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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 16, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. borisjohnson is due to visit northern ireland later — with the government set to confirm new legislation to override parts of the brexit deal. an 18—year—old man is charged with murder after 10 people are shot in a racially motivated attack in the us city of buffalo. millions of pupils in england, wales and northern ireland will start sitting their first formal exams in three years today. the queen attends the first big event of her platinum jubilee, taking in the final night of the royal windsor horse show.
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and how much plastic do you throw away in a week? i am with a family in margate who will document every single piece, every pot, every trade they use. and join me deep down in the vaults of the bank of england, surrounded by gold. we're talking about why it's never been more important to understand the economy. good morning, chelsea do the double. a week after winning the league title — they lift the fa cup at wembley. and more thunderstorms to come today but a brighter day across southern areas. more wet weather further north. all the details here on breakfast. it's monday the 16th of may. our main story. the prime minister will visit belfast today to urge the main parties there to resume power—sharing. the democratic unionist party is currently refusing to re—enter the assembly because of the post—brexit
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trading arrangements known as the northern ireland protocol. meanwhile, the government is expected to introduce legislation which would allow ministers to override parts of that protocol. political correspondent nick eardley reports. boris johnson will arrive in northern ireland later to find a political system which is stuck. despite elections earlier this month, there's no new government. sinn fein finished top for the first time ever, but the democratic unionist party — the second largest at stormont — won't agree to power—sharing until the brexit deal is changed. they're worried about checks on goods travelling from great britain to northern ireland. even though many parties accept these arrangements, if unionist politicians don't, power—sharing can't get back up and running. borisjohnson signed the brexit deal, but he now agrees that changes are needed and is calling for the european union to negotiate tweaks. ahead of his visit today, boris johnson writes in the belfast telegraph...
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back in london, ministers have been drawing up legislation which would allow them to override parts of the brexit deal. it's set to be confirmed tomorrow, but will have to pass through parliament, meaning it could be months before the government has the power to act without agreement from europe. but the move would be controversial. some fear it could spark a trade war at a time when many businesses and households can least afford one. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent adam fleming. good morning. we heard rumours about the future of the protocol. will we get some clarity from the government this week? it get some clarity from the government this week? , ,., get some clarity from the government this week? , , ., ., this week? it will be something that looks like clarity _ this week? it will be something that looks like clarity because _ this week? it will be something that looks like clarity because the - this week? it will be something that looks like clarity because the best . looks like clarity because the best way it is explained to me about what is going on is the government is
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gradually making it more clear to the eu what the consequences would be if the uk and eu cannot reach a deal on tweaking the protocol, the bit of the deal that applies to northern ireland so the idea behind publishing draft legislation about what you would do if the protocol was not functioning would be to make it clear this is where you are heading, the government saying this is what we are keeping in reserve if negotiations do not work. worth noting that the main thing boris johnson is saying is he believes there can be negotiations with the eu. they are not at the end of the road, they are still halfway down the road. maybe further than halfway depending on how long you have watched negotiations unfold. i think there is potential for watched negotiations unfold. i think there is potentialfor this to be less dramatic than it sounds at the moment. in terms of the trip to belfast today, i think the main job the prime minister has got is to
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convince the democratic unionist party to soften their position. they are saying the only way they will join the government in northern ireland and stop holding up the process of a government being formed is if the protocol is dropped from the brexit deal altogether. no one is willing to do that. away will have to be found for the dup to soften their position without the protocol being dropped so can join the government and the logjam can be broken so logjam in northern ireland and also between the eu and uk. this is borisjohnson�*s attempt to break both. is boris johnson's attempt to break both. . nato officials have said vladimir putin's invasion strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling. it's thought russia may have lost a third of its ground combat troops — and they are failing to gain ground in the donbas region. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv.
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the invasion might have stalled but it seems it is far from over. that is the case- _ it seems it is far from over. that is the case. when _ it seems it is far from over. that is the case. when we _ it seems it is far from over. that is the case. when we talk- it seems it is far from over. twat is the case. when we talk about a third of combat troops, that is from the ministry of defence, it includes killed and injured soldiers and damaged equipment. nato thinks ukraine could put itself in a position to fully push the russians back and win this war. but when president zelensky was asked about mariupol he conceded he did not have military means to push the russians out and free the deadlock as things stand. the us made a similar conclusion a month ago saying the russians had lost around 25% of its invading force. i think this has been the case for some time and the reasons russia has looked to shift things eastwards and today ukrainians are saying the russians
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are trying to launch offensives along the front line stretching from the east and across the land corridor to the south. but they are sustaining heavy losses in terms of bridge building equipment, continued morale issues. there is heavy fighting around a city in the north—east. which the russians now occupy, but ukrainians are keen to disrupt things so to not have friendly troops trapped further southin friendly troops trapped further south in the donbas region where we are continuing to see heavy fighting. are continuing to see heavy fiuuhtin. �* are continuing to see heavy fiuuhtin. ~ ~ ., fighting. and we saw ukraine winning eurovision on — fighting. and we saw ukraine winning eurovision on saturday, _ fighting. and we saw ukraine winning eurovision on saturday, a _ fighting. and we saw ukraine winning eurovision on saturday, a reminder i eurovision on saturday, a reminder of how much support they have across europe. of how much support they have across euro e. ~ . of how much support they have across euroe. ~ . .,, of how much support they have across euroe. ~ . ., of how much support they have across euro e, . ., .,, .,. ., europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat — europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat and _ europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat and sombre. _ europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat and sombre. when - europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat and sombre. when the l it was upbeat and sombre. when the results came in, it would have been around 3am, in the middle of a curfew. many ukrainians watching at home, they might have had house
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parties. what matters to people is standing up for their country. one member of the group was not there, he was serving in the territorial defence and volunteering to fight. other members had special permission to leave the country to perform in italy. i think any gesture, big or small, that stands up for ukraine in its continued struggle in the invasion is seen as a good thing and is received well. for ukrainians to watch and sing along and cheer for something is something vastly different from the previous 82 days. james, thank you. a three—year—old boy has died in a suspected dog attack in greater manchester. it happened at a house in the town of milnrow, near rochdale, yesterday afternoon. greater manchester police says it's investigating previous incidents
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involving dogs at the home. no arrests have been made. airlines and airports in eu countries are no longer telling passengers and staff to wear facemasks. the european union aviation safety agency says the change — which comes into force today — is a big step forward in normalising air travel. some airlines will still require face coverings to be worn. the queen has attended the final night of the royal windsor horse show — which was the first official event to celebrate her platinum jubilee. applause her majesty was met with a standing ovation as she arrived. celebrities including tom cruise, helen mirren and katherinejenkins appeared in the open—air celebration. and martin clunes. well spotted. and that was helen mirren as elizabeth i.
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my mirren as elizabeth i. my goodness. did she think it was fancy dress? i do not think so. why did you not tell me? you do not have many more early is but did you look up to the sky this morning? it was really reining in sheffield and as i approached manchester it was getting better. but still wet here. if you have clear skies, take a look outside and you may see the moon has turned a dusky shade of red. here's a live shot from chile. it's the result of a total lunar eclipse, when the earth passes between the moon and the sun, casting a shadow over the moon. this year, it's happening while the moon is in its closest orbit to earth, making it a "super blood moon". if you do have spectacular pictures, we would love to see them. when i was in rio dejaneiro for the
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olympics, the moon, 190 it went completely red. so you have seen one? i think it was to do with dust particles and the reflection of light. i did make a call out to get brian cox on the programme. he was busy? yes. probably had a lot on, teaching. i bet there is a hashtag for this this morning. here's a modern twist on the traditional fireworks display — a formation of drones carrying coloured lights. this took place in coventry last night to mark the start of its final month as the uk city of culture. that is beautiful. better than that moon. the uk city of culture. coventry. organisers of the 16—minute show — called our wilder family — say it was the largest and longest
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drone display ever staged in the uk. shall we keep watching these? these are great. it is very clever. i'm sure it is preprogrammed on a computer. we had a butterfly. what was before the butterfly? it is like a quiz question. that is very funky. like an eagle. with a beating heart. that could be a phoenix. absolutely gorgeous. or a peacock. ithink absolutely gorgeous. or a peacock. i think that wins best pictures of the mourning 12 minutes in. ican see in. i can see why we were not asked to do commentary on anything. i think it is a peacock! no, that is a phoenix. we will get some more of that later. shall we talk about exams? a exa ms ? a stressful exams? a stressful time of year. most gcse and a—level exams start from today — which means many students in england, wales and northern ireland, will be sitting their first formal exams since the start of the pandemic. scottish highers began at the end of april.
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for some it's their first experience of sitting in an exam hall, while school leaders are warning about a shortage of invigilators. our education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to a school in wigan to check on preparations. coming up in the next couple of weeks, it's absolutely essential that we have a good revision programme. at the deanery church of england high school in wigan, its final study sessions. when i did my mocks and i got the results, iwas like, agh. chelsea and her classmates have done their mock exams. tears were coming in my eyes as i was walking in. i could just see the paper, all the invigilatorsjust standing at the front with her arms crossed. i'm just like, "oh, my days!" the next time they go into the exam room, it will be for real. i want to do a career in medicine, so i obviously want to get them seven, eights and nines to, like, obviously, gain, like, offers from university. like major universities like manchester, even oxford. it wasn't as bad as i was expecting, considering what we did at revision
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catching up in the canteen, it's talk of revision and exam timetables. if, you know, people have been off with covid, teachers have been good at live lessons and putting work on so we can do everything. i've got 21 exams spread out across a month and a half, so sometimes i'll go home and i'll revise for an hour or so and then i'll go to footballjust to take my mind off it. i think it's really important to not only...obviously, worry about your grades, but worry about yourself and worry about your mental health. ok, year11, you can put your pens down, please. the government says this year's students will be graded more generously than the last time exams were sat in 2019, but they won't get as many top grades as last year, when results were decided by teachers' assessments. pupils will get formula sheets to use in exams and there has been advance information for gcses and a—levels. so i've got two a—levels left — design and technology, and engineering i've got left, but i've got a btec and a ctec, as well.
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jasmine is worried about what could come up. it's been a bit mad, to be honest, because we've missed so much time and every time someone was off we'd all have to go off. so, as engineering students, we can't do our things at home. it's more just all online or special software we don't have at home. and so we're all 18 now and it feels like we've missed a big chunk of, like, growing up in our in a—levels. it's just like stress constantly that you're not going to get everything done. and then, after that into actual jobs, it feels like we've not even been in school at all. we are really excited for our children to be able to show what they're brilliant at, as well, and do well in their gcses for the deputy head, mrs turner, it's about making pupils believe they can aim high. but there is no doubt anxiety levels are also high. most pupils haven't had any national exams since their sats in primary school. we are seeing children that
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are presenting to us with really, really difficult social, emotional and mental health issues. we've got more children, probably triple, quadruple the amount of children, that previously would have struggled to go in an exam hall that are feeling that way now getting ready for an exam. it's all the stuff you put in beforehand. it's all the practice runs. it's all the getting yourselves ready that they've not had. sometimes, the children rub their hands together. i'll see their legs are shaking, breathing might get a little bit faster. so just go over to those children and just let them know that we're here. a quiet, "are you ok?" because of increased levels of anxiety, more invigilators are needed and some schools have struggled to recruit. here, the school nurse has stepped in. predominantly, an invigilator has always been like a retired person. unfortunately, when covid did hit, a lot of the retirees didn't want to come into school then. so there has been quite a bit of a shortage. breathe in. hold. in the library, there's an exam stress workshop.
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as well as breathing techniques, minnie is on hand to help pupils and staff. if pupils are having a difficult day, then they can come into the wellbeing room. they can have a chat with me, they can spend a little time with minnie. we'll go for a walk and we'll talk to pupils that way. she's a very big part of the school. star pupil! she is the star pupil, yes. what can we think about that we could do to maybe help with that? teachers here have put on revision classes in the easter holidays and extra sessions after school. i'm going to actually do question 13. the government says national exams represent a major step back to normality. for these pupils, it's a major step towards their future goals and aspirations. our grades open the doors to what we want to become in this world and ijust honestly think that the support that the teachers are giving me and giving to the rest of the students as well is just really helpful. elaine dunkley, bbc news.
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good luck to anybody starting their exams at the moment. a stressful time. this might not be the best advice but try... try not to worry about it. it is really hard. now the weather with matt. very dramatic picture behind you. yes, taken in winchester yesterday. a lively evening and night for some of you especially in southern england with frequent lightning and some thunder. most of it is fading but there will be more thunderstorms around today. still some heavy showers. and a wet start in the bulk of england, scotland and northern ireland. heavy bursts in northern ireland. heavy bursts in northern ireland before things improve later. and rain in northern england but improving in much of england and wales. scotland, the best of the weather in shetland. a breeze making
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it feel cool in central and eastern parts and further rain into the afternoon. maybe some heavy showers in northern ireland and also in northern england with showers around this afternoon. some of them thundery. central and southern parts of england and wales, a better chance of staying dry. feeling humid in the sunshine. overnight, drier in scotland. cloud in the north and east. wet weather in parts of cornwall and the isles of scilly. fresher than last night but still mild. tomorrow, cloud across western areas. rain becoming heavy later in the day. much of scotland, england, eastern wales, a dry day and not only the warmest day of the week but the year so far. up to 26 in the south—east corner. more details later.
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that looks good. let's take a look at some of today's papers. the belfast telegraph has an exclusive message from the prime minister today, ahead of his visit to northern ireland. writing in the paper, borisjohnson says the protocol will not be scrapped but must be fundamentally changed. "radiant, happy and simply glorious" is the headline on the daily mail, alongside a picture of the queen. the paper says her appearance at the closing of the royal windsor horse show last night — the second time she's been seen in public in three days — lifted the nation's spirits. the metro leads on the story that volodymyr zelensky has promised that ukraine will host eurovision next year, after his country's emotional song contest triumph. and one of the most—read stories on bbc online this morning is the news that david tennant and catherine tate are to return to doctor who. the bbc has confirmed the pair are currently filming for the show�*s 60th anniversary, which it will celebrate next year. tennant played the tenth doctor from 2005 to 2010, while tate played his companion
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donna noble. we do not know exactly what part they will play but they are part of they will play but they are part of the filming. big doctor who news. mentioning eurovision. saturday night was busy. the fa cup final straight into eurovision. penalties and eurovision. did you stay up for the eurovision experience? not till the end. was it good? it was good. we are used to the uk being on the bottom right. last year was zero points. sam is big on tiktok and social media but i think he did diplomatic work in various countries in the build—up. and he performed perfectly. it was a bit like a win. and it was great to see ukraine win. the public vote was enormous. we
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will talk about that later in the programme. there's been another mass shooting in the us. one person has died and four were critically injured after a man opened fire at a church in california, shortly after the morning service. it came after ten people were killed in a separate incident in buffalo, in new york state, on saturday. that attack has been described as racially motivated, and an 18—year—old man has been arrested. will grant reports. once again, one man's deep—seated racism and easy access to semi—automatic weapons have combined to deadly effect in america. 18—year—old payton gendron drove for miles to reach this supermarket in a predominantly black neighbourhood of buffalo. heavily armed and dressed in tactical gear, he livestreamed his entire horrific attack. the killing spree began in the car park, where four people were killed, before he entered the building and continued his rampage.
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a security guard, a retired buffalo policeman, tried to stop him but was among those killed. most of the victims were black. before the attack, the gunman posted a kind of manifesto online — a hate—filled screed laying bare his extremist views. outside the supermarket, gendron was disarmed, taken into custody and charged with first—degree murder. in court, his lawyer entered a not—guilty plea. now, new and difficult questions have emerged. after threatening such violence last year, the gunman was held by the authorities for a mental health evaluation, then released. a further blow to this tight—knit community torn apart by a teenager with a gun. will grant, bbc news. the reverend mark blue is the president of the buffalo naacp, which works to support black communities in the us. hejoins us now from buffalo.
