $5 change of heart by narendra modi? is you said, india was seen as filling the gap, ukraine and russia make up
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about a third of all wheat exports, so it was vital that india stepped up so it was vital that india stepped up to the plate, and they were having a great harvest until march, exporting 7 million tonnes, an increase of 250% on the previous year, but they have been hit badly by a heatwave, temperatures of 45 degrees, and they think this is not going away, it will continue until the monsoons, so they expect a shortfall in their crops. 0n the monsoons, so they expect a shortfall in their crops. on top of that, though, the country has also been hit by inflation, hitting its highest levels since 2014 at 7.79%. the reserve bank of india put up interest rates for the first time in four years, which surprised everyone. so they are trying to look after their own domestic market, and this will have a massive impact on poorer countries especially who rely on this wheat. as you say, only a little while ago they were saying, we are here to export wheat. they sent trade delegates out in april to places like the philippines and
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morocco to say, we will export more to you, but that is now on the back shelf. �* ., ., ., ., shelf. and another headache for those countries _ shelf. and another headache for those countries who _ shelf. and another headache for those countries who have i shelf. and another headache for those countries who have been l shelf. and another headache for- those countries who have been trying to backfill because of the effective end of supplies from ukraine, which is in the middle of a war, it doesn�*t have the time to harvest what is planted and may not be in a position to plant for next year. that is true, and the g7 have come out and said, look, president putin, russia has to stop this blockade of ukrainian ports. they estimate 25 million tonnes of grains are stuck in ukrainian ports, 25 million tonnes of grain that we could all do with, and the germans have been very strong and said, look, i will give you an exact quote, you are trying to extend the military war against yewtree into a so—called wheat war, and they say that countries like africa and the middle east, they could see millions of people really suffering and going into food poverty here, food hunger, i should
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say. b. poverty here, food hunger, i should sa . �* y poverty here, food hunger, i should sa . �* , ~ poverty here, food hunger, i should say. a country like lebanon depends almost entirely _ say. a country like lebanon depends almost entirely on _ say. a country like lebanon depends almost entirely on imported - say. a country like lebanon depends almost entirely on imported wheat. | almost entirely on imported wheat. exactly, and other countries say they are willing to take action, the canadians are one of the biggest producers, they say they will send ships to ukraine to help get the grains out to the ports, this is what their foreign minister had to say. we are an agricultural power. we have a lot of knowledge and expertise in grain growing and grain shipping, and we will make sure to free ukrainian wheat. so this meeting of the g7, they were pretty stark in their warnings to russia that, look, let�*s free up these ports, let�*s get these grains out, because this is a crisis that could extend notjust as a military crisis but as a food and fuel crisis thatis crisis but as a food and fuel crisis that is going to impact everyone across the world.— that is going to impact everyone across the world. ramzan karmali, thank ou across the world. ramzan karmali, thank you very _ across the world. ramzan karmali,
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thank you very much. _ the north korean leader, kim jong—un, has described the covid outbreak as the greatest disaster his country has ever faced. speaking at an emergency meeting, mr kim called for an all—out battle to tackle the spread of the virus, which the government acknowledged only two days ago. 0fficial media say another 21 people have died and 170,000 new cases have been identified. in all, more than half a million people are now reported to have shown symptoms. a nationwide lockdown has been imposed to try to stop the spread of the virus among the population, which has not been vaccinated. we can cross live to boston to speak to sung—yong lee, professor in korean studies at tufts university. professor, thank you very much for speaking to us. let me ask you first of all, is north korea one of those countries that is suffering because it hasn�*t received vaccines from the outside world? it is
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it hasn't received vaccines from the outside world?— outside world? it is the supreme leader of north _ outside world? it is the supreme leader of north korea _ outside world? it is the supreme leader of north korea himself i outside world? it is the supreme i leader of north korea himself who has declined multiple offers of aid, vaccines included, from the united states, from south korea, from the united nations, and now the supreme leader seems to be panicking that the disease is spreading in the capital city, and that perhaps he has come to reconcile himself or fear he is imminent mortality. the north korean leader has never faced an existential threat like this. during a famine, the high and mighty never go country, but the pandemic can kill kings and paupers alike, so it shows you the concern, the anxiety, the stress that kim jong—un himself is feeling. in anxiety, the stress that kim jong-un himself is feeling.— himself is feeling. in terms of what north korea _ himself is feeling. in terms of what north korea has— himself is feeling. in terms of what north korea has been _ himself is feeling. in terms of what north korea has been setting i himself is feeling. in terms of what north korea has been setting up i north korea has been setting up until now about the global pandemic, as it simply refused to acknowledge any cases before this last announcement? it any cases before this last announcement?- any cases before this last announcement? . ., , announcement? it did, and it was the
