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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 14, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will bring us tomorrow. with me are journalist and author shyama perera and lawyer and broadcaster andrew kidd.
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back to them in a moment, first tomorrow's front pages. the observer says many school buildings in england are now in such disrepair they are now a �*risk to life�* — according to internal government documents leaked to the paper. the express says chancellor rishi sunak has promised that he will do �*everything in his power�* to help with the cost of living crisis. and the telegraph has a different twist on the cost of living crisis — saying cabinet ministers have turned on the bank of england over rising inflation. the independent has liverpool winning the fa cup trophy, they beat chelsea 6—5 on penalties today. either of you liverpool fans?
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disclaimer theft up? flat either of you liverpool fans? disclaimer theft up? not especially. andrew, disclaimer theft up? not especially. andrew. we — disclaimer theft up? not especially. andrew, we will— disclaimer theft up? not especially. andrew, we will start _ disclaimer theft up? not especially. andrew, we will start with _ disclaimer theft up? not especially. andrew, we will start with the - andrew, we will start with the observer and the crumbling schools are risk to life, officials warn number ten?— are risk to life, officials warn number ten? , , ., ., , number ten? this is another bad news sto for number ten? this is another bad news story for boris- — number ten? this is another bad news story for boris. it _ number ten? this is another bad news story for boris. it is _ number ten? this is another bad news story for boris. it is another _ story for boris. it is another headache on top of an ever growing list of problems in his in tray. finding the money to address the problem is going to be extremely difficult. that is very worrying news for teachers and pupils who go to school in these buildings. shyama, what is the damage? i am shyama, what is the damage? i am uuuessin , shyama, what is the damage? i am guessing. it — shyama, what is the damage? i am guessing, it doesn't _ shyama, what is the damage? i am guessing, it doesn't give you the detail_ guessing, it doesn't give you the detail on— guessing, it doesn't give you the detail on the front page, but i know from previous surveys of all
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schooling stock, it is usually dodgy windows. _ schooling stock, it is usually dodgy windows, roofs needing redoing, toilet. _ windows, roofs needing redoing, toilet, access for the children. those — toilet, access for the children. those things that make school life safe, _ those things that make school life safe, lights on the stairs and systems— safe, lights on the stairs and systems for walking up and down them, _ systems for walking up and down them, school playgrounds. i think this is_ them, school playgrounds. i think this is a _ them, school playgrounds. i think this is a joke. not the story itself, _ this is a joke. not the story itself, but a joke the story comes out after— itself, but a joke the story comes out after should oxbridge be tilting the story— out after should oxbridge be tilting the story towards state school. this story— the story towards state school. this storyiust _ the story towards state school. this storyjust goes to show why so many chiidreh_ storyjust goes to show why so many children are — storyjust goes to show why so many children are underserved by the state _ children are underserved by the state education system. because if you are _ state education system. because if you are hot — state education system. because if you are not able to sit safely and comfortably in a warm classroom, in a safe _ comfortably in a warm classroom, in a safe school, you are already disadvantaged before you even start your a, _ disadvantaged before you even start your a, b. _ disadvantaged before you even start youra, b, see. disadvantaged before you even start your a. b. see-— your a, b, see. andrew, further pressure — your a, b, see. andrew, further pressure being _ your a, b, see. andrew, further pressure being piled _ your a, b, see. andrew, further
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pressure being piled on - your a, b, see. andrew, further pressure being piled on the - pressure being piled on the government being asked to divert billions to keep school safe at a time when the cost of living crisis deepens? time when the cost of living crisis dee ens? ., , ., , , , deepens? reading the story, it seems more serious — deepens? reading the story, it seems more serious than _ deepens? reading the story, it seems more serious than that. _ deepens? reading the story, it seems more serious than that. they - deepens? reading the story, it seems more serious than that. they are - more serious than that. they are saying the disrepair is a potentially risk to life and that would suggest some structural defects in many schools. another headache for the government and more pressure on the treasury. the story says 30 billion available because of higher education reform. i am sure that has been immediately earmarked for something else in the ever increasing list of public spending priorities. but another bad news story for the treasury.— priorities. but another bad news story for the treasury. shyama, the other story — story for the treasury. shyama, the other story on _ story for the treasury. shyama, the other story on the _ story for the treasury. shyama, the other story on the observer, - story for the treasury. shyama, the other story on the observer, plansl other story on the observer, plans to succeed keir starmer? that other story on the observer, plans to succeed keir starmer?- other story on the observer, plans to succeed keir starmer? that is the sto in its to succeed keir starmer? that is the story in its essence, _ to succeed keir starmer? that is the story in its essence, less _ to succeed keir starmer? that is the story in its essence, less treating i story in its essence, less treating has been — story in its essence, less treating has been uncovered, discovered at a
