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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 15, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. our headlines today: ukraine win eurovision, taking the title on the public vote in a symbolic show of support. the uk came second. thank you for supporting ukraine. this victory is for every ukrainian. nhs prescription charges in england are to be frozen as part of the government's efforts to ease the cost—of—living crisis.
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ten people have been killed in a shooting at a supermarket in buffalo in new york state. the gunman is in custody. i'm from wembley, where liverpool have done the double after beating chelsea on penalties to lift the fa cup. good morning. we've got more spells of warm sunshine today, but also some heavy showers and the odd thunderstorm pushing northwards. i'll bring you all the details here on bbc breakfast. it is sunday 15 may. our main story: ukraine has won the eurovision song contest in a symbolic show of public support after the country was invaded by russia. the uk's sam ryder came second, its best result for more than 20 years. ryder won the most votes from the music industry experts, but when the public votes were added, ukraine's kalush orchestra leapt to first place. mark lobel has this report from turn.
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let the eurovision song contest 2020 to begin! let the eurovision song contest 2020 to beuin! .,, h let the eurovision song contest 2020 to beuin! .,, �*, ., ., ., to begin! europe's fanfare of fund came to turin. — to begin! europe's fanfare of fund came to turin, with _ to begin! europe's fanfare of fund came to turin, with its _ to begin! europe's fanfare of fund came to turin, with its unique - to begin! europe's fanfare of fund | came to turin, with its unique mix of glam, glitter and glorious tunes. a europe seeing war for the first time in three decades coming together in a plea for peace before the entries took to the stage. the sparkles of spain belting it out with a sequin field dance, anything but slow mode. the hosts, italy, with a heavy falsetto all—male love song. sweden, eurovision once gave birth to abba. remember than? the hand washer of serbia asking why meghan markle's hair is so shiny.
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and in the uk, with spaceman, sam ryder hoping his stratospheric notes would match his points up against ukraine's folk hip—hop number, one band member staying to fight, the others hitting special permission to leave the country. —— getting special permission to leave the country. as the votes came in from the europeanjuries, it was heading for a close race. the uk, sweden, spain and ukraine leading at the top, before it went to the public votes. (kg; , top, before it went to the public votes-_ they - top, before it went to the public votes._ they did - top, before it went to the public votes._ they did so . top, before it went to the public i votes._ they did so well. votes. 183 points! they did so well. there it is- — votes. 183 points! they did so well. there it is. but _ votes. 183 points! they did so well. there it is. but sam _ votes. 183 points! they did so well. there it is. but sam ryder - votes. 183 points! they did so well. there it is. but sam ryder was - there it is. but sam ryder was .'. ed there it is. but sam ryder was -|- ed at there it is. but sam ryder was pipped at the _ there it is. but sam ryder was pipped at the post _ there it is. but sam ryder was pipped at the post by - there it is. but sam ryder was pipped at the post by ukraine, | pipped at the post by ukraine, eurovision triumph in its darkest
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moment. the spaceman had hoped to take the uk over the moon, but in the end public was with ukraine. huge congratulations to ukraine. for the very worthy second placed sam, relief at the uk's best result in years, a success to build on next time. ., ., , , time. the whole team held themselves with such credit, _ time. the whole team held themselves with such credit, such _ time. the whole team held themselves with such credit, such positivity, - with such credit, such positivity, being in that arena and witnessing just this tangible energy of life was incredible.— was incredible. everybody is standinu was incredible. everybody is standing un- _ was incredible. everybody is standing up. everybody- was incredible. everybody is standing up. everybody is. was incredible. everybody is - standing up. everybody is enjoying. everybody — standing up. everybody is enjoying. everybody is in peace in this arena. fighting _ everybody is in peace in this arena. fighting back on the ground, standing proud on stage, living up to its national slogan — glory to ukraine. to its national slogan - glory to ukraine. . ~ to its national slogan - glory to ukraine. ., ~ , ., to its national slogan - glory to ukraine. . ~' ,, to its national slogan - glory to ukraine. ., ~ . to its national slogan - glory to ukraine. ., . ., ~ ukraine. thank you so much. thank ou for ukraine. thank you so much. thank you for sunporting _ ukraine. thank you so much. thank you for supporting ukraine. - ukraine. thank you so much. thank you for supporting ukraine. this - you for supporting ukraine. this victory is for every ukrainian. what
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victory is for every ukrainian. what an emotional _ victory is for every ukrainian. what an emotional night. _ it was a huge night for ukraine, and this was the reaction from one viewing party in the capital, kyiv. the group of friends who had gathered to cheer on kalush 0rchestra gave us their verdicts on the big win. cheering we won here in eurovision, and now these whole feelings are like, yes, and we will win also the war with russia. find like, yes, and we will win also the war with russia.— like, yes, and we will win also the war with russia. and all of europe is with us, — war with russia. and all of europe is with us, and _ war with russia. and all of europe is with us, and it _ war with russia. and all of europe is with us, and it was _ war with russia. and all of europe is with us, and it was feeling - war with russia. and all of europe is with us, and it was feeling like l is with us, and it was feeling like we are _ is with us, and it was feeling like we are all— is with us, and it was feeling like we are all together. in is with us, and it was feeling like we are all together.— is with us, and it was feeling like we are all together. in ukraine, we have war- it _ we are all together. in ukraine, we have war. it is _ we are all together. in ukraine, we have war. it is not _ we are all together. in ukraine, we have war. it is not a _ we are all together. in ukraine, we have war. it is not a time _ we are all together. in ukraine, we have war. it is not a time to - we are all together. in ukraine, we have war. it is not a time to have l have war. it is not a time to have fun, _ have war. it is not a time to have fun, but— have war. it is not a time to have fun, but we — have war. it is not a time to have fun, but we need _ have war. it is not a time to have fun, but we need to _ have war. it is not a time to have fun, but we need to have - have war. it is not a time to have fun, but we need to have fun. . have war. it is not a time to have| fun, but we need to have fun. we need _ fun, but we need to have fun. we need to— fun, but we need to have fun. we need to live, _ fun, but we need to have fun. we need to live, and _ fun, but we need to have fun. we need to live, and we _ fun, but we need to have fun. we need to live, and we need - fun, but we need to have fun. we need to live, and we need to- fun, but we need to have fun. we| need to live, and we need to have understanding _ need to live, and we need to have understanding and _ need to live, and we need to have understanding and a _ need to live, and we need to have understanding and a feeling - need to live, and we need to have understanding and a feeling of. need to live, and we need to have i understanding and a feeling of life. how many— understanding and a feeling of life. how many years— understanding and a feeling of life. how many years we _ understanding and a feeling of life. how many years we gathered - understanding and a feeling of life. how many years we gathered herel understanding and a feeling of life. l how many years we gathered here to celebrate the eurovision, because it
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is like — something that is like... unites us in the whole of europe, and we feel like we're part of europe. for us it very important to be a part of this.— be a part of this. thank you for every one _ be a part of this. thank you for every one of— be a part of this. thank you for every one of your _ be a part of this. thank you for every one of your votes. - be a part of this. thank you for every one of your votes. you . be a part of this. thank you for - every one of your votes. you voted not for _ every one of your votes. you voted not for ukraine. you voted for peace — 0ur correspondentjoe inwood is in lviv in the west of ukraine. we will come onto the situation in ukraine in a second, but clearly a hugely symbolic night last night, that public vote propelling ukraine to the top of that leaderboard. how has it gone down where you are? well, pretty much as you would imagine. the sounds you could hear their, i think out of our hotel windows we heard similar things as the news was announced. this is a country that takes eurovision very seriously. i know in the uk sometimes people are a bit snooty about it, think it is not something
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to be taken that seriously, but here it matters, and i think this year it matters more than anything. that chance of glory to ukraine could be heard as well. it was a really, really important night. there was one little kind of sour note, though. nothing to do with the competition, but as the victory was announced, the air raid sirens here in lviv went off and those carried on for a few minutes or so. we don't think any missiles landed here, but there are reports that some were intercepted. 0n social media, some people were saying that as the rest of the world were celebrating with ukraine, sending missiles was russia's way of sending a message. yes, quite, and let speak of that invasion and current developments. in the east of the country, in kharkiv, the mayor saying that russian troops are actually retreating from the city and that some ukrainians are finally able to move back. what we know about that so—called declared victory in kharkiv as far as ukraine is
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concerned?— kharkiv as far as ukraine is concerned? ~ , ., ., concerned? well, we started to get re orts of concerned? well, we started to get reports of this. _ concerned? well, we started to get reports of this, the _ concerned? well, we started to get reports of this, the suggestion - concerned? well, we started to get reports of this, the suggestion that| reports of this, the suggestion that it was happening yesterday morning. we have sort of had indications that the russians were in retreat and then yesterday the mayor of kharkiv confirmed that ukraine's second city, the city they say is a fortress city, has basically earned that name. the russians have been pushed all the way back, we think, well out of artillery range, and thatis well out of artillery range, and that is why we are seeing people starting to return. this is a city that has been under constant bombardment for seven days, people living in subways and pretty much no life on the streets. now we think thatis life on the streets. now we think that is starting to change. it is going to take time. the city is seriously damaged but some life is going to start returning to kharkiv. for now, thanks very much. foreign ministers from nato countries are resuming talks in berlin this morning as finland and sweden move closer tojoining the military alliance. both countries have seen a surge in public support for membership since russia invaded ukraine. meanwhile, president zelenksy says the situation in ukraine's donbas region remains difficult, despite a large convoy of mariupol residents being evacuated to nearby
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zaporizhzhia last night. frances read reports. in the dead of night, a convoy of what is estimated to be up to 1000 cars carrying refugees from mariupol. it has arrived in ukrainian controlled zaporizhzhia after waiting days for russian troops to allow them to leave. finally, some fresh supplies and food. elsewhere, near geneva, more damage to homes by russian bombs but the russian soldiers have left ear now and retreated back towards the border. it is the same in kharkiv, where the mayor says the battle has been won. ukrainian soldiers had to replicate the success of kharkiv elsewhere, testing out grenade launchers supplied by european allies. but the president of
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ukraine, president zelensky, no success is not yet secured. —— knows the success is not yet secured. in the black sea, nato forces are training, while foreign ministers resume talks in berlin, it is these elite troops who would be relied upon if conflict spread outside of ukraine. finland and sweden are moving get closer to joining the nato alliance, with finns expected to request membership and sweden reversing previous opposition to joining. 0vernight the us secretary of state arrived in berlin to smooth out objections from member state turkey, but the kremlin warned nato expansion would have repercussions. russian propaganda videos show its
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troops on the offensive, but make no mistake: the loss of kharkiv would be significant to moscow. and nato special forces will continue to train together, showing strength, where any perceived weakness could lose diplomatic ground. ten people have been killed in a shooting at a supermarket in the city of buffalo in the state of new york. the gunman, who has been identified as an 18—year—old white man, is in custody. the authorities say the attack was racially motivated. our new york correspondent nada tawfik reports. a busy grocery store in a predominantly black community, this was the shooter's intended target. the horror started immediately in the parking lot, as the gunman emerged from his car heavily armed and wearing tactical gear, he shot four people, killing three of them. two eyewitnesses, it was clear he came to do maximum damage. imilieu
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two eyewitnesses, it was clear he came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him — came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him shooting, _ came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him shooting, he _ came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him shooting, he shot - came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him shooting, he shot a - first saw him shooting, he shot a woman, he shot a deacon, he shot another woman, and then he went in the store and started shooting again. at the store and started shooting aaain. �* �* ., the store and started shooting aaain.�* �* ., . again. a retired buffalo police officer was — again. a retired buffalo police officer was working _ again. a retired buffalo police officer was working security i again. a retired buffalo police i officer was working security and shot the gunman, but he was unharmed because of his armour stop the shooter then returned fire, killing the security guard. the entire horrific episode of people being killed in cold blood in the store was streamed live online. 0fficials was streamed live online. officials said evidence showed the attack was racially motivated. taste said evidence showed the attack was racially motivated.— racially motivated. we are investigating _ racially motivated. we are investigating this - racially motivated. we are investigating this incident| racially motivated. we are i investigating this incident as racially motivated. we are - investigating this incident as both a hate crime and a case of racially motivated violent extremism. aha, a hate crime and a case of racially motivated violent extremism. a white su - remacist motivated violent extremism. a white suoremacist who _ motivated violent extremism. a white supremacist who has _ motivated violent extremism. a white supremacist who has engaged - motivated violent extremism. a white supremacist who has engaged in - motivated violent extremism. a white supremacist who has engaged in an i supremacist who has engaged in an act of— supremacist who has engaged in an act of terrorism and will be prosecuted as such, in a coldhearted, cruel, calculating way. a military _
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coldhearted, cruel, calculating way. a military style execution targeting people _ a military style execution targeting people who simply want to buy groceries. people who simply want to buy aroceries. , , , . ., , ., ~ groceries. the suspect was taken into custody _ groceries. the suspect was taken into custody alive _ groceries. the suspect was taken into custody alive after _ groceries. the suspect was taken into custody alive after putting i groceries. the suspect was taken | into custody alive after putting his gun to his neck and threatening to shoot himself. he has been identified as an 18—year—old white male and has been charged with murder in the first degree. distraught community members have been gathering at the scene, trying to come to terms with the fact that a toxic mix of guns and racism has ended their neighbours' lives in an instant. nhs prescription charges in england are to be frozen at their current rates as part of government efforts to ease the rising cost of living. the department of health and social care says it will save people £17 million overall. however, prescriptions remain free across the rest of the uk. gareth barlow reports. is the cost of living rises, for the first time in over a decade the cost of prescriptions will not. in a
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typical year, of prescriptions will not. in a typicalyear, charges of prescriptions will not. in a typical year, charges usually increase in line with inflation, but with inflation soaring at the fastest rate for 30 years, ministers have decided to freeze charges at their current rates. the move only affects patients in england, as people living elsewhere in the uk already don't have to pay. the freeze means a single prescription will remain at £9.35, while a three month prescription payment will continue to be just over £30. but there are calls for the government to go further with its support. those are the sort of people, the squeezed middle people, who don't get free prescriptions because they are not on the medicines that qualify or they are not on the income that qualifies or the age that qualifies. they often have to make decisions about which medicine they need, and those medicines are all prescribed for a reason, because those patients need that treatment. the decision of whether to buy medicines to treat high blood pressure or use that money to feed
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her children is the situation faced by faith, a single mother of two who says she can't afford the vital drugs. i says she can't afford the vital dru:s. ., says she can't afford the vital dru . s. ., ., ,., , drugs. i would rather save my children than _ drugs. i would rather save my children than myself, - drugs. i would rather save my children than myself, and - drugs. i would rather save my. children than myself, and that's drugs. i would rather save my- children than myself, and that's why sometimes i can't afford the prescription. so it won't go far, because it's not necessarily the outgoings which is affecting me, it is the fact that everything is going up is the fact that everything is going up in price, and i am notable is the fact that everything is going up in price, and i am not able to up in price, and i am notable to afford up in price, and i am not able to afford everything that i used to be, including my prescription. hat including my prescription. not eve one including my prescription. not everyone in — including my prescription. not everyone in england has to pay for their medicines. in fact, the department of health says 18 labour centre prescriptions are dispensed free of charge. two people benefiting from age, income, maternity or medical based exemptions. however, laura cockrum, chair of the prescription charges coalition, says it is time for the government to review who is eligible for free prescriptions. government to review who is eligible forfree prescriptions. irate government to review who is eligible for free prescriptions.— for free prescriptions. we really are urging _ for free prescriptions. we really are urging the _ for free prescriptions. we really are urging the government - for free prescriptions. we really are urging the government to i are urging the government to actually review the prescription charge exemption list. it was put together over 50 years ago when some conditions like hiv didn't even
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exist, but also at the same time, there weren't life—saving treatments for things like asthma and maybe parkinson's and ms so we think that actually it is really important that the government does overhaul the prescription charge exemption list. but this announcement today is very welcome from the health secretary. the department of health and social care estimates the freeze will save patients in england £17 million overall, and it isjust one measure that the government hopes may help people with the rising cost of living. a number of changes to national rail services and timetables come into effect today. some services suspended due to covid are being restored and there is a new station due to open in the scottish borders. however, there has been criticism over cuts to the number of trains operating on some lines in the north of england. many families are feeling the strain as the cost of living rises, but for some, worrying about money is robbing them of time they don't have.