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first acknowledgement _ announcement? it did, and it was the first acknowledgement of _ announcement? it did, and it was the first acknowledgement of covid, i announcement? it did, and it was the first acknowledgement of covid, the i first acknowledgement of covid, the presence of covid in north korea when kimjong—un made presence of covid in north korea when kim jong—un made this announcement a few days ago, and he has held two high level meetings to address the issue over the course of two days. it is unprecedented, north korea has denied the existence of the disease in their country over the disease in their country over the past two and a half years, so i think kimjong—un the past two and a half years, so i think kim jong—un and is the past two and a half years, so i think kimjong—un and is now the past two and a half years, so i think kim jong—un and is now willing to really use draconian measures to limit the freedom of movement, the supply of food and medicine to the vast majority of the people, yet kim jong—un himself supposedly donated family reserved medicine to people in pyongyang. not out of altruism, necessarily, but out of personal concerns. ., necessarily, but out of personal concerne— necessarily, but out of personal concerns. ., ., ., , ., , concerns. north korea is a country which imposes _ concerns. north korea is a country which imposes extreme _ concerns. north korea is a countryl which imposes extreme restrictions on its people, therefore one presumes it would be perfectly possible, in an outbreak like this, for north korea to do what the
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chinese government have done in several cities and simply lock them down. . ., several cities and simply lock them down. i ., . down. indeed, kim jong-un in recent da s has down. indeed, kim jong-un in recent days has praised _ down. indeed, kim jong-un in recent days has praised the _ down. indeed, kim jong-un in recent days has praised the chinese - days has praised the chinese measures, the restrictive measures, and even in normal times you need, a north korea needs a special travel permit to go from his town to the next town over, so the repression, the restrictions will become inhumane, and ifearwe are witnessing now the early stage of pervasive human misery, hunger, death and famine like situation to come in the course of the next weeks and months. come in the course of the next weeks and months-— come in the course of the next weeks and months. thank you very much for our time and months. thank you very much for your time and — and months. thank you very much for your time and your _ and months. thank you very much for your time and your insights. - and months. thank you very much for your time and your insights. thank i your time and your insights. thank ou. it�*s the final of the eurovision song contest night. tonight and thousands of fans have been gathering in italy
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for the big night. singer sam ryder is hoping to end a run of bad results for the uk, but ukraine is hotly tipped to win the contest. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito has been meeting some of the contestants. the feet belong to a singer called mahmood, here with his fans. and he�*s here in turin for his second eurovision song contest, representing italy. you have fans here and everywhere. everyone knows you. have you got used to all of this, what eurovision has done to you? are you used to this fame? oh, you know, for me it�*s always a new thing, you know, because the emotion is always the same, so...yeah. in the past, many looked upon eurovision as a graveyard for careers. but things have changed. for anyone who wonders what eurovision is all about, this is what it�*s all about. for mahmood, it�*s made him a star. and it�*s also done the same for last year�*s winners — maneskin.
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well, we�*ve basically been touring nonstop, making new music. yeah. — going all around the world. so it�*s been like basically all we dreamt of. music: stefania by kalush 0rchestra. and while the favourites for tonight are ukraine�*s kalush 0rchestra, there�*ve also been quite a few bets on a country that�*s rather struggled in recent years — the uk. # i'm up in space, man... sam ryder and space man has won many admirers. i�*ll be completely honest, it�*s quite strange walking around as part of the uk delegation, with people going, "you�*re going to win, you�*re going to win!" and we�*re like, "what?!" # and i wanna go home... winning is perhaps being a bit optimistic, but few expect another last place. the left side of the leaderboard for us is a win, put it that way. a top ten is a win. a top five is a homecoming bus tour, in my eyes. a win is panic stations. "what are we going to do? this is amazing."