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good morning. thank you for talking to us. could you please, in your words, explain how the community has been affected? the words, explain how the community has been affected?— been affected? the community is totally distraught. _ been affected? the community is totally distraught. hurt, - been affected? the community is totally distraught. hurt, and - been affected? the community is totally distraught. hurt, and we | been affected? the community is l totally distraught. hurt, and we are trying to bring healing back to the community. this senseless act of racial tension from this terrorist, this gunman who randomly came to our community from over 200 miles away, it was premeditated. it was calculated. and we are trying to bring the pieces of our community back together. our community is distraught, totally upset, and we are trying to bring healing back to the community. we are trying to bring healing back to the community.— are trying to bring healing back to the communi . ~ ., , ., , the community. we are seeing images from the location _ the community. we are seeing images from the location of _ the community. we are seeing images from the location of the _ the community. we are seeing images from the location of the shooting. - from the location of the shooting. you have been there over the weekend where vigils are happening. what you have been there over the weekend where vigils are happening.— where vigils are happening. what was it like bein: where vigils are happening. what was
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it like being there? _ where vigils are happening. what was it like being there? it _ where vigils are happening. what was it like being there? it is _ where vigils are happening. what was it like being there? it is a _ where vigils are happening. what was it like being there? it is a sense - it like being there? it is a sense of community awareness and community togetherness. we realised that this act alone can forge the community together. it did not have to happen. people are asking that question why, why is it happening in such a time as this? we have seen it in other communities but when it comes to yourfront door, a lot communities but when it comes to your front door, a lot of people really do not know what to do. we are trying to bring the community back together. we had prayer vigils. there are outlines of individuals who were deceased in the parking lot. people are questioning why was this individual taken in peacefully when other things could have happened to the individual. we know
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that african—americans have been polarised in our society and we are looking at how and why this was done, where this individual gets to live again and those ten victims and families have been totally destroyed. at}?! families have been totally destroyed-— families have been totally destro ed. , ., , , ., families have been totally destro ed. , ., destroyed. of the people you have soken destroyed. of the people you have spoken to. — destroyed. of the people you have spoken to, what _ destroyed. of the people you have spoken to, what stories _ destroyed. of the people you have spoken to, what stories are - destroyed. of the people you have spoken to, what stories are you i spoken to, what stories are you hearing? spoken to, what stories are you hearin: ? , ., ., ., hearing? these are regular human beinus. hearing? these are regular human beinqs- they _ hearing? these are regular human beings. they were _ hearing? these are regular human beings. they were going _ hearing? these are regular human beings. they were going about - hearing? these are regular human l beings. they were going about their regular duties. one of the victims was shopping for groceries to go home. a security guard doing his job, being a hero, but he was outgunned because this individual came with military gear. there was another man who was shot in his vehicle. this was a senseless crime. this terrorist polarised the
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community. we need to make sure this does not happen again. the grocery store, it was a staple in our community and the only grocery store within 3—4 miles of the community. that community is virtually in a food desert and that was the only means where individuals could come and get fresh produce and vegetables. so it has been totally ravaged and devastated by the heinous act of this terrorist. thank ou so heinous act of this terrorist. thank you so much _ heinous act of this terrorist. thank you so much for— heinous act of this terrorist. thank you so much for talking _ heinous act of this terrorist. thank you so much for talking to - heinous act of this terrorist. thank you so much for talking to us. - the reverend mark blue is the president of the buffalo naacp. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. police are investigating social media footage appearing to show an officer repeatedly hitting an individual in the head
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during an incident in east london at the weekend. the footage — which includes others besides this — shows officers dragging a man beside a police van outside kingsland shopping centre on saturday. officers say they were carrying out a pre—planned operation "targeting e—scooters and moped—enabled crime". nine people were arrested for violent disorder. nightclubs across london are warning they're "running out of time" to find bouncers — and they claim its leading to fears about safety. three quarters of bars, pubs and clubs have been found to be short of security staff. the night time industries association is calling for government action before the peak months of the summer — when securityjobs are in highest demand. a memorial garden where survivors can remember those who lost their lives looks likely to be created at the site of g re nfell tower. 72 people died when fire engulfed the residential tower block in north kensington almost five years ago. no decision has yet been made
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about the future of the tower — but a commission is speaking to people as part of the process. we spoke to some of the families that lost people in 9/11, and they were part of a commission similar to ours to help decide what would happen. and they told us how difficult it was and how, honestly, that is part of the process — having people find out they don't like things and then readjust and keep changing the idea until we arrive there — and that is the process. travel, and a look at the tube board. the bank branch of the northern line reopens this morning after four months of improvement work. the district line has delays due to engineering works. and the metropolitan line is part suspended due to a signal failure. onto the weather now with sara. good morning to you. we've had some thunderstorms out towards the south west of london overnight. they are largely clearing away. we've got some, mist and murk, though, to start us off this morning in our suburbs. any showers pulling off
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towards the north, but then some sunshine could spark off some further showers here and there as we run through the day today. a lot of places will stay dry with some sunshine — in the best of it, temperatures around 21 celsius. overnight tonight, we're dry, we're clear, we are going to see a little bit of mist and murk and maybe some passing cloud, as well. but we'll stay dry into tomorrow morning, and temperatures typically staying in low double figures, so it'll be a warm start tomorrow. i just want to show you the fronts charts to show you what a mess it is, actually, over the next few days. we've got low pressure dominating our weather this week, there are frontal systems trying to push further showers in at times. showers, so of course they are hit and miss — we won't all see them. tomorrow, though, largely dry for a good deal of the day, and a warm one — could be 25 or 26 degrees for us — very high 70s in fahrenheit. staying warm through the week, but unsettled. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. after the uk came second in
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eurovision on saturday night, jason is on bbc radio london and he is asking what you come second in life, but still feel like a winner? hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on the programme this morning... we'll find out what happened when the bank of england let nina into its gold vault — which contains £2 billion worth of bullion. ben elton will be on the sofa for a chat about the stage version of his shakespearean sitcom upstart crow, which is back in theatres after being shelved during the pandemic. he yells in delight. and we'll catch up with the ukrainian eurovision commentator who gave us that moment of pure joy from inside his broadcast bunker. if you've just finished the milk
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and you're about to throw the plastic bottle in the recycling — just hang on a moment because you might need to make a note of it first. that's because today is the first day of the big plastic count. our climate and environment correspondentjonah fisher is in margate to tell us more. good morning. good morning. we have been very kindly _ good morning. good morning. we have been very kindly invited _ good morning. good morning. we have been very kindly invited into _ good morning. good morning. we have been very kindly invited into the - been very kindly invited into the kitchen of rachel, alex and johnny and they have the dog dodge. daniel is in charge of the big plastic count and will be speaking to us in a minute. iam count and will be speaking to us in a minute. i am fascinated by what goes on behind—the—scenes and in particular about what happens to our recycling. this is the recycling for this house. just over from the weekend. last week i went to a
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recycling plant in london to try to get a better idea of what exactly happens when we put that bike outside and it is taken away. every year, each of us, on average, produces about 400 kilos of household waste. 44% of it is then recycled. this is one of the biggest recycling plants in britain — in southwark, in south london. this facility deals with the recycling for about two million people every year. that's 150,000 tonnes. the number—one rule is if you're not sure, don't put it in your recyclable bin. with the ball, that baseball ball, that needs to be removed. when we collect the waste in the streets, we ask the general public to put plastics, glass, metals and paper in the in the same bin. so the role of this facility is to separate this material. the top few things that we are seeing coming to our facilities
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and which should not would be the things like textiles — clothes. we see shoes, jumpers, etc. it can be recycled, but not on the kerb—side collection. it needs to be at a household waste recycling centre. we see a lot of, like, coffee cups. it can be recycled — again, if it's brought back to the the shop or the store where you bought your coffee. check on your local council's website where all the guidelines are provided and usually you get the contact details if you're unsure. so this feels like the end of the process here in this plant. absolutely. so at the very end. so you can see the different fractions. we've got all the plastics together — it will go to another plant to be sorted and recycled. we've got the cardboard and the paper, which will go directly to a paper mill to be recycled into new piece of cardboard and paper. and, finally, we've got the metals. of those, plastic is the hardest to recycle. but there are some success stories. each different type of plastic needs
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a different processing plant. this one in east london, it processes milk bottles. you can see all these bales here. these are all milk bottles that we use at home and have been sorted and brought here. now, this plant is a big one. it processes about 400 million milk bottles every year. it works 2a hours a day round the clock. that's about 10% of the milk bottles that we use in the uk. the bottles are chopped up with their tops on and then a machine sorts the plastic by colour. so this is the end product. these are white plastic pellets — very much like lentils, in fact. now, tim, this is what's come out at the end here. what happens to these now? so what we're going to do with this is make new milk bottles. and these milk bottles can come back
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here and create a circular loop to recycle them again and again. just over half our recycling is processed here. the rest is sent abroad. so how is this big plastic count going to work? daniel webb is one of the brains behind this survey. why have you decided to do this and how will it work? the have you decided to do this and how will it work?— will it work? the big plastic count is a collaboration _ will it work? the big plastic count is a collaboration between - will it work? the big plastic count i is a collaboration between everyday plastic— is a collaboration between everyday plastic and greenpeace and is biggest — plastic and greenpeace and is biggest ever investigation in the uk into household plastic waste. we are all doing _ into household plastic waste. we are all doing our bit to recycle but plastic— all doing our bit to recycle but plastic waste is everywhere so something doesn't add up and we need to get— something doesn't add up and we need to get into _ something doesn't add up and we need to get into the bottom of it. we are asking _ to get into the bottom of it. we are asking people across the country to count _ asking people across the country to count the _ asking people across the country to count the plastic they throw away for one _ count the plastic they throw away for one week. submit their results into our— for one week. submit their results into our special website and that will then— into our special website and that will then generate the data that we
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really _ will then generate the data that we really need to push for change. let's _ really need to push for change. let's have _ really need to push for change. let's have a look here. rachel, alex, 94 having us in your house. johnny, do the honours with the plastic. ok! great. fantastic. what is this, a weekend or a week? from plastic. 0k! great. fantastic. what is this, a weekend or a week? from a weekend. is this, a weekend or a week? from a weekend- why _ is this, a weekend or a week? from a weekend. why have _ is this, a weekend or a week? from a weekend. why have you _ is this, a weekend or a week? from a weekend. why have you decided - is this, a weekend or a week? from a weekend. why have you decided to i is this, a weekend or a week? from a | weekend. why have you decided to do this? it weekend. why have you decided to do this? it seems — weekend. why have you decided to do this? it seems a _ weekend. why have you decided to do this? it seems a lot _ weekend. why have you decided to do this? it seems a lot of _ weekend. why have you decided to do this? it seems a lot of extra _ this? it seems a lot of extra paperwork. this? it seems a lot of extra paperwork-— this? it seems a lot of extra paperwork. we have made a lot of chances paperwork. we have made a lot of changes over _ paperwork. we have made a lot of changes over the last couple of. changes over the last couple of years — changes over the last couple of years we _ changes over the last couple of years. we use reusable wipes and we are still— years. we use reusable wipes and we are still producing this much plastic— are still producing this much plastic so there is something amiss. we are _ plastic so there is something amiss. we are making lots of changes and still putting this in the recycling bin and — still putting this in the recycling bin and assuming it all goes off and is recycled — bin and assuming it all goes off and is recycled into something else. johnny, — is recycled into something else. johnny, you will play a big role in filling this. perhaps dan can talk you help it will work. you filling this. perhaps dan can talk you help it will work.— filling this. perhaps dan can talk you help it will work. you need to look at all — you help it will work. you need to look at all this _ you help it will work. you need to look at all this plastic _
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you help it will work. you need to look at all this plastic you - you help it will work. you need to look at all this plastic you have i look at all this plastic you have here _ look at all this plastic you have here and — look at all this plastic you have here and categorise each little bit. if here and categorise each little bit. if we _ here and categorise each little bit. if we take — here and categorise each little bit. if we take this a bag of peas, this is a frozen — if we take this a bag of peas, this is a frozen bike so it would go under— is a frozen bike so it would go under other soft food and drink packaging so itjust a little ticked on there — packaging so itjust a little ticked on there. and so what we have done is create _ on there. and so what we have done is create 19— on there. and so what we have done is create 19 different categories. there _ is create 19 different categories. there are — is create 19 different categories. there are lots of different types of plastic. there are lots of different types of lastic. , ., ., ., plastic. yes, and we have tried to whittle it down _ plastic. yes, and we have tried to whittle it down as _ plastic. yes, and we have tried to whittle it down as much - plastic. yes, and we have tried to whittle it down as much as - plastic. yes, and we have tried to whittle it down as much as we - plastic. yes, and we have tried to l whittle it down as much as we can. there _ whittle it down as much as we can. there are — whittle it down as much as we can. there are three main categories. food _ there are three main categories. food and — there are three main categories. food and drink, cleaning and toiletries, and everything else, to make _ toiletries, and everything else, to make it _ toiletries, and everything else, to make it easy as possible for people in the _ make it easy as possible for people in the country to take part. you make it easy as possible for people in the country to take part.- in the country to take part. you are not daunted _ in the country to take part. you are not daunted by _ in the country to take part. you are not daunted by this? _ in the country to take part. you are not daunted by this? you _ in the country to take part. you are not daunted by this? you both - in the country to take part. you are. not daunted by this? you both work, it is something extra to stop me at no, the kids can do it. it is worthwhile for the environmental. good luck. dan, is the idea here is that you are making people a bit more aware of the amount of plastic they use, or are you aiming this survey at government, supermarkets?