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fumiraiser— has been uncovered, discovered at a fundraiser which was attended by ian mckeiteh _ fundraiser which was attended by ian mckellen and michael cashman and an lgbto _ mckellen and michael cashman and an lgbtq activist called linda riley. he picked up the bill. i don't know if they— he picked up the bill. i don't know if they think he is going to lobby for the _ if they think he is going to lobby for the lgbtq group as he progresses through— for the lgbtq group as he progresses through the labour party. it seems an obvious — through the labour party. it seems an obvious line of action really as keir starmer is starting to struggle a little _ keir starmer is starting to struggle a little bit — keir starmer is starting to struggle a little bit and west treating is so clearty _ a little bit and west treating is so clearly arising staff. but the bill for this— clearly arising staff. but the bill for this buffy and drinks, which was a fundraiser— for this buffy and drinks, which was a fundraiser was £4600 and the event raised _ a fundraiser was £4600 and the event raised £20,000, which will be divided — raised £20,000, which will be divided between west treating and kim ted _ divided between west treating and kim led beta. an election pamphlet is 25p, _ kim led beta. an election pamphlet is 25p, and — kim led beta. an election pamphlet is 25p, and they have given enough
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mohey_ is 25p, and they have given enough money to— is 25p, and they have given enough money to produce 40,000 election pamphlets when they are neck standing — pamphlets when they are neck standing in their constituencies. it is so _ standing in their constituencies. it is so sad _ standing in their constituencies. it is so sad that when labour does fundraising, 10,000 is a good amount — fundraising, 10,000 is a good amount. forthe fundraising, 10,000 is a good amount. for the tories, that would be a starting — amount. for the tories, that would be a starting bid on a holiday in rome — be a starting bid on a holiday in rome. ,, w' be a starting bid on a holiday in rome. ,, ." ., , be a starting bid on a holiday in rome. ,, w ., , ., .~' rome. quick maths and quick assessment _ rome. quick maths and quick assessment of _ rome. quick maths and quick assessment of that _ rome. quick maths and quick assessment of that story, - rome. quick maths and quick assessment of that story, sol rome. quick maths and quickj assessment of that story, so i rome. quick maths and quick - assessment of that story, so i will talk about one and andrew lee will turn to the sunday express where their focus is turn to the sunday express where theirfocus is rishi sunak is ready to help on cost of living crisis. some would ask, where has the help been already? bud some would ask, where has the help been already?— been already? and i think unfairly because the _ been already? and i think unfairly because the treasury _ been already? and i think unfairly because the treasury has - been already? and i think unfairly because the treasury has already | because the treasury has already done quite a lot trying to alleviate the huge pressure on people�*s finances. of course, coming on the back of an unprecedented public spending as a result of the pandemic. borrowing is at record
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high at 2.3 trillion, 96% of gdp. we are paying 70 billion in interest. the public finances are in a terrible state, but the treasury is doing what it can to help. it has increased the national living wage, universal credit relief, we have all had the council tax rebate of £150. i have, it came into my account in april. the tv licence fee frozen, cold weather payments and winter fuel payments. the treasury is doing a lot. people don�*t seem to like to talk about that. a lot. people don't seem to like to talk about that.— a lot. people don't seem to like to talk about that. shyama, no escaping the --aers talk about that. shyama, no escaping the papers tomorrow _ talk about that. shyama, no escaping the papers tomorrow for _ talk about that. shyama, no escaping the papers tomorrow for rishi - talk about that. shyama, no escaping the papers tomorrow for rishi sunakl the papers tomorrow for rishi sunak because of return to the sunday times, their line is new pressure on rishi sunak as one in five pulled into higher tax bands? he rishi sunak as one in five pulled into higher tax bands?— into higher tax bands? he has increased _ into higher tax bands? he has increased national _ into higher tax bands? he has increased national insurance | into higher tax bands? he has. increased national insurance and white _ increased national insurance and while he — increased national insurance and while he has raised the limit at the
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bottom _ while he has raised the limit at the bottom for— while he has raised the limit at the bottom for those who are amongst the lowest _ bottom for those who are amongst the lowest earners, he has not raised the threshold for those who have tipped _ the threshold for those who have tipped over £40,000 into the next tax band — tipped over £40,000 into the next tax band. they are getting squeezed twice because they are not getting any kind _ twice because they are not getting any kind of incentive, it isjust more — any kind of incentive, it isjust more and _ any kind of incentive, it isjust more and more money being taken out. it more and more money being taken out. it says— more and more money being taken out. it says that _ more and more money being taken out. it says that will affect one in five workers. — it says that will affect one in five workers, according to an analysis done _ workers, according to an analysis done for— workers, according to an analysis done for the sunday times, which is 2.5 done for the sunday times, which is 25 million _ done for the sunday times, which is 2.5 million more taxpayers dragged into rates— 2.5 million more taxpayers dragged into rates of 40% or 