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and given the uk�*s long fallow period, a bit of eurovision hope is an unexpected turn of events. # and i wanna go home. # david sillito, bbc news, turin. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. we are going to see the weather changing and towards the south—west of england by this evening we have got more cloud and may be some showers which will push northwards but mainly affect the more southern parts of england and could get heavy and thundery downpours into the night. further north it will be chillier in scotland where we have got clearer skies but they could be a few showers by the morning as far north as scotland and ireland. the heavy ones will move away. generally showers are developing further north
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and moving further north allowing more in the way of warm sunshine to come to across southern parts of england and wales and northern parts of scotland mainly missing the showers entirely. cooler than today. breeze beginning to pick up. more wet weather into monday. mainly for northern and western areas of the uk. again, it could be heavy, possibly thundery. a few showers. warm here. cooler and wetter to the north. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: russian troops have withdrawn from ukraine�*s second biggiest city kharkiv, according to its mayor. it�*s been under constant bombardment since the invasion began. finland tells president putin it plans to join nato, as russia stops supplying the country with electricity, accusing it of not paying for previous deliveries. a ban on buy one—get—one free deals on unhealthy food in england is to be put on hold for a year.
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a former health minister warns that it undermines the country�*s commitment to healthy living. and can liverpool keep their quadruple hopes alive? they face chelsea this afternoon in the fa cup final at wembley. the first baby beaver — or kit — to be born on exmoorfor 400 years has just had it�*s first birthday. to mark the birthday of the young beaver, named rashford after the england footballer, the national trust has released this new footage of him hard at work building dams and moving mud with his dad, yogi. it�*s part of their project to reintroduce the rodents and revitalise wetlands across the country. let�*s chat now to ben eardley, project manager for the national trust at holnicote in somerset.
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thanks ever so much for hanging on for hours. a lovely day to be out there. these pictures, they are quite something, and they? when you realise just how long beavers were absent from exmoor.— realise just how long beavers were absent from exmoor. that's fight and the are absent from exmoor. that's fight and they are fantastic _ absent from exmoor. that's fight and they are fantastic animals. _ absent from exmoor. that's fight and they are fantastic animals. i - absent from exmoor. that's fight and they are fantastic animals. i mean, i they are fantastic animals. i mean, they are fantastic animals. i mean, they can�*t sing so they could help us with your revision but they did do a lot else. there are ecosystem engineers, they are a keystone species and have been missing for a long time but what we have seen is really significant change and it is great to see ratchford doing really well in learning the skills you will need to be a grown—up beaver. white but my dad used to deliver the post to that estate and i knowjust how large it is. how enormous the estate is. how easy has it been to be able to create a protected environment where they can gradually be reintroduced? where they can get comfortable in the environment not only without people, necessarily, hassling them but even other animals? you are right. the estate
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is big. it is the largest contiguous land that we have in this area. the national trust is serious about addressing climate change, and the biodiversity crisis. the beavers tick the box for that thing. you can only get a license for an enclosed release so we have a couple of enclosures. about three hectares each and yogi and rushford and one of those enclosures and they have modified it significantly so it was, you know, woodland and water disconnected. it is now a wetland which is a habitat that we have lost. and it seems very otherworldly in there. it is a remarkable place. we are looking at some of the pictures now. building dams is an essential activity when talking about controlling the flow of water and how much water you can end up with which the moorland canned necessarily absorb. why then are we