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first, we don't want to make anyone feel guilty— first, we don't want to make anyone feel guilty for the plastic waste they use — feel guilty for the plastic waste they use through the week. rachel has already said she is making huge changes— has already said she is making huge changes and has done already but this is— changes and has done already but this is still— changes and has done already but this is still how much they are going — this is still how much they are going through in one weekend. plastic— going through in one weekend. plastic is — going through in one weekend. plastic is the default material, we cannot— plastic is the default material, we cannot avoid very easily. what we need _ cannot avoid very easily. what we need to— cannot avoid very easily. what we need to do— cannot avoid very easily. what we need to do is we need help to make changes— need to do is we need help to make changes and that is what we want to do with— changes and that is what we want to do with this — changes and that is what we want to do with this project, we want to present— do with this project, we want to present the data to government, supermarkets and retailers. if supermarkets and retailers. people supermarkets and retailers. if people are seeing this now, they have not sent in for the papers, they can still get involved. absolutely. go to thebigplasticcount. com absolutely. go to thebigplasticcount.com to sign up. thank— thebigplasticcount.com to sign up. thank you — thebigplasticcount.com to sign up. thank you so much for having us. this is the rubbish for this family forjust the weekend. i wonder how much you and your family will create in a full week. aha, much you and your family will create in a full week-— in a full week. a lot, i can tell
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ou in a full week. a lot, i can tell you that! _ in a full week. a lot, i can tell you that! thank— in a full week. a lot, i can tell you that! thank you _ in a full week. a lot, i can tell you that! thank you very - in a full week. a lot, i can tell i you that! thank you very much. in a full week. a lot, i can tell - you that! thank you very much. dodge getting well involved.— getting well involved. brown been in sheffield today. _ getting well involved. brown been in sheffield today. my _ getting well involved. brown been in sheffield today. my black— getting well involved. brown been in sheffield today. my black bean - getting well involved. brown been in sheffield today. my black bean is - getting well involved. brown been inj sheffield today. my black bean is my lastic bin. sheffield today. my black bean is my plastic bin. this _ sheffield today. my black bean is my plastic bin. this is _ sheffield today. my black bean is my plastic bin. this is why _ sheffield today. my black bean is my plastic bin. this is why you _ sheffield today. my black bean is my plastic bin. this is why you tune - plastic bin. this is why you tune in. ~ . , plastic bin. this is why you tune in. . ., , , ., plastic bin. this is why you tune in. what is your normal one with aout -- in. what is your normal one with gout -- what _ in. what is your normal one with gout -- what is _ in. what is your normal one with gout -- what is your _ in. what is your normal one with gout -- what is your normal - in. what is your normal one with | gout -- what is your normal bin? gout —— what is your normal bin? grey. gout -- what is your normal bin? gre . ~ ., ., gout -- what is your normal bin? gre .~ ., ., ., ,, ,, grey. we are not talking about bins, chetan. it felt — grey. we are not talking about bins, chetan. it felt like _ grey. we are not talking about bins, chetan. it felt like a _ grey. we are not talking about bins, chetan. it felt like a proper - chetan. it felt like a proper weekend — chetan. it felt like a proper weekend of _ chetan. it felt like a proper weekend of fa _ chetan. it felt like a proper weekend of fa cup - chetan. it felt like a proper| weekend of fa cup football, chetan. it felt like a proper - weekend of fa cup football, men's and women's. the first time in history we have one on the friday and saturday and one on the sunday. the saturday final was good, liverpool and chelsea. it was edgy, extra time and penalties. chelsea won the women's final. we have talked about the sanctions as challenges chelsea have had this season. problems off the field. emma
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hayes has done an incrediblejob, 11 trophies since she has been there. understandably emotional as chelsea got themselves over the line to complete the double week after they won the women's super league. they saw off manchester city three having to extra time to win the fa cup for the fourth time. it went to extra time — chelsea were heading for victory after this brilliant second—half goalfrom erin cuthbert who put them 2—1 up. but in the 89th minute, city pressed forward and grabbed an equaliser — hayley raso straight off the bech hayley raso straight off the bench to see the game go to extra time. no penalties needed, though — sam kerr's shot was deflected in off alex greenwood and that proved to be the winner — to the delight of emma hayes after a challenging season. there is no denying it was the best fa cup final, i think, in recent years. but we dig so deep — had players carrying cramp, groin strains, everything —
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that we can dig it out and i thoughtjust...by far and away my favourite win. i really feel we've had to deal with a lot this year, on and off the pitch, and that one is for everyone at the club because we've been through a lot. it is getting interesting in the premier league title race. manchester city will be crowned premier league champions if they beat aston villa in their final game of the season. but liverpool play against southampton tomorrow night. when that and they would be one point behind manchester city going into the final game because manchester city dropped points yesterday in a dramatic game at west ham united. craig templeton reports. here he comes. saved by fabianski. if that had gone in, manchester city would have one hand on the premier league title. now there's still a chance it could fall out of their grasp. it was the jarrod bowen show in the first half for west ham.
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incredible! jarrod bowen for west ham! his two goals had the champions concerned. but, as they so often do, city found a way — even if it was a west ham defender that made it 2—2. mahrez�*s miss means liverpool can close the gap to one point. city, though, will retain their crown if they beat aston villa on the final day. we have our chance for the last game with our people in the etihad stadium to do the last 95 minutes to win the title. that's the tale at the top. the story at the bottom is equally tight. and the header�*s in, and pascal struijk equalises in added time! leeds' late leveller means they're out of the bottom three — they still believe. i went to dinner two nights ago and, walking down the street, i heard 15, 20 people saying, "come on, we're behind you, we're with you, keep going, got to believe." everton knew a win would secure their safety. a flick off dominic calvert—lewin's chest gave them the perfect start. when you haven't scored in the league since august,
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always good to check the ref knows it was yours. but against ten men, watford scored two in two minutes. it's all going horribly wrong at goodison again. a 3—2 defeat means, for everton, the nervous wait continues. that is also the case for burnley — a penalty from harry kane, one of spurs' own — puts the clarets in the relegation zone. as for the north london fight forfourth, tottenham are there for now — over to arsenal tonight. craig templeton, bbc news. a fascinating weekend ahead as the premier league comes to a climax. stjohnstone will head into the scottish premiership play—offs after being beaten 4—0 by hibs. a hat—trick from james scott ensured hibs' first home win since february, meaning stjohnstone will now face inverness caledonian thistle in a two legged play off as they look to retain their top—flight status. stockport county have won promotion back to the football league,
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after spending 11 years playing in the fifth and sixth tiers of english football. they needed a draw at home to halifax to be absolutely certain — goals from paddy madden and will collar secured a 2—0 win and there were joyous scenes at the final whistle on the edgeley park pitch — players, staff and fans alike celebrated winning the national league players, staff, fans. great scenes. novak djokovic won his first title of the year at the italian open. the world number one beat stefanos tsitsipas 6—0, 7—6 to wrap up his sixth italian open title — the last competition before the french open gets underway next week. he will beat the defending champion there. and iga swaitek won the women's event — that's her 28th victory in a row. it also means she's won five
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tournaments in a row — victory in rome following wins in doha, indian wells, miami and stuttgart. can anyone stop her at roland garros? that title, she has won before. the french open just one week away. fantastic white thank you very much for that, chetan. we spoke to matt about half an hour ago. he has gone one better. good morning. at last, gone one better. good morning. at last. some — gone one better. good morning. at last, some sunshine _ gone one better. good morning. at last, some sunshine across - gone one better. good morning. at last, some sunshine across the - last, some sunshine across the southern coastal counties this morning. after the overnight storms. those have faded but the rain has moved northwards. you can see how the showers have faded but the wet weather is pushing northwards across northern england, scotland and northern ireland. we still have one or two heavy showers across the south. parts of wales, the midlands, drifting into northern england through the rush then brightening scares many come a bit of sunshine but the scattering of showers developing, some heavy and thundery but many southern counties only have
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a few showers. this morning, northern ireland, finer than england, southern scotland, outbreaks of rain coming and going pushing into the rest of scotland in the afternoon. brightening in northern ireland and northern england to scattered showers. best of sunshine in shetland but a cold easterly wind across a good part of scotland and that will bring lots of low cloud, stained grey. temperatures at their lowest around ten to 15 degrees. further south, northern ireland 18, 19, low 20s for much of england and wales. humid, after the overnight rain and sunshine, a boost on the pollen levels. high in wales and southern england. we finished the day with a few showers and thunderstorms around, persistent rain in northern scotland which faced tonight, low cloud will sit throughout, mist and fog patches elsewhere. it won't be quite as humid and muggy tonight as last night but still pretty mild for many into tomorrow. for tuesday, weather fronts pushing many into tomorrow. for tuesday, weatherfronts pushing in from many into tomorrow. for tuesday, weather fronts pushing in from the west but as they arrive we dragged
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in even more humid airfrom the south so it will be a real humid day for many. that weather front in the west almost activates through the day. outbreaks across parts of northern ireland and scotland. a good portion of england, wales and scotland, humid, 25 and 26 in the south—east. warmest day of the year south—east. warmest day of the year so far. rain spreads across the country, not much across the south and as the weather front which is eastwards, subtle change in wind direction on wednesday, so not quite as humid but some good sunny spells. maybe a rumble of thunder across the south—west, could get to 25 or 26 of parts of east anglia, maybe 17 or 18 or around scotland. really one for the rest of this week, but not quite as humid and still the chance of a few showers and thunderstorms, but equally some dry weather.
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a little bit of everything through the week. back to you both. thank ou. we the week. back to you both. thank you- we are _ the week. back to you both. thank you. we are having _ the week. back to you both. thank you. we are having some - the week. back to you both. thank you. we are having some moon i the week. back to you both. thank. you. we are having some moon news toda . you. we are having some moon news today- you — you. we are having some moon news today- you have _ you. we are having some moon news today. you have your _ you. we are having some moon news today. you have your pictures - you. we are having some moon news today. you have your pictures at - you. we are having some moon news today. you have your pictures at the l today. you have your pictures at the ready stocking up you are prepared! out this is a blood moon. yes. ready stocking up you are prepared! out this is a blood moon.— out this is a blood moon. yes, you are late if— out this is a blood moon. yes, you are late if you _ out this is a blood moon. yes, you are late if you want _ out this is a blood moon. yes, you are late if you want to _ out this is a blood moon. yes, you are late if you want to capture - out this is a blood moon. yes, you are late if you want to capture it. l are late if you want to capture it. it all happened before sunrise in the uk at one of our weather watchers was up in horsham, he managed to capture the various stages. the moon was moved into the shadow, cast by earth onto it. the sun was on the other side of, because that shadow and as it goes into that shadow, because of the atmospheric conditions, you get a bit of light on it and it starts to look red. the orbit around the earth is not quite scented and so it is at its closest point in that one bit, henceit its closest point in that one bit, hence it looked bigger. still ongoing across other parts of the world, particularly in north america. if you are hoping to catch it this morning i'm afraid you have
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missed out and for many it was too cloudy anyway. fight! missed out and for many it was too cloudy anyway-— cloudy anyway. and too late, but never fear! _ cloudy anyway. and too late, but never fear! we _ cloudy anyway. and too late, but never fear! we have _ cloudy anyway. and too late, but never fear! we have some - cloudy anyway. and too late, but never fear! we have some of- cloudy anyway. and too late, but never fear! we have some of ourj cloudy anyway. and too late, but - never fear! we have some of our own pictures. it never fear! we have some of our own ictures. , ~ never fear! we have some of our own ictures. , ,, , ., these pictures were taken in selsey, in west sussex. you can see the earth's shadow blocking out much of the moon. who is that coming from? i can't quite see. thank you for your picture. and this was the view from greece last night. that looks fake, doesn't it? what?! what did you _ that looks fake, doesn't it? what?! what did you say? _ that looks fake, doesn't it? what?! what did you say? it _ that looks fake, doesn't it? what?! what did you say? it looks - that looks fake, doesn't it? what?! what did you say? it looks what?! l what did you say? it looks what?! that is the genuine ancient temple of poseidon. that is the genuine ancient temple of poseidon-— of poseidon. that looks real, but the moon doesn't. _ of poseidon. that looks real, but the moon doesn't. that - of poseidon. that looks real, but the moon doesn't. that is - of poseidon. that looks real, but the moon doesn't. that is 70 - the moon doesn't. that is 70 kilometres south of athens, according to my data. really good knowledge- _ according to my data. really good knowledge. you'd _ according to my data. really good knowledge. you'd better - according to my data. really good knowledge. you'd better believe, | knowledge. you'd better believe, that was real. if you took a picture of the super blood moon this morning, we'd love to see it. if you are able to see it.
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you can send it in via twitter or e—mail bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. and please don't just and please don'tjust superimpose a moon. j and please don't 'ust superimpose a moon. ., �* ~ ., ,, and please don't 'ust superimpose a moon. ., �* ~ ., i. ., ., moon. i don't think anyone would do that. we moon. i don't think anyone would do that- we will — moon. i don't think anyone would do that. we will show _ moon. i don't think anyone would do that. we will show our _ moon. i don't think anyone would do that. we will show our favourites - that. we will show our favourites later. nina always gives us tv gold. do you like that? you have been lookin: do you like that? you have been looking around _ do you like that? you have been looking around the _ do you like that? you have been looking around the bank- do you like that? you have been looking around the bank of- do you like that? you have been i looking around the bank of england meghan belt save 100,000 buyers of gold with £200 billion. that is a lot of bling. great to get down there and see the goal. but also to chat with the people at the bank of england, especially at the moment with inflation being so high, higher thanit with inflation being so high, higher than it has been for three decades. the bank of england are forecasting inflation could hit 10%, way off their target of 2% which is where we would like to be in a healthy economy. i always talk about this on the day we learn about inflation,
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they raise interest rates in the hope we can save more, spend less and bring inflation down. inflation has gone up four times already this year, they are at 1%, 30 year high. the prediction is that that inflation will not slow down and we could by the end of the year, according to the bank, hit a recession when the economy stops growing and gets smaller. all of this economic chat can be a bit of a head scramble, quite confusing. the bank of england have written their first book, basic economics that they hope to get into every primary school because it is really important to have a good sense of how the economy works and i went down to meet them.— down to meet them. let's have a look. almost every decision we make — to buy a butty or bring one in, to walk or take the train — they all have an economic consequence. prices keep rising, savings and wages are standing still. these decisions are feeling more and more important. and it's the job of this place to keep the economy
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in check and keep our costs of living stable. she gasps. oh, my goodness! it's everywhere! rupal and jack are on a crusade to help us understand economics. it's really heavy. and they brought me to quite an exclusive spot. so what are they worth? this one, for example, if i was to... how much is it worth? that today is worth around £600,000. so that's interesting — you say around £600,000. does that change? and why are you wielding bars of chocolate? chocolate bars are a very tasty and a very easy way to explain some economics. so if you think about the price of a chocolate bar — say, a freddo, the chocolate frogs — when i was a child and when rupal was a child, we both remember them being 10p when we take our pocket money to the shop. and now if you look in the shops, that's 25p — so there's been a huge increase. and that just shows this process that's in the back of everyone's lives called inflation,
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whereby prices over time just go up and go up. so here's a big question — why don't you just print more money?! yeah, with all these gold bars around us, we could probably all think about putting one in our pocket and walking out the door. the problem, of course, is that while it's quite intuitive to give people more money, and therefore they think they can go out and spend more, that creates inflation, and inflation then erodes the value of money. what do you think would be the damage ofjust printing loads of money for everyone, rupal? well, if we all got £1 million each and then went out and spent it, you'd quickly realise that the price of everything would go up. and so, actually, you'd buy — you'd be able to buy fewer things and that's inflation. yeah. we are in quite an unusual situation at the moment, aren't we? where do you see this ending? there's a lot of uncertainty in the economy at the moment, and that's why it's really important that people understand what this uncertainty means for them. everyone kind of thinks about economics as long maths equations or nerds in suits, but it's a lot more than that — it's really the economics of day—to—day life. a final question —
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can ijust take one of these? because you've got absolutely loads of them. what harm can it do — just one? if you make a run, we'll distract the security guard. it's a deal! laughter. that looks like a lot of fun. what was it like being in there and holding it? i was it like being in there and holding it?— was it like being in there and holding it? was it like being in there and holdin: it? �* ., ., holding it? i didn't manage to snap one, unfortunately, _ holding it? i didn't manage to snap one, unfortunately, but— holding it? i didn't manage to snap one, unfortunately, but they i holding it? i didn't manage to snap one, unfortunately, but they gavel holding it? i didn't manage to snap i one, unfortunately, but they gave me want to hold so i could film a piece to camera, headline, holding it. it was so heavy. i kept nearly dropping it. they told me to keep my toes out of the way. there is no way anyone will steal it but security has to be really... will steal it but security has to be reall ., i really... view let me down there. i am incredibly _ really... view let me down there. i am incredibly buff _ really... view let me down there. i am incredibly buff so _ really... view let me down there. i am incredibly buff so it _ really... view let me down there. i am incredibly buff so it is - am incredibly buff so it is surprising. am incredibly buff so it is surprising-— am incredibly buff so it is surrisinu. ., ~ , ., ., surprising. you keep leaning over. the door as _ surprising. you keep leaning over. the door as our _ surprising. you keep leaning over. the door as our six _ surprising. you keep leaning over. the door as our six foot _ surprising. you keep leaning over. the door as our six foot thick i surprising. you keep leaning over. the door as our six foot thick and l the door as our six foot thick and luckily i have a really bad memory.