45%. they are factoring _ into rates of 40% or 45%. they are factoring into that, the fact that wages _ factoring into that, the fact that wages are going up at the moment and possibly— wages are going up at the moment and possibly wages are going up most in that earning area. i am not sure how he read _ that earning area. i am not sure how he read this, — that earning area. i am not sure how he read this, because the fact is, we have — he read this, because the fact is, we have att— he read this, because the fact is, we have all got to pay the price and those _ we have all got to pay the price and those of— we have all got to pay the price and those of us — we have all got to pay the price and those of us who are earning a bit more _ those of us who are earning a bit more as— those of us who are earning a bit more as you _ those of us who are earning a bit more as you go up the scale are going _ more as you go up the scale are going to — more as you go up the scale are going to pay more. i am slightly with andrew on that, which is i see
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that it _ with andrew on that, which is i see that it hurts. — with andrew on that, which is i see that it hurts, but i'm not quite sure _ that it hurts, but i'm not quite sure what _ that it hurts, but i'm not quite sure what the other option is. the former brexit _ sure what the other option is. tie: former brexit secretary sure what the other option is. t'te: former brexit secretary david sure what the other option is. tte: former brexit secretary david davis is saying it is hugely concerning, andrew, how do you read this one? there aren�*t that many leaders the government can pull. unlike in the pandemic, if it turns on the public spending tap again, that will only aggravate inflation. the government is on a tight rope and it is very limited in what it can do to alleviate the pressure on people�*s finances. he alleviate the pressure on people's finances. ., ., finances. he took about that pressure _ finances. he took about that pressure across _ finances. he took about that pressure across the - finances. he took about that pressure across the board, | finances. he took about that i pressure across the board, the sunday telegraph talking about ministers turning on the bank of england. unprecedented this, shyama, in many ways? it england. unprecedented this, shyama, in many ways?— in many ways? it is, the bank of encland in many ways? it is, the bank of england were — in many ways? it is, the bank of england were only _ in many ways? it is, the bank of england were only given - in many ways? it is, the bank of england were only given full - in many ways? it is, the bank of. england were only given full control under— england were only given full control under gordon brown. it is not that lon- under gordon brown. it is not that long they— under gordon brown. it is not that long they have been motoring,
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untroubled by the political agenda. the had _ untroubled by the political agenda. the had to come a point where people would _ the had to come a point where people would say, _ the had to come a point where people would say, we don't like this any more _ would say, we don't like this any more that — would say, we don't like this any more. that moment appears to have come. _ more. that moment appears to have come, according to the telegraph. it points— come, according to the telegraph. it points out— come, according to the telegraph. it points out that cabinet ministers are questioning the independence of the bank— are questioning the independence of the bank of england. they are fitting — the bank of england. they are filling the andrew bailey, the governor, isn't doing enough and should _ governor, isn't doing enough and should be — governor, isn't doing enough and should be held to account. if you remember, _ should be held to account. if you remember, andrew halliday, quit as the chief— remember, andrew halliday, quit as the chief economist of the bank last year and _ the chief economist of the bank last year and has been put in charge of ieveiiing _ year and has been put in charge of levelling up. i should think he is grinding — levelling up. i should think he is grinding his teeth at the moment. i find it— grinding his teeth at the moment. i find it very— grinding his teeth at the moment. i find it very difficult with the story — find it very difficult with the story is— find it very difficult with the story is to know who is really to blame — story is to know who is really to blame for — story is to know who is really to blame for anything. we have a government that is so good at pointing — government that is so good at pointing its finger at absolutely everyone, but never, ever showing any kind _ everyone, but never, ever showing any kind of— everyone, but never, ever showing any kind of introspection or humiiity~ _ any kind of introspection or humility. it is very difficult to know — humility. it is very difficult to know if, _ humility. it is very difficult to know if, for me, if andrew bailey
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realty— know if, for me, if andrew bailey really is — know if, for me, if andrew bailey really is a — know if, for me, if andrew bailey really is a bad person for what he is doing. — really is a bad person for what he is doing. or— really is a bad person for what he is doing, or if this is something that— is doing, or if this is something that is— is doing, or if this is something that is coming from 10 downing street— that is coming from 10 downing street and he is responding to. andrew, — street and he is responding to. andrew, quickly on this, it will be amplification of the volume on this do anything? the amplification of the volume on this do anything?