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the charity marie curie says one in four people in scotland with a terminal illness are experiencing poverty, and they are calling for more support from the government. 0ur social affairs correspondent chris clements reports. melody a mother of one and has been given 12—18 months to live. currently, i am given 12—18 months to live. currently, iam now given 12—18 months to live. currently, i am now a stage iv metastatic cancer, and it is everywhere, it is in my brain, it is in my bones, it isn't lungs, hips, knees, bone marrow, just everywhere. she is on a reduced pay and her husband, tom, has cut his hours to provide her care. after a six—month wait she is claiming disability benefits to help with extra costs, but money is still tight. this past winter we had the heating on lower bucca constant to keep the
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house warm because having bone cancer, as much as i do, ifeel the cold. we got a bill estimating that we are spending £1700 on — certainly on the electricity last year. we have now been told that we are probably going to be spending another £2500. the issue we are going to have is if we are going to keep the house warm for me again because of the bone cancer, we are not going to be able to as put much money on it because we put in 300-£400 money on it because we put in 300—£400 each month on the gas and electricity. it is taking a huge chunk out of our budget. because i would really like to go and do things before i die, you know, like your bucket list, and i can't afford it, i can't do it. she is not alone, a study released by marie curie and loughborough university found one in four scots
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in the final year of life our experience in poverty. using data on poverty levels and mortality rates claims that more than 8000 people each year will die in poverty in scotland. the charity is going from action from both scottish and uk governments to help those like melanie. we are calling on the scottish government to ensure that when the winter heating assistance is rolled out much later this year, that it is available and eligible for all to many people, even those under 65, and for the uk government, we are really calling on them to make the state pension available to terminally ill people of working age to ensure that nobody dies in poverty, and they are not experiencing and beilpajah. the scottish government said it is interested in a number of measures, including a time requirement to fast—track benefit requirements. the uk government said it has fast tracking access to ensure more people get help at the end of life, sooner. i am trying to make memories with my
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son before i die, to do things that we have done together as a family so he has something to remember me and others by. in regards to me passing, yes, i am worried that tom is not going to be financially secure with joseph. and if things continue to escalate, cost wise, he is going to struggle, he is really going to struggle. chris clements, bbc news, inverness. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. basking in the sunshine yesterday, sarah, but taking a little bit of a turn today? it is, yes, good morning to you at home. yesterday we had temperatures 23.5 degrees, lots of warm, spring sunshine. today, more sunshine but also heavy downpours. but, it is a glorious start to the day. cromarty
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and highland, beautiful sunrises, and highland, beautiful sunrises, and packed up and down the uk this morning. spells of warm sunshine will come through the day but we have got heavy showers, some gundary. downpours in the forecast as well. we would all see them because they can be hit and miss. they are moving in from the south and heading north on this feature you can see. the high pressure is just nudging off to the east. this is the radar over the last few hours, showing where we have had the bring already, happy through central england, wales, with thunderstorms across the isle of wight and sommerset. the downpours will continue pushing their way north, gradually through today. it will affect much of england and wales, pushing into part of northern ireland and southern scotland through the middle of the day. a return to sunnier, drier conditions in the south, quite warm air in places with temperatures around 20-23 in places with temperatures around 20—23 in at that sunshine towards the south, cooler under the cloud towards the north, under belfast. in aberdeen we have the breeze coming
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in from the north sea. cooler than yesterday as well. into the evening hours, the first area of showers continue its progress north across scotland. the next batch of heavy downpours roles and from the south, affecting parts of england, wales, and heading into northern ireland in the early hours of monday morning. you may hear thunder overnight tonight. tomorrow, we start with mild and humid, muggy air. fairly uncomfortable for sleeping for some of us with the muggy edwards itself. but, monday, the showers continue their progress north. heavy downpours and a chance of thunderstorms again for northern ireland, northern england. the band offering pushers across scotland through monday. for the south, a return to sunnier drier conditions, the odd scattered showers and thunderstorms. temperatures mild, around 23 for the south, butjust 11 for aberdeen with the rain and of the easterly breeze as well. looking
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through next week, fairly unsettled conditions. low pressure pushers and from the west as we head into tuesday, high—pressure keeping things dry in the east. a breezy and west picture towards northern ireland, the western fringes of britain. for many central and eastern areas, a southerly breeze drawn in a head of the rain, so dry and quite warm. tuesday probably the warmest of the week, 25, even 26 towards the south—east, but for most of us we are looking at a warm tuesday. through the middle of the week, moorang to get out of the way but it looks like higher pressure will build in behind as we head thursday. rain on wednesday, still quite warm through the middle of the week. thank you, we'll see you later. it's been a big weekend of fa cup football, after liverpool beat chelsea in yesterday's penalty shootout in the men's game. and today, it's the turn of chelsea's and manchester city's women. chetan is at wembley for us. good
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what a brilliant day of football yesterday. the weather was scorching hot here at wembley. the the weather was scorching hot here at wembley-— at wembley. the liverpool fans en'o ed at wembley. the liverpool fans enjoyed the _ at wembley. the liverpool fans enjoyed the sunshine _ at wembley. the liverpool fans enjoyed the sunshine with - at wembley. the liverpool fans enjoyed the sunshine with that| enjoyed the sunshine with that penalty win. another penalty win over chelsea but the branding has changed quickly. they have a working overnight for the first time in fa cup history — the men's and women's finals are being applied was the same weekend. we have chelsea against manchester city coming appealing here later this afternoon, thatis appealing here later this afternoon, that is at 2:30 p.m., kick off. it was chelsea beaten again byjurgen klopp's liverpool again today, less than two months after they lost in a shootout in that league cup final, that got little the first review of the season. liverpool have made a two out of what could be a possible three or four. they have a champions' league final at the end of the month and still in with a shout for the premier league title as well. it was another thrilling zero—zero, plenty of chances but
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still no goals between these two in the 240 minutes of the two finals this season. in the end it went to a shootout, it was liverpool who held the nerve to get over the line. more on that right now. 150 years, and liverpool's name is engraved on the trophy. another event this weekend where you are represented by waving a flag, although, in the fa cup it is not a case of nepal, butter printer breed. four trophies in a season, chelsea trying to avoid a three fa cup final defeat. luis diaz's finish didn't match his clever run. 30 minutes in, the reds were forced into a substitution. it was a key player, the top scorer mo salah. in the first half, then after the break
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chelsea settled, coming closer to getting on the scoresheet when we had a free kick, alonso grazing the post. as full—time need, a final chance. again, so close. so, that meant extra time, and a chance for extra words of encouragement between players and from the fans. when another team scored, penalties will decide the winner. so when mason mount missed, successful liverpool spot kick would win it. applause. liverpool's euro. it was the toughest game i played this season but we expected. it toughest game i played this season but we expected.— but we expected. it was normal, it was final. but we expected. it was normal, it was final- we _ but we expected. it was normal, it was final. we have _ but we expected. it was normal, it was final. we have two _ but we expected. it was normal, it was final. we have two more - but we expected. it was normal, it was final. we have two more cups| but we expected. it was normal, it i was final. we have two more cups to lo. go. we will go. — we will see. liverpool go. we will see. liverpool have the fa cup! the second trip to wembley this season— the second trip to wembley this season and the second time they have
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lifted the _ season and the second time they have lifted the trophy here. the quest for the _ lifted the trophy here. the quest for the quadruple, four trophies in one season, — for the quadruple, four trophies in one season, lives on. nottingham forest lead sheffield united 2—1 after the first leg of their championship play—off semifinal. this was forest's second goal, scored afterjoe lolley caught blades defenderjohn egan. he set up brennanjohnson to make it 2—0. and in the 91st minute, sheffield united got one back. sander berg gave them hope, going into the second leg on tuesday night. celtic finished their scottish premiership season out in style after thrashing motherwell. they'd already won the title earlier in the week but scored six goals with kyogo scoring twice. celtic finished 25 points behind rivals rangers last season, but have recovered brilliantly
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in manger ange postecoglou's first season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we do, season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we do, and, season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we do, and, you season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we do, and, you know, season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we do, and, you know, there season in charge. we kind of get a lot of rewards for what we do, and, you know, there is a lot of pressure to add to but this week is at the special bed. this week is at the special bed. this week is, you know, you just can't explain what it means notjust for myself but when i look around and what it means for other people, and the joy we have been able to give it this year. it stays with you for ever. seven premier league games today. manchester city can go six points clear if they win at west ham. tottenham can leap above arsenal into fourth, with at least a point against burnley, who will be hoping themselves to put some distance between themselves and third from bottom leeds, who are at home to brighton.
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we obviously know that we need to win. it is a must win? no, but three points is massive and minimum one, right? so we need to find a way to really, again, turn the momentum. we have two matches, this match could be the defining moment in the season, for sure. it was scorching hot here today, pouring with rain at the moment. let's hope the weather gets better for the woman's fa cup final. holders chelsea take on manchester city at wembley. they already have taken the suitability, can they take the fa cup? just a city beat chelsea already, can they do it again? the showpiece of out of the woman's football calendar will be played by two teams who have pulled everything out of the bag this season. 0ne
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two teams who have pulled everything out of the bag this season. one week ago, chelsea became the first club in women's super league history to win three titles in a row. absolutely spectacular! after cam ai . n absolutely spectacular! after campaign of _ absolutely spectacular! after campaign of sheer _ absolutely spectacular! after campaign of sheer grit - absolutely spectacular! after campaign of sheer grit and i campaign of sheer grit and breathtaking audacity. when it has come round to, you know, the big crunch games, quarter—finals, semifinals, we have coached really well over the years because the team has been well prepared, mentally, i think for prepared, mentally, ithink for that. also, prepared, mentally, i think for that. also, the dressing room is unbelievable. finding just sustained success. the chelsea boss said she held off on celebrations to spare the hangover, to remain focused. because standing on the way of their domestic double hopes is a side that since the turn of the year have shown terrific form, with a 13—match winning run in all competitions. manchester city haven't been without their problems. a rocky start of the season and key players missing
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through injury. but, they adapted, regain momentum and went on to win the league got back in march. that's when they ended chelsea's unbeaten run of the year, added a champions' league spot to that so far fa cup performances and they go to wembley with renewed confidence. an emotional moment for chloe kelly, scoring herfirst goal, recovering from that horrific knee injury. we start together and we believe we will always qualify for champions' league — will always qualify for champions' league. to be in the fa cup final, third _ league. to be in the fa cup final, third place — league. to be in the fa cup final, third place similarly, i think third place similarly, ! think nobody— third place similarly, i think nobody really expected it other than ourselves _ ourselves. remarkably, given the preeminence of these two teams in the game, this will be the first time they go head—to—head and fa cup final. and, both will be hoping to get their grip on more silver. they have just killed the floodlights, on cue. ifeel like i need to be like steve mclaren and have a brolly. the rain is really
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pelting down, 55,000 tickets sold for the women's fa cup final this afternoon, that is a record. if it is anything in terms of the intensity of yesterday's men's final, that will be a great thing, but we just want goals in normal time as well. i am not sure if we will get them, but we will keep our fingers crossed for that. bind will get them, but we will keep our fingers crossed for that.— fingers crossed for that. and our fin . ers fingers crossed for that. and our fingers crossed _ fingers crossed for that. and our fingers crossed that _ fingers crossed for that. and our fingers crossed that maybe - fingers crossed for that. and our fingers crossed that maybe the l fingers crossed for that. and our i fingers crossed that maybe the sun breaks out over wembley. brute fingers crossed that maybe the sun breaks out over wembley.- fingers crossed that maybe the sun breaks out over wembley. we will be back a little later. _ stargazers in the uk could be in for a treat tonight as two rare moon events take place at the same time. if it is not too cloudy then you should be able to see a total lunar eclipse at about 4:30am in the morning. not only that, but it will be an extra special super blood moon. to tell us more, we are joined by astronomer drjenifer millard. nice to see you this morning. first of all, i am not entirely sure what the weather forecast will be like for that time of the morning. do you
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think we're going to get a clear view of this? i think we're going to get a clear view of this?— view of this? i am sure that someone. _ view of this? i am sure that someone, somewhere - view of this? i am sure that someone, somewhere in i view of this? i am sure that| someone, somewhere in the view of this? i am sure that - someone, somewhere in the uk, will get a clear view. i am not sure in wales, where i am, whether it will be clear or not, but i am hoping that some will.— that some will. first of all, the ech-se, that some will. first of all, the eclipse. tell — that some will. first of all, the eclipse, tell us _ that some will. first of all, the eclipse, tell us about - that some will. first of all, the eclipse, tell us about what - eclipse, tell us about what particular kind of eclipse this is. what is happening? this particular kind of eclipse this is. what is happening?— particular kind of eclipse this is. what is happening? this is a total lunar eclipse. _ what is happening? this is a total lunar eclipse, so _ what is happening? this is a total lunar eclipse, so when _ what is happening? this is a total lunar eclipse, so when the - what is happening? this is a total lunar eclipse, so when the moon | lunar eclipse, so when the moon passes through the earth's shadow. it doesn't happen too often. we get a total eclipse every two or three years and parcel eclipses two or three times a year. so they are quite rare events, especially over the uk, so it is something to have a look at because the moon is going to turn this beautiful blood red colour. unfortunately this one is not perfectly positioned for us. in america they have the greatest view, but nasa will be broadcasting even if it is cloudy. an opportunity to
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see this rare celestial events. bind see this rare celestial events. and where does _ see this rare celestial events. and where does the _ see this rare celestial events. and where does the orange effect on the super blood moon happen? that where does the orange effect on the super blood moon happen?- where does the orange effect on the super blood moon happen? that is a reall aood super blood moon happen? that is a really good question. _ super blood moon happen? that is a really good question. it _ super blood moon happen? that is a really good question. it is _ super blood moon happen? that is a really good question. it is the - super blood moon happen? that is a really good question. it is the same | really good question. it is the same reason the sky is blue and the sunrise is red. it is all to do with sunlight shining through our atmosphere. sunlight is made up of all the colours of the rainbow, so the longer wavelength red light in the longer wavelength red light in the shorter wavelength blue light. and the shorter wavelength blue light is easily scattered by dust particles in our atmosphere. when the sun is high up ahead, the blue light is scattered through our atmosphere and so this guy appears blue and at sunset and sunrise, that sunlight has to travel through so much more atmosphere, and that blue light actually gets scattered away and all we're left with is that red and all we're left with is that red and orange, the longer wavelength light. the only sunlight that is reaching the moon during a total lunar eclipses that sunlight that is travelling through our atmosphere, so the blue light is scattered the only light that reaches us is that longer wavelength red and orange
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light, which is why a total lunar eclipse appears red. we don't quite know how red it is going to be, because it depends on how dusty our atmosphere is. it could be orange or that glorious red colour that we always hope for.— always hope for. that is fascinating. _ always hope for. that is fascinating. for- always hope for. that is fascinating. for people | always hope for. that is - fascinating. for people getting up at a normal time, 7:30 a.m., fascinating. for people getting up ata normaltime, 7:30 a.m., will you see anything of this at all? unfortunately the moon is setting as we are getting into the eclipse, so from the uk it starts about 2:30am but the real blood red colour will appear at about 4:30am. that is when the moon will be really low on the south—west horizon, and then we are battling the dawn, so it will be ever harder to see the moon. but you can always have a look online afterwards, because nasa will be live streaming the event, and i am sure lots of people with better views than us will be taking photographs and posting them on social media. we will get to see it one way or another, even if it is cloudy. one way or another, even if it is cloud . ,, , , one way or another, even if it is cloud. ,, , , , ., ., cloudy. quite, because short of movin: cloudy. quite, because short of moving to _ cloudy. quite, because short of moving to america _ cloudy. quite, because short of moving to america for- cloudy. quite, because short of moving to america for the - cloudy. quite, because short of. moving to america for the event,
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what is the best way to get a view? you can see it with the naked eye, presumably. you can see it with the naked eye, presumably-— you can see it with the naked eye, presumably. exactly. this is one of those events _ presumably. exactly. this is one of those events where _ presumably. exactly. this is one of those events where you _ presumably. exactly. this is one of those events where you don't - presumably. exactly. this is one of those events where you don't need presumably. exactly. this is one of i those events where you don't need a telescope or binoculars. the west commack best way to have a look is with the naked eye. you want a nice clear south—west horizon. if you can get somewhere higher, that is great, or near the coast. and you want to have a hot drink and wrap up warm, because the weather is getting warmer but when you sit outside for a while it can get chilly. and just watch as that moon is setting. it will turn that beautiful blood red colour, which will be a wonderful sight. colour, which will be a wonderful siuht. ., , ., . ~' colour, which will be a wonderful siuht. ., , ., ., ,, ., colour, which will be a wonderful siuht. ., , ., . ~ colour, which will be a wonderful siuht. ., , ., ., ,, , sight. lovely to talk to you this morning- _ sight. lovely to talk to you this morning. thank _ sight. lovely to talk to you this morning. thank you _ sight. lovely to talk to you this morning. thank you for - sight. lovely to talk to you this morning. thank you for being l sight. lovely to talk to you this | morning. thank you for being up bright and early on a sunday morning. i do congratulate people for being up at this time, particularly if you were up late last night watching eurovision, as both of us were. i last night watching eurovision, as both of us were.— last night watching eurovision, as both of us were. i am quite excited about that eclipse, _ both of us were. i am quite excited about that eclipse, because - both of us were. i am quite excited about that eclipse, because it - both of us were. i am quite excited l about that eclipse, because it means for once we get to see something thatis for once we get to see something that is a benefit for working the stupid hours that we both work.
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now on breakfast, it's time for this week's travel show. this week, on the show... meeting mummies in chile. wow, there are so many mummies here, vivien. grannies in austria. this is the open kitchen where our grandmas and grandpas bake their lovely cakes. and cabbies in england. oh, wow, look at this! this is amazing, john.
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in the chilean region of arica, on the northern fringes of the country's atacama desert, you find clues that something significant lies beneath the ground. hidden in the sand are some of the oldest mummified bodies in the world, evidence of an overlooked culture that once lived and thrived here on the western coast of south america. it's amazing how close these skeletons are to the surface and, apparently, there is layer after layer after layer of bodies going down as low as 2m underground. this is crazy. ifeel quite strange walking on the dead here. between 7,000 and 1,500 bc, the hunter—gatherer chinchorro people called this area home and developed complex mummification practices which have astounded 21st—century researchers.
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last year, chinchorro burial culture was officially recognised by unesco, who placed it on their world heritage list. and many hope this will transform awareness of these remarkable mummified bodies. when you think of mummies, you think of the ancient egyptians wrapped in bandages but these guys here, there are sticks where their bones are, there's masks and what's fascinating is these smaller mummies of children and babies. wow. behind the scenes, at san miguel de azapa museum, the careful study and preservation of the majority of the chinchorro mummies takes place. there are so many mummies here, vivien. how many? yes, we have about 70 mummies, chinchorro mummies, in this store.
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let me show you. it's quite small. what can you tell me about this mummy? because if it was me, i would be very scared to work here. what do you love about yourjob? it's very interesting.
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but these fragile relics, which date back as much as 2,000 years before the egyptian mummies, are deteriorating at an increasing rate, in part due to climate change. for vivien, it's best to do as little as possible with the samples they have. with the museum's facilities lacking air—conditioning, rising humidity levels are a big threat to the mummies, a problem that's hoped to be solved by a vast new $25 million museum in construction on the grounds of the current one.
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so is the local people's relationship with these mummies starting to change? further along the coast, at the small fishing village of caleta camarones, just some statues and a chinchorro—themed restaurant indicate that this is,
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in fact, the closest town to one of the world's top sites where the chinchorro mummies have been found. there are said to have been so many mummies buried here that locals find them on a regular basis. so before we came here, some people said you could see the mummies in the ground and some said you couldn't, so i wasn't really sure what we'd find, but while we were having lunch, we got talking to the guy who runs the place and he said he can show us some mummies in the ground, and its two minutes down the road so we're on our way. currently, the mummies buried in the ground are being left there by archaeologists for their protection. and as we approach, we take great care not to disturb any of the remains. wow, it's so close to the road.
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what was it like growing up here? did you see many mummies when you were a child? attitudes have changed towards the mummies a lot, and now they've got unesco world heritage status. has this changed your life?
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so all these shells that have been used by the chinchorro people. while chinchorro tourism here may be some way off making its mark for the people, for vivien, this land tells a remarkable story. so vivien, how many mummies, chinchorro mummies, do you think are buried in the hills here?