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don't tell anyone the direction of getting here and luckily i can't remember anything. getting here and luckily i can't rememberanything. nobody getting here and luckily i can't remember anything. nobody has ever broken it apart from ones in the 18705. a sewage worker found his way in, didn't stealanything is 18705. a sewage worker found his way in, didn't steal anything is left a note for the director of the bank of england asset, i know how to get in, i will meet you here at this given time, there was a rumble from below and he came up and said i haven't stolen anything but i want the bank to be secure so as a reward they gave him £8,000 which is worth about 90 grand to date.— 90 grand to date. could have taken a lot. too 90 grand to date. could have taken a lot- too heavy. _ 90 grand to date. could have taken a lot. too heavy, how— 90 grand to date. could have taken a lot. too heavy, how far _ 90 grand to date. could have taken a lot. too heavy, how far would - 90 grand to date. could have taken a lot. too heavy, how far would you i lot. too heavy, how far would you aet? lot. too heavy, how far would you get? how — lot. too heavy, how far would you get? how heavy _ lot. too heavy, how far would you get? how heavy is _ lot. too heavy, how far would you get? how heavy is one? - lot. too heavy, how far would you get? how heavy is one? about i lot. too heavy, how far would you | get? how heavy is one? about 2.5 stone but they _ get? how heavy is one? about 2.5 stone but they look _ get? how heavy is one? about 2.5 stone but they look so _ get? how heavy is one? about 2.5 stone but they look so light i get? how heavy is one? about 2.5 stone but they look so light and i stone but they look so light and just look like gold but that is what surprised me. just look like gold but that is what surprised me— just look like gold but that is what surrised me. ., , , i. �* surprised me. that is why you didn't brina one surprised me. that is why you didn't bring one back- _ surprised me. that is why you didn't bring one back. and _ surprised me. that is why you didn't bring one back. and also _ surprised me. that is why you didn't bring one back. and also because i i bring one back. and also because i am a good — bring one back. and also because i am a good citizen. _ bring one back. and also because i am a good citizen. that _ bring one back. and also because i am a good citizen. that would i bring one back. and also because i am a good citizen. that would be l bring one back. and also because i j am a good citizen. that would be a theft. brilliant _ am a good citizen. that would be a theft. brilliant access. _ am a good citizen. that would be a theft. brilliant access. than - am a good citizen. that would be a theft. brilliant access. than don't i theft. brilliant access. than don't a fantastic- _ time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. police are investigating social media footage — appearing to show an officer repeatedly hitting an individual on the head during an incident in east london at the weekend. the footage — which includes others besides this — shows officers dragging a man beside a police van outside kingsland shopping centre on saturday. officers say they were carrying out a pre—planned operation targeting e—scooters and moped—enabled crime. nine people were arrested. nightclubs across london are warning they're running out of time to find bouncers — and they claim its leading to fears about safety. three quarters of bars, pubs and clubs have been found to be short of security staff. the night time industries association is calling for government action before the peak months of the summer
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when securityjobs are in highest demand. a memorial garden where survivors can remember those who lost their lives looks likely to be created at the site of grenfell tower. 72 people died when fire engulfed the residential tower block in north kensington five years ago. the grenfell tower memorial commission said it was engaging with survivors, the bereaved and local residents about ideas for the community—led memorial. we spoke to some of the families that lost people in 9/11, and they were part of a commission similar to ours to help decide what would happen. and they told us how difficult it was and how, honestly, that is part of the process — having people find out they don't like things and then readjust and keep changing the idea until we arrive there — and that is the process. travel, and a look at the tube board. the bank branch of the northern line has reopeneed this morning after four months of improvement work. there are delays on the district line following late finishing engineering work. and delays on the metropolitan line due to a signal failure.
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onto the weather now with sara. good morning to you. we've had some thunderstorms out towards the south west of london overnight. they are largely clearing away. we've got some, mist and murk, though, to start us off this morning in our suburbs. any showers pulling off towards the north, but then some sunshine could spark off some further showers here and there as we run through the day today. a lot of places will stay dry with some sunshine — in the best of it, temperatures around 21 celsius. overnight tonight, we're dry, we're clear, we are going to see a little bit of mist and murk and maybe some passing cloud, as well. but we'll stay dry into tomorrow morning, and temperatures typically staying in low double figures, so it'll be a warm start tomorrow. i just want to show you the fronts charts to show you what a mess it is, actually, over the next few days. we've got low pressure dominating our weather this week, there are frontal systems trying to push further showers in at times. showers, so of course they are hit and miss — we won't all see them. tomorrow, though, largely
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dry for a good deal of the day, and a warm one — could be 25 or 26 degrees for us — very high 705 in fahrenheit. staying warm through the week, but unsettled. there's more on saturday's eurovision song contest result with vanessa feltz on bbc radio london. stray ukraine won — and sam ryder�*s uk entry came second — but the boy from essex has beaten harry stiles and others to become number in the itunes charts. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. borisjohnson is due to visit northern ireland later — with the government set to confirm new legislation to override parts of the brexit deal. we'll be live in belfast in a few minutes. millions of pupils in england, wales and northern ireland will start sitting their first formal exams in three years today. the queen attends the first big
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event of her platinum jubilee, taking in the final night of the royal windsor horse show. good morning, chelsea do the double. a week after winning the league title — they lift the fa cup at wembley. also this morning, after the pandemic mothballed his new show just weeks after it started, comedy legend ben elton's with us to talk about taking upstart crow back on the road. in upstart crow back on the road. scotland it might br but in scotland it might be wet today but elsewhere, things will brighten up. sunshine and some heavy showers. details coming up. it's monday the 16th of may. our main story. the prime minister will visit belfast today to urge the main parties there to resume power—sharing. the democratic unionist party is currently refusing to re—enter the assembly because of the post—brexit trading arrangements known as the northern ireland protocol. meanwhile, the government
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is expected to introduce legislation which would allow ministers to override parts of that protocol. political correspondent nick eardley reports. boris johnson will arrive in northern ireland later to find a political system which is stuck. despite elections earlier this month, there's no new government. sinn fein finished top for the first time ever, but the democratic unionist party — the second largest at stormont — won't agree to power—sharing until the brexit deal is changed. they're worried about checks on goods travelling from great britain to northern ireland. even though many parties accept these arrangements, if unionist politicians don't, power—sharing can't get back up and running. borisjohnson signed the brexit deal, but he now agrees that changes are needed and is calling for the european union to negotiate tweaks. ahead of his visit today, boris johnson writes in the belfast telegraph:
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back in london, ministers have been drawing up legislation which would allow them to override parts of the brexit deal. it's set to be confirmed tomorrow, but will have to pass through parliament, meaning it could be months before the government has the power to act without agreement from europe. but the move would be controversial. some fear it could spark a trade war at a time when many businesses and households can least afford one. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. our correspondent charlotte gallagher is outside stormont this morning. what reaction can we expect to be prime minister's visit today? he has a difficult day _ prime minister's visit today? he has a difficult day ahead, _ prime minister's visit today? he has a difficult day ahead, i _ prime minister's visit today? he has a difficult day ahead, i think. - prime minister's visit today? he has a difficult day ahead, i think. he i a difficult day ahead, i think. he has to do two crucial things. to convince the dup to go back to work
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at stormont, and also he has to convince sinn fein about changes to the protocol. sinn fein have already said before changes without cooperation of the eu would be reckless, and the dup have said they are not going back to work unless there is action. they are notjust happy with promises, they want action on the protocol. i think both parties will be unhappy with some of the suggestions. also we heard from ireland. the irish foreign minister said if the uk takes unilateral action on the protocol without the eu, that will send a message to the rest of the world the uk doesn't respect international law. he also warned this action could undermine the peace process, so serious warnings from ireland. i think it will be a difficult day for boris johnson. it is hard to see how everyone will be happy with what he
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suggests. a three—year—old boy has died in a suspected dog attack in greater manchester. it happened at a house in the town of milnrow, near rochdale, yesterday afternoon. greater manchester police says it's investigating previous incidents involving dogs at the home. no arrests have been made. airlines and airports in eu countries are no longer telling passengers and staff to wear face masks. the european union aviation safety agency says the change — which comes into force today — is a big step forward in normalising air travel. some airlines will still require face coverings to be worn. it's not often you see tom cruise and alan titchmarsh sharing a stage together — but this is no ordinary stage. they were amongst a star—studded cast at windsor castle, hosting the royal windsor horse show to mark the beginning of the queen's platinum jubilee celebrations. helena wilkinson was there.
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arriving to a delighted audience, the queen looked well. she and the audience were witness to a spectacular show — taken through more than five centuries of history. at its heart, the queen's beloved animal — horses. more than 500 took part, accompanied by 1,000 performers. singing. there were spectacular stunts... ..a hollywood star, and music, too. # while thou shalt flourish, shalt flourish great and free... over the years, definitely, my admiration for her has grown, and so i think that makes you even more nervous. anybody that sort of says they're blase about singing for the queen, ijust don't believe! and i'm sure everyone backstage is feeling the need to really put on their best performance, because that's what she deserves.
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as well as the pomp and pageantry, there was humour. on behalf of everyone here, we'd like to very humbly thank you for choosing us over the state opening of parliament. laughter. applause. i speak on behalf of the whole cast, that we know this is notjust a once—in—a—generational event — this is never going to happen again. i don't think in a thousand years we will have another monarch, you know, who lives 70 years, so we�*re aware of the occasion. and the fact that we also know that she loves horses — whatever happens, she is going to love every single moment of this show. towards the end of the performance, a poignant moment. lady louise windsor in the duke of edinburgh's carriage. the queen's horses and ponies were also brought out. lady louise's riding pony. i therefore speak on behalf of a grateful nation and commonwealth when i give you our sincere and most loving thanks.
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applause. fire! it was an evening of celebration, and one that appeared to bring greatjoy to the queen. helena wilkinson, bbc news. what a party. the energy regulator ofgem says it's considering more regular reviews of the price cap. nina's here with the details. good morning. they announced it in the last few minutes. as things stand every six months there is a price cap for the average user. they went up 50 more percent in april to almost £2000 a year. speculation about where it will go in october and some say as high as £3000. some say it might not be near that. it is
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a long time to wait and for wholesale buyers of energy to wait to know the price. ofgem have announced potentially reviewing the price gap every three months so instead of waiting until autumn it would bejuly we instead of waiting until autumn it would be july we would instead of waiting until autumn it would bejuly we would know instead of waiting until autumn it would be july we would know where prices were and that would mean even if they are higher, we could budge it better. they said a more frequent price cap would reflect an up—to—date and more accurate pricing customers would benefit sooner and crucially for the industry it would help energy suppliers accurately predict how much they would need to purchase for consumers reducing the risk of further failures of suppliers which would ultimately push up the cost for consumers. they are considering a three month review. uncertainty is the tricky thing in this situation. it is difficult for suppliers who do not know how much to buy in. big
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suppliers say they bought the energy last year for the high suppliers say they bought the energy last yearfor the high price suppliers say they bought the energy last year for the high price and suppliers say they bought the energy last yearfor the high price and if you bring the prices down now, we will not make money and will not be able to invest in green energy but households are already feeling that and what should we sacrifice this summer to have that buffer. if we knew in july, summer to have that buffer. if we knew injuly, we would all be in better control. nato officials have said vladimir putin's invasion strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling. it's thought russia may have lost a third of its ground combat troops — and is failing to make progress in the donbas region. the ukrainian mp oleksiy goncharenko has spoken to us from ukraine several times since the invasion. he's now visiting the uk to meet politicians here — so we can say hello in person. good morning. fantastic to see you here. we are used to seeing you on the screen so great to see you here. how are you?—
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the screen so great to see you here. how are you? how was the “ourney? it was cuite how are you? how was the “ourney? it was quite hard — how are you? how was the “ourney? it was quite hard but i i how are you? how was the “ourney? it was quite hard but i am i how are you? how was the “ourney? it was quite hard but i am oki how are you? how was the journey? it was quite hard but i am 0k and - how are you? how was the journey? it was quite hard but i am 0k and i i was quite hard but i am ok and i want to thank you for coverage and i want to thank you for coverage and i want to thank british people for all support. it is unbelievable, the support. it is unbelievable, the support from people, support to refugees and support from the government and first of all with weapons and sanctions against russia. that is absolutely important. vital, i can say. and the uk shows leadership in this and we appreciated enormously. iloathed uk shows leadership in this and we appreciated enormously.— appreciated enormously. what is it like to be outside _ appreciated enormously. what is it like to be outside ukraine? - appreciated enormously. what is it like to be outside ukraine? you i like to be outside ukraine? you arrived on _ like to be outside ukraine? gm. arrived on saturday. when i hear the playing, i think it is a missile. i woke up early in the morning. there was sound outside. i decided it was a bombing. it was the garbage. so after our cities, it is quite
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unusual. ifeela after our cities, it is quite unusual. ifeel a little bit, i don't know, a savage coming to a big city. but i am sure we will win and succeed. ~ . , city. but i am sure we will win and succeed. ~ ., , ., , succeed. what is the latest in your home country? — succeed. what is the latest in your home country? how— succeed. what is the latest in your home country? how do _ succeed. what is the latest in your home country? how do you - succeed. what is the latest in your home country? how do you feel. succeed. what is the latest in your home country? how do you feel it| succeed. what is the latest in your i home country? how do you feel it is going? we home country? how do you feel it is auoin ? ~ . home country? how do you feel it is oiiin?. ., ,.. ,, home country? how do you feel it is oiiin? ., ,.. ,, ., going? we are successful on the battlefield- _ going? we are successful on the battlefield. let's _ going? we are successful on the battlefield. let's be _ going? we are successful on the battlefield. let's be frank. i going? we are successful on the battlefield. let's be frank. manyi going? we are successful on the i battlefield. let's be frank. many in the west were thinking ukraine will fail in several days, but we are successful. we won the battle for kyiv and now kharkiv. we are on the border with russia near kharkiv. we are winning the battle for odesa, my native city. we sank the russian flagship in the black sea. we are stopping them on the land and even kicking them out, stopping them at
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sea. our problem is air. russia has an advantage there and they are using it to bomb civilian areas, hospitals, it is awful what they are doing. everywhere, the worst atrocities. i was there and i can tell you they are real barbarians. raping women, killing children. what i saw... i raping women, killing children. what isaw... i met raping women, killing children. what i saw... i meta raping women, killing children. what i saw... i met a couple and the russians shoot people in front of their private house. in the night they took their bodies and buried them in their garden. they did not know them. and when we entered hostomel, i was in the first wave. i came into their small private garden. there were vegetables,
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flowers and two graves. they say these people were killed, we do not know who they are. it is awful. but we are successful but what we need now is to stop them in the air and stop barbaric air attack so we need air defence and aircraft. i hope we will be helped with these by the uk, the west, united states. you will be helped with these by the uk, the west, united states.— the west, united states. you said the west, united states. you said the uk had _ the west, united states. you said the uk had been _ the west, united states. you said the uk had been a _ the west, united states. you said the uk had been a big _ the west, united states. you said the uk had been a big support. i the west, united states. you said l the uk had been a big support. are they the points you will make to mp5 when you meet them? they the points you will make to mps when you meet them?— when you meet them? there are two uestions when you meet them? there are two questions and _ when you meet them? there are two questions and number _ when you meet them? there are two questions and number one _ when you meet them? there are two questions and number one is - when you meet them? there are two questions and number one is a i questions and number one is a victory and for victory we need weapons, weapons and more weapons. air defence, aircraft, long—range artillery. because we have our people with courage and brain. but weapons assistance is what we need. for years we are preparing for this. we are fighting for the free world. every day they say they want to go
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further, take baltic states, poland. this is what they say on russian state tv. the first thing is victory and here we need weapons. and the second thing is to rebuild the country after because the country is devastated. it is important to work with the uk because there are many assets, billions and billions of pounds of russian oligarchs, russian corruption, people from putin's entourage. and all of this should be frozen, should be confiscated and given to ukraine to rebuild the country. it should be russian money to rebuild the country because they are guilty, not of british taxpayers. but of russians, putin, ally is guilty in this awful war —— allies.