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in a situation where there seem so much caution about reintroducing them? what is it people are worried about? it them? what is it people are worried about? , . ., , about? it is change. sometimes chance is about? it is change. sometimes change is uncomfortable. i about? it is change. sometimes change is uncomfortable. we'vej change is uncomfortable. we�*ve gotten used to a landscape, a countryside that has very managed, thatis countryside that has very managed, that is very simple, that is very tidy. and i think beavers are sort of an indicator of something a little bit different. a little bit more mess. but unless that brings positive change, you know. it would have to be managed properly but they bring sort of some of the changes that you have mentioned so they slow the flow of water to the catchment and have been shown to improve water quality create a real variety of habitat which is a real benefit for other species that have evolved. the last time i was down on the estate, with the then chairman of the national trust, she was talking about the efforts and we being shown the efforts being made to try to improve drainage. there is a real issue,is improve drainage. there is a real
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issue, is there? for high land like exmoor when you talk about if we are going to see a warmer climate and the consequence of which include heavier rainfall, more prolonged rainfall. it was only 70 years ago down the road from where you are now that a village was wiped out because of burst papers that had dammed up and been blocked for so long that when the water burst through from the two rivers the destruction was terrifying. the two rivers the destruction was terri int. , ,. the two rivers the destruction was terri int. , i. ., terrifying. yes, you are right. it is all about— terrifying. yes, you are right. it is all about developing - terrifying. yes, you are right. it| is all about developing resilience for the extreme weather we are going to see. notjust a wetter weather but the drier weather. we are lucky to have had funding from the environment agency and european funding and what those organisations are interested in is developing resilience. we are going to face prolonged dry hot spells as well so it is about how do we hold water in the landscape because how do we
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reconnect that water with the surrounding landscape and they do that for us. they have a remarkable animal and he is doing really well. brilliant to see. thank you so much. we will keep our fingers crossed for markets later in the year. we will keep our fingers crossed for markets later in the year. the duke of cambridge has presented the cancer campaigner deborahjames — also known as bowelbabe — with a damehood at her family home. the 40—year—old, who hosts the bbc�*s �*you, me and the big c�* podcast, has raised more than five—million—pounds for charity since revealing she is receiving end—of—life care for bowel cancer. graham satchell reports. what a day for dame deborahjames. less than 24 hours after the queen announced she would be honoured, prince william came to her parents�* house to present the award in person. the duke of cambridge spent
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much of the afternoon with deborah and herfamily. in a post on social media, dame deborah said... # baby, baby! # when you touch me like this... dame deborah has been a real inspiration for other people living with cancer. in a post on social media, dame deborah said... # baby, baby! # when you touch me like this... dame deborah has been a real inspiration for other people living with cancer. with remarkable good humour and extraordinary candour, she�*s been sharing every part of herjourney. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2016 when she was just 35. on monday, she announced she was stopping active treatment. she said her bodyjust couldn�*t continue any more. the same day, she set up a new fund for cancer charities,
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her family constantly refreshing the justgiving page, celebrating each milestone. cheering and applause. the total has now passed more than £5 million. there�*s been huge of love and appreciation for what dame deborah has achieved. i�*m a bit numb because i think it�*s... it�*s a bit surreal because i know that i�*m going to die. and the messages are beautiful, but they�*re heartbreaking as well, and so i�*m trying to read what i can, and i hope that when i�*m not feeling well enough to read them myself, then my family will read them to me, and i think that will give me some comfort. deborah says this is her favourite photo with prince william and her lookalike brother ben.