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wow, that was unbelievable. you know, it's one thing to see these things in a museum and totally a different experience to be there in real life. like, i could have been standing next to one of the oldest mummified human remains in the world. and with the care and recognition the mummies are now getting, the unique chinchorro culture seems set to be remembered for some time to come. well, if the chinchorro have piqued your interest in a desert getaway, there is much more to see around the world. why not start your desert explorations with the world's biggest sand desert, the sahara, stretching out across much of northern africa? the question is, where to begin?
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morocco and egypt are both popular and each with distinct and fascinating cultures. get close to wildlife on safari in southern africa's kalahari desert. there's a huge range of animals to see here and it's a spectacular way to learn about this challenging desert environment. and for those in search of a thrill, dune bashing can be done all over the world, like in the deserts of the united arab emirates. 0r take to the skies with an early—morning hot—air balloon ride. still to come on the travel show: cat moh is back with a packed day in manchester. and we visit the cafe in vienna challenging the idea that they don't make them like they used to. they really have old recipes from the grandmothers. secret ingredients.
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so don't go away. as restrictions relax, i'm travelling across the uk to see how ready the country's top attractions are, to meet the people getting us excited about travel again, and hear their plans for the new normal. today's trip is in the north—west of england. hello from manchester, home to two very famous football clubs, a vibrant music scene, and trams. now, i know there's way more to the city than that, so i've enlisted the perfect person to show me around, let's go. so this is no ordinary taxi ride. hello. so i've organised the weather for you today as well, not that i needed to, because it's always sunny in manchester.
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so when we book with you, there is guaranteed sunshine. guaranteed sunshine. good on you. john runs city tours in his all—electric taxi followed by afternoon tea in his cab. he came up with the concept as a way to supplement his income during lockdown. my three most popular tours are football, music and coronation street. the last one being the longest—running british soap opera. but, really, the tour can be whatever you want. so i've asked for a route that traces the history of the city to see how it's shaped the manchester we know today. i won't spoil the tour, but the city has been a hotbed of innovative thinkers. it's where the suffragettes movement was born. it's where the duke of bridgewater brought canals which cut the price of coal in half, spurring manchester to be the world's first industrial city. and it's where karl marx formed his ideas for the communist manifesto, at this very spot, which happens to be in the world's oldest
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english—speaking library. even people from manchester don't realise that you can come in here and actually soak up the atmosphere. it's definitely worth booking an appointment and coming here. come on, you ready for part two? you look so excited! i don't know which one i wanna start with first! i was thinking about how i could do something different. maybe people were nervous about being in crowds or being in places where there was a lot of people, that the afternoon tea taxi tour would be ideal because you are encapsulated in the back of a taxi. it's proved really popular. i have to pinch myself sometimes. how was it as a taxi driver in lockdown? really, really difficult. as a tour guide as well, there were no tourists, and it's just started to come back again now as restrictions start to end. so you think this is something you'll continue then? i'm definitely going to continue it, yes.
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before the pandemic, manchester was the third most visited city in the uk after london and edinburgh by international visitors. 0ne huge draw is its iconic music scene. famous bands to come out of manchester? the stone roses. 0asis. the smiths. simply red. elbow! 0k! not had elbow! oh, really? but to find the bands of tomorrow, the northern quarter is where to go. it's home to some of the city's liveliest music venues, so i've come to night and day cafe. over the years it's gained legendary status for showcasing big name bands in their early days. what was it like to suddenly playing in front of a live audience again? kind of strange at first, wasn't it? it was quite odd to being really loud. i was like, '0h, my god,
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i don't know what to do' because i'm not on my living room pretending i can play synthesizer. it's good to see regular fans and people, it's a really big part of our social lives as well, isn't it? it's definitely picking up now- with people more confident to come out now and stand in crowds, which wasn't before. - it's that return of confidence in people that breathing life back into venues like this. i'll be back laterfor the gig but there is a more thing i need to do. i am no football expert but i do know that it was here in manchester that the first professional football league was set up back in 1888. i've been told, if you can't make a game, it's well worth doing a stadium tour. first, before we begin, how many of us are from manchester? that's a big group that's not come from manchester.
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football is undoubtedly the city's biggest cultural export with hundreds of millions of fans either supporting man united or man city globally. not that anyone would openly admit supporting the former here. is this the best bit so far? yes. go on then, which is yourfavourite one? de bruyne. theyjust got all the kids to line up at the top of the tunnel and walk out through the pitch side. it's so cute. you just walked through the tunnel? yeah. how was it? it was fun. i actually kind of felt like a footballer. it's my dream job to be a footballer. how long have you wanted to walk through that tunnel? nine years, almost. nine years? yeah. because it's your birthday, right? yeah, it's my birthday on monday. is this the best birthday present? probably, yeah, it's the best birthday present i've ever had by a mile. mum, don't cry. laughter.
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i'm a man city fan for the weekend. 0k, very diplomatic. he has to be. time to get back to see the gig, as it wouldn't be a complete day of manchester if you didn't experience some of its famous nightlife. manchester is definitely springing back from a very tough few years. but what struck me most is how proud the mancunians are of their city. a cultural hotspot of the north. finally this week, we are off to the austrian capital of vienna, where a trip isn't complete without a generous helping of their traditional coffee and cake. we've been into one cafe which is transforming the experience, especially staffed by the elderly in an effort to bring back a taste of the good old days.
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we have a lot of good cakes, especially in vienna, but the best cakes you get from grandma. the idea was really to create a space for young and old to come together and where grandmas and grandpas can bake their home—made recipes. we are a public living room, and as you can see, decorations, you come inside, you kind of feel the atmosphere. you are at grandma's living room, you have nice music, nice smell, follow me, i'll show you where the cakes are baked. this is our open kitchen where the grandpas and grandmas bake their lovely cakes, different cakes — we have chocolate, apple strudel, everything. everything is fresh, everything is home—made. it's kind of the core and heart of the vollpension. we have been here for such a long
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time so it's all kind of a family for me. so i have a very close connection to the people here. my name is marianne and i am living in vienna. i am 77 years old and i have lived here since 48 years. i must say, old people, please, go out. you can work in vollpension. you can cook, you can speak with the guests and it's better than not alone in this time and when you go at home and feel i have a good day. many old peoples are alone at home and now in vollpension it's like a family. i am the host. myjob is to receive the guests. i speak with the guests and it's nice when the guests laugh and i think it's myjob.
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people at home are always very lonely, of course, old people, and i think it'sjust a great idea to communicate with them. iwe've heard that they really have| old recipes from the grandmothers. with secret ingredients. yes, we are very excited. the pandemic hit us and we had to close our coffeehouses and we put our heads together and said, ok, there is no more coffeehouse but what can we do with our grandmothers? so we had the brilliant idea of taking grandmas' knowledge and putting it online so we built an online baking academy where you can learn baking from a grandmother, either through on—demand videos or via baking courses.
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that went very, very well. and we even kind of went international. we invited grandmothers and grandfathers from all over the world to join us with their baking knowledge. right now we are about 35 elderly people working for us. at the cafe, the kind of production room and also for live baking courses and everything. we'd love to hire even more but we are still a small social business. a lot of elder people in austria live by themselves so they are a bit isolated. they have so much to give and theyjust need a place where they can express them.
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that's all for now. coming up next time: the forgotten smells of the old world. christa's in holland to find out why scientists are attempting to recreate europe's ancient odours and how following your nose could enrich your travels. it's lovely! such a really good air freshener! in the meantime, you can keep up with all our travels on the bbc iplayer. and don't forget, we are on social media too. just search bbc travel show and look for the little blue logo. we are on facebook and instagram. until next time, from all of us here in chile, it's goodbye.
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welcome to breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. 0ur headlines today: ukraine win eurovision, taking the title on the public vote in a symbolic show of support. the uk came second. thank you for supporting ukraine. this victory is for every ukrainian. slava ukraini! nhs prescription charges in england are to be frozen as part of the government's efforts to ease the cost—of—living crisis. ten people have been killed in a shooting at a supermarket in buffalo in new york state.
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the gunman is in custody. good morning. iam here at good morning. i am here at wembley stadium, where liverpool beat chelsea on penalties to lift the fa cup. good morning. we've got more spells of warm sunshine today, but also some heavy showers and the odd thunderstorm pushing northwards. i'll bring you all the details here on bbc breakfast. it is sunday 15 may. our main story: ukraine has won the eurovision song contest, in a symbolic show of public support after the country was invaded by russia. the uk's sam ryder came second, its best result for more than 20 years. the uk won the most votes from the music industry experts, but when the public votes were added, ukraine leapt to first place. mark lowen has this report from turin.
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let the eurovision song contest 2020 to begin! europe's fanfare of fun came to turin, with its unique mix of glam, glitter and glorious tunes. a europe seeing war for the first time in three decades coming together in a plea for peace before the entries took to the stage. the sparkles of spain belting it out with slomo, her sequin—filled dance anything but. the hosts, italy, with a heady, falsetto all—male love song. sweden — eurovision once gave birth to abba. remember them? the hand washer of serbia asking why meghan markle's hair is so shiny.
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and in the uk, struggling in recent years. but with space man, sam ryder hoping his stratospheric notes would match his points up against ukraine's folk hip—hop number — one band member staying to fight, the others getting special permission to leave the country. as the votes came in from the europeanjuries, it was heading for a close race — the uk, sweden, spain and ukraine leading at the top before it went to the public votes. 183 points! he did so well. there it is. but sam ryder was pipped at the post by ukraine — eurovision triumph in its darkest moment. the space man had hoped to take the uk over the moon, but in the end, the public was with ukraine. huge congratulations to ukraine.
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for the very worthy second—placed sam, relief at the uk's best result in years — a success to build on next time. the whole team held themselves with such credit, such positivity. being in that arena and witnessing just this tangible energy of light was incredible. everybody is standing up. everybody is enjoying. everybody is in peace in this arena. fighting back on the ground, standing proud on stage, living up to its national slogan — slava ukraini, glory to ukraine. thank you so much. thank you for supporting ukraine. this victory is for every ukrainian. slava ukraini! oh, what an emotional night.
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it was an emotional night, thank you to graham norton, valiant as ever for the bbc last night. we're joined now by our arts correspondent david sillito, who is in turin for us. david, what has the reaction been like where you are? there is that phrase emotional rollercoaster. we were in the press room and there was a little moment when the votes started to come through when everyone suddenly looked across to the british journalists, going, hang on a second, you are getting some points. there was a surprise, and then it turned into amazement, and then i suddenly thought to myself, why am i here? i think i need to be with the brits. we knew of this pub called the isle of skye where they all gather in turin, and i hot footed it across the city because i wanted to watch the faces. i suddenly thought, oh my goodness, what are we watching? last year, remember, it
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was null points. there is that phrase from john cleese, it is not the despair, it is the hope he couldn't stand. i think that is what it was all about. hope that possibly something amazing was about to happen for the uk, who had had such a terrible run of luck. at the end, all you can say about sam ryder is what an amazing song, what an amazing singer, and what a fantastic effort he made. he can only have his head held high. but this was always going to be ukraine's night. this was about ukraine, and i have spoken to a member of the orchestra before the event and the only thing you can say is thatjust getting on that stage was a victory for them. they said, you know, it is a song contest. forthem,
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said, you know, it is a song contest. for them, this was part of a national struggle. eurovision always tries to say we try to avoid politics, no politics on stage. but just the sheer fact that they were on that stage was a statement to the rest of the world. when that public vote came through, i can only say one thing. eurovision realised it was part of a bigger and more momentous, more important things in eurovision normally is.— eurovision normally is. thank you so much. i eurovision normally is. thank you so much- i am — eurovision normally is. thank you so much- i am glad _ eurovision normally is. thank you so much. i am glad you _ eurovision normally is. thank you so much. i am glad you made - eurovision normally is. thank you so much. i am glad you made it- eurovision normally is. thank you so much. i am glad you made it to - eurovision normally is. thank you so much. i am glad you made it to the l much. i am glad you made it to the british pub for the celebrations. and if you are waking up this morning thinking it was just a singing contest, as david was saying, there is no denying a huge note for ukraine. this group of friends gathered at a viewing party in the capital, kyiv. this was their reaction. cheering. we won here in eurovision,
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and now these whole feelings is like — yes, and we will win also in the war with russia. and all europe is with us, and it was feeling like we're all together. in ukraine, we have war. it's not a time to have fun, but we need to have fun. l we need to live, and we need to have understanding and feeling of life. - how many years have we gathered here to celebrate the eurovision? because it's something that, like, unites us in the whole of europe. and we feel like we are part of europe, and for us it's very important to be a part of this. thank you for every of your votes. you voted not for ukraine, you voted for peace. that really is the message that came out of last night. 0ur correspondentjoe inwood
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is in lviv in the west of ukraine. did you get a sense last night of how many people in ukraine were able to watch it? we know that many have left, but what access was there to be able to view that and to see some of that celebration?— of that celebration? well, if the noises i heard _ of that celebration? well, if the noises i heard out _ of that celebration? well, if the noises i heard out of— of that celebration? well, if the noises i heard out of my - of that celebration? well, if the | noises i heard out of my window of that celebration? well, if the - noises i heard out of my window were anything to go by, a lot of people have access. you could hear cheering across the city, shouts of slava ukraini, glory to ukraine. this year it was more of a big deal. it was a moment of national celebration in a period when there is so little to celebrate. 0bviously period when there is so little to celebrate. obviously i was in bed nice and early so i could get up and speak to you but we heard parties going on late into the night. as we came down for a bit of breakfast before speaking to you this morning, there were people still there having a glass of wine and celebrating. i think it is fair to say that this has gone down very well, and people here will be taking some comfort in otherwise very dark times.
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particularly when it came to that public vote, it gave a real sense of the support for ukraine. let's talk about the events on the ground. the uk ministry of defence has released its latest intelligence update, saying that russia's offensive in the donbas has lost momentum. what evidence are they basing that on? , , ., , ., , , on? yes, this was a very interesting one. for me, the most striking thing it said also was that they think the russians have lost the third of the ground forces they used to invade backin ground forces they used to invade back in february. they think that there has been significant, significant losses. as you say, that invasion, the one around the donbas now, is installing, is grinding to a halt. in terms of evidence, there is lots of intelligence that comes from the ground, lots of satellite imagery and what we call open source intelligence, and also the reports from ukrainian forces. we don't always have a perfect picture, and even the british government don't, but i think there is a lot of
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evidence. you will have seen images from a few days ago of the entire battalion tactical group wiped out as it tried to cross the donetsk river. the fact that forces have been pushed back from around the city of kharkiv. however, there are places where the russians have made gains, slow though they may be, coming from the south and also mariupol, where the defenders are confined to the steelworks. thank ou for confined to the steelworks. thank you for that _ confined to the steelworks. thank you for that date. _ confined to the steelworks. thank you for that date. we _ confined to the steelworks. thank you for that date. we will- confined to the steelworks. thank you for that date. we will be - confined to the steelworks. thank you for that date. we will be backj you for that date. we will be back with you a little later. we are joined now from the ukrainian city kharkiv by taras topolia, an army medic and the lead singer of the band antytila, who recently released a song with ed sheeran. it is terrific to talk to you. thank you for taking the time this morning. it feels kind of ridiculous to start by talking about the eurovision song contest, but i know it is something that has meant so much to people in ukraine at the moment. were you able to watch it and follow it last night? hello
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everybody- — and follow it last night? hello everybody. unfortunately - and follow it last night? hello | everybody. unfortunately not, and follow it last night? hello everybody. unfortunately not, but, you know, of course i know that ukraine won the eurovision song contest this year. and it is, of course, a big pleasure for us because we understand that the eurovision contest is notjust a song contest. it also has a political spirit this year especially. this huge support to ukraine from european countries is very important for us. it is very essential for us. very important for us. it is very essentialfor us. and you know very important for us. it is very essential for us. and you know what i am thinking about now? i am thinking that we must win this war and to organise the new contest in ukraine, and to find a place. maybe it will be ukrainian yalta in
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crimea, so we can do a lot to make it happen in ukraine next year. we have a lot of work, and it motivates. it gives us power to fight. believe me, it is notjust celebrating for us. it is a huge symbolic event that keeps us going and gives us the power to fight. yes, and you say it keeps you going. i wonder what difference it makes, maybe just mentally, when you see the support from so many countries and that public vote that really propel ukraine right to the top of that leaderboard. what difference will it make for people there right now? i will it make for people there right now? , ., ., ., ,, will it make for people there right now? , ., ., .,~ ., will it make for people there right now? , ., ., ., ., , now? i 'ust want to make an example from now? ijust want to make an example from my own — now? ijust want to make an example from my own story- — now? ijust want to make an example from my own story. believe _ now? ijust want to make an example from my own story. believe me, - now? ijust want to make an example from my own story. believe me, the. from my own story. believe me, the war is notjust bravery times. the
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war, it is sometimes very scary. when you feel the support, you feel the goosebumps on your skin. it defeats the feelings of scary — i don't know how to say it right. in that time, you turn out this scare and you just do your work, because you know that behind you, near you, the people of the whole free world with you. it is very essential. believe me, when the celebrities are talking about ukraine and support ukraine, when the politicians, european politicians, support ukraine, especially when the united kingdom, great britain and the
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people — like a brave irish legend comes to ukraine and supports us, bono, and says some essential words, some important words, and to all of the world — it gives power, believe me. you know, my generation especially, for my generation, for the young generation of millennials who are fighting now, who are by their hands doing the future of our country and the future of the whole of europe, it is very important when very famous people and very famous politicians support us. we have been talking about development you get a sense that ukrainian forces are in control of the city now? yes, it makes me smile, you know,
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because it is a lot of success. here in kharkiv district, in a couple of place, military forces standing nearby — now standing near the ukraine—russian border, like five, three kilometres. so we have pushed out the occupiers from this territories, and keep doing the step—by—step. we are recapturing our small and big cities around kharkiv, and, you know, it isjust a matter of time when we will make free, all the contrary, free from russian occupiers. so we achieve success every day. it is really good to talk to you again, do you find out how things are going where you are at the moment. thank you so much for your time.
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thank you so much for your time. thank you, goodbye. that was taras, a musician, he talks to ours from a place of war, it is extraordinary. extraordinary that we can have those lines of communications with him but he finds himself in this position, and ever russia this song contest emir, it feels like a distant dream —— ukraine host. it does feel absurd talking about it in that context, but of course that are boring support that we saw, it makes such a huge difference, as we were hearing there. really interesting to see that support last night. i should say, by the way, we will speak to james newman, an entry last yearfor eurovision.