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ally is guilty in this awful war -- allies. �* , , ., ally is guilty in this awful war -- allies. �* , ., allies. i'm sure you were encouraged b the allies. i'm sure you were encouraged by the support _ allies. i'm sure you were encouraged by the support you — allies. i'm sure you were encouraged by the support you saw _ allies. i'm sure you were encouraged by the support you saw through i allies. i'm sure you were encouraged by the support you saw through your| by the support you saw through your revision over the weekend. what was it like, you are here watching it? what was it like to see the show of solidarity. ma; what was it like to see the show of solidari . g ., ., ., , ., solidarity. my congratulations to the uk. ukraine _ solidarity. my congratulations to the uk. ukraine and _ solidarity. my congratulations to the uk. ukraine and uk - solidarity. my congratulations to l the uk. ukraine and uk together. that is a good sign. i loved very much the factor and yes it was amazing how that support from all over europe to our singers, our group. also i wear today this traditional ukrainian shirt. you look great. thank you so much. it is a sign of support to ukraine and a sign that ukraine is a member of the european family, that we are of one blood and one value. the european family, that we are of one blood and one value.— blood and one value. the winner of our blood and one value. the winner of your revision _ blood and one value. the winner of your revision normally _ blood and one value. the winner of your revision normally gets - blood and one value. the winner of your revision normally gets to i
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blood and one value. the winner of your revision normally gets to host | your revision normally gets to host it next year. is that a dream, is it possible? it next year. is that a dream, is it ossible? ~ ., i. ., it next year. is that a dream, is it ossible? ~ ., , ., ., ., it next year. is that a dream, is it possible?— possible? would you love that to ha--en? possible? would you love that to happen? absolutely. _ possible? would you love that to happen? absolutely. i— possible? would you love that to happen? absolutely. iwant- possible? would you love that to happen? absolutely. i want backi possible? would you love that to i happen? absolutely. i want back to happen? absolutely. i want back to happen in ukrainian crimea. we are ready to liberate our whole country because crimea was occupied eight years. we will never accept it. we are fighting for our land. and we are fighting for our land. and we are not going to give up any insurer of ourland. it are not going to give up any insurer of our land. it is our land. we do not have any other. i hope that next year! not have any other. i hope that next year i want to invite everybody. please come to ukraine next year, peaceful ukraine. a lot of work to rebuild but you will see a great country, european country, a true brother. please welcome to ukraine next year, to your revision, i hope to crimea. it next year, to your revision, i hope to crimea-— to crimea. it is lovely to see you here. to crimea. it is lovely to see you here- thank _ to crimea. it is lovely to see you here. thank you _ to crimea. it is lovely to see you here. thank you for _ to crimea. it is lovely to see you
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here. thank you for talking. i to crimea. it is lovely to see you i here. thank you for talking. again, reat here. thank you for talking. again, great thanks _ here. thank you for talking. again, great thanks to _ here. thank you for talking. again, great thanks to british _ here. thank you for talking. again, great thanks to british people, i great thanks to british people, especially ordinary people. we feel it enormously. especially ordinary people. we feel it enormously-— it enormously. en'oy the next few da s in it enormously. en'oy the next few days in the _ it enormously. en'oy the next few days in the uk _ it enormously. enjoy the next few days in the uk and _ it enormously. enjoy the next few days in the uk and have - it enormously. enjoy the next few days in the uk and have a - it enormously. enjoy the next few days in the uk and have a safe i it enormously. enjoy the next few| days in the uk and have a safe trip back. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. whether perhaps getting warmer but there is thunder and lightning behind you. it was an evening and night of nasty thunderstorms in southern england especially, captured by weather watchers. they have largely faded. some showers working northwards and the bulk of the rain in north—east england and southern scotland. as it pushes northwards, some hefty downpours in northern ireland. overall england and wales will brighten up. more sunshine and some showers around. some will miss them.
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sonny, shetland today. a lot of rain in parts of scotland. a cold breeze. cloud to the north and east. brighter conditions in northern ireland. as temperatures rise, it could set off thundery showers. temperatures low 20s in much of england and wales. fewer showers in the south. showers in the evening will fade during the night. rainbow easing in scotland. fog patches to take us into tomorrow morning. most will start tuesday on a dry note. still mild. tomorrow, the big change in western areas with rain developing. parts of scotland away from the north—east and england and east of wales, dry and sunny and the warmest day of the year. coleen rooney will continue to give
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evidence in the high court today as she defends a libel claim made by fellow footballer�*s wife, rebekah vardy. our correspondent colin paterson has been following the so—called wagatha christie trial from the start. he joins us now from outside the high court. good morning. where are we up to in the trial? ., , ., ., ., the trial? four days are dam and three days _ the trial? four days are dam and three days to _ the trial? four days are dam and three days to go. _ the trial? four days are dam and three days to go. it _ the trial? four days are dam and three days to go. it ended i the trial? four days are dam and three days to go. it ended on i the trial? four days are dam and i three days to go. it ended on friday with coleen rooney being questioned, giving her evidence. it has been a dramatic few days. coleen rooney is being sued for libel by rebekah vardy for accusations she made on social media about rebekah vardy being a leak to the press of private information. in the dock, a different performance from coleen rooney. far more talkative and from the off she emphasises she does not want to be here, saying in a written
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statement three times she has tried to settle this out of court but was rebuffed by rebekah vardy. also in court, she has had difficult moments where she had to talk about her relationship difficulties with wayne rooney. a particular leak related to a photograph of herfamily in pyjamas. she said at that time they were discussing whether their marriage still had a future. rebekah vardy gave her evidence earlier and it lasted almost 12 hours spread overfour it lasted almost 12 hours spread over four days and she cried on three of them. she said the reason she brought this to the high court was because she felt she had to clear her name for her sake and the sake of her children. towards the end of questioning she said she felt she was being bullied and manipulated in the court. she had many difficult moments, in particular, they brought up a 2004
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kiss and tell she did with peter andre. let's say, i did not expect the word chipper larder —— chipolata to be said in court. we will leave it there. it is very intense. only 35 people in the court. you are so close up to them and it is fascinating watching the body language. the rooneys did not look at rebekah vardy. when coleen rooney got into the witness box, it was interesting to see wayne rooney actually looked away from her while she was giving evidence. at one
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point on thursday i was moved because they wanted to make space for the court artist and i sat by the witness box and my head was three feet from rebekah vardy�*s ankles as she burst into tears and proceedings were stopped to allow her to regroup. there has been light—hearted moments. there has been a lot of swearing in the trial. the qcs have had to read out a lot of exchanges on whatsapp and there are a lot of words you could not say on a breakfast show. as the trial has gone on they have delivered them with more gusto and at one point members of the press were told off for laughing and were told if they did it again they would be asked to leave. on friday, i sat next to a guy is so enraptured with capturing every mention of gemma collins and others, i had to pass a message to him to tell him he was typing too
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loudly. the. him to tell him he was typing too loudl. �* ., ,. ., him to tell him he was typing too loudl . r ., ,. ., ., loudly. a fascinating level of detail. what _ loudly. a fascinating level of detail. what is _ loudly. a fascinating level of detail. what is still - loudly. a fascinating level of detail. what is still to i loudly. a fascinating level of| detail. what is still to come? loudly. a fascinating level of i detail. what is still to come? well, toda will detail. what is still to come? well, today will be _ detail. what is still to come? well, today will be coleen _ detail. what is still to come? well, today will be coleen rooney - detail. what is still to come? well, today will be coleen rooney in i detail. what is still to come? well, today will be coleen rooney in the | today will be coleen rooney in the witness stand continuing to give evidence. for clean really to win the trial, what she has to do is prove rebekah vardy was the leak or she instructed the leak. there has been talk of the trial about the relationship between rebekah vardy and her agent. a lot of the whatsapp messages have been read out from that but the agent will not appear in the trial because she has a medical note. coleen rooney's team have expressed frustration that the agenfs have expressed frustration that the agent's mobile ended up at the bottom of the north sea three days after she was asked to hand it over for evidence. that led to a memorable moment when coleen rooney's barrister said the mobile
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is at the bottom of the north sea with davyjones' locker and rebekah vardy replied, who is davyjones? there has been a question about why jamie vardy has not been in court. he has been playing and he has played two games and has scored four goals, so possibly the only one of them having a good time. i cannot et the them having a good time. i cannot get the image _ them having a good time. i cannot get the image of— them having a good time. i cannot get the image of colin _ them having a good time. i cannot get the image of colin being i them having a good time. i cannot get the image of colin being three i get the image of colin being three feet away from rebekah vardy�*s ankles. and imagine being told off for laughing. we would not get in. talking of court cases, there won't be one between the fashion magazine vogue, and a cornish pub which bears the same name. vogue's publishers conde nast had sent a letter threatening to sue the star inn at vogue — a tiny village near saint day — if it didn't change its name. after a stinging response from the landlord, the firm has now admitted it should have
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done more research. john henderson picks up the story. phone rings. the star inn at vogue — how can i help? it's been around for about 200 years, serving cask ales, coke and crisps, and pub grub. the star inn at vogue ticks the traditional box. so the landlord was mildly amused to receive a letter from fashion magazine vogue, asking for the pub to change its name. i thought it was one of the locals having a bit of a laugh. yes, idid. and then i looked further into it and found out — no, they were serious. they are serious. so here i am leafing through vogue in the star inn in vogue. i hope i can say that. i think i can say that. last year, the pub registered at companies house as the star inn vogue ltd. but in march, the magazine's publisher, conde nast, wrote that that could cause a problem, fearing the public
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could think the two businesses were connected. they didn't even bother to look into it. didn't do the research or anything. theyjust decided that, "ooh, right, we need to write them a letter and get them to stop using the name," without even checking up who we actually were. the letter also told the couple to reply within seven days, or conde nast would take appropriate remedial steps. mark wrote back, all right — promising a parish vogue magazine and maybe even a vogue fashion show — including regulars. i i'm going to be one of the firstl on the catwalk on fashion week. i've already booked my place and that's it. i should have done their research. this is the mining capital of the world. this name is not a new name. it's not a new village. and near the pub are clues to that — including vogue hill, wherejune's lived for years. you haven't ever had a letter from vogue magazine? no, not... not to my knowledge, no.
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have you ever read vogue magazine? no, no. no? no. today, conde nast said further research would have identified they did not need to send such a letter, and the pub won't be changing its name. we might even approach vogue to see if they will change their name, cos we was here first! that is all that matters. they were there first. that would be a court case. send colinton at one! good morning, i'm asad ahmad. police are investigating social media footage appearing to show an officer repeatedly hitting an individual in the head during an incident in east london at the weekend. the footage — which includes others besides this — shows officers dragging a man beside a police van outside kingsland shopping centre on saturday. officers say they were carrying out a pre—planned operation "targeting
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e—scooters and moped—enabled crime". nine people were arrested. nightclubs across london are warning they're "running out of time" to find bouncers — and they claim its leading to fears about safety. three quarters of bars, pubs and clubs have been found to be short of security staff. the night time industries association is calling for government action before the peak months of the summer — when securityjobs are in highest demand. a memorial garden where survivors can remember those who lost their lives looks likely to be created at the site of g re nfell tower. 72 people died when fire engulfed the residential tower block in north kensington almost five years ago. no decision has yet been made about the future of the tower — but a commission is speaking to people as part of the process. the commission said it was speaking to survivors for ideas. we spoke to some of the families that lost people in 9/11,
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and they were part of a commission similar to ours to help decide what would happen. and they told us how difficult it was and how, honestly, that is part of the process — having people find out they don't like things and then readjust and keep changing the idea until we arrive there — and that is the process. travel, and a look at the tube board. the bank branch of the northern line has reopened this morning after 4 months of improvement work. there are delays on the district line following late—finishing engineering work, and delays on the metropolitan line due to a signal failure. onto the weather now with sara. good morning to you. we've had some thunderstorms out towards the south west of london overnight. they are largely clearing away. we've got some, mist and murk, though, to start us off this morning in our suburbs. any showers pulling off towards the north, but then some sunshine could spark off some further showers here and there as we run through the day today. a lot of places will stay dry with some sunshine — in the best of it, temperatures around 21 celsius.