— amplification of the volume on this do an hint ? ., , , ., do anything? the government seems to be havin: a do anything? the government seems to be having a go — do anything? the government seems to be having a go at _ do anything? the government seems to be having a go at the _ do anything? the government seems to be having a go at the independence - be having a go at the independence of the bank of england, but is it having a go at its performance? to what extent is that related to it independence? its target for inflation is 2%, is a big problem. but it is down to it independence, that remains to be seen? shyama, we will move on — that remains to be seen? shyama, we will move on before _ that remains to be seen? shyama, we will move on before we _ that remains to be seen? shyama, we will move on before we get _ that remains to be seen? shyama, we will move on before we get to - that remains to be seen? shyama, we will move on before we get to the - will move on before we get to the football, which i am sure you are keen to talk on.— keen to talk on. earlier we were lookin: keen to talk on. earlier we were looking at _ keen to talk on. earlier we were looking at the _ keen to talk on. earlier we were looking at the sunday _ keen to talk on. earlier we were looking at the sunday express l keen to talk on. earlier we were i looking at the sunday express and keen to talk on. earlier we were - looking at the sunday express and it said rishi _ looking at the sunday express and it said rishi sunak had told readers he
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would _ said rishi sunak had told readers he would do _ said rishi sunak had told readers he would do everything to help them. very wise — would do everything to help them. very wise words, the sunday express doesn't _ very wise words, the sunday express doesn't have that many readers, so if he does _ doesn't have that many readers, so if he doesjust help them, it will be a _ if he doesjust help them, it will be a get — if he doesjust help them, it will be a get out ofjail free card. what be a get out of “ail free card. what about the be a get out ofjail free card. what about the story — be a get out ofjail free card. what about the story on _ be a get out ofjail free card. what about the story on the _ be a get out ofjail free card. mrngt about the story on the independence? £240 million earmarked for cancelling out our uk carbon emissions, which was the green home grant _ emissions, which was the green home grant had _ emissions, which was the green home grant had been returned by the business — grant had been returned by the business department to the treasury. but again. _ business department to the treasury. but again, £5,000 is what the maximum _ but again, £5,000 is what the maximum was you could get under the green _ maximum was you could get under the green homes grant. so if there were 48,000 _ green homes grant. so if there were 48,000 green home grants that were not given— 48,000 green home grants that were not given out. i don't know if that is a function — not given out. i don't know if that is a function of the grant not being large _ is a function of the grant not being large enough, all the work required been so _ large enough, all the work required been so great, that even if it were
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large _ been so great, that even if it were large enough people are not willing to commit— large enough people are not willing to commit to it. what i am seeing here _ to commit to it. what i am seeing here is— to commit to it. what i am seeing here is why— to commit to it. what i am seeing here is why that money has been returned. — here is why that money has been returned, why it has not been applied — returned, why it has not been applied for by people wanting to insulate — applied for by people wanting to insulate their homes, change their heating _ insulate their homes, change their heating systems and generallyjust brin- heating systems and generallyjust bring down their carbon footprint. andrew, — bring down their carbon footprint. andrew, we are into extra time, which brings us to the sunday telegraph. their cups runneth over, give as a sentence on liverpool�*s fa cup victory over chelsea? cup victory over chelsea ? nail—biting, cup victory over chelsea? nail—biting, absolutely incredible. nobody likes penalties, even when you are not particularly a fan of either side. would be nail—biting to go into sudden death like that. but both of them are winners. great for the winners. _ both of them are winners. great for the winners, but _ both of them are winners. great for the winners, but for _ both of them are winners. great for the winners, but for the _ both of them are winners. great for the winners, but for the losers, - the winners, but for the losers, thatis the winners, but for the losers, that is full—time. thank you to both of you. that�*s it for the papers this hour.
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shyama and andrew will be back at 11:30 for another look at the papers. goodbye for now. for the whole of human history, we have had no choice but to live off the land — literally. everything that we use comes from planet earth. now, some of those resources — rare, precious metals, for example — are really useful for scientific and climate research, but they are really difficult to mine. other resources are just, well, running out. all systems are ready...
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and all of this begs the question — as we venture into space, how are we going to live? where are we going to live? and what are we going to live on? so, as humans, we have been exploiting the resources on earth for as long as we have been around, but instead of looking down now at what is underneath our feet, we are starting to look up and see what else is out there. ultimately, what we are looking at doing is going to an asteroid, landing on it, taking samples and then, kind of bringing them back. yes, we�*re going asteroid mining! and these are the concept designs for machines that could one day be part of a new gold rush — well, actually, platinum rush — that could potentially be worth quintillions of pounds. and this is the first part of that robot — the claw that stops it from floating away from the asteroid by gripping onto the surface hard. the grippers that they use are essentially derived from, ultimately, things like
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gecko pads and if you look at, like, the ends of tarantula�*s feet,

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