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ten people have been killed in a shooting at a supermarket in the city of buffalo in the state of new york. the gunman, who has been identified as an 18—year—old white man, is in custody. the authorities say the attack was racially motivated. our new york correspondent nada tawfik reports. a busy grocery store in a predominantly black community, this was the shooter's intended target. the horror started immediately in the parking lot. as the gunman emerged from his car heavily armed and wearing tactical gear, he shot four people, killing three of them. to eyewitnesses, it was clear he came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him shooting, he shot a woman, he shot a deacon, he shot another woman, and then he went in the store and started shooting again. a retired buffalo police officer was working security and shot the gunman, but he was unharmed because of his armour. the shooter then returned fire, killing the security guard. the entire horrific episode of people being killed in cold blood
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in the store was streamed live online. officials said evidence showed the attack was racially motivated. we're investigating this incident as both a hate crime and a case of racially motivated violent extremism. a white supremacist who has engaged in an act of terrorism and will be prosecuted as such, in a coldhearted, cruel, calculating way. a military—style execution targeting people who simply want to buy groceries. the suspect was taken into custody alive after putting his gun to his neck and threatening to shoot himself. he has been identified as an 18—year—old white male and has been charged with murder in the first degree. distraught community members have been gathering at the scene, trying to come to terms with the fact that a toxic mix
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of guns and racism has ended their neighbours' lives in an instant. the prime minister will tell northern ireland's politicians tomorrow to break the political deadlock and restore power—sharing at stormont. the democratic unionists have refused to nominate a deputy first minister until changes are made to the post—brexit trading deal. we're joined now by our political correspondent david wallace lockhart. what is borisjohnson hoping to achieve? what is available here to the government? still no government in vain and the national— still no government in vain and the national party emerged from those elections _ national party emerged from those elections is the largest party, nominating a first minister. the dup is the _ nominating a first minister. the dup is the biggest unionist party, with the right— is the biggest unionist party, with the right to nominate the deputy first minister. but, they are refusing _ first minister. but, they are refusing to do so, leading to
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stalemate. the reason dup is refusing — stalemate. the reason dup is refusing to do so is because of the northern— refusing to do so is because of the northern ireland protocol, part of the brewit— northern ireland protocol, part of the brexit deal that means there are checks— the brexit deal that means there are checks from goods from england coming — checks from goods from england coming into northern ireland, to keep— coming into northern ireland, to keep the — coming into northern ireland, to keep the border open, so boris johnson — keep the border open, so boris johnson is _ keep the border open, so boris johnson is going to be entered northern— johnson is going to be entered northern ireland tomorrow, delivering what he calls a tough message — delivering what he calls a tough message that the executive must get back up— message that the executive must get back up and running. but largely the intended _ back up and running. but largely the intended audience for his message is the eu _ intended audience for his message is the eu because he wants the european union _ the eu because he wants the european union to— the eu because he wants the european union to be _ the eu because he wants the european union to be more flexible on making changes— union to be more flexible on making changes to _ union to be more flexible on making changes to the northern ireland protocot — changes to the northern ireland protocol. they have said they are willing _ protocol. they have said they are willing to — protocol. they have said they are willing to negotiate but he doesn't feel they— willing to negotiate but he doesn't feel they are going far enough. he will talk— feel they are going far enough. he will talk about the necessity to act, the — will talk about the necessity to act, the uk taking it into their own hands _ act, the uk taking it into their own hands of— act, the uk taking it into their own hands of the eu would go far enough. the consequences could be significant, and it would be controversial, it would not go down well with _ controversial, it would not go down well with the eu and could end up in something _ well with the eu and could end up in something resembling a trade war. thank— something resembling a trade war. thank you — something resembling a trade war. thank you very much.
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nhs prescription charges in england are to be frozen at their current rates as part of government efforts to ease the rising cost of living. the department of health and social care says it will save people £17 million overall. however, prescriptions remain free across the rest of the uk. gareth barlow reports. as the cost of living rises, for the first time in over a decade, the cost of prescriptions will not. in a typical year, charges usually increase in line with inflation. but with inflation soaring at the fastest rate for 30 years, ministers have decided to freeze charges at their current rates. the move only affects patients in england, as people living elsewhere in the uk already don't have to pay. the freeze means a single prescription will remain at £9.35, while a three—month prescription payment will continue to be just over £30. but there are calls for the government to go further with its support. those are the sort of people, the squeezed middle people, who don't get free prescriptions because they're not on the medicines that qualify, or they're not
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on the income that qualifies or the age that qualifies. they often have to make decisions about which medicine they need. and those medicines are all prescribed for a reason, because those patients need that treatment. the decision of whether to buy medicines to treat high blood pressure or use that money to feed her children is the situation faced by faith, a single mother—of—two who says she can't afford the vital drugs. i would rather save my children than myself, and that's why sometimes i can't afford the prescription. so it won't go far, because it's not necessarily the outgoings which is affecting me. it's the fact that everything is going up in price and i'm not able to afford everything that i used to be, including my prescription. not everyone in england has to pay for their medicines. in fact, the department of health says 18 labour centre prescriptions
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——in fact, the department of health says 89% of prescriptions are dispensed free of charge to people benefiting from age, income, maternity or medical—based exemptions. however, laura cockram, chair of the prescription charges coalition, says it is time for the government to review who is eligible for free prescriptions. we really are urging the government to actually review the prescription charge exemption list. it was put together over 50 years ago, when some conditions like hiv didn't even exist. but also, at the same time, there weren't life—saving treatments for things like asthma, and maybe parkinson's and ms. so we think that actually it's really important that the government does overhaul the prescription charge exemption list, but this announcement today is very welcome from the health secretary. the department of health and social care estimates the freeze will save patients in england £17 million overall, and it isjust one measure that the government hopes may help people with the rising cost of living.
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shall i go? shalli go? creatures shall i go? creatures of! laughs _ shall i go? creatures of! laughs- _ laughs. it is because i had a mouthful of coffee. do you want to do the rest? i was basking in the beautiful sun yesterday. this morning, i know it isn't so pretty, except it is where you are, sarah. where is that behind you? yes, good morning, this is devon. they had the downpours already, and they have swept through. we return to the sunshine after the rain. many of us will have a similar story, downpours around but we will also see some spells of warm sunshine, so it is a mixed day. some sun, some showers, some thunderstorms, a bit of everything in the forecast. thunderstorms rolling in from the south already. you can see it is shifting north through the day. high pressure that was with us yesterday
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is squeezed to the east. but not too far away. this is the radar and where we see the lightning over recent hours, particularly through the english channel, isle of wight, somerset and dorset. they push north now. 0ver somerset and dorset. they push north now. over the next few hours we will continue to see heavy showers and potential thunder for galloway, for instance, northern ireland as well. the showers tend to ease throughout the afternoon, some sunny spells. towards are south, more sunshine working in across southern england and wales. it will be warm in the south this afternoon. 22, 23, cooler under the cloud in the north particularly towards the east coast because the breeze is coming off the cool north sea. into the evening, the showers in the north peter out overnight. then we see the next batch of heavy showers and thunderstorms from the south. some could be heavy into the early hours of monday morning. you could be woken up to thunder and lightning across central england, wales,
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northern ireland, and it will be muqqy northern ireland, and it will be muggy for sleeping, northern ireland, and it will be muggy forsleeping, quite northern ireland, and it will be muggy for sleeping, quite humid 14-15 muggy for sleeping, quite humid 14—15 overnight low. clear skies across scotland, looking fresher. through monday, we will continue to see the frontal system pushing north. that is the band of heavy rain will start the day weather. northern ireland, northern england, heading into scotland. 0ne northern ireland, northern england, heading into scotland. one or two thunderstorms mixed in with the rain in the north, quite cool with the easterly breeze across scotland. further south, a return to sunny skies through the day. wanted to showers bubbling up. they could be an isolated storm, but temperatures are around 22—23 toward southern and the south—east. near 11 in aberdeen with the onshore breeze. through next week, it is looking unsettled. another area of low pressure trying to move in through tuesday, bringing wet and breezy weather to western parts of the uk. further east, it will be warm and at the sun with temperatures possibly 25—26 on
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tuesday being the warmest of the week. we'll see a little bit later. what did i drop? are you all right? the sunday morning programme is on at nine o'clock, let's find out what is on. good morning! europe loves again, thatis good morning! europe loves again, that is what people were shouting last night, as the uk came second in eurovision. how long will the love last was to prepares to to fly off to belfast as tensions go over brexit and northern ireland. we all speak to the minister. ed miliband will be here to talk about labour leadership and the cost of leadership. i will talk to the former health secretaryjeremy hunt who says the nhs was at times a rogue system covering up suffering from a cover—up culture that failed patients and staff. and, a voice from the heart of the pentagon, as russia threatens finland over its plans to join nato. russia threatens finland over its plans tojoin nato. i russia threatens finland over its plans to join nato. i will talk to the press secretary, john kirkby, all that at nine o'clock. thank you sophie!
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a number of significant changes to train timetables will come into effect from today, including the restoration of some services that were cancelled during the height of the covid pandemic. however, there's been criticism over cuts that will affect the north of england. we're joined now by the independent�*s travel correspondent, simon calder, who is at london euston station. lovely to see you, is this just a return to normality, albeit with a few changes? let return to normality, albeit with a few changes?— return to normality, albeit with a few chances? ., ,, ., few changes? let me talk you through what is happening- — few changes? let me talk you through what is happening. twice _ few changes? let me talk you through what is happening. twice a _ few changes? let me talk you through what is happening. twice a year, - few changes? let me talk you through what is happening. twice a year, the l what is happening. twice a year, the middle of may or december the timetable change and gradually over timetable change and gradually over time you expect them to see improvements. during covid, we saw a large number of services card, partly due to staff shortage but also due to passenger shortage, and passenger numbers still remain stubbornly below 80%. but, from tomorrow — from today, you should actual local station and through the
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working week find it rather more trains running, all of same number. although, as you hand, in the north of england we could possibly see if you are trains running on particular lines. the labour party is very upset with that. the train operators say they are moving around assets to get the best possible outcome. here at london euston, for instance, the hub for the west coast, the memo for the midlands, southern scotland, you are going to get slightly more trains. although, if you are hoping to travel today, good luck. the first three trains, one due out in 40 minutes to manchester and then to liverpool, then to lancaster, all of them are an express. all cancelled. it appears to be to staff shortage. great to the day. talk to us about the northern services. people will be understandably very nervous
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because the last time there was a timetable change, it didn't quite go according to plan, did it? no, taking you backjust for two years to this very day in 2018 when i was a complete transformation of the timetables for the northern rail andindeedin the timetables for the northern rail and indeed in south—east england. it all went extremely badly wrong. for weeks afterwards, they were massive cancellations, utterly chaotic. the whole range of reasons from driver training, two people simply not having changes properly thought out. as a result, things went back to sort of normal, but what is happening up in yorkshire is of great concern to the labour party. their shadow transport spokesperson louise hague has said, look, for places like sheffield we're going to see fewer chains to pontypridd, leeds, and that is unacceptable, you
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should be cutting back the trains at a time when the government is keen to be levelling out the north of england. the department of transport meanwhile says that it is absolutely nonsense to say the government isn't interested in rail and north, they are investing billions and and just that. northern rail says they does moving trains around, moving stuff around to try and deliver the best possible service for the highest number of people. but, certainly if you are used to a certain level of trains in your area and you live in the north of england, it'll be worth checking to see if you will get more, fewer, orfor most people, stay the same. and what is your assessment of passenger numbers right now, given everything we have seen through the pandemic, more people still working from home — is there a need for trains in as many numbers as before? are people doing things differently?
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they are certainly doing things differently, which is part of the struggle the rail industry is having. everything has been underpinned by the idea that most of the £10 billion every year of their revenue that has traditionally come in is from commuters, most of those in is from commuters, most of those in south—east england. most of those people are not buying season tickets anymore, so you have a funding crisis. but you're also seeing, particularly at the weekends, very large numbers of using the trains. there is some movement on that. transport for wales in particular is doing really well in terms of restoring its services, and they are going to be putting on more trains to resorts such as aberystwyth and also key wr on the great western region. they will be bringing back trains from london and paddington direct to newquay in cornwall. it is a question of how quickly the railway can turn things around so that it reflects how people are travelling these days. meanwhile, of
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course, the huge investment in high speed two, which is happening here initially, and then birmingham, controversially not leads, is under way with getting on for £100 billion of taxpayers' money being pumped into that. the government, of course, says it wants to do all it can to persuade people to travel by train, but there is still some work to do. ,, ., train, but there is still some work to do, ,, ., .,, train, but there is still some work todo. ,, ., ., train, but there is still some work to do. ,, ., ., , ., train, but there is still some work todo. ,, ., ., to do. simon, as always, good to see ou in a to do. simon, as always, good to see you in a quiet— to do. simon, as always, good to see you in a quiet looking _ to do. simon, as always, good to see you in a quiet looking use _ to do. simon, as always, good to see you in a quiet looking use station - you in a quiet looking use station this morning. good luck getting where you are going. just this morning. good luck getting where you are going. just picking up on some of— where you are going. just picking up on some of the _ where you are going. just picking up on some of the detail _ where you are going. just picking up on some of the detail from - where you are going. just picking up on some of the detail from last - on some of the detail from last night's eurovision, did i see that france gave us doux points? fiui. night's eurovision, did i see that france gave us doux points? oui. we will be talking _ france gave us doux points? oui. we will be talking about _ france gave us doux points? oui. we
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will be talking about last _ france gave us doux points? oui. we will be talking about last year's - will be talking about last year's null—points entry later. in the meantime, we had better catch up with the sport. chetan is at wembley for us. good morning, rachel. i have been working hard through the night to rebrand wembley, if you like, head of the women's fa cup final. this is the first time in fa cup history that a men's final and a women's final are taking place across the same weekend. we talk about chelsea against manchester city shortly, but we will start with yesterday's penalty drama between liverpool and chelsea. they did the same as two months ago, jurgen klopp's side with their second trophy of the season,
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in a season which could bring a potential quadruple against real madrid and the premier league as well. for chelsea, unwanted history is the first team to lose three consecutive finals in the fa cup after more heart break in a shootout. 0ur sports correspondent nesta mcgregor watched the action at wembley. 150 years since the first fa cup final, and it's liverpool's name engraved on the trophy this year. another event this weekend where you're represented by waving your flag, although in the fa cup it's not a case of null points — more a point to prove. as liverpool chased an english football record of four trophies in a season, chelsea were trying to avoid three fa cup final defeats in a row. liverpool started freshest and fastest, but luis diaz's finish didn't match his clever run. 30 minutes in, the reds were forced into a substitution, and it was a key player — top scorer mo salah. a goal—less first half,
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and after the break chelsea settled. they came closest to getting on the scoresheet when, from a free kick, marcus alonso grazed the post. as full—time neared, one final chance. off the post. again, so close. so, that meant extra time and a chance for extra words of encouragement between players, and from the fans. when either team failed to score, penalties would decide the winner. so when mason mount missed, the successful liverpool spot kick would win it. applause. liverpool's hero! honestl,y i think it was the toughest game we played this season, but we expect it. it's normal because it was the final. we have two more cups to go. we will see. liverpool have the fa cup! so liverpool's second trip
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to wembley this season, and the second time they have lifted a trophy here. the quest for the quadruple, four trophies in one season, lives on. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. today it is the turn of the women in the fa cup final, and yesterday i spoke to former england and arenal forward kelly smith at wembley. 55,000 tickets sold, a record crowd expect it, and ahead of that final i spoke to kelly smith, who knows a few things about women winning the fa cup. she has won five of these trophies. she gave me her thoughts ahead of the match. we start together, and we always believed we'd qualify for the champions' league.
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to be in the fa cup final, third place similarly, i think nobody really expected it other than ourselves. nottingham forest lead sheffield united 2—1 after the first leg of their championship play—off semi—final. this was forest's second goal, scored afterjoe lolley caught blades defenderjohn egan. he set up brennanjohnson to make it 2—0. and in the 91st minute, sheffield united got one back. sander berg gave them hope going into the second leg on tuesday night. celtic finished their scottish premiership season out in style after thrashing motherwell. they had already won the title earlier in the week, but scored six goals, with kyogo scoring twice. celtic finished 25 points behind rivals rangers last season, but have recovered brilliantly in manger ange postecoglou's first season in charge.
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i bring you some sad news next. former australia cricketer andrew symonds has died after being involved in a car crash. the 46—year—old all—rounder played 26 test matches, nearly 200 0ne—day internationals and 14 t20s between 1998 and 2009. he won two 50 over world cups and was part of australia's ashes winning side in 2006—07. he also played county cricket at gloucestershire, kent, lancashire and surrey. cricket australia said it was shocked and saddened by the news. we will turn our attention to tennis next. warming up for the french open. novak djokovic has reached another milestone in men's tennis. he has now won 1,000 matches in his professional career and got through to the final of the rome open in the process. the world number one beat norway's casper ruud 6—4, 6—3, and will face stefanos
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tsitsipas in the final. defending champion iga swiatek is through to the women's final. she is now unbeaten in 27 matches after a straight—sets win over aryna sabalenka. the world number one will play tunisia's 0ns jabeur in the final. she won in madrid, so a mouthwatering final in prospect there. leinster reached their first champions cup final since 2019 with a comfortable 40—17 win over holders toulouse in dublin. james lowe's two tries were the standout in a dominant performance by leinster, and they will face the winners of the other semi—final between french sides racing 92 and la rochelle in marseille in two weeks' time. but the european challenge cup will be an all—french affair. wasps lost to lyon, and saracens were beaten 25—16 in their semi—final by toulon.
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a great try byjiuta wainiqolo clinched it for the french side. i think the sun might be trying to peek through here at wembley. more for you later. back to you. that peek through here at wembley. more for you later. back to you.— for you later. back to you. that is aood for you later. back to you. that is good news- _ for you later. back to you. that is good news. fingers _ for you later. back to you. that is good news. fingers crossed - for you later. back to you. that is good news. fingers crossed for. for you later. back to you. that is l good news. fingers crossed for the 50 odd thousand fans who will be there for the women's fa cup a little bit later on this afternoon. still so nice seeing so many people back out like that. it takes a little bit of getting used to. the sound from _ little bit of getting used to. tue: sound from wembley yesterday little bit of getting used to. tye: sound from wembley yesterday was absolutely out of this world. for some people genes can play a major role in how much they weigh, and at luton and dunstable hospital, 100 patients who struggle with obesity are having their dna tested to find out if their genetics could be a factor. doctors are looking for faulty genes that tell the brain the body is hungry even when it doesn't need food. richard westcott reports.