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in what has been just a few short days, deborah — now dame deborahjames — has left an extraordinary legacy. graham satchell, bbc news. i will be back at the top of the hour. ., i will be back at the top of the houn . , i will be back at the top of the hour. ., , ., i will be back at the top of the hour. ., i ., ., ., hour. hello there. they are going to see the weather _ hour. hello there. they are going to see the weather changing _ hour. hello there. they are going to see the weather changing overnight | see the weather changing overnight tomorrow but it has been a super start to the weekend. sunshine far and wide. temperatures approaching 20 degrees in belfast. this is the picture earlier on in devon. warm enough for a paddle but it is in the south—west of england that the weather was going to going to start to change this evening. high pressure has built the sunshine and dry weather and light winds. towards the south—west the cloud is beginning to build this evening and we�*ve got the first sign of some showers as well. 0vernight stay
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showers as well. 0vernight stay showers or push their way northwards into parts of wales and the midlands but mainly affecting more southern parts of england and heavy and thundery downpours as well. quite a bit warmer here but further north across the uk where it is dry with clear skies it could be a cherry started tomorrow in scotland. early in the morning that could be showers pushing as far north as northern ireland and south—west scotland. the heavier ones will move away and generally, showers that you develop will be further north and had their way further north of the day. for more southern parts of england and wales will become and warmer with some sunshine. northern scotland may mist the showers as well but even with showers temperatures of this and that what we see today. a little bit cooler perhaps on north sea coast with breeze beginning to pick up. high pressure getting squeezed away. pressure is the reading. when speaking up and we have this rain pushing in from the south—west and there is more wet weather around on monday as well. mainly affecting northern and western parts of the uk. farthersouth northern and western parts of the uk. farther south and east there
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will be fewer showers are more in the way of sunshine and it will feel warmer as well. but as you head further north where we�*ve got more cloud and most of the vane into the afternoon, particularly in scotland, it will be quite a bit cooler here on monday afternoon. moving quickly into tuesday rain clearing out of the way we start with some sunshine. but towards the west is another band of incoming in affecting western parts of the uk and ahead of that it may well be dry and warm as well particularly in the south—east, likely to be the warmest day of the week ahead. a warm start to the week but we have got the threat of rain which could be heavy and potentially thundery as well. from that week onwards it does become a drier, fewer showers, some sunshine, temperatures probably not quite as high.
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good afternoon. the mayor of kharkiv has told the bbc that russian forces have withdrawn from the city area and are heading for the russian border. ihor terekhov says shelling has stopped, and residents are gradually returning to ukraine�*s second largest city. but he warned that many residential areas have been badly damaged or destroyed. 0ur correspondentjoe inwood has the latest from lviv. a parting gift from russian forces in retreat. this used to be the palace of culture in dergachi, a small town on the outskirts of kharkiv.
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translation: we were hit by rockets. three floors were breached. as you can see, the palace of culture is almost completely destroyed. it has nothing to do with military infrastructure. it�*s a civilian facility. it�*s a scene replicated right across ukraine�*s second city, much of which has been reduced to rubble. but kharkiv is known as a fortress city. in this invasion, it has earned that name. its defenders have resisted and now repelled the russians. the battle for kharkiv, it seems, has been won. it�*s a very different story from that of mariupol, where russia seems confident enough of the victory to be redeploying troops to the donbas region. the ukrainian government says it wants to arm a million men for what is increasingly looking like a long fight.
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that this conflict will continue is maybe the only thing both sides agree on. translation: today nobody can predict how long this war will last, but we are doing everything in order to free our land as soon as possible. this is our priority, every day to work towards making the war shorter. however, it doesn't depend only on our people, unfortunately. the collective west has declared total war — the collective west has declared total war on _ the collective west has declared total war on us _ the collective west has declared total war on us and _ the collective west has declared total war on us and it _ the collective west has declared total war on us and it is- the collective west has declared total war on us and it is hard i the collective west has declared total war on us and it is hard toi total war on us and it is hard to predict — total war on us and it is hard to predict how— total war on us and it is hard to predict how long _ total war on us and it is hard to predict how long it— total war on us and it is hard to predict how long it will- total war on us and it is hard to predict how long it will last, i total war on us and it is hard to| predict how long it will last, but the consequences _ predict how long it will last, but the consequences will— predict how long it will last, but the consequences will be - predict how long it will last, but the consequences will be felt i predict how long it will last, butj the consequences will be felt by everyone — the consequences will be felt by everyone without _ the consequences will be felt by everyone without exception. i any diplomatic solutions will depend on russia, who today released these pictures showing their troops on the offensive. their top diplomat was also in combative mood. all over the kharkiv region, the scars of the battle for ukraine�*s second city. this is unlikely to be a turning point in this conflict, but with russian supply lines now in ukrainian sights,