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overnight tonight, we're dry, we're clear, we are going to see a little bit of mist and murk and maybe some passing cloud, as well. but we'll stay dry into tomorrow morning, and temperatures typically staying in low double figures, so it'll be a warm start tomorrow. i just want to show you the fronts charts to show you what a mess it is, actually, over the next few days. we've got low pressure dominating our weather this week, there are frontal systems trying to push further showers in at times. showers, so of course they are hit and miss — we won't all see them. tomorrow, though, largely dry for a good deal of the day, and a warm one — could be 25 or 26 degrees for us — very high 705 in fahrenheit. staying warm through the week, but unsettled. that's it, but go to our website to read about a former london teacher who's become a netflix reality star. i'll have our next update in an hour. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and sally nugent. the prime minister will head to belfast today, to meet with party leaders and urge them to restore power—sharing at stormont. the sticking point is the post—brexit trade arrangements known as the northern ireland protocol which the dup find an acceptable and which the dup find an acceptable and which the dup find an acceptable and which the westminster government is preparing to change. we're joined now by professorjon tonge, who specialises in british and irish politics. good morning. good morning. we don't have two hours — good morning. good morning. we don't have two hours but _ good morning. good morning. we don't have two hours but i _ good morning. good morning. we don't have two hours but i understand - good morning. good morning. we don't have two hours but i understand this i have two hours but i understand this is a broad question. how have we got to this point?— to this point? briefly, the democratic _ to this point? briefly, the democratic unionist i to this point? briefly, the| democratic unionist party, to this point? briefly, the i democratic unionist party, the largest unionist party in northern ireland, walked out of the devolved power sharing institutions before the recent elections saying that they wanted the protocol, the irish sea border, the trade border between great britain and northern ireland,
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they wanted a abolished, that it was an affront to their unionism. boris johnson in belfast is trying to get the dup back into devolved power sharing, restore the good friday agreement political institutions, and says he will fix the protocol. he is not saying he will abolish it, he will fix it, in other words get rid of some of the checks on those goods going between great britain and northern ireland. we goods going between great britain and northern ireland.— and northern ireland. we have a fairl bi and northern ireland. we have a fairly big clue — and northern ireland. we have a fairly big clue about _ and northern ireland. we have a fairly big clue about what - and northern ireland. we have a fairly big clue about what boris l fairly big clue about what boris johnson thinks about the situation because he has written an article in the belfast telegraph basically explaining what he thinks. what do we learn from that? that explaining what he thinks. what do we learn from that?— explaining what he thinks. what do we learn from that? that they could well be domestic _ we learn from that? that they could well be domestic legislation - we learn from that? that they could well be domestic legislation passed | well be domestic legislation passed at westminster which will disapply some parts of the protocol, so some of the checks on chilled meats for example. the checks in some ways have been huge, even a packet of sandwiches checked because it is chilled meat. those checks take place to keep the border on the island of ireland are soft. there is a risk of good be going between
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great britain and northern ireland going into the eu south of the border. the disagreement is that these checks are excessive and we need to get rid, but it's not that easyjust need to get rid, but it's not that easy just to pass need to get rid, but it's not that easyjust to pass domestic legislation which potentially ties up legislation which potentially ties up the treaty that borisjohnson has assigned with the eu —— tears of the treaty. the eu may retaliate and say, well, the trade deal you conducted with us is being torn up as a consequence of you tearing up the protocol. borisjohnson is trying to square a lot of circles in belfast. ., ~ trying to square a lot of circles in belfast. ., ,, ., ,., trying to square a lot of circles in belfast. ., ,, ., ., trying to square a lot of circles in belfast. ., ~ ., ., ., belfast. talking about a potential trade were. _ belfast. talking about a potential trade were, trying _ belfast. talking about a potential trade were, trying to _ belfast. talking about a potential trade were, trying to avoid i belfast. talking about a potential trade were, trying to avoid more | trade were, trying to avoid more issues during a cost—of—living crisis those cost of living issues arise because what might happen, the eu can respond by for example putting tariffs on british goods heading to the eu, the british can respond to that by putting tariffs on goods coming from the eu as part of a trade war, but that is the last thing people want because that would
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put up prices. the thing people want because that would put up prices-— put up prices. the last thing boris johnson really _ put up prices. the last thing boris johnson really wanted _ put up prices. the last thing boris johnson really wanted to - put up prices. the last thing boris johnson really wanted to get i johnson really wanted to get involved in another set of negotiations with the eu. he hopes the eu will accept some sort of fudge on the protocol, some watering down, but the message from the eu so far is, no, you signed this, you have to live with it, implement it and the eu have also pointed to the fact that most people in northern ireland at the recent election voted in favour of pro—protocol parties. those people in northern ireland are living without an executive government. what does that mean for everything else? it is government. what does that mean for everything else?— everything else? it is a disaster for the peeple _ everything else? it is a disaster for the people of _ everything else? it is a disaster for the people of northern - everything else? it is a disaster i for the people of northern ireland because we have had health service crisis in northern ireland that predate covid, that happened the last time there was a collapse in 2017 and collapse has been a feature of the stormont government, it has been missing for 40% of the time since the good friday agreement. there is no immediate sign of restoration. they have 2a weeks to try to resolve this but nobody is
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betting on an early resumption of devolved power sharing.- devolved power sharing. island's foreian devolved power sharing. island's foreign minister _ devolved power sharing. island's foreign minister was _ devolved power sharing. island's foreign minister was talking - devolved power sharing. island's i foreign minister was talking about action over the weekend. the quote was, could undermine the peace process. in terms of the ramifications of all this, out wide for that go?— ramifications of all this, out wide for that go? part of the reason he said that is _ for that go? part of the reason he said that is because _ for that go? part of the reason he said that is because he _ for that go? part of the reason he said that is because he was - for that go? part of the reason he said that is because he was a - for that go? part of the reason he l said that is because he was a victim of a hoax attack in belfast a couple of a hoax attack in belfast a couple of months ago when he had to abandon his speech because loyalists sent a hoax device to where he was speaking so it would be reckless to talk up the threat of a resumption of violence in northern ireland. there is no real sign of that, but there are staring is particularly within loyalist paramilitaries because of their opposition to the protocol and thatis their opposition to the protocol and that is what he is alluding to in what he says. that is what he is alluding to in what he save-— that is what he is alluding to in what he says. that is what he is alluding to in what he sa s. ~ . , what he says. meanwhile, there is hue what he says. meanwhile, there is huge pressure _ what he says. meanwhile, there is huge pressure on _ what he says. meanwhile, there is huge pressure on both _ what he says. meanwhile, there is huge pressure on both sides. - what he says. meanwhile, there is i huge pressure on both sides. where will it go? huge pressure on both sides. where will it no? ~ , will it go? well, there is huge ressure will it go? well, there is huge pressure because _ will it go? well, there is huge pressure because if _ will it go? well, there is huge pressure because if devolved | will it go? well, there is huge - pressure because if devolved power sharing is not restored this time, then what happens to the good friday agreement more broadly? it is based
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on the notion of devolved power sharing and the irony is that the eu northern ireland protocol was introduced to keep the good friday agreement safe. the risk is that the protocol brings down the good friday agreement because unionists will not resume power sharing with nationalists. sinn fein is now the largest party in northern ireland and they are waiting for unionists tojoin them in political matrimony at the new ultech in northern ireland. if you don't have that power sharing then where does the good friday agreement go? there is a lot at stake in terms of boris johnson's visit.— lot at stake in terms of boris johnson's visit. ., ~ , ., ,., . johnson's visit. thank you so much for exalaining _ johnson's visit. thank you so much for explaining that _ johnson's visit. thank you so much for explaining that so _ johnson's visit. thank you so much for explaining that so clearly, - johnson's visit. thank you so much for explaining that so clearly, it - for explaining that so clearly, it was invaluable. professor atjon tonge, thank you. chetan is here talking about... we have the men's fa cup final on saturday and a much better in terms of quality and goals, the women's final yesterday. five goals between chelsea and manchester city and chelsea have a week after they won the women's super league title, now the double.
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they have won the fa cup. in front ofjust they have won the fa cup. in front of just over they have won the fa cup. in front ofjust over 19,000 fans, a record for the final. back to back winners in the showpiece event on the season. chelsea celebrating their dominance after truly being put to the test. in the early minutes manchester city had chances, before millie bright set up a perfect ball. deep had chances, before millie bright set up a perfect ball.— had chances, before millie bright set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in- — set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in. all— set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in. all it _ set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in. all it took _ set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in. all it took was - set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in. all it took was a - set up a perfect ball. deep cross in and it is in. all it took was a nick l and it is in. all it took was a nick from sam _ and it is in. all it took was a nick from sam kerr _ and it is in. all it took was a nick from sam kerr to _ and it is in. all it took was a nick from sam kerr to help _ and it is in. all it took was a nick from sam kerr to help it - and it is in. all it took was a nick from sam kerr to help it over. i and it is in. all it took was a nick - from sam kerr to help it over. emma hayes said earlier this week she loves watching lauren hemp play but she won't have enjoyed this. six. she won't have en'oyed this. six coals in she won't have enjoyed this. s goals in six games. she won't have enjoyed this. six goals in six games. erin - she won't have enjoyed this. six l goals in six games. erin cuthbert, who had covered _ goals in six games. erin cuthbert, who had covered every _ goals in six games. erin cuthbert, who had covered every inch - goals in six games. erin cuthbert, who had covered every inch of- goals in six games. erin cuthbert, | who had covered every inch of this pitch, is often the creator of goals for chelsea, but she definitely owned this. two teams are showing no signs of backing down. all set to end before the game was sent into
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extra time. the lead's golden boot winner sam co has a magnetic touch at once she latched onto the ball, no one could stop her. this at once she latched onto the ball, no one could stop her.— at once she latched onto the ball, no one could stop her. this team has a su erb no one could stop her. this team has a superb character— no one could stop her. this team has a superb character for _ no one could stop her. this team has a superb character for a _ no one could stop her. this team has a superb character for a reason - no one could stop her. this team has a superb character for a reason and l a superb character for a reason and we have won the titles we have for multiple reasons. there is no denying it was the best fa cup final, i think, denying it was the best fa cup final, ithink, in recent denying it was the best fa cup final, i think, in recent years. chelsea are cup winners 2022. manchester city gave it their all but the depth and consistency of this chelsea squad has paid off. they won the league last week and have now secured their fourth fa cup, lifting trophies becoming a habit for them. incredible stuff. 11 trophies for emma hayes in her ten years at chelsea. will there be a final twist in the premier league title race? manchester city's lead at the top
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could be cut to appoint if liverpool win at southampton yesterday, at the city were held to a 2—2 draw at west ham. west ham 2—0. bowen scoring his second just before half—time but city fought back after the break, jack grealish scoring before this own goal levelled the game and city had a chance to win here. a late penalty saved. as long as city beat aston villa in the final day they will be champions, or if liverpool lose at southampton tomorrow. everton boss hopes of staying in the premier league are still in the balance after they lost three having two at home to brentford. everton had two players sent off, brentford had two players sent off, brentford had already equalised twice when henry headed in what proved to be the winning goal, leaving everton 16th in the table, two points clear of relegation. we 16th in the table, two points clear of relegation-— of relegation. we have control of the game. _ of relegation. we have control of the game, looking _ of relegation. we have control of the game, looking like _ of relegation. we have control of the game, looking like we - of relegation. we have control of the game, looking like we could | of relegation. we have control of- the game, looking like we could have scored more goals and hopefully win the game to get ourselves in the same position we want
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the red kite changes it. the players gave everything, the game is difficult. i don't think you can play 70 minutes in the premier league with ten men and expect much more. all i ask for is the players give everything and they did, they fought, we got ourselves back in front but in the end it was a step too far because of the red kite. aligned to bring you this morning, everton have confirmed they are assisting merseyside police after a brentford striker evan tony and full—back rico tony alleged there families were racially abused during yesterday's win. staying at the bottom of the table, leeds have kept alive their hopes of survival. this was the goal. injury time equaliser. the roof off at elland road, they are one point clear of the relegation zone but burnley are below them and have a game in hand. belly remain in the bottom three for now, losing 1—0 at tottenham, who are into four. the penalty settled it, given what this handball by ashley barnes on the stroke of
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half—time. you can guess who took it. harry kane ensured spurs were in the final champions league qualification. novak djokovic won his first title of the year at the italian open. the world number one beat stefanos tsitsipas 6—0, 7—6 to wrap up his sixth italian open title — the last competition before the french open gets underway next week. he will beat the defending champion there. ——he will be the defending champion there. and iga swaitek won the women's event — that's her 28th victory in a row. it also means she's won five tournaments in a row — victory in rome following wins in doha, indian wells, miami and stuttgart. can anyone stop her at roland garros? she is a wimbledonjunior champion, as well, we will be talking about wimbledon soon. she as well, we will be talking about wimbledon soon.— as well, we will be talking about wimbledon soon. she loves clay. she loves the grass. _ wimbledon soon. she loves clay. she loves the grass, as _ wimbledon soon. she loves clay. she loves the grass, as well, _ wimbledon soon. she loves clay. she loves the grass, as well, that - wimbledon soon. she loves clay. she loves the grass, as well, that says i loves the grass, as well, that says you need to get better on it. it is
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on the way. _ you need to get better on it. it 3 on the way, wimbledon, you know it is so met. i have another w wait for you now, whether. good morning. we will be talking about christmas before long. lots of them storms last night across southern parts of england and wales but a bright start here, a bit of sunshine around. different story the further north you are across of northern england, scotland, northern ireland, this paycheque captured a short while ago. outbreaks of rain, rather grey outside. more persistent rain in northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland, moving north—west. we concentrated across the southern half of the uk first, we have heavy showers along north wales coming up drifting into northern england but things turned dry, bright, but as temperatures rise into the afternoon it will set “p rise into the afternoon it will set up a scattering of showers but there are big gaps between them. some stay dry but showers can be heavy and thundery. dad was in northern ireland this afternoon and for the finals of england but also in
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scotland one of those days that gets more grey for many, outbreaks of rain coming and going, chilly easterly breeze, best of the weather in shetland. not especially warm but you will have sunshine throughout where is under grey skies and easterly wind across scotland, temperatures around 11 to 15. such outbreaks were northern ireland, 18 to 90 degrees, even that wales widely into low 20s and increasingly humid. after the rain fell, the sunshine comes out, recharges the pollen levels, they will burst up and the upward trend across wales, southern england and into the afternoon. as we go into this evening and overnight, the showers we have to begin with fade away, ten drier crosscut than with lots of low cloud to the north—east. temperatures in the male side but not quite as muggy as last night. a filtrate are pushing up of the atlantic will have more of an impact across western areas through the day but it approaches that we dragged airfrom the but it approaches that we dragged air from the south, so the they will feel more and more humid, lots of sunshine after mist or stiefel
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through parts of scotland, england and eastern wales, low cloud to the east of scotland but in the far west around the irish sea areas we will see heavy rain develop into the afternoon. that will knock the temperatures here but elsewhere, 20 degrees around the moray firth, could be 25 or 26 in south—east england, making it the warmest day of the year so far. when it was none non—uk on tuesday night, not much in the south but at the east, the wind shift direction taking away some of the humility. a day in the sunshine, a good deal about, one or two showers to begin greater chances of heavy showers, maybe the odd rumble of thunder to the south—west later. humid in east anglia and the south—east but a pleasant spring day for many, 17 to 23 degrees. the rest of the week on the one side, especially with the sun out but one of those weeks throughout where you have to have some waterproofs close to hand showers will develop through the week, changing from one day to the week, changing from one day to the next and where you see them there is always potential there
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could be a bit on the thundery side. 17 in edinburgh as we go through the end of the week, may be still holding around the low 20s across parts of southern england and parts of south wales. back to you both. on your way into work did you manage to see the gorgeous blood moon, super moon? i to see the gorgeous blood moon, suaer moon?— to see the gorgeous blood moon, suer moon? �* , , super moon? i didn't because it was too cloudy. — super moon? i didn't because it was too cloudy, thunderstorms - super moon? i didn't because it was too cloudy, thunderstorms all - super moon? i didn't because it was l too cloudy, thunderstorms all around as i was driving in and you had to be up very early to catch it but one of our weather watchers did this lovely time—lapse of how that eclipse took place, that was on the south coast at horsham. that eclipse took place, that was on the south coast at horsham.— south coast at horsham. that is lovel , south coast at horsham. that is lovely. thank — south coast at horsham. that is lovely, thank you, _ south coast at horsham. that is lovely, thank you, ken. - south coast at horsham. that is lovely, thank you, ken. we - south coast at horsham. that is| lovely, thank you, ken. we have south coast at horsham. that is - lovely, thank you, ken. we have got more! lots of you were looking at that gorgeous moon overnight. these are from west sussex. isn't that pretty? you can see the shadow of the earth blocking out most of the moon. , , ., , moon. this is from philip in wiltshire. _ moon. this is from philip in wiltshire. that _ moon. this is from philip in wiltshire. that is _ moon. this is from philip in wiltshire. that is quite - moon. this is from philip in | wiltshire. that is quite pink. moon. this is from philip in i wiltshire. that is quite pink. if ou ever wiltshire. that is quite pink. if you ever try — wiltshire. that is quite pink. if you ever try to _ wiltshire. that is quite pink. if you ever try to take _
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wiltshire. that is quite pink. if you ever try to take a - wiltshire. that is quite pink. if you ever try to take a picture l wiltshire. that is quite pink. if| you ever try to take a picture of the moon on your phone it is a light blood, i think that is a proper camera. �* , ., blood, i think that is a proper camera. 2 ., ., blood, i think that is a proper camera. �*, ., ., , . blood, i think that is a proper i camera-_ who blood, i think that is a proper camera. 3 ., ., , . who is camera. let's go to greece. who is there? look _ camera. let's go to greece. who is there? look at _ camera. let's go to greece. who is there? look at that. _ camera. let's go to greece. who is there? look at that. that - camera. let's go to greece. who is there? look at that. that is - camera. let's go to greece. who is there? look at that. that is the i there? look at that. that is the view last night. _ there? look at that. that is the view last night. moon - there? look at that. that is the view last night. moon rise i there? look at that. that is the view last night. moon rise over| there? look at that. that is the i view last night. moon rise over the ancient temple of poseidon, 70 kilometres south of athens. inter? kilometres south of athens. very aood kilometres south of athens. very good geography _ kilometres south of athens. very good geography of— kilometres south of athens. very good geography of the top of your head, that. i good geography of the top of your head, that. ~ ., ., ., good geography of the top of your head. that-— head, that. i know all that, it is in here. head, that. i know all that, it is in here- if— head, that. i know all that, it is in here. if you _ head, that. i know all that, it is in here. if you took _ head, that. i know all that, it is in here. if you took a _ head, that. i know all that, it is in here. if you took a picture i head, that. i know all that, it is in here. if you took a picture of| in here. if you took a picture of the soper _ in here. if you took a picture of the super blood _ in here. if you took a picture of the super blood moon - in here. if you took a picture of the super blood moon this i in here. if you took a picture of i the super blood moon this morning in here. if you took a picture of - the super blood moon this morning we would love you to send it into us. you can do it via social media or e—mail us. you can do it via social media or e-mail us— you can do it via social media or e-mail us. don't forget to give us our e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name _ e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name so _ e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name so we _ e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name so we can _ e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name so we can see - e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name so we can see her- e-mail us. don't forget to give us your name so we can see her say| e-mail us. don't forget to give us i your name so we can see her say who your name so we can see her say who you are when we show your pitch and we will share more of our favourites later on in the programme. we've got a story now about a really brave little boy called leo. he's undergone numerous surgeries on his heart — the first when he was just a week old — which have left a large scar on his chest. leo's mum aimee has written a book about his scar, to help him — and other children with heart conditions — feel proud of what they have overcome, as alexander howick reports.