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did you experience extreme hunger that was not easily satisfied? yes. some people _ that was not easily satisfied? yes. some people are _ that was not easily satisfied? yes. some people are naturally preprogrammed to gain weight. they have faulty genes, making their brain tell them that they are ravenously hungry no matter how much they eat. for ravenously hungry no matter how much the eat. ., , ., , ., ., they eat. for starters, i can have a full big meal _ they eat. for starters, i can have a full big meal and _ they eat. for starters, i can have a full big meal and five, _ they eat. for starters, i can have a full big meal and five, ten - they eat. for starters, i can have a full big meal and five, ten minutes afterwards— full big meal and five, ten minutes afterwards it would feel like i've had nothing to eat at all. sol would — had nothing to eat at all. sol would have to have a sandwich and then half—an—hour afterwards a bowl of cereal, _ then half—an—hour afterwards a bowl of cereal, and then maybe before bed, _ of cereal, and then maybe before bed, again, another bowl of cereal, 'ust bed, again, another bowl of cereal, just so— bed, again, another bowl of cereal, just so i_ bed, again, another bowl of cereal, just so i don't get up during the night _ just so i don't get up during the night and — just so i don't get up during the night and have something to eat. it! is why night and have something to eat. is why kevin night and have something to eat. it is why kevin is having his dna swab today. he is one of 100 patients being tested at this illusion clinic to see if he has got any of these faulty genes. to see if he has got any of these faulty genes-—
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faulty genes. well, we hope to find out how many _ faulty genes. well, we hope to find out how many of— faulty genes. well, we hope to find out how many of the _ faulty genes. well, we hope to find out how many of the people - faulty genes. well, we hope to find | out how many of the people coming faulty genes. well, we hope to find i out how many of the people coming to us have _ out how many of the people coming to us have obesity and how much of it is due _ us have obesity and how much of it is due to _ us have obesity and how much of it is due to the — us have obesity and how much of it is due to the environment —— luton. it is due to the environment —— luton. it would _ is due to the environment —— luton. it would give — is due to the environment —— luton. it would give a lot of validation to the patient to understand, 0k, it would give a lot of validation to the patient to understand, ok, this is not _ the patient to understand, ok, this is not my— the patient to understand, ok, this is not my fault. it is an actual homeowner problem, and as hormonal imbalances— homeowner problem, and as hormonal imbalances cause is other diseases, it causes— imbalances cause is other diseases, it causes actually hunger is a disease _ it causes actually hunger is a disease and it is so severe that they— disease and it is so severe that they are — disease and it is so severe that they are not able to control it. this— they are not able to control it. this cambridge lab is a world leader in researching genetic obesity. they are analysing dna samples from hundreds of countries. 0ver are analysing dna samples from hundreds of countries. over the past 25 years, scientists have found 40 different genes that are linked to obesity. it often boils down to how your brain decides if you are hungry or not. your brain decides if you are hungry or not, , .,, your brain decides if you are hungry or not. , .,, ., ., your brain decides if you are hungry or not. , ., ., , or not. some people have a big a- etite. or not. some people have a big appetite. other— or not. some people have a big appetite. other people - or not. some people have a big appetite. other people can - or not. some people have a big appetite. other people can eat| or not. some people have a big - appetite. other people can eat what they like and they never gain weight, and those differences between us are down to our genes. these genes work by affecting the pathways in the brain that regulate our appetite. so in the past, people used to think it was just down to
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your voluntary control. you choose how much you want to eat and it is “p how much you want to eat and it is up to you. it's not as simple as that. ., , ,. ., up to you. it's not as simple as that. ., , ,.., ., ,., that. the more they discover about the natural — that. the more they discover about the natural genetic _ that. the more they discover about the natural genetic causes - that. the more they discover about the natural genetic causes of - the natural genetic causes of obesity, the more they can find treatments to help. for obesity, the more they can find treatments to help.— obesity, the more they can find treatments to help. for a long time we and others _ treatments to help. for a long time we and others have _ treatments to help. for a long time we and others have been _ treatments to help. for a long time we and others have been trying - treatments to help. for a long time we and others have been trying to i we and others have been trying to map out how those circuits in the brain work, where those jeans fit in, and to try to find new drugs that might target those genes for effective treatment. and now we're finally getting to a point where some of those treatments are coming on board, and that means that really, for people who really struggle with their weight, who often have a big appetite of that we may find new ways to treat them. people struggling with obesity are often stigmatised by family, friends, colleagues, even healthcare professionals. they assume it is a lifestyle choice. but for many, it is in their genes. do you think of more people realise that this could be genetic, it could be something you are born with thatjust keeps telling you you are hungry, they might be a bit more forgiving about people who are bigger? yes. people who are bigger? yes, certainly- _ people who are bigger? yes,
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certainly. that _ people who are bigger? yes, certainly. that would - people who are bigger? yes, certainly. that would help i people who are bigger? yes, certainly. that would help ifl people who are bigger? jes certainly. that would help if people actually knew. this could help make people think that it's not my fault. 7.45. should we go to the weather? the weather most places yesterday was glorious but it won't last. but it is coming back, apparently. brute it is coming back, apparently. we hardly need sarah! that expert delivery. hardly need sarah! that expert delive . ,., ., hardly need sarah! that expert delive . ., hardly need sarah! that expert delivery._ good | delivery. good morning. good morning- _ delivery. good morning. good morning. upand-down, - delivery. good morning. good morning. upand-down, the i delivery. good morning. good - morning. upand-down, the weather is, morning. upand—down, the weather is, during _ morning. upand—down, the weather is, during the _ morning. upand—down, the weather is, during the course of the day. we have _ during the course of the day. we have some — during the course of the day. we have some more of the warm spring sunshine _ have some more of the warm spring sunshine like yesterday, but also some _ sunshine like yesterday, but also some heavy downpours and thunderstorms, too. here is a menacing _ thunderstorms, too. here is a menacing sky in cambridge. grey clouds _ menacing sky in cambridge. grey clouds there. in the past few hours, this is— clouds there. in the past few hours, this is the _ clouds there. in the past few hours, this is the radar showing where the rain has _ this is the radar showing where the rain has been rolling in from the south, _ rain has been rolling in from the south, with— rain has been rolling in from the south, with thunder and lightning down _ south, with thunder and lightning down to— south, with thunder and lightning down to the isle of wight. we have
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those _ down to the isle of wight. we have those storms around this morning. we can track— those storms around this morning. we can track them further north through the course _ can track them further north through the course of today. they are hit and miss— the course of today. they are hit and miss so— the course of today. they are hit and miss so not everyone is getting the rain _ and miss so not everyone is getting the rain clouds. in the south, the return— the rain clouds. in the south, the return to — the rain clouds. in the south, the return to sunshine through the day. warm _ return to sunshine through the day. warm spring sunshine, 22—23 for london _ warm spring sunshine, 22—23 for london and — warm spring sunshine, 22—23 for london and cardiff. cool for belfast with 15 _ london and cardiff. cool for belfast with 15. the odd spot of showery rain there — with 15. the odd spot of showery rain there. qualifieraberdeen. the breeze _ rain there. qualifieraberdeen. the breeze coming in off the north sea there _ breeze coming in off the north sea there 20 — breeze coming in off the north sea there. 20 degrees across parts of scotland — there. 20 degrees across parts of scotland. the north of scotland is keeping _ scotland. the north of scotland is keeping clear skies for a good part of the _ keeping clear skies for a good part of the day — keeping clear skies for a good part of the day. we will tend to lose the first batch — of the day. we will tend to lose the first batch of showers in the north into the _ first batch of showers in the north into the evening and tonight. but more _ into the evening and tonight. but more storms come in from the south in the _ more storms come in from the south in the earty— more storms come in from the south in the early hours of monday. you could _ in the early hours of monday. you could hear— in the early hours of monday. you could hear some thunder and lightning in the midlands and northern ireland as well. this front will push _ northern ireland as well. this front will push north. more rain for some of us, _ will push north. more rain for some of us, particularly towards the north — of us, particularly towards the north. further south, tomorrow, a
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day of— north. further south, tomorrow, a day of sunshine and showers. it will feel warm~ — day of sunshine and showers. it will feel warm. temperatures could be up into the _ feel warm. temperatures could be up into the mid20s. feelwarm. temperatures could be up into the mid20s.— into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is 7-47- — into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is 7.47. right — into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is 7.47. right now, _ into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is 7.47. right now, it _ into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is 7.47. right now, it is _ into the mid20s. thank you, sarah. it is 7.47. right now, it is time - it is 7.47. right now, it is time for click. for the whole of human history, we have had no choice but to live off the land — literally. everything that we use comes from planet earth. now, some of those resources — rare, precious metals, for example — are really useful for scientific
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and climate research, but they are really difficult to mine. other resources are just, well, running out. all systems are ready... and all of this begs the question — as we venture into space, how are we going to live? where are we going to live? and what are we going to live on? so, as humans, we have been exploiting the resources on earth for as long as we have been around, but instead of looking down now at what is underneath our feet, we are starting to look up and see what else is out there. ultimately, what we are looking at doing is going to an asteroid, landing on it, taking samples and then, kind of bringing them back. yes, we're going asteroid mining! and these are the concept designs for machines that could one day be part of a new gold rush — well, actually, platinum rush — that could potentially be worth quintillions of pounds. and this is the first part of that robot — the claw that stops it from floating away from the asteroid by
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gripping onto the surface hard. the grippers that they use are essentially derived from, ultimately, things like gecko pads and if you look at, like, the ends of tarantula's feet, you know, the hairs that they have? that's how a spider is able to climb the wall. we've not quite tested this, but if you were to put one on your head, it would have the force required to crush your skull. oh, good! which is lovely, isn't it? well, if you're going to make an asteroid—climbing robot, make a killer asteroid—climbing robot. but, really, is this the way to solve our resource problem? after all, it's all a fair way off yet. as well as designing the rest of the robot, with help of tohoko university injapan, the asteroid mining corporation need to find the right asteroid to mine. now, that's done by looking at the chemical composition of meteorites to identify what their parent bodies — in this case, asteroids — are made of. so, there you go. each element has been assigned randomly a colour.
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so, in this image, all the green is iron, all the orange is calcium, the pink is silicon, the cyan is magnesium and there's also some darker green that is oxygen in here. is it the case that you will look through all your meteorite samples and one day, you'll come across something that's, say, rich in platinum, and then that gives them then the green light to go get it? absolutely. if we find a concentration of platinum in one of our meteorites, then we can certainly tell the amc guys, "ok, the types of meteorites that we're finding platinum in "are likely to involve this type of asteroid, "so now, it is over to you." and, you know, these days, we can actually go one better than waiting for space debris to come to us. and we have gone and got it. the uk's national space centre in leicester is at the centre of the universe — well, that's what they tell me, anyway — so let's hit their planetarium for a quick recap one of the most daring space rock missions so far. the asteroid belt is this ring of bits and bobs that orbits the sun
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further out than mars, but that's not where all the asteroids are. if we fly back towards the sun, past mars, you will find some asteroids a lot closer to earth. and one of those is called ryugu, and that's the one that all the fuss was about. back in 2018, we visited the japanese space agency, jaxa, to meet the team behind hayabusa2. this audacious mission successfully flew to ryugu, blew a hole in it, and brought samples back to earth. so, we thought before the landing that it was one sort of asteroid, but now we've actually started analysing it, we realise it's actually experienced an awful lot of alteration with water. and, as we know, water could mean life. but what does professor bridges think about commercial asteroid mining?
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i think it's a really fascinating area. will it be economic to bring back a large fragment of an asteroid, which is very metal rich, say? will it make more economic sense to recycle and reuse or have a new mine on earth? it could take decades before anyone successfully pulls off asteroid mining — which, considering there are only a few protections in place for the preservation of space, means that hungry pioneers might end up further exploiting our natural world for profit. of course, not all space research is about what we bring back from the beyond. as more and more of us head up there, paul carter has been looking at how we might go about building space habitats for humans. the international space station — a home to humans since the year 2000 with seven researchers on board
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at any time. and our interplanetary population is set to grow as private firms also compete to put more people in orbit. this is why scientists at the university of manchester are developing new materials for habitats in space, on the moon and mars. in space, micrometeorites hit the structure at 8 kilometres a second, so we want to make it safer for astronauts, so we are using graphene, which is 200 times stronger than steel. this is the model we are working on. shown here as a sheet or a powder, graphene also reduces the need for bulky insulation, with space temperatures ranging from a sunny 120 degrees to a cool —170. on a single layer of graphene around the structure can dissipate the heat from hot to cold side. astronauts can have more space within the habitat, wspecially when they are living
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there for months or years, they need as much space as they can get. and you only need something one atom to get those benefits? we only need one atom. it's a magic material! many models have been 3d—printed in plastic, but a large—scale model is being woven out of graphene—coated carbon fibre. this is a 3k carbon fibre. so, it's very thin, as you can see. it is really kind of precise, it's really kind of fine movements. this side will be very weak, so we can put many different directions of fibre. and so, that increases the strength of the final material? that's correct. this collaborative robot is designed to improve efficiency and safety. ai also identifies faults that would become dangers in the high pressure and temperatures of space. the flexible material is then set at around 170 degrees. so, you're just cooking your own space habitat? exactly!
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in true blue peterfashion, here's a scale model we made earlier. the full size is about 6 metres wide by 12 metres high. while vivek is working with governments and businesses to get his graphene pod into space in the next six years, other labs are looking at building homes on the surface of lunar landscapes. transporting material from earth to the moon and mars is very expensive, so, really, what we want to do is utilise as much resources in situ as possible. aled's already made bricks with binders like egg albumen, chickpea juice and cow blood, but the right glue has to be freely available in space. you imagine, like, cows floating in, like, space. it's just going to be a nightmare. so, human blood has been used in these experiments. in some ways, it seems, you know, quite feasible, but it would probably also damage the health of the astronaut. that one says 'urea' on it. now, is that...is that what i think it is?
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0bviously, wee is something we are going to be producing in abundance. of course! actually, when we added urea, it made the materials up to three times stronger. one of the most viable concretes comes from a by—product of space food. we know we'll probably feed astronauts on the moon and mars with algae, just because it is so efficient, so we could potentially produce construction materials from this algae, which we know we'll probably be growing anyway. looking at the bubbling algae growing in action, it's incredible to think its by—products could become the building blocks of the future. and as for graphene homes knitted by robots? you'll have to...watch this space. paul there with some out—of—this world solutions. but back on earth, we're notjust rethinking the spaces we live in, but how we move through them. technologies are aiming to get more people travelling on two wheels. this is tether, which beams a laser light 1.5m around the bike,
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creating an area that cars shouldn't enter. it is, of course, more visible and more necessary at night—time, but the box is also collecting data on any cars that do enter that zone in the hopes that it will be able to create a map of a safer city for cyclists. the device was developed here in the uk where a third of cycle injuries and deaths are the result of cars overtaking too closely. cycling across london is borderline terrifying or just very unsafe. we present that back to cyclists when they're next taking a route across london or any city in the world, we can highlight where those unsafe areas on their route are. that can be everything from "avoid these routes" right through to "this is the best bridge to cycle across london "on from north to south." do you think the cyclists, seeing where the danger is on the road, could actually put them off cycling — which, of course,
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isn't what you want? this we hope the outcome will be almost like traffic data, so that you can make a better decision about how, when you leave, or driving safer in certain places. whilst these lasers light up vulnerable cyclists at night, in future, these devices could also go on helmets or backpacks, helping users communicate in different ways. looking at audio feedback as well. like, we love the idea of pressing a button and changing the projection to a heart to say, "thank you for giving me enough space," for example. the data doesn't cover the whole capital yet, but with 60 more testers receiving kit this month, it will soon cover more ground, and a wider launch is expected for later this year. well, after giving it a go, i can see how data collection like this, alongside decent cycling lanes, can make a difference to help people feel more confident. but that's it for the shortcut of the show. the full—length programme can be found on iplayer and we will, of course, be back next week.
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thanks for watching. bye—bye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. good morning. 0ur headlines today... ukraine win eurovision, taking the title on the public vote, in a symbolic show of support. the uk came second. thank you for supporting the ukraine —— thank you for supporting ukraine, this victory is for every ukrainian.