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make no mistake — this is a major victory. joe inwood, bbc news, lviv. health campaigners have criticised the government�*s plan to delay a ban on multi—buy deals forjunk food and pre—watershed tv advertising by a year. ministers say they�*re putting the policy on junk food deals on hold to help with the cost of living crisis. here�*s 0livia richwald. as a country, britain is rather chubby and under the government�*s obesity strategy, junk food ads would have been banned before 9pm. multi—buy offers on food high in fat sugar and salt would will sugar and salt would also have been banned. but today the proposed junk food bans were delayed by 12 months. if the government doesn�*t see through these straight forward measures, which are by the way in line with where history is taking us, i worry if commitment to health
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disparities, to the ten—year cancer programme, to the five more years of healthy life longevity commitment to our whole commitment to making britain healthier.— britain healthier. according to the latest figures _ britain healthier. according to the latest figures 14% _ britain healthier. according to the latest figures 14% of _ britain healthier. according to the i latest figures 1496 of five-year-olds latest figures 14% of five—year—olds were classed as obese. by 11 it rose to 25%. some of the strategy has been put into place, like you calory counts on menus. but is that enough? shoppers in leeds had mixed views on whether a delay on banning junk food deals would stop them eating more healthily. i the believe they deserve a treat and it_ i the believe they deserve a treat and it shouldn't have to put us mums out—of— pocket and it shouldn't have to put us mums out—of—pocket do that. and it shouldn't have to put us mums out-of-pocket do that.— out-of-pocket do that. seem places the have out-of-pocket do that. seem places they have taken _ out-of-pocket do that. seem places they have taken off— out-of-pocket do that. seem places they have taken off multi-buy i they have taken off multi—buy offers, — they have taken off multi—buy offers, it _ they have taken off multi—buy offers, it should _ they have taken off multi—buy offers, it should be _ they have taken off multi—buy offers, it should be put- they have taken off multi—buy offers, it should be put on. they have taken off multi—buy- offers, it should be put on healthy foods_ offers, it should be put on healthy foods maybe — offers, it should be put on healthy foods maybe to _ offers, it should be put on healthy foods maybe to stop _ offers, it should be put on healthy foods maybe to stop obesity i offers, it should be put on healthy foods maybe to stop obesity in i offers, it should be put on healthy| foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk. foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk bui— foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk but of— foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk. but of course _ foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk. but of course with _ foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk. but of course with the - foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk. but of course with the cost i foods maybe to stop obesity in the uk. but of course with the cost ofl uk. but of course with the cost of living _ uk. but of course with the cost of living crisis— uk. but of course with the cost of living crisis it _ uk. but of course with the cost of living crisis it is _ uk. but of course with the cost of
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living crisis it is difficult. - the british retail consortium says supermarkets have been moving away from multi—buy offers anyway, but it welcomed the delay to changes in advertising. campaigners are urging retailers to promote offers on healthy food instead. in the meantime, the battle between bulging waistlines and skinny wallets continues. 0livia richwald, bbc news, leeds. it�*s just under an hour until chelsea take on liverpool in the men�*s fa cup final. this is the third season in a row chelsea have made the final. 0ur correspondent nesta mcgregor is at wembley for us. and nesta — these two teams know each other very well, don�*t they? yeah, and can i say wembley is beginning to look and sound like a venue that is hosting the fa cup final. the weather is wonderful, the pitch is pristine and close to 90,000 people are expected. these
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teams know one another well, they have already met once at wembley in the league cup final and liverpool won. so they are chasing a historic four trophies in one season. klopp has never won the fa cup. he said days like this can�*t be taken for granted. for chems it is their —— chelsea it is their only chance of silverware. the teams have arrived, we have seen them wave and we know the fa cup is capable of producing memorable moments n a split second somebody will do something that is retold for generations to come. the big question is who.— retold for generations to come. the big question is who. en'oy the game. thank ou. it�*s the final of the eurovision song contest tonight and thousands of fans are gathering in italy for the big night. singer sam ryder is hoping to end a run of bad results for the uk, but ukraine is hotly tipped to win. 0ur arts correspondent
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david sillito has been meeting some of the contestants. eurovision song contest and the fans are gathering. turin is the host and this is italy�*s hopeful. it is his second contest. you have fans here everyone knows you. have you got used to all of this, what eurovision has done to you? are you used to this fame? oh, you know, for me it�*s always a new thing, you know, because the emotion is always the same, so...yeah. in the past, many looked upon eurovision as a graveyard for careers. but things have changed. for anyone who wonders what eurovision is all about, this is what it�*s all about. for mahmood, it�*s made him a star. and it�*s also done the same for last year�*s winners — maneskin.