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what's your name? leo. how old are you, leo? four. when leo was only seven days old, he had open heart surgery. it left him with a huge scar on his chest. it's quite thick, because he was opened up so many times. he's gone through more than any child should have to go through. now his mum's written a book about leo and his scar to help him and others understand why he's a little different. right there, under leo's top, was a long, jagged, white scar. i know. i know! why he has it, why he gets out of breath, and why other children don't have it. leo's mum, aimee, also hopes it'll help other children with heart conditions. i wanted other children to understand that it wasn'tjust given to him. he has fought to be here.
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he suffered for it. and that it's a cool thing. it's something leo needs to be proud of. leo still needs more surgery on his heart, but is doing well. leo says the books helped his friends understand him better. they think it's cool? yes. but it's a reminder for us what we went through, how we lost him, how we had to say goodbye to him so many times. all the pain. it's a major reminder about how strong he is. he is so strong. yeah, it's cool. it makes him him. the book's published through the charity heart heroes and all proceeds will go to helping children with heart conditions. alex howick, bbc news.
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well done, leo. that was a proper scar. well done, leo. that was a proper scar- jess — well done, leo. that was a proper scar- jess to _ well done, leo. that was a proper scar. jess to celebrate _ well done, leo. that was a proper scar. jess to celebrate survival. i when ben elton wrote a stage version of his tv sitcom upstart crow — about the early career of william shakespeare — it opened to rave reviews. sadly, it then closed almost immediately because of the pandemic. now it's coming back — and ben's here to tell us all about it. good morning. good morning. before we talk to you — good morning. good morning. before we talk to you we _ good morning. good morning. before we talk to you we will _ good morning. good morning. before we talk to you we will show _ we talk to you we will show everybody that help a tiny clip. how was your shopping, mr shakespeare? did you get all our essential items? no, i didn't!! still not a scrap of damp moss for the privy to be found in all of the south bank! still?! people are just mad. every tree stump and ancient gravestone stripped. i hate hoarders. why — just why?! there be no shortage! so here's an idea — let's create one. it's actually hoarding that creates the shortages. although, of course, in such uncertain times, it does make sense to shop
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prudently, even for socially responsible citizens such as us. which is why i thought it sensible to pick up another ham, some more turnips, a few potatoes, more salted meat, and an extra bundle of sugar sticks. which is definitely not hoarding! laughter well, my goodness, how relevant and in touch with today.— in touch with today. desperately to - ical 18 in touch with today. desperately topical 18 months _ in touch with today. desperately topical 18 months ago _ in touch with today. desperately topical 18 months ago when i in touch with today. desperately topical 18 months ago when it i in touch with today. desperately i topical 18 months ago when it was broadcast — topical 18 months ago when it was broadcast. the old toilet paper gag still resonating from memories of the pandemic. that was the pandemic upstart _ the pandemic. that was the pandemic upstart crow special we did.— upstart crow special we did. because of course you — upstart crow special we did. because of course you had _ upstart crow special we did. because of course you had one _ upstart crow special we did. because of course you had one box _ upstart crow special we did. because of course you had one box on - upstart crow special we did. because of course you had one box on what i of course you had one box on what was so fascinating about doing upstart crow again, it is a sitcom about the life of william shakespeare, and he had to close his theatres because of a pandemic. than theatres because of a pandemic. an astonishing resonance of history, the last— astonishing resonance of history, the last time the plague close theatres — the last time the plague close theatres was in shakespeare's date and then— theatres was in shakespeare's date and then the puritans did it for whatever— and then the puritans did it for whatever reason, they felt theatre
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was ungodly and after hundreds of years— was ungodly and after hundreds of years of— was ungodly and after hundreds of years of live entertainment in britain — years of live entertainment in britain we had a two—year culture catastrophe and the bbc were fantastic and commissioned at christmas special about shakespeare's experience of lockdown sha kespeare's experience of lockdown and shakespeare's experience of lockdown and a pandemic closing his theatres and a pandemic closing his theatres and that— and a pandemic closing his theatres and that was broadcast a couple of years— and that was broadcast a couple of years ago — and that was broadcast a couple of years ago. david and janet, the dreamcast, as a writer —— gemma. they— dreamcast, as a writer —— gemma. they are — dreamcast, as a writer —— gemma. they are great to work with. they create the — they are great to work with. they create the characters _ they are great to work with. the: create the characters beautifully that you write on the page. tell us about how the pandemic interrupted the theatre production of this. their work rave reviews and it was over. it their work rave reviews and it was over. . , ., , , ,., , over. it was literally... everybody has their moment _ over. it was literally... everybody has their moment in _ over. it was literally... everybody has their moment in march i over. it was literally... everybody has their moment in march 2020 | over. it was literally... everybody i has their moment in march 2020 when everything _ has their moment in march 2020 when everything changed and certainly for us in the _ everything changed and certainly for us in the theatre, it was a cultural catastrophe — us in the theatre, it was a cultural catastrophe and personally very sad. we got _ catastrophe and personally very sad. we got nominated for best comedy otivier— we got nominated for best comedy
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olivier award and closed basically two days — olivier award and closed basically two days later. there was a particularly bittersweet irony because it was life imitating art and here — because it was life imitating art and here we are, a play, a sitcom about— and here we are, a play, a sitcom about a _ and here we are, a play, a sitcom about a live — and here we are, a play, a sitcom about a live theatre sitcom, which of course — about a live theatre sitcom, which of course was recorded almost theatrically in the old way, just in front— theatrically in the old way, just in front of— theatrically in the old way, just in front of a — theatrically in the old way, just in front of a live audience, then brought— front of a live audience, then brought back to the theatre. upstart crow is _ brought back to the theatre. upstart crow is in _ brought back to the theatre. upstart crow is in the theatre where it should — crow is in the theatre where it should be! in a way it is its natural— should be! in a way it is its natural home and then closed due to pandemic, _ natural home and then closed due to pandemic, just as shakespeare had been _ pandemic, just as shakespeare had been a _ pandemic, just as shakespeare had been. a terrible time but now we are all celebrating the return of life in the _ all celebrating the return of life in the uk — all celebrating the return of life in the uk but particularly from live entertainment, the source of, i think. — entertainment, the source of, i think, every community. my eiffel dodger— think, every community. my eiffel dodger is— think, every community. my eiffel dodger is still fondly remembered from when i did amateur dramatics —— my artful— from when i did amateur dramatics —— my artful dodger. d from when i did amateur dramatics -- my artful dodger-— my artful dodger. d that one of the reasons upstart _ my artful dodger. d that one of the reasons upstart crow _ my artful dodger. d that one of the reasons upstart crow was - my artful dodger. d that one of the reasons upstart crow was so i reasons upstart crow was so successful on tv, you mention a live audience and those classic sitcoms
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we love from years ago, there was a familiarity, the sense it gives you that people are watching this live, help make it work better. t that people are watching this live, help make it work better.- help make it work better. i think so. it is almost _ help make it work better. i think so. it is almost considered i so. it is almost considered unfashionable now, the old studio way of— unfashionable now, the old studio way of doing it. people say it is a taped _ way of doing it. people say it is a taped laughter but it is live laughter and you are also hearing that reaction to comic timing. "a stupid _ that reaction to comic timing. "a stupid boy. — that reaction to comic timing. "a stupid boy, pike!" was being done for the _ stupid boy, pike!" was being done for the audience and that is why people — for the audience and that is why people enjoyed it. comedy is a community experience and while i love the _ community experience and while i love the single camera work and brilliant — love the single camera work and brilliant work like offrice, there is a great — brilliant work like offrice, there is a great sense of theatre and that is a great sense of theatre and that is what _ is a great sense of theatre and that is what dad's army gave and my early career— is what dad's army gave and my early career and _ is what dad's army gave and my early career and we have stuck with that for upstart — career and we have stuck with that for upstart crow because it is a theatrical— for upstart crow because it is a theatrical sitcom. it seems to work and people — theatrical sitcom. it seems to work and people seem to enjoy it. our and people seem to en'oy it. our fascinating — and people seem to enjoy it. qt" fascinating shakespeare is going
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nowhere. there are semi details to his life and he is so intrinsically woven into our culture.- woven into our culture. funnily enou~h, woven into our culture. funnily enough, contrary _ woven into our culture. funnily enough, contrary to _ woven into our culture. funnily enough, contrary to popular i woven into our culture. funnily i enough, contrary to popular myth, we know a _ enough, contrary to popular myth, we know a great— enough, contrary to popular myth, we know a great deal about him, far more _ know a great deal about him, far more than — know a great deal about him, far more than we knew or know about any other— more than we knew or know about any other renaissance poet. all fascinatingly human because he had real vanity— fascinatingly human because he had real vanity and in some ways petty vanity _ real vanity and in some ways petty vanity he — real vanity and in some ways petty vanity. he bought himself a coat of arm5, _ vanity. he bought himself a coat of arms. which— vanity. he bought himself a coat of arms, which is the modern equivalent of buying _ arms, which is the modern equivalent of buying a _ arms, which is the modern equivalent of buying a customised number plate. he wanted _ of buying a customised number plate. he wanted respect, he was a property investor. _ he wanted respect, he was a property investor, wanted success. in a way the classic— investor, wanted success. in a way the classic british sitcom figure in that he _ the classic british sitcom figure in that he was a private, a grammar school _ that he was a private, a grammar school boy, — that he was a private, a grammar school boy, which in those days was the lowest _ school boy, which in those days was the lowest because he was not privately— the lowest because he was not privately educated. he was uppity, trying _ privately educated. he was uppity, trying to— privately educated. he was uppity, trying to play against the posh boys~ — trying to play against the posh boys. just like captain manewaring. it seems _ boys. just like captain manewaring. it seems great on tv and now we are
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back in— it seems great on tv and now we are back in the _ it seems great on tv and now we are back in the west end and in fact we will shortly — back in the west end and in fact we will shortly go live, the ticket sales— will shortly go live, the ticket sales start at 8am.— will shortly go live, the ticket sales start at 8am. that is well timed, sales start at 8am. that is well timed. five _ sales start at 8am. that is well timed, five minutes! _ sales start at 8am. that is well timed, five minutes! we i sales start at 8am. that is well timed, five minutes! we are i timed, five minutes! we are unleashing _ timed, five minutes! we are unleashing on _ timed, five minutes! we are unleashing on the _ timed, five minutes! we are unleashing on the public i timed, five minutes! we are| unleashing on the public who timed, five minutes! we are i unleashing on the public who wants to see _ unleashing on the public who wants to see the — unleashing on the public who wants to see the play on shaftesbury avenue. — to see the play on shaftesbury avenue. i_ to see the play on shaftesbury avenue, i think we are at the apollo — avenue, i think we are at the aollo. ., . avenue, i think we are at the apollo-- a _ avenue, i think we are at the apollo.- a beautifull avenue, i think we are at the i apollo.- a beautiful theatre apollo. you are. a beautiful theatre and the tickets _ apollo. you are. a beautiful theatre and the tickets are _ apollo. you are. a beautiful theatre and the tickets are on _ apollo. you are. a beautiful theatre and the tickets are on sale - apollo. you are. a beautiful theatre and the tickets are on sale this i and the tickets are on sale this morning — and the tickets are on sale this morning at 8am.— and the tickets are on sale this morning at 8am. how much more secial is morning at 8am. how much more special is it _ morning at 8am. how much more special is it to _ morning at 8am. how much more special is it to be _ morning at 8am. how much more special is it to be in _ morning at 8am. how much more special is it to be in front - morning at 8am. how much more special is it to be in front of- morning at 8am. how much more special is it to be in front of a i special is it to be in front of a theatre audience now? they bring the magic. $5 theatre audience now? they bring the manic. �* , theatre audience now? they bring the maiic, �*, , theatre audience now? they bring the manic. a , ., magic. as i say, it is about a theatre genius, _ magic. as i say, it is about a theatre genius, it _ magic. as i say, it is about a theatre genius, it is - magic. as i say, it is about a theatre genius, it is live i magic. as i say, it is about a i theatre genius, it is live comedy, comedy— theatre genius, it is live comedy, comedy for— theatre genius, it is live comedy, comedy for me has always been a comedy— comedy for me has always been a comedy activity. i toured as a stand-up _ comedy activity. i toured as a stand—up. laughtertogether comedy activity. i toured as a stand—up. laughter together is in many— stand—up. laughter together is in many ways— stand—up. laughter together is in many ways better than laughter alone — many ways better than laughter alone it — many ways better than laughter alone. it is a shared experience. i think— alone. it is a shared experience. i think particularly because of the pandemic, i think the fact we are now able — pandemic, i think the fact we are now able to go and see a comedian, a band, _ now able to go and see a comedian, a band. enjoy— now able to go and see a comedian, a band, enjoy being part of the society. _ band, enjoy being part of the society, ratherthan band, enjoy being part of the society, rather than being locked away _ society, rather than being locked away in _ society, rather than being locked away in our — society, rather than being locked away in our own little rooms. it was
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very bittersweet when it closed, as did the _ very bittersweet when it closed, as did the whole of british theatre and well theatre, with the emphasis on it is bittersweet opening with the emphasis on sweets because live entertainment is back and i am so happy— entertainment is back and i am so happy that— entertainment is back and i am so happy that the laughter we are creating — happy that the laughter we are creating with david and gemma and unannounced guest stars will be leading — unannounced guest stars will be leading the vanguard. can unannounced guest stars will be leading the vanguard.— unannounced guest stars will be leading the vanguard. can you dangle an of leading the vanguard. can you dangle any of those — leading the vanguard. can you dangle any of those unannounced _ leading the vanguard. can you dangle any of those unannounced guest i any of those unannounced guest stars? h any of those unannounced guest stars? a, a, a, stars? i would never dangle in front of an audience. _ stars? i would never dangle in front of an audience. course _ stars? i would never dangle in front of an audience. course david - of an audience. course david mitchell as _ of an audience. course david mitchell as shakespeare - of an audience. course david mitchell as shakespeare and | of an audience. course david - mitchell as shakespeare and gemma of an audience. course david _ mitchell as shakespeare and gemma as a land by�*s daughter is an incredible thing. they are doing it live and we managed to book them for three months! have you any idea i how busy they are?! gemma is in every single thing. she how busy they are?! gemma is in every single thing.— how busy they are?! gemma is in every single thing. she was here a week a90- — every single thing. she was here a week age - _ every single thing. she was here a week age - i _ every single thing. she was here a week ago. . i am _ every single thing. she was here a week ago. . i am lucky— every single thing. she was here a week ago. . i am lucky has - every single thing. she was here a week ago. . i am lucky has a - every single thing. she was here a week ago. . i am lucky has a right| week ago. . i am lucky has a right to audiences _ week ago. . i am lucky has a right to audiences are _ week ago. . i am lucky has a right to audiences are looking - week ago. . i am lucky has a right to audiences are looking to - week ago. . i am lucky has a right to audiences are looking to get i week ago. . i am lucky has a right to audiences are looking to get to i to audiences are looking to get to see big _ to audiences are looking to get to see big stars like that in the west end~ _ see big stars like that in the west end. . , ., see big stars like that in the west end. ., in _, ., end. can you compare the thrill of bein: on end. can you compare the thrill of being on stage — end. can you compare the thrill of being on stage as _ end. can you compare the thrill of being on stage as a _ end. can you compare the thrill of