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slava ukraini! nhs prescription charges in england are to be frozen — as part of the government's efforts to ease the cost of living crisis ten people have been killed in a shooting at a supermarket in buffalo in new york state — the gunman is in custody. good morning. i'm here at wembley stadium where liverpool beat chelsea on penalties to lift the fa cup. and some warm spells of sunshine today but the odd shower and storm pushing northwards, we will bring all the details here on bbc breakfast. good morning. it'sjust after eight o'clock. it's sunday the 15th of may. our main story... ukraine has won the eurovision song contest — in a symbolic show of public support after the country was invaded by russia. the uk's sam ryder came second — its best result for
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more than 20 years. the uk won the most votes from the music industry experts, but when the public votes were added, ukraine leapt to first place. mark lowen has this report from turin. let the universe and song contest 2022 begin! —— let the eurovision song contest 2022 begin! the eurovision europe's eurovision fanfare of fun came to turin. - the sparkles of spain belting it out with slomo, then italy with an all male falsetto love song.- with slomo, then italy with an all male falsetto love song. sweden once ave birth male falsetto love song. sweden once gave birth to — male falsetto love song. sweden once gave birth to abba, _ male falsetto love song. sweden once gave birth to abba, remember - male falsetto love song. sweden once gave birth to abba, remember them? | gave birth to abba, remember them? then the hand washer of serbia
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asking why megan marco's hair is so shiny. —— asking why meghan markle was mackerras so shiny. then sam ryder hits is stratospheric roads with —— stratospheric notes with spaceman. 0ne band memberfor ukraine the stayed in the country to fight and the rest got permission to leave. . , , ., as leave. the final results that... as the votes — leave. the final results that... as the votes came _ leave. the final results that... as the votes came in _ leave. the final results that... as the votes came in from _ leave. the final results that... as the votes came in from the - leave. the final results that... as - the votes came in from the european juries, it was heading for a close race, the uk, sweden, spain and ukraine leading at the top before it went to the public votes. 183 oints. went to the public votes. 183 points- he — went to the public votes. 183 points. he did _ went to the public votes. 183 points. he did so _ went to the public votes. 183 points. he did so well. - went to the public votes. 183j points. he did so well. there went to the public votes. 183 l points. he did so well. there it went to the public votes. 183 -
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points. he did so well. there it is. sam ryder— points. he did so well. there it is. sam ryder was — points. he did so well. there it is. sam ryder was pipped _ points. he did so well. there it is. sam ryder was pipped at - points. he did so well. there it is. sam ryder was pipped at the - points. he did so well. there it is. sam ryder was pipped at the postj points. he did so well. there it is. i sam ryder was pipped at the post by ukraine. eurovision triumph in its darkest moment. the spaceman had hoped to take the uk over the moon but in the end the public was with ukraine. forthe but in the end the public was with ukraine. for the very worthy second place sam, relief for the uk's best resulting years, a success to build on next time. you'll make the whole team help them suffer such credit, such positivity. being and that arena and witnessing just this tangible energy of light was incredible.— tangible energy of light was incredible. , , , ., incredible. everybody is standing eve bod incredible. everybody is standing everybody is _ incredible. everybody is standing everybody is enjoying, _ incredible. everybody is standing | everybody is enjoying, everybody incredible. everybody is standing i everybody is enjoying, everybody is in peace _ everybody is enjoying, everybody is in peace in — everybody is enjoying, everybody is in peace in this arena.— in peace in this arena. fighting back on the — in peace in this arena. fighting back on the ground, _ in peace in this arena. fighting back on the ground, standing i in peace in this arena. fighting - back on the ground, standing proud on stage, living up to its national slogan, glory to ukraine.- on stage, living up to its national slogan, glory to ukraine. thank you so much, thank _ slogan, glory to ukraine. thank you so much, thank you _ slogan, glory to ukraine. thank you so much, thank you for _ slogan, glory to ukraine. thank you so much, thank you for supporting. so much, thank you for supporting
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ukraine. this victory is for every ukrainian. slava ukraini! ilirui’hat ukraine. this victory is for every ukrainian. slava ukraini! what an emotional night. _ yes, emotional it was. we're joined now by our arts correspondent, david sillito, who is in turin for us. there are two stories here, aren't they? 0ne there are two stories here, aren't they? one of the huge support for ukraine after everything that is going on but also the impressive performance by the uk.- going on but also the impressive performance by the uk. yeah, so close, performance by the uk. yeah, so close. but _ performance by the uk. yeah, so close. but it _ performance by the uk. yeah, so close, but it was _ performance by the uk. yeah, so close, but it was always - performance by the uk. yeah, so close, but it was always going . performance by the uk. yeah, so close, but it was always going to | performance by the uk. yeah, so i close, but it was always going to be ukraine's night, newer version always wants to avoid politics but just seeing the kalush 0rchestra on stage, well, it was making a statement but one person was there right in amongst it, joins me now. explain, explain. you are from one of the fan supporters clubs. brute
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explain, explain. you are from one of the fan supporters clubs. we are the official ux — of the fan supporters clubs. we are the official uk eurovision _ of the fan supporters clubs. we are the official uk eurovision is - of the fan supporters clubs. we are the official uk eurovision is fan - the official uk eurovision is fan club _ the official uk eurovision is fan club and — the official uk eurovision is fan club and i_ the official uk eurovision is fan club and i am the president and we were _ club and i am the president and we were in_ club and i am the president and we were in the — club and i am the president and we were in the arena last night and it is incredible. as a uk eurovision fan, _ is incredible. as a uk eurovision fan. we — is incredible. as a uk eurovision fan, we normally sitting down early on we _ fan, we normally sitting down early on we know — fan, we normally sitting down early on we know what will happen but last i'iili'it on we know what will happen but last night all— on we know what will happen but last night all the attention was on a specifically for the jury votes and it was— specifically for the jury votes and it was amazing, the atmosphere was incredible _ it was amazing, the atmosphere was incredible. ~ ., , ., ., . incredible. when it was announced the uk had — incredible. when it was announced the uk had won, _ incredible. when it was announced the uk had won, what _ incredible. when it was announced the uk had won, what did - incredible. when it was announced the uk had won, what did it - incredible. when it was announced the uk had won, what did it feel i the uk had won, what did it feel like inside the arena? brute the uk had won, what did it feel like inside the arena?— the uk had won, what did it feel like inside the arena? we knew it was coming _ like inside the arena? we knew it was coming but _ like inside the arena? we knew it was coming but it _ like inside the arena? we knew it was coming but it was _ like inside the arena? we knew it was coming but it was joyous, - like inside the arena? we knew it i was coming but it was joyous, truly was, and was solidarity. that is what happened last night, it was from the tv voters and it was a sign of solidarity with ukraine and to come second to that is perfectly good for us. many people said the uk would never get any votes, it's all political. this has proved them all wrong, hasn't it? yes, and as fans we are finally rejoicing in that. if you have a good song, fantastic singer and really good staging and you do really well in this contest and that's what every other country
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has been doing and we finally done that this year. look at the results we've got. that this year. look at the results we've not. �* that this year. look at the results we've got-— we've got. and a lot of people wonder where _ we've got. and a lot of people wonder where eurovision - we've got. and a lot of people wonder where eurovision willl we've got. and a lot of people - wonder where eurovision will take place next year, is every chance it might come to the uk? you never know. it's unlikely that ukraine might post itjust now, people will get put forward and with our willingness to do it, we could get it. this is quite a eurovision moment, isn't it? want to be a new arena with. moment, isn't it? want to be a new arena with-— arena with. absolutely, 'ust incredible. i arena with. absolutely, 'ust incredible. it's i arena with. absolutely, 'ust incredible. it's my i arena with. absolutely, 'ust incredible. it's my first h arena with. absolutely, just incredible. it's my first yearj arena with. absolutely, just i incredible. it's my first year as president of the club and normally we are resigned to our own fate and for all the energy and to rejoice in that, and sam is an incredible artist, incredible acts, and we're so of him. 50 artist, incredible acts, and we're so of him-— artist, incredible acts, and we're so of him. , ., ., , ., ., so of him. so proud to be waving a union flag — so of him. so proud to be waving a union flag last— so of him. so proud to be waving a union flag last night? _ so of him. so proud to be waving a union flag last night? normally i union flag last night? normally sta s at union flag last night? normally stays at home _ union flag last night? normally stays at home but _ union flag last night? normally stays at home but who - union flag last night? normally stays at home but who were i union flag last night? normally - stays at home but who were proudly flying it last night because it was
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such a proud moment and great to be part. such a proud moment and great to be art. ., , , ., such a proud moment and great to be art. , ,., part. hope you get some sleep today. mornin: part. hope you get some sleep today. morning after — part. hope you get some sleep today. morning after the _ part. hope you get some sleep today. morning after the night _ part. hope you get some sleep today. morning after the night before - morning after the night before feeling certainly from turin, a lot of happy people here this morning. and we will let you go and get some sleep this morning as well, i'm sure you had quite a late night so thank you had quite a late night so thank you for that. we're joined now by last year's uk eurovision entry james newman. a late free as well, did you watch it till the bitter end? i late free as well, did you watch it till the bitter end?— till the bitter end? i did, it was so tense but _ till the bitter end? i did, it was so tense but it _ till the bitter end? i did, it was so tense but it was _ till the bitter end? i did, it was so tense but it was amazing, i till the bitter end? i did, it was i so tense but it was amazing, had such a great night watching it. your mates with sam _ such a great night watching it. your mates with sam ryder, _ such a great night watching it. your mates with sam ryder, so having that kind of personal connection must have been really thrilling seeing him come second.— him come second. yeah, it was amazing- _ him come second. yeah, it was amazing- he's— him come second. yeah, it was amazing. he's such _ him come second. yeah, it was amazing. he's such a _ him come second. yeah, it was amazing. he's such a nice - him come second. yeah, it was amazing. he's such a nice guy. | him come second. yeah, it was i amazing. he's such a nice guy. my mate max wrote the song with him so it was nail—biting and it was like going through it again but obviously better results out of lian.— better results out of lian. james, we are normally _ better results out of lian. james, we are normally in _ better results out of lian. james, we are normally in this _ better results out of lian. james, we are normally in this position i better results out of lian. james, i we are normally in this position the
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norm —— make position the morning after dissecting and talking about whether are staging, the song, the artist or the position in the running order and whether it's about politics. we are in a really lovely position to talk about what went right. what was the secret to last night and is doing so well? i’m right. what was the secret to last night and is doing so well? i'm not sure. it night and is doing so well? i'm not sure- itjust— night and is doing so well? i'm not sure. it just felt _ night and is doing so well? i'm not sure. it just felt really _ night and is doing so well? i'm not sure. itjust felt really magical- sure. itjust felt really magical and sam are such a lovely and likeable person, so talented, he just went out there and just sort of represented is really well and everyone fell in love with him in the staging i thought was amazing. he just absolutely smashed his performance and it looks like he was earning it. ithink performance and it looks like he was earning it. i think it alljust fell into place, it was so brilliant to watch. i think you have also likeable, james, let's not forget that, but also had the big base of support, this huge following on tiktok. do you think for the younger audiences, we have to look at that kind of candidate for the future?
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yes, the whole music industry, that is where _ yes, the whole music industry, that is where it— yes, the whole music industry, that is where it is, — yes, the whole music industry, that is where it is, it is based on tiktok— is where it is, it is based on tiktok and _ is where it is, it is based on tiktok and stuff, so i think the fact that — tiktok and stuff, so i think the fact that he has 12 million followers really helped reach out to more _ followers really helped reach out to more people that would usually see that programme or be involved in eurovision. — that programme or be involved in eurovision, so it was all... everything _ eurovision, so it was all... everything really helped him. can be almost have — everything really helped him. can be almost have the _ everything really helped him. can be almost have the pandemic _ everything really helped him. can be almost have the pandemic to - everything really helped him. can be almost have the pandemic to thank. almost have the pandemic to thank for a lot of this because so much of it was conceived during the pandemic. it was conceived during the pandemic-— it was conceived during the pandemic. it was conceived during the andemic. . ., , it was conceived during the andemic. . . , , ., pandemic. yeah, he was... he started sinuain in pandemic. yeah, he was... he started singing in his — pandemic. yeah, he was... he started singing in his shed _ pandemic. yeah, he was... he started singing in his shed two _ pandemic. yeah, he was... he started singing in his shed two years - pandemic. yeah, he was... he started singing in his shed two years ago. i singing in his shed two years ago. just doing videos of himself singing, because he has such an amazing voice everyone wanted to hear him sing whitney houston song so it's gone from singing in his shed to singing in front of 200 million people so it is absently amazing. is million people so it is absently amazinu. , ., . . . , million people so it is absently amazin.. , ., ., . . , ., amazing. is often a criticism that we don't really _ amazing. is often a criticism that we don't really take _ amazing. is often a criticism that we don't really take eurovision i amazing. is often a criticism that i we don't really take eurovision very seriously or may be the opposite, probably, we take it so seriously we end up choosing the wrong song because we try so hard to wind the thing. where, on the scale, where we have this year? we clearly took it
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seriously because it was a great act but we seem to get it right as far as pitching it at the right level. definitely, the thing about music is, especially with that huge stage, you just don't know what song will connect so i think it really did connect so i think it really did connect last night and they kind of got it all right and it is amazing, amazing thing. the got it all right and it is amazing, amazing thing-— got it all right and it is amazing, amazin: thin. ., ., amazing thing. the other thing about this son: as amazing thing. the other thing about this song as it _ amazing thing. the other thing about this song as it is _ amazing thing. the other thing about this song as it is basically _ amazing thing. the other thing about this song as it is basicallyjust - this song as it is basicallyjust more or less. you were singing the first —— singing within the first 30 seconds of hearing it, enjoy song writer so you will appreciate that. there a science behind writing a song that will get in people's had very quickly and be familiar to them. ' :: :: , very quickly and be familiar to them. ' i: i: , ., very quickly and be familiar to them. 'i: :: , ., , ., them. 100%. that is the golden ticket. if them. 10096. that is the golden ticket- if you — them. 10096. that is the golden ticket. if you can _ them. 10096. that is the golden ticket. if you can write - them. 10096. that is the golden ticket. if you can write a - them. 10096. that is the golden ticket. if you can write a song i them. 10096. that is the golden i ticket. if you can write a song that people feel like they've heard before but do not know how, itjust is so hoochie and hits the right notes, and i think for a competition like that, with a song it feels like
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you've heard before, it makes you think, oh, my god, ilove you've heard before, it makes you think, oh, my god, i love this song instantly and it needs to be that because 200 million people are watching the telly that might never have heard that song before. tbs, lat have heard that song before. a lot can to have heard that song before. a lot can go wrong _ have heard that song before. a lot can go wrong on — have heard that song before. a lot can go wrong on the _ have heard that song before. a lot can go wrong on the night, the staging comedy performance itself, loosing that many a time before, but talk to me about what it is like being up on that stage, in front of so many viewers, as you said, the pressure, it's nerve—racking, the pressure, it's nerve-racking, the pressure is incredible.— pressure is incredible. yeah, it is mad. i pressure is incredible. yeah, it is mad- i can't _ pressure is incredible. yeah, it is mad. i can't really _ pressure is incredible. yeah, it is mad. i can't really explain - pressure is incredible. yeah, it is mad. i can't really explain how. pressure is incredible. yeah, it is mad. i can't really explain how it| mad. i can't really explain how it feels because it is just... mad. i can't really explain how it feels because it isjust... you've been there for the whole weekend and loads of rehearsals, you've been on the stage and performed to an audience in the arena, with cameras and stuff but then when the lights go down, just before you perform, and the actualfinal, go down, just before you perform, and the actual final, you're like, oh, my god, is 200 million people watching. it's mind blowing and i
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think the pressure of it kind of built up but once you're there, it all goes away and in the moment and it's kind of like meditation, i think, but its a mad thing to do. why do you have to be in the flow. i have to ask, how have the last 12 months been for you? what has the post eurovision effect been like for you? it has been mad because i was meant to do the year before as well, so two years of my life doing eurovision so i've just been getting back to song writing for other people, travelling the world again which has been amazing, writing songs in la and just writing for myself without any pressure of being like, oh, what songs are going to be to sing for these millions of people? it has been nicejust to kind of get back to normal life and right for other people again. i was auoin to right for other people again. i was going to say. _ right for other people again. i was going to say. that _ right for other people again. i was going to say, that sounds - right for other people again. i was going to say, that sounds pretty good to me, actually. it was nice to talk to you again, james, thank you so much for being with us!- so much for being with us! thank
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ou, so much for being with us! thank you. guys- _ so much for being with us! thank you. guys- no — so much for being with us! thank you, guys. no worries. _ so much for being with us! thank you, guys. no worries. see - so much for being with us! thank you, guys. no worries. see you i you, guys. no worries. see you later. white so infectious, that enthusiasm. —— so infectious, that enthusiasm. 0ur correspondent joe inwood is in lviv, in the west of ukraine. for some people, putting eurovision as our first question to you this morning feels a bit strange but we cannot really underestimate the impact this has had. at this moment in time, what is it like watching from where you are today? yeah, --eole from where you are today? yeah, people think _ from where you are today? yeah, people think this _ from where you are today? yeah, people think this is _ from where you are today? yeah, people think this is just _ from where you are today? yeah, people think this isjust a - from where you are today? yeah, people think this isjust a song i people think this is just a song contest and one not taken that seriously but in ukraine it is taken seriously but in ukraine it is taken seriously in this year, my god, it has been taken seriously. it has really energised people, this is a very, very dark time this country is going through but if you could hear the sounds i heard out of my bedroom window today, the cheers, it was very clear that to the people this does mean something and it means something very number of reasons. firstly the international support, the fact it was the public vote that won it for the calabash 0rchestra, it shows something that's right for
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the kalush 0rchestra. it shows the solidarity they have around the continent but the fact that they won it —— for the kalush 0rchestra. but the fact that so much of the narrative around this russian invasion has been that ukraine is not a country and is just a region of russia so for them to put something that so clearly draws on their heritage, it has really given them something to celebrate. i understand that within a short time after the song contest itself finishing, there were further russian air strikes across the country, just what is the state of play in terms of the military operation, the war there at the moment? , . operation, the war there at the moment?— operation, the war there at the moment? , . , ., , moment? just after the result was announced. _ moment? just after the result was announced. we — moment? just after the result was announced, we heard _ moment? just after the result was announced, we heard the - moment? just after the result was announced, we heard the sirens i moment? just after the result was | announced, we heard the sirens go off year and is difficult to know, we did hear reports of one missile strike on a military target around lviv, i came up to the roofjust afterwards and looked around and
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could not see any smoke but we understand there has been one strike but no further details coming out. in terms of the broader picture, quite interesting, in the rcr was the british ministry of defence has released an assessment and they say something really remarkable, they think the russians have lost one third of the invading ground forces which is really, really an astonishing level of attrition if true and it does tally with some of the images we've seen, the fact they've been pushed back from kharkiv but they are still making some advances in places like mariupol. ten people have been killed in a shooting at a supermarket in the city of buffalo, in the state of new york. the gunman, who has been identified as an 18—year—old white man, is in custody. the authorities say the attack was racially motivated. our new york correspondent, nada tawfik reports. a busy grocery store in a predominantly black community. this was the shooter's intended target. the horror started immediately in the parking lot
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as the gunman emerged from his car, heavily armed and wearing tactical gear — he shot four people, killing three of them. to eyewitnesses it was clear he came to do maximum damage. when i first saw him shooting, he shot a woman, he shot a deacon, he shot another woman, and then he went in the store and started shooting again. a retired buffalo police officer was working security and shot the gunman, but he was unharmed because of his armour. the shooter then returned fire, killing the security guard. the entire horrific episode of people being killed in cold blood in the store was streamed live online. officials said evidence showed the attack was racially motivated. we are investigating this incident as both a hate crime and a case of racially motivated violent extremism. a white supremacist who has engaged in an act of terrorism — and will be prosecuted
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as such — in a cold—hearted, cruel, calculating way. a military—style execution, targeting people who simply want to buy groceries. the suspect was taken into custody alive after putting his gun to his neck and threatening to shoot himself. he's been identified as an 18—year—old white male and has been charged with murder in the first degree. distraught community members have been gathering at the scene, trying to come to terms with the fact that a toxic mix of guns and racism has ended their neighbours' lives in an instant. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. the prime minister will tell northern ireland's politicians tomorrow to break the political deadlock and restore power—sharing at stormont. if the democratic unionists have refused to nominate i a deputy first minister until changes are made to the post—brexit trading deal.