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well, we've basically been touring nonstop, making new music. yeah. going all around the world. so it's been like basically all we dreamt of. music: stefania by kalush 0rchestra. and while the favourites for tonight are ukraine�*s kalush 0rchestra, there�*ve also been quite a few bets on a country that�*s rather struggled in recent years — the uk. # i�*m up in space, man... sam ryder and space man has won many admirers. i�*ll be completely honest, it�*s quite strange walking around as part of the uk delegation, with people going, "you�*re going to win, you�*re going to win!" and we�*re like, "what?!" # and i wanna go home... winning is perhaps being a bit optimistic, but few expect another last place. the left side of the leaderboard for us is a win, put it that way. a top ten is a win. a top five is a homecoming bus tour, in my eyes. a win is panic stations —
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"what are we going to do?" "this is amazing." and given the uk�*s long fallow period, a bit of eurovision hope is an unexpected turn of events. # and i wanna go home.# david sillito, bbc news, turin. you can watch the fa cup on bean one. that�*s it we�*re back around midnight. now on bbc one it�*s time for the news where you are. goodbye. it has been a super start to the weekend. sunshine farand it has been a super start to the weekend. sunshine far and wide. temperatures approaching 20 degrees in belfast. this is the picture earlier on in devon. warm enough for
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a paddle but it is in the south—west of england that the weather is going to start to change this evening. high pressure has brought the sunshine and dry weather and light winds as well. towards the south—west the cloud is beginning to build this evening and we brought the first signs of some showers as well. 0vernight, though showers are push their way northwards into parts of wales and the midlands but mainly affecting more southern parts of england and there could be heavy and thundery downpours as well. quite a bit warmer here but for the north across the uk where it is drier, with some clearer skies, it could be quite a chilly started tomorrow in scotland. early in the morning there could be some showers pushing as far north as northern ireland and south—west scotland. everyone is in southern that will move away and generally, showers that you develop will be further north and way further north to the day several more southern parts it will become drier and warmer with some sunshine. northern scotland may mist the showers as well but even with some showers as well but even with some showers temperatures are going to be similar to what we see today. is it a bit cooler events on north sea
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coast with the breeze beginning to pick up. high pressure is getting squeezed away. pressure is lower in. we�*ve got the wind is picking up and have got this rain pushing in from the south—west. more wet weather around on monday as well. mainly affecting western parts of the uk. further south and east there will be fewer showers, further south and east there will be fewershowers, more further south and east there will be fewer showers, more in the way of sunshine and it will feel warm as well. but, as you head further north where you�*ve got more cloud and most of the vane into the afternoon particularly in scotland it will be quite a bit cooler here on monday afternoon. moving quickly into tuesday without rain clearing out of the way we will start with some sunshine out towards the west there is another band of incoming in. mainly affecting the western part of the uk and, ahead of that, it may well be dry and warm as well particularly in the south—east, likely to be the warmest day of the week ahead. so, it is a warm start to the big but we have got the threat of rain which could be heavy and potentially thundery as well. and then from mid week onwards as it does become a drier, showers, some
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sunshine and temperatures probably not quite as high.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: finland tells president putin it plans to join nato, as russia stops supplying the country with electricity, accusing it of not paying for previous deliveries. russian troops have withdrawn from ukraine�*s second biggest city, kharkiv, according to its mayor. it�*s been under constant bombardment since the invasion began. a ban on "buy one, get one free" deals on unhealthy food in england is to be put on hold for a year. a former health minister warns that it undermines the country�*s commitment to healthy living. i worry that its commitment to health disparities, to the ten—year cancer programme, to the five more years of healthy life longevity commitment, to a whole commitment to making britain healthier. can liverpool keep their
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quadruple hopes alive?

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