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—— the democratic unionists have refused to nominate a deputy first minister until changes are made to the post—brexit trading deal. we're joined now by our political correspondent david wallace lockhart. it so hard to work out what boris johnson could actually achieve given the stalemate in stormont. 0ne johnson could actually achieve given the stalemate in stormont. one with gun from the election, and the executive —— one week on from the election. the dup are unwilling to go into government, the biggest unionist party, because of the northern ireland protocol of part of the brexit arrangements that means goods going from the gb mainland face checks before getting into northern ireland and the whole idea behind that process is trying to keep the border between northern ireland and the irish republic completely open so when boris johnson goes to northern ireland tomorrow, we expect him to deliver what he says is a tough message to the executive to get up and running but there will also be a message
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they are for the european union because they've said they are willing to make modifications to the northern ireland protocol but they are not making big enough change for the uk government and the uk government is not ruling out the possibility of acting unilaterally, using domestic legislation to... it and that would be viewed very seriously by the eu, potentially breach of international law in the eyes of many eu diplomats and there could be significant consequences to trade off the back of that. thank you. a number of changes to national rail services and timetables come into effect today.some services suspended due to covid are being restored and there is a new station due to open in the scottish borders. however, there has been criticism over cuts to the number of trains operating on some lines in the north of england. if you're going to be up early enoughin if you're going to be up early enough in the morning, the something to look at in the sky. we will actually be up, for once, for
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something happening while you are awake. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. with sam ryder�*s success last night with spaceman, it is appropriate that we are looking up to one of the moon. yours lastly�*s almost all moon captured by one of our weather watchers but tonight we have something called a super flower blood moon on the way. what is that all mean? superman because the moon is notjust the all mean? superman because the moon is not just the full moon all mean? superman because the moon is notjust the full moon but all mean? superman because the moon is not just the full moon but the closest towards the earth so reaching its perigee so it will appeara reaching its perigee so it will appear a bit bigger, a flower moon because the northern hemisphere has all the flowers in bloom known as a flower moon, but the blood element comes from the pack saito to learner eclipse. any light reaching the moon is passing through the sun's atmosphere, the longer red
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wavelength of that light moves towards the moon and it will appear a dusky red colour and if you do want to see it as will happen at around 4:30pm through the early hours of monday morning and your best bets of seeing it across parts of scotland, the final of the england but the far south as well, so cornwall, isle of wight, and you will see quite a lot of outbreaks of showery rain as well so you hope will be lucky either end of the country if you catch a glimpse of the blood from tonight but for the year and now, heavy showers pushing the way northwards. moving in over the way northwards. moving in over the past three hours, thunderstorms from the isle of wight to dumfries and galloway over the past few hours, to, so it's obvious that many of us across parts of england, wales, pushing into northern ireland and scotland with northern ireland keeping the sunnier conditions through the morning. as the area of cloud and showery rain moves northwards, we will see the sunshine reappearing across southern england and wales, too, the temperature is
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possibly 22—23 c in the best spots with the breeze coming in from the north e making it feel a bit chilly for the likes of newcastle and aberdeen as well. into the evening and the initial batch of cloud and showers clears away from the north but then the next area of cloud and heavy showers and thunderstorms rattles it across much of england, wales and northern ireland, so the clearest skies first thing monday morning across the north of scotland and also the far south and south—west of england as well but quite mild and muggy for most of us with that mild air moving in. through the day tomorrow, this relevant bridge is way northwards and that will bring that band of rain which will be quietly weaving across parts of northern ireland and northern england, then pushing into scotland, too, with the odd rumble of thunder and flash of lightning on that band of rain the further south, a return to warm, sunny conditions with one or two isolated showers bubbling up through the day and top temperatures in the south again 22— possibly 23 celsius but cooler for the likes of aberdeen with the raining breeze coming in for the
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east as well. a bit of an unsettled picture as we head through the course of next week with another area of low pressure going in from the west on tuesday, higher pressure in the east so looking a bit wet and windy for western areas through the day on tuesday but for many central and eastern parts, a warm, dry day on tuesday possibly the warmest day of the coming week with temperatures around 25—26 c in the south and east, back to you both. that around 25-26 c in the south and east, back to you both. that sounds treat, east, back to you both. that sounds great. thank — east, back to you both. that sounds great, thank you. _ east, back to you both. that sounds great, thank you. i _ east, back to you both. that sounds great, thank you. i got _ east, back to you both. that sounds great, thank you. i got new - east, back to you both. that sounds great, thank you. i got new garden | great, thank you. i got new garden furniture so _ great, thank you. i got new garden furniture so i'm _ great, thank you. i got new garden furniture so i'm very _ great, thank you. i got new garden furniture so i'm very excited - great, thank you. i got new garden furniture so i'm very excited about| furniture so i'm very excited about the 25. that is basically the biggest thing to happen and ben's live for the last few years, isn't it?- to happen and ben's live for the last few years, isn't it? yes, but then ou last few years, isn't it? yes, but then you buy _ last few years, isn't it? yes, but then you buy it _ last few years, isn't it? yes, but then you buy it and _ last few years, isn't it? yes, but then you buy it and it _ last few years, isn't it? yes, but then you buy it and it rains - last few years, isn't it? yes, but then you buy it and it rains for i last few years, isn't it? yes, but l then you buy it and it rains for 40 days and 40 nights. brute then you buy it and it rains for 40 days and 40 nights.— then you buy it and it rains for 40 days and 40 nights. we were able to blame men. — days and 40 nights. we were able to blame men, then. _ days and 40 nights. we were able to blame men, then. only— days and 40 nights. we were able to blame men, then. only for- days and 40 nights. we were able to blame men, then. only for a - days and 40 nights. we were able to blame men, then. only for a couple | blame men, then. only for a couple of da s, blame men, then. only for a couple of days. maybe. — blame men, then. only for a couple of days, maybe, but _ blame men, then. only for a couple of days, maybe, but we _ blame men, then. only for a couple of days, maybe, but we will - blame men, then. only for a couple of days, maybe, but we will take i blame men, then. only for a couple of days, maybe, but we will take it. j of days, maybe, but we will take it. that has my name all over it. thank
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you. it is a 20 4am. sunday morning, bbc breakfast. let's talk about prescription charges now. nhs prescription charges in england are to be frozen at their current rates, as part of government efforts to ease the rising cost of living. the department of health and social care says it will save people 17—million—pounds overall, however prescriptions remain free across the rest of the uk. gareth barlow reports. as the cost of living rises for the first time in every decade the cost of prescriptions will not. in a typical year, of prescriptions will not. in a typicalyear, charges of prescriptions will not. in a typical year, charges usually increase in line with inflation but with inflation soaring at the fastest rate for 30 years, ministers have decided to freeze charges in their current rates. the move only affects patients in england as people living elsewhere in the uk already do not have to pay. the freeze means a single prescription will remain at £9 35 while a three
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month prescription prepayment will continue to be just over £30. but there are calls for the government to go further with its support. those are the sort of people we squeeze, the middle people who don't get free prescriptions because they are not on the medicines that qualify or on the income that qualifies, they often have to make decisions about which medicines they need and those medicines are all prescribed for a reason. because those patients need that treatment. white make the decision of whether to buy medicines to treat a high blood pressure or use the money to feed children is the situation faced by faith, a single mother of two who says she cannot afford vital drugs. i would rather save my children and myself and that is why sometimes i cannot afford the prescriptions so it will not go far because it is not necessarily the... it affects, it is everything going up price—wise and i
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cannot afford everything i used to be able to come including my prescription. irlat be able to come including my prescription-— prescription. not everyone in en . land prescription. not everyone in england has _ prescription. not everyone in england has to _ prescription. not everyone in england has to pay _ prescription. not everyone in england has to pay for - prescription. not everyone in england has to pay for their i england has to pay for their medicine in fact the department of health says 89% of prescriptions are dispensed free of charge. two people benefiting from age, income, maternity or medical based exemptions however, the chair of the prescription charges coalition said it is time for the government to review who is eligible for free prescriptions. brute review who is eligible for free prescriptions.— review who is eligible for free rescri tions. ~ . , ., prescriptions. we really are urging the government _ prescriptions. we really are urging the government to _ prescriptions. we really are urging the government to actually - prescriptions. we really are urging the government to actually review| the government to actually review the government to actually review the prescription charges exemption list, it has put together over 50 years when some conditions like hiv didn't even exist but at the same time, there were not life—saving treatments for things like asthma and maybe parkinson's and ms, so we think it is really important that the government does overhaul prescription charge exemption list and this announcement today is very welcome from the health secretary. the department of health and social
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care is meant to freeze all safe patient in england £17 million overall and it isjust patient in england £17 million overall and it is just one measure that the government hopes may help people with the rising cost of living. we'rejoined now by gp dr sarahjarvis. how are you? on the face of it, this looks like good news but when you drill down into the detail, it doesn't affect a huge amount of people, does it? tia. doesn't affect a huge amount of people, does it?— doesn't affect a huge amount of people, does it? no, it certainly does not. _ people, does it? no, it certainly does not, about _ people, does it? no, it certainly does not, about 9096 _ people, does it? no, it certainly does not, about 9096 of - people, does it? no, it certainly- does not, about 9096 of prescriptions does not, about 90% of prescriptions are dispensed in england free of charge, all medicines in scotland, wales and northern ireland are free of charge and of course two thirds of charge and of course two thirds of medicines dispensed are dispensed to people eligible on the basis that they are over 60 so the vast majority of medicines are given to people who are older because they are most likely to have multiple medical conditions and interestingly the government was very recently calling on an announcement and a consultation to increase the age at which you get free prescriptions in
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line with the state pension age because it is 64 men and women and they are looking at increasing that if they decided to do that, i think it would probably affect more people and prevent more people from having to pay prescription charges. right. to pay prescription charges. right, havin: said to pay prescription charges. right, having said all _ to pay prescription charges. right, having said all that, _ to pay prescription charges. right, having said all that, every - to pay prescription charges. right, having said all that, every little i having said all that, every little bit counts, right? so particularly for people on repeat prescriptions, it would be a fairly significant extra cost to bear if it did go up in line with inflation.— in line with inflation. yes, if it toes u- in line with inflation. yes, if it goes up by — in line with inflation. yes, if it goes up by 1096 _ in line with inflation. yes, if it goes up by 1096 then - in line with inflation. yes, if it goes up by 1096 then each i in line with inflation. yes, if it i goes up by 1096 then each medication goes up by 10% then each medication will probably go up by about 90p and if you are on three or more medications, fur three months, you can get a prepayment certificate which means anything you get above that, doesn't matter how many medicines you get, you do not pay for those so it might be that the prepayment certificate would go up in line with inflation which will be £3 per three months, so actually overall, we are talking about saving
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people a maximum of £3 per three months, £1 per month, and all right that helps but it will not help much. . . that helps but it will not help much. ., , ., ., that helps but it will not help much. .,, ., ., ,., ., , much. there was another potentially ma'or much. there was another potentially major public — much. there was another potentially major public health _ much. there was another potentially major public health policy _ much. there was another potentially major public health policy that i much. there was another potentially major public health policy that was i major public health policy that was delayed this week, also we are told in order to help with the cost of living and that is the ban on junk food promotions in supermarkets. what do you make of that move and what impact might that have long term and the health of the nation? i do not think there was any question that the government is putting popularity above the health of the public. there is no question in my mind that if you have buy one get one free officers, they are always one free officers, they are always onjunk one free officers, they are always on junk food, they always seem to be on junk food, they always seem to be on unhealthy foods because those are the branded ones, when was the last time you saw bio given free on cauliflower or broccoli? that is the sadness and if that happened, i would be delighted to have that kind of buy one get one free offer but
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unfortunately in the meantime, what we see is that this encourages people to spend a greater proportion of their income on junk food and we know that unfortunately, the lower the level of socio— economic difficulty people are in, the more deprived area they live in, the worse their health and we know children, the incidence of obesity has gone up from one in five to one at ten ivanov and four at 10—11 years old in the last year and we know this is the opposite —— from one in five to one in four. we know people from deprived areas will suffer more. people from deprived areas will suffer more-— suffer more. one of the things ou're suffer more. one of the things you're hearing _ suffer more. one of the things you're hearing is _ suffer more. one of the things you're hearing is the _ suffer more. one of the things you're hearing is the old i you're hearing is the old cost—of—living challenge beginning to impact on health in particular. it is huge for my patient and unfortunately they are really worried and saying, i cannot afford to eat healthily and in our area, is relatively easy because you got a
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market where people can buy vegetables, relatively speaking, very cheaply but i do appreciate it is difficult for them and although you can buy vegetables and tinned vegetables, frozen vegetables all count as well as fresh, and standard vegetables, carrots, cabbage, onions, all count, they take a lot more time and if i've got patients who are saying, i am working seven days a week and i'm exhausted because otherwise i cannot afford the rent and i cannot afford the electricity, and i cannot afford to feed my kids, then they have not got time to eat healthily and they certainly have not got time to exercise. it is certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. it certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. it has certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. it has been certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. it has been a certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. it has been a big certainly have not got time to exercise. it is 8.32. it has been a big fa cup final at wembley this weekend. the big day yesterday, big day—to—day as well, bring is up—to—date.
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absolutely, for the first time in fa cup final, the men's and women's final taking place at the same weekend. the ground staff told us they were here until midnight last night. they want is pledged to look immaculate so no one thinks there was a minutes of football and a penalty shoot—out played annette last night. we have the women's fa cup final to come, we will talk about that in a moment. the drama last night, a penalty between —— a penalty cup shoot—out between liverpool and chelsea. jurgen klopp setting up his dream of a quadruple. they have done it again in the fa cup. the drama of a shoot—out which lasted 0—0 after extra time. the —— sadio mane a had the opportunity to
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win it for liverpool but his penalty was saved. the substitute had to step up and take the decisive penalty and he won it for liverpool. and that is every major english trophy won forjurgen klopp. two down and two to go but the premier league title race still in contention and our european champions league final to play later this month. chelsea the first team to lose three consecutive finals. can chelsea women put that right today? they have had an outstanding season, 18 wins out of 22 games. manchester city have won 13 games across all competitions. two titans going head—to—head. we heard from the city forward earlier. i was also speaking to kelly smith, she has won
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the fa cup five times and she has been giving me her thoughts about theirfinal this been giving me her thoughts about their final this afternoon. nerves can get the better view sometimes. the players will be nervous, it is a big occasion, obviously both sides will want to win it. the fans will be loud, screaming. but it is how you deal with those nerves, making your first pass, that first connection, playing your way into the game and then your confidence grows. but you can use the crowd to your advantage so yeah, just go out and enjoy it. these finals do not come around too often. just express yourself and play with a smile on your face, that's why i would say. what was your routine like on the morning of the final? get up early, have breakfast, check my phone, call my mum and dad. then i would actually write three things down and i wanted to achieve in the game on a piece of paper. i would put that in my bag and located before i came out the channel, keep it fresh in my mind. just stick to those three things and hopefully if those three things worked, hopefully we would win. so it was an easy routine but i always tried to start the game
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really fast and positive. it worked quite a lot for you. fascinating about that routine. let's talk about chelsea, of course women's super league winners. 0utstanding in the league and really want to get this double done. what has impressed you most about them this season? so much really. their resilience, how good they have been defensively. i think milly bright started every game for them. they have had to juggle their back line. they have had players coming in and out, they lost their captain erickson. erin cuthbert has been in and out and come in again, and really good form. sam kerr, player of the season for me. jess park has been amazing at right back. it has been great to watch them playing, they have had a lot of tough games. to win the league in the final game of the season, really kept you entertained, they work the game. to go two goals down and show the character to come back and nick the title off arsenal in the final day of the season, that's what you want in football. great to watch.
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you say that as a former arsenal player, that must be tough. talk about manchester city because they had struggles in the first half of the season but they have been a great run, 30 wins the competition. and of course beat chelsea in the league cup final. does that give them an edge or not? it gives them a little bit more belief that they can do on the big stage in the final. their players are back fit now. they missed ten players, big chunk the early part of the season. any team that loses that players is going to struggle. i think they were down to nine at one point which is unheard of in a manchester city site. but they cut their way back. they have been in sensational form, scoring goals for fun. i think lauren hemps — a top scorer with ten goals. they have such an array of firepower and attacking flair and they have not conceded too many goals in the last 13 games. they are really strong at the back. you have caroline weir in there, bossing the midfield. they are going to believe they can come out here on sunday and win this.
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in the old days, you could not be this close to the pitch on wembley if the lawnmowers were going. these are electric more. the ground staff here, late into last night and the early hours getting this page to look absolutely perfect. they want to perfect for our women's final which is expecting a record crowd, 55,000 tickets sold. chelsea and manchester city are chasing a double. you can watch it live on bbc. this is such a special place to be. nottingham forest and sheffield united both want to be here soon. nottingham forest lead sheffield united 2—1 after the first leg of their championship play—off semi—final. this was forest's second goal, scored afterjoe lolley caught blades defenderjohn egan — he set up brennanjohnson to make it 2—0. and in the 91st minute,
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sheffield united got one back — sander berg gave them hope, going into the second leg on tuesday night. celtic finished their scottish premiership season out in style after thrashing motherwell. an impressive performance yet again. they'd already won the title earlier in the week but scored six goals with kyogo scoring twice. celtic finished 25 points behind rivals rangers last season but have recovered brilliantly in manager ange postecoglou's first season in charge. some news confirmed in the early hours of this morning. former australia cricketer andrew symonds has died after being involved in a car crash. the 46—year—old all—rounder played 26 tests matchers, nearly 200 one—day internationals and 14 t20s
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between 1998 and 2009. so underrated in my opinion, and outstanding cricketer. cricket australia said it was "shocked and saddened by the news". turning our attention to tennis. warming upforthe turning our attention to tennis. warming up for the start of the french open. warming up for the start of the french open. novak djokovic has reached another milestone in men's tennis — he's now won 1000 matches in his professional career and got through to the final of the rome open in the process. the world number one beat norway's casper ruud 6—4 6—3, and will face stefanos tsitsipas in the final. wimbledon two, where he will be the defending champion, and in paris as well, djokovic looking very good.
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that is the case for the women's number one as well. defending champion iga swiatek is through to the women's final — she's now unbeaten in 27 matches after a straight sets win over aryna sabalenka. the world number one will play tunisia's 0ns jabeur in the final. some rugby union used to end with. leinster reached their first champions cup final since 2019 with a comfortable 40—17 win over holders toulouse in dublin. james lowe's two tries were the standout in a dominant performance by leinster and they will face the winners of the other semi—final between french sides racing 92 and la rochelle in marseille in two weeks time. the grass cutters are getting closer to us. the grass cutters are getting closer to us. but the european challenge cup will be an all—french affair... wasps lost to lyon and saracens were beaten 25—16 in their semi—final by toulon. a great try byjuita wainiqolo clinched it for the french side.
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the electric mowers are getting quite close but we are perfectly safe. they will be going for a few more hours yet. it is a 2:30pm kick—off at the women's final. i know we didn't get any goals yesterday in the men's finals, there is plenty of chances and a load of intensity, i hope we get our lot of goals in the fa cup live, live on bbc one at 2:30pm.— goals in the fa cup live, live on bbc one at 2:30pm. thank you so much, that _ bbc one at 2:30pm. thank you so much, that grass _ bbc one at 2:30pm. thank you so much, that grass does _ bbc one at 2:30pm. thank you so much, that grass does look i bbc one at 2:30pm. thank you so i much, that grass does look amazing. so immaculate. thank you, we will see later. �* . ,, see later. beautiful. it looks like someone has— see later. beautiful. it looks like someone has been _ see later. beautiful. it looks like someone has been combing i see later. beautiful. it looks like someone has been combing it i someone has been combing it overnight. someone has been combing it overnight-— someone has been combing it overniaht. . , ., ., , overnight. our lawn is full of holes where the dog _ overnight. our lawn is full of holes where the dog has _ overnight. our lawn is full of holes where the dog has been. - overnight. our lawn is full of holes where the dog has been. my i overnight. our lawn is full of holes where the dog has been. my dog i overnight. our lawn is full of holes i where the dog has been. my dog does not get near the wembley lawn.
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we're going to talk about rashford now — not marcus, the manchester united footballer — but a baby beaver named after him. rashford — named after a public vote — was born last year in exmoor — and he's just celebrated his first birthday. here he is hard at work building a dam and moving mud, alongside his dad yogi, helping transform the area around the holnicote estate in somerset. he's believed to be the first kit born in the area in 400 years. joining us now is ben eardley who is project manager for the national trust at holnicote. amazing to get that little brief insight into rashford's life down there, how close of you be able to track him in the last year?- track him in the last year? pretty closel . track him in the last year? pretty closely- we _ track him in the last year? pretty closely. we keep _ track him in the last year? pretty closely. we keep a _ track him in the last year? pretty closely. we keep a keen - track him in the last year? pretty closely. we keep a keen ionian i track him in the last year? pretty| closely. we keep a keen ionian in the enclosure with a camera, some of the enclosure with a camera, some of the footage you have seen, it is a
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real privilege to see them adapting the site and going about their business, being healthy, happy, healthy beavers. what role does he play there in the ecosystem. just explain some of the work if you can call it that. , ., explain some of the work if you can call it that-— call it that. they are busy beavers, the do call it that. they are busy beavers, they do more _ call it that. they are busy beavers, they do more grass _ call it that. they are busy beavers, they do more grass like _ call it that. they are busy beavers, they do more grass like you i they do more grass like you mentioned earlier on. they are ecosystem engineers so when they haven't _ ecosystem engineers so when they haven't got the habitat they need, they modify to suit themselves. they want deeper water so as well as browsing, — want deeper water so as well as browsing, create deeper water. want deeper water so as well as browsing, create deeperwater. so that footage you saw of rashford, that's _ that footage you saw of rashford, that's him — that footage you saw of rashford, that's him learning the skills he needs_ that's him learning the skills he needs to — that's him learning the skills he needs to be adult beaver to create the habitat he needs. that helps us, develops— the habitat he needs. that helps us, develops the water systems, developed resilience to extreme
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weather, — developed resilience to extreme weather, rainfalland developed resilience to extreme weather, rainfall and drought and benefits _ weather, rainfall and drought and benefits other wildlife as well. how confident are _ benefits other wildlife as well. how confident are you _ benefits other wildlife as well. how confident are you he would be able to thrive in that environment? are the natural predators? the? to thrive in that environment? are the natural predators?— to thrive in that environment? are the natural predators? they do. they still think there _ the natural predators? they do. they still think there are _ the natural predators? they do. they still think there are beers _ the natural predators? they do. they still think there are beers and - still think there are beers and wills in the countryside so that is why they like the deeper water to access food and to hide from predators. foxes will take young beavers. now he is bigger, less threat. so there were challenges when he was younger but he is a year old now and he is thriving. talk about efforts _ old now and he is thriving. talk about efforts to _ old now and he is thriving. talk about efforts to increase the population of beavers there. at about efforts to increase the population of beavers there. at the moment you _ population of beavers there. at the moment you can — population of beavers there. at the moment you can only _ population of beavers there. at the moment you can only get - population of beavers there. at the moment you can only get license . moment you can only get license foreign enclosed released which is what we have done, we are serious about addressing issues of climate change and biodiversity. the government are out at consultation about releases for beaver in the
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wider countryside and we wait to see lambs with regard to that. find lambs with regard to that. and visitors, lambs with regard to that. and visitors. can — lambs with regard to that. and visitors, can they _ lambs with regard to that. and visitors, can they get a sense of what the beavers are up to? we have len of what the beavers are up to? we have plenty of footage _ what the beavers are up to? we have plenty of footage on _ what the beavers are up to? we have plenty of footage on the _ what the beavers are up to? we have plenty of footage on the national- plenty of footage on the national trust website. although you cannot get into the enclosure, you can see the work they have done from outside. we are working really closely with the local community on this project, we had taken lots of local community around the site and the feedback has been really positive, people are very engaged and positive about the changes they have seen the beavers effect. it has have seen the beavers effect. it has been very interesting _ have seen the beavers effect. it has been very interesting to _ have seen the beavers effect. it has been very interesting to talk - have seen the beavers effect. it has been very interesting to talk to - been very interesting to talk to you, thanks for explaining all that and good luck with all the work, i know this is a culmination of a lot of work but still lots more to do so thanks for being with us. we thanks for being with us. no worries. _ thanks for being with us. in; worries, thank you very much.
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now you may not have heard about it, but trading—up is the latest craze — where swapping items can get you anything from a hair clip — to a house. well, a nine—year—old named madison has taken up the hobby, and she's been exchanging items to raise money for her grandma. simon spark has the story. what is a story about trading up got to do with a carpet shop? do you even know were trading uppers? a certain nine—year—old girl has managed to get a carpet worth £100 after initially trading a home—made craft book. that girl is madison and we should ask her to explain. hi. i we should ask her to explain. hi, i am maddison. _ we should ask her to explain. hi, i am maddison, i— we should ask her to explain. hi, i am maddison, i made _ we should ask her to explain. hi, i am maddison, i made a _ we should ask her to explain. h . i am maddison, i made a home—made book with my grandma and i traded it for a monopoly board. i traded that with michael and then i traded with andre for a carpet. i
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michael and then i traded with andre for a carpet-— for a carpet. i have been on a auest. for a carpet. i have been on a quest- this — for a carpet. i have been on a quest. this is _ for a carpet. i have been on a quest. this is the _ for a carpet. i have been on a quest. this is the tiktok - for a carpet. i have been on a | quest. this is the tiktok video for a carpet. i have been on a . quest. this is the tiktok video of one of the world's most famous trader up. debbie from san francisco started with a here group and swapped a mid—rise in nashville, tennessee. —— ear grip. this has inspired madison to raise money for people who could benefit from it closer to home. i people who could benefit from it closer to home.— people who could benefit from it closer to home. i had a few choices and i decided _ closer to home. i had a few choices and i decided to _ closer to home. i had a few choices and i decided to do _ closer to home. i had a few choices and i decided to do it _ closer to home. i had a few choices and i decided to do it for _ closer to home. i had a few choices and i decided to do it for homes. i and i decided to do it for homes. she is such a caring person. she has seen _ she is such a caring person. she has seen the _ she is such a caring person. she has seen the effect that crohn's disease has had _ seen the effect that crohn's disease has had on — seen the effect that crohn's disease has had on me. i was in tears, i reatiy— has had on me. i was in tears, i really was _ has had on me. i was in tears, i really was. she made my day when she said i really was. she made my day when she said i am _ really was. she made my day when she said i am going to do it for you grandma _ said i am going to do it for you grandma-— said i am going to do it for you urandma. �* . ., ., grandma. after trading her home-made craft book, grandma. after trading her home-made craft book. in — grandma. after trading her home-made craft book, in return _ grandma. after trading her home-made craft book, in return she _ grandma. after trading her home-made craft book, in return she received - grandma. after trading her home-made craft book, in return she received a - craft book, in return she received a monopoly game. craft book, in return she received a monopoly game-— craft book, in return she received a monopoly game. then maple got in touch. monopoly game. then maple got in touch- who —
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monopoly game. then maple got in touch. who doesn't _ monopoly game. then maple got in touch. who doesn't like _ monopoly game. then maple got in touch. who doesn't like monopoly. | monopoly game. then maple got in i touch. who doesn't like monopoly. -- touch. who doesn't like monopoly. michael. touch. who doesn't like monopoly. » michael. michael swapped the game for £200 worth of beauty product. a carpet firm got involved and swapped the products were 400 pound carpet. you see someone of a young age doing something good and you know you want to get involved. 50 if something good and you know you want to get involved-— to get involved. so if you want to help madison _ to get involved. so if you want to help madison with _ to get involved. so if you want to help madison with her _ to get involved. so if you want to help madison with her next - to get involved. so if you want to help madison with her next swap| help madison with her next swap comment now is your chance. fancy your carpet with luxury underlay, c your carpet with luxury underlay, c your swaps? ii your carpet with luxury underlay, c your swaps?— your swaps? if anyone with like to trade with me, _ your swaps? if anyone with like to trade with me, i _ your swaps? if anyone with like to trade with me, iwill— your swaps? if anyone with like to trade with me, i will see - your swaps? if anyone with like to trade with me, i will see what - your swaps? if anyone with like to trade with me, i will see what you can offer and i will accept it. that report was from simon spark. this is when we say goodbye to rachel. but first, let us check—in with the weekend weather. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. you have made a friend, who is the dog.
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i've made friends with a couple of collies in bolton this morning. fine start to the weather but i have a fine start to the day for you. some blue skies and sunshine around but also some really heavy downpours and thunderstorms. they have been pushing their way south to north. as this pushes north, it will fizzle out about. showers not quite as heavy later on in the day. the last few hours, this is where they have been and we have had thunder and lightning through parts of the south coast of england, into south wales and dumfries and galloway, so a rash of showers pushing their way north through the day. quite cloudy conditions, some areas of sunshine, especially in the north of sunshine. return to sunny skies for much of england and wales. it will feel warm and humid, 22 or23 england and wales. it will feel warm and humid, 22 or 23 degrees. colder under the cloud, especially with the
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breeze from the north sea like newcastle. the first area of showers cleared from the north but then more coming from the south. showers and thunderstorms putting into central wales, northern ireland, by the early hours of monday. if you hope to catch the lunar eclipse, you will see it in the north of scotland and the far south—west of england. cloudy skies for the rest. through the day tomorrow, here is front moving north. slow—moving rain through northern ireland and northern england and wales. heading into central scotland during the afternoon. also the odd rumble of thunder as well. further south, a return to sunnier skies, one or two isolated showers, it could be heavy and thundery. temperatures 22 or 23 in the south—east but only 11 in aberdeen with outbreaks of rain. through monday night and tuesday,
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low pressure from the west, ahead of that we willjoin a southerly breeze so quite a warm spring day for many of us but tanning wet and windy for western parts of britain and northern ireland. central and east had the warmest day of the week, temperatures up to 25 and possibly 26. bacteria. thank you, enjoy the rest of the day whatever you adopted. —— to you. we bring you everything on this programme, including this next story. balancing giant rocks on each other with nothing to hold them together may sound impossible, but not for one man, who has made it his life's work. the artist adrian gray has been honing his craft for 20 years, and his sculptures are going on display at the chelsea flower show this month. john danks went along to meet him. adrian gray has been balancing stones for over 20 years. it is good to put me under pressure. so there is more
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concentration involved. i cannot believe thatjust stuck there like that. but it is very delicate, i think i could blow that over. i really do. it has got a little wobble. i am happy with that. i think that is ok. he has gone from balancing rocks on a beach in lyme regis to creating huge sculptures like these. monumental sculptures can be anything up to six metres tall, weigh 15, 18 tons. and very different technique in balancing those. obviously i can't use my hands, i have to use a big crane and it is a lot more trial and error and also the composition of the two stones seems to be absolutely key to get something that has huge impact. he will be balancing boulders of cornish granite for a display at the chelsea flower show later this month. buyers snapped up his work
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at last year's event. what i do is i balance the stones and then we film that as evidence of them being balanced and then i fixed them for safety and longevity. but they do reassemble exactly in their balance position and you can't see any of the fixings so a lot of people still think they are balanced, which is great. they are even a little bit reluctant to go near them, which i like. it has taken him years to balance this balancing act. so what is the secret? it is kind of listening with your fingers. when it does find that point of balance, the stone goes really light in your fingers. it's a wonderful feeling. and then you just have to, you might not even see me moving, just minute changes until it stops falling over. john danks, bbc news, axminster. the amount of patience you must have to do that, it is quite calming but lots of patience required.
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let's return to eurovision now and that hugely symbolic win by ukraine. let's have a look at what happened last night. �*i83 let's have a look at what happened last niuht. (kg; ,., , let's have a look at what happened last niuht. (kg; , last night. 183 points. he did so well, last night. 183 points. he did so well. that _ last night. 183 points. he did so well. that it _ last night. 183 points. he did so well, that it is. _ last night. 183 points. he did so well, that it is. unbelievable, . well, that it is. unbelievable, ladies — well, that it is. unbelievable, ladies and _ well, that it is. unbelievable, ladies and gentlemen, - well, that it is. unbelievable, ladies and gentlemen, we - well, that it is. unbelievable, i ladies and gentlemen, we have well, that it is. unbelievable, - ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd. ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd we _ ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd we have — ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd. we have come _ ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd. we have come second _ ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd. we have come second place - ladies and gentlemen, we have come 2nd. we have come second place in. 2nd. we have come second place in the eurovision— 2nd. we have come second place in the eurovision song _ 2nd. we have come second place in the eurovision song contest- 2nd. we have come second place in the eurovision song contest 2022, i the eurovision song contest 2022, this is— the eurovision song contest 2022, this is a _ the eurovision song contest 2022, this is a red — the eurovision song contest 2022, this is a red letter— the eurovision song contest 2022, this is a red letter day. _ the eurovision song contest 2022, this is a red letter day. obviouslyl this is a red letter day. obviously huge _ this is a red letter day. obviously huge congratulations _ this is a red letter day. obviously huge congratulations to - this is a red letter day. obviously huge congratulations to ukraine, | this is a red letter day. obviously. huge congratulations to ukraine, a very poputar— huge congratulations to ukraine, a very popular winner, _ huge congratulations to ukraine, a very popular winner, and - very popular winner, and extraordinary— very popular winner, and extraordinary people's i very popular winner, and . extraordinary people's vote very popular winner, and - extraordinary people's vote for them — extraordinary people's vote for them sam _ extraordinary people's vote for them. sam ryder— extraordinary people's vote for them. sam ryder came- extraordinary people's vote for. them. sam ryder came second, extraordinary people's vote for - them. sam ryder came second, that is 'ust them. sam ryder came second, that is just brilliant _ them. sam ryder came second, that is just brilliant lt— them. sam ryder came second, that is just brilliant-— just brilliant. it was 'ust brilliant. i it was just brilliant. we're joined by the tv critic scott bryan... good morning, how is your head? that
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aside, last night actually happened. astonishing. we have gone from nothing last year to second this year. of course if we take out the ukraine effect which in itself is incredible, what an achievement? what an achievement, from zero points to 466 points. leading the jury points to 466 points. leading the jury vote. it was a testament to his amazing performance but what i love so much about last night is that it has put the argument to bed because the reason we don't perform well is because of brexit and our relationship with europe and what europe thinks about as in general. it has come down to the performance on the actual night itself and the actual song. on the actual night itself and the actualsong. last on the actual night itself and the actual song. last night sam ryder was exceptional, he could not have done any better. i think it was the
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fact that we have managed to get 12 points from countries that we just did not expect, 12 points from france and the jury vote is absolutely astonishing. it was the moment. i don't about you but when you are watching the results, normally when we had at the bottom you get the sense of a bit of resignation, it is quite a carefree part of the night because it is such low stakes. last night was so stressful because when we started to well, we had the rest —— realisation that we could do well here. some dot tjy that we could do well here. some dot by the graham norton commentary, someone at the bbc is getting nervous. , , . ., , nervous. -- summed up. we have been havin: this nervous. -- summed up. we have been having this conversation _ nervous. -- summed up. we have been having this conversation about - nervous. -- summed up. we have been having this conversation about what - having this conversation about what went wrong and how do we change it? so talk to me about what went right, what was that recipe to success last
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night? i what was that recipe to success last niuht? ~ , what was that recipe to success last niuht? ~' , .., what was that recipe to success last niuht? ~' , .. ., ., night? i think it 'ust came down to the fact that — night? i think itjust came down to the fact that the _ night? i think itjust came down to the fact that the bbc _ night? i think itjust came down to the fact that the bbc and - night? i think itjust came down to the fact that the bbc and the - night? i think itjust came down to l the fact that the bbc and the people decided which entry to centre forward listen to the feedback. they listened regarding to staging and to the audience and the right entry forward. it is so important these days, there are so many young people listening so not sent an act forward that will be just eurovision but send a strong artist, someone who is going on a career trajectory and will create an actual career for themselves. sam hasjust been will create an actual career for themselves. sam has just been such a fantastic part of the whole eurovision process. it is surreal. but he was really embracing every single moment with such positivity. there was a moment last night when one country received a zero points, he went over to give them a hug, as an acceptance of i know what it has
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been like have of the uk. where did that guitar come from? itjust arrived when he was performing. it is so lovely to see you, enjoy the rest of your day and i hope the hangover eases up. i rest of your day and i hope the hangover eases up.— rest of your day and i hope the hangover eases up. i am going back to bed. hangover eases up. i am going back to iaed- huge _ hangover eases up. i am going back to bed. huge congratulations - hangover eases up. i am going back to bed. huge congratulations to - to bed. huge congratulations to ukraine, a really symbolic victory for them with that symbolic vote. you are up—to—date. that is all we have time for. have a lovely day.
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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. our top stories... ten people have been killed and three injured in a mass shooting in buffalo, new york. president biden says america must do everything in its power to end hate—filled domestic terrorism. a british military intelligence assessment suggest that russia may have lost one third of the ground forces it committed to the invasion of ukraine. nato ministers are meeting in brussels, as its leaders hope to smooth over a difference with turkey, to enable sweden and finland to join the alliance. lebanon holds parliamentary elections for the first time since an economic collapse sparked widespread anger against the political elite.

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