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being on stage as a stand - end. can you compare the thrill of being on stage as a stand and - being on stage as a stand and getting a laugh, to writing something and then watching other people laugh at something you have written, delivered by something else? it written, delivered by something else? , . ~ written, delivered by something else? , ., . ., else? it is a much greater thrill for me to _ else? it is a much greater thrill for me to just _ else? it is a much greater thrill for me to just be _ else? it is a much greater thrill for me to just be the _ else? it is a much greater thrill for me to just be the writer - else? it is a much greater thrill - for me to just be the writer because i don't _ for me to just be the writer because i don't have — for me to just be the writer because i don't have the nurse! endless butterflies and trying to get it right — butterflies and trying to get it right. my work as a stand—up is a small_ right. my work as a stand—up is a small part — right. my work as a stand—up is a small part of my work, i write my act and _ small part of my work, i write my act and deliver what to watch david mitchell _ act and deliver what to watch david mitchell or — act and deliver what to watch david mitchell or the late, great rick male, — mitchell or the late, great rick male, i— mitchell or the late, great rick male, i have been fortunate to work with some _ male, i have been fortunate to work with some of the greatest comic performers —— rik. i could never feel_ performers —— rik. i could never feel that — performers —— rik. i could never feel that thrill listening to myself. when i see the exquisite timing _ myself. when i see the exquisite timing of— myself. when i see the exquisite timing of david mitchell that is the greatest _ timing of david mitchell that is the greatest thrill. $0 timing of david mitchell that is the greatest thrill.— greatest thrill. 40 years since the youn: greatest thrill. 40 years since the young ones. _ greatest thrill. 40 years since the young ones. 20 _ greatest thrill. 40 years since the young ones, 20 since _
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greatest thrill. 40 years since the young ones, 20 since we - greatest thrill. 40 years since the young ones, 20 since we will - greatest thrill. 40 years since the | young ones, 20 since we will rock you. {05} young ones, 20 since we will rock you. ii ., , �* , young ones, 20 since we will rock you. :: ., , ~,~ young ones, 20 since we will rock you. 1: ., , n�* ., ., you. 40 years as a comedian. actually. _ you. 40 years as a comedian. actually. 41. — you. 40 years as a comedian. actually, 41. will— you. 40 years as a comedian. actually, 41. will you - you. 40 years as a comedian. l actually, 41. will you celebrate? you. 40 years as a comedian. - actually, 41. will you celebrate? my life is a celebration _ actually, 41. will you celebrate? my life is a celebration i _ actually, 41. will you celebrate? my life is a celebration i said _ actually, 41. will you celebrate? my life is a celebration i said i- actually, 41. will you celebrate? my life is a celebration i said i did - life is a celebration i said i did amateur— life is a celebration i said i did amateur dramatics when i was ten years— amateur dramatics when i was ten years old. — amateur dramatics when i was ten years old, played slightly soiled a lost boy— years old, played slightly soiled a lost boy in peter pan in guildford and i_ lost boy in peter pan in guildford and i have — lost boy in peter pan in guildford and i have wanted to be in theatre ever since. — and i have wanted to be in theatre ever since, mainly as a writer so in a way— ever since, mainly as a writer so in a way i _ ever since, mainly as a writer so in a way i get — ever since, mainly as a writer so in a way i get to— ever since, mainly as a writer so in a way i get to celebrate every day but today— a way i get to celebrate every day but today is a particular celebration because i am bringing a playback— celebration because i am bringing a playback that was cruelly interrupted and now it is back should — interrupted and now it is back should people wish to see it. tickets— should people wish to see it. tickets go on sale in 40 seconds what upstart crow starting on the 23rd of september at the apollo in london._ thank- 23rd of september at the apollo in london._ thank you i 23rd of september at the apollo in i london._ thank you so london. limited run. thank you so much. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. borisjohnson is due to visit northern ireland later — with the government set to confirm new legislation to override parts of the brexit deal. millions of pupils in england, wales and northern ireland will start sitting their first formal exams in three years today. it's not old age, it's an illness — the simple message from a dementia charity, as they encourage early diagnosis. queen attends the first big event
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of her platinum jubilee, taking in the final night of the royal windsor horse show. and join me deep down in the vaults of the bank of england, surrounded by gold. we're talking about why it's never been more important to understand the economy. is there to be a final twist in the title race after the premier league leaders manchester city missed out on a win at west ham? across much of scotland, a wet and cool day. _ across much of scotland, a wet and cool day, but elsewhere, sunshine will come — cool day, but elsewhere, sunshine will come out. but cool day, but elsewhere, sunshine will come out.— will come out. but they could be thundery showers _ will come out. but they could be thundery showers later. - will come out. but they could be thundery showers later. more i will come out. but they could be . thundery showers later. more later. it's monday, the 16th of may. our main story. the prime minister will visit belfast today to urge the main parties there to resume power—sharing. the democratic unionist party is currently refusing to re—enter the assembly because of the post—brexit trading arrangements known as the northern ireland protocol. meanwhile, the government
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is expected to introduce legislation which would allow ministers to override parts of that protocol. political correspondent nick eardley reports. boris johnson will arrive in northern ireland later to find a political system which is stuck. despite elections earlier this month, there's no new government. sinn fein finished top for the first time ever, but the democratic unionist party — the second largest at stormont — won't agree to power—sharing until the brexit deal is changed. they're worried about checks on goods travelling from great britain to northern ireland. even though many parties accept these arrangements, if unionist politicians don't, power—sharing can't get back up and running. borisjohnson signed the brexit deal, but he now agrees that changes are needed and is calling for the european union to negotiate tweaks. ahead of his visit today, boris johnson writes in the belfast telegraph.
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back in london, ministers have been drawing up legislation which would allow them to override parts of the brexit deal. it's set to be confirmed tomorrow, but will have to pass through parliament, meaning it could be months before the government has the power to act without agreement from europe. but the move would be controversial. some fear it could spark a trade war at a time when many businesses and households can least afford one. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. we're joined by chief political correspondent adam fleming. there has been rumour about what will happen with the protocol. we spoke to a northern ireland expert this morning. spoke to a northern ireland expert this morning-— spoke to a northern ireland expert this morning. clarity is needed from the government. _ this morning. clarity is needed from the government. yes, _ this morning. clarity is needed from the government. yes, the _ this morning. clarity is needed from the government. yes, the first - this morning. clarity is needed from the government. yes, the first task| the government. yes, the first task in front of borisjohnson when he
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goes to northern ireland is about the democratic unionist party, the dup, who stood in the recent elections to the northern ireland assembly on the platform of the protocol being scrapped. neither the uk or eu are talking about that as an option so away must be found to let the dup climb—down from that position. if they are to go into the power—sharing government, which would be required to get the assembly and northern ireland executive back up and running. that is the task that will be starting today for the prime minister. we think is soonest tomorrow the uk could reveal draft legislation that would allow them to override parts of the protocol. the purpose would be if you decided to scrap bits of the protocol, you would need something to give you legal certainty for trade from great britain to northern ireland and the bits of the protocol you had abandoned, so you would need
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something in its place. but, it serves a political purpose because the prime minister can say to the dup we have a back—up plan if negotiations do not go well, stick with it. it helps with conservative backbenchers who want him to be tougher with the eu. it makes it clear to the eu if negotiations go nowhere, this is what the uk back—up option will be. it is important to remember, the pro —— the prime minister has said the preferred solution is to talk to the eu and get the tweaks to the protocol agreed together. whether what the prime minister says in northern ireland today and in the legislation tomorrow freaks out the eu and they take action is another matter but thatis take action is another matter but that is where we are today. thank ou. nato officials have said vladimir putin's invasion strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling. it's thought russia may have lost a third of its ground combat troops —
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and is failing to make progress in the donbas region. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv. good morning. the invasion may have stalled, but it is far from over. i think that is right. this morning, a video was posted from ukrainian soldiers on the russian border in the kharkiv region in the north—east around the city, a city the second biggest in ukraine and one the russians wanted to take. in the video they say look, mr president, we are here. talking to president zelensky who says today the russians will realise they are reaching a dead end in the war. that said, because russian forces move south, it does not mean their desire to carve out victory has diminished. they focus efforts on holding this city strategically significant. the
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ukrainians are trying to prevent that to stop defending forces being sealed off as the russians continued to launch assaults in the donbas region. and all eyes again on russia's ally, the country to the north of ukraine that shares a border, and a country that helps russian forces moving in the first place. according to the uk ministry of defence, belarus has started to move troops along the border, as well as station artillery and anti—aircraft missiles to the west which is doing two things. fixating ukrainian troops, the belarusians claim there are 10,000 ukrainian troops to the north, meaning they cannot move east and get involved in fighting there. and the biggest nato exercise happening in estonia and latvia with 15,000 troops involving ten countries, planned before the invasion, but the alliance has been
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carrying out more of these exercises in the previous eight years, where we have seen russia's campaign of aggression towards ukraine. ukraine won eurovision _ aggression towards ukraine. ukraine won eurovision on _ aggression towards ukraine. ukraine won eurovision on saturday. - aggression towards ukraine. ukraine won eurovision on saturday. a - won eurovision on saturday. a reminder of support they have across europe. reminder of support they have across euro e. ~ . reminder of support they have across euroe. ~ . .,, reminder of support they have across euroe. ~ ., ., reminder of support they have across euro e, . ., .,, .,. ., europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat- — europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat. people _ europe. what was the reaction there? it was upbeat. people celebratory. - it was upbeat. people celebratory. they enjoy their moment. some of the team met ukrainians at a house party. all in the name of work. people had to watch from indoors because of the curfew. people there were delighted to see the group do what they did on the grand stage. when other countries pledge support, voice support for ukraine and condemn what is happening to the country and the actions of russia, it goes down extremely well. one
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member of the band was not there. they are staying here to fight. the rest of the band will return here. it was a rare moment of light in what has been a dark 82 days. thanks. james moorhouse. we all know the phrase "having a senior moment" to explain a bit of forgetfulness, but a leading charity is urging people not to simply brush off what could be the start of dementia. now, the alzheimer's society is launching an online checklist to help identify the symptoms as part of a campaign to try and improve the rates of early diagnosis. let's take a look. what time should we leave tomorrow? i think about eight. what do you reckon? yeah, that sounds about right. laughter. what time should we leave tomorrow? i told you — eight. what time should we leave tomorrow?
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we're leaving at eight, jane. what time should we leave tomorrow? eight. i think we should leave at eight o'clock. an important point they make, not getting old, getting ill. joining us on the sofa this morning is chris larkin from the alzheimer's society, along withjo wilson and her husband bill. jo was diagnosed with dementia in 2020. lovely to see you all. give us an idea of what life has been like over the past years?—
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idea of what life has been like over the past years? devastating. really hiuh eaks the past years? devastating. really high peaks of _ the past years? devastating. really high peaks of joy — the past years? devastating. really high peaks ofioy as _ the past years? devastating. really high peaks ofjoy as well. _ the past years? devastating. really high peaks ofjoy as well. it - the past years? devastating. really high peaks ofjoy as well. it is - the past years? devastating. really high peaks ofjoy as well. it is a - high peaks ofjoy as well. it is a new world, a new beginning. the old world died two years ago. probably more than that. but a new world has begun. it is quite exciting, it is thrilling. it is stressful. it is a gambit of emotions. incredible, you cannot pin down any one day or an hour, because it is going to be different. we have this little thing where we say we love and laugh every day and that is important. because it keeps both of us positive. during the bad times and when it is negative, we can look towards that and think, this is us now. the old life has gone but we have a new life and it is really good. i life has gone but we have a new life and it is really good.— and it is really good. i love the wa ou
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and it is really good. i love the way you describe _ and it is really good. i love the way you describe jo _ and it is really good. i love the way you describe 10 as - and it is really good. i love the way you describe 10 as an - and it is really good. i love the| way you describe 10 as an alpha way you describejo as an alpha female. way you describe 10 as an alpha female. ,, . ., ,, female. still in charge. still in charue, female. still in charge. still in charge, aren't _ female. still in charge. still in charge, aren't you? _ female. still in charge. still in charge, aren't you? of? - female. still in charge. still in charge, aren't you? of? me. | female. still in charge. still in charge, aren't you? of? me. i female. still in charge. still in - charge, aren't you? of? me. i know m lace charge, aren't you? of? me. i know my place and _ charge, aren't you? of? me. i know my place and know _ charge, aren't you? of? me. i know my place and know what _ charge, aren't you? of? me. i know my place and know what to - charge, aren't you? of? me. i know my place and know what to do. - charge, aren't you? of? me. i know. my place and know what to do. chris, bill's my place and know what to do. chris, ltill's attitude — my place and know what to do. chris, bill's attitude is _ my place and know what to do. chris, bill's attitude is so _ my place and know what to do. chris, bill's attitude is so important - my place and know what to do. chris, bill's attitude is so important and - bill's attitude is so important and not an attitude everybody has because it can be challenging to care for someone with dementia, someone you have no many years has a diagnosis like this. it is incredibly _ diagnosis like this. it is incredibly challenging. | diagnosis like this. it is incredibly challenging. bill has an amazing — incredibly challenging. bill has an amazing attitude. _ incredibly challenging. bill has an amazing attitude. i— incredibly challenging. bill has an amazing attitude. i had _ incredibly challenging. bill has an amazing attitude. i had tears - incredibly challenging. bill has an amazing attitude. i had tears in l incredibly challenging. bill has an. amazing attitude. i had tears in my eyes listening _ amazing attitude. i had tears in my eyes listening to _ amazing attitude. i had tears in my eyes listening to him. _ amazing attitude. i had tears in my eyes listening to him. we - amazing attitude. i had tears in my eyes listening to him. we know- amazing attitude. i had tears in my eyes listening to him. we know so| eyes listening to him. we know so many— eyes listening to him. we know so many we _ eyes listening to him. we know so many we have _ eyes listening to him. we know so many we have spoken _ eyes listening to him. we know so many we have spoken to, - eyes listening to him. we know soi many we have spoken to, research indicates _ many we have spoken to, research indicates over_ many we have spoken to, research indicates over 90% _ many we have spoken to, research indicates over 90% affected - many we have spoken to, research indicates over 90% affected by- indicates over 90% affected by dementia _ indicates over 90% affected by dementia feel— indicates over 90% affected by dementia feel positive - indicates over 90% affected by dementia feel positive when i indicates over 90% affected by. dementia feel positive when they have a _ dementia feel positive when they have a diagnosis _ dementia feel positive when they have a diagnosis in— dementia feel positive when they have a diagnosis in terms- dementia feel positive when they have a diagnosis in terms of- dementia feel positive when they have a diagnosis in terms of the. have a diagnosis in terms of the benefits— have a diagnosis in terms of the benefits it — have a diagnosis in terms of the benefits it can _ have a diagnosis in terms of the benefits it can bring _ have a diagnosis in terms of the benefits it can bring to - have a diagnosis in terms of the benefits it can bring to helping i benefits it can bring to helping them — benefits it can bring to helping them to— benefits it can bring to helping them to manage _ benefits it can bring to helping them to manage the _ benefits it can bring to helpingj them to manage the condition. benefits it can bring to helping - them to manage the condition. bill,
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you have _ them to manage the condition. bill, you have spoken— them to manage the condition. bill, you have spoken about _ them to manage the condition. bill, you have spoken about that. - them to manage the condition. bill, you have spoken about that. there. you have spoken about that. there are obvious _ you have spoken about that. there are obvious concerns. _ you have spoken about that. there are obvious concerns. many - you have spoken about that.- are obvious concerns. many people, you will have to tell us about your situation, that you might not want to admit what is happening and you are scared and worried.— are scared and worried. exactly riuht. are scared and worried. exactly right- for— are scared and worried. exactly right- for two _ are scared and worried. exactly right. for two years _ are scared and worried. exactly right. for two years we - are scared and worried. exactly right. for two years we did - are scared and worried. exactly right. for two years we did not| are scared and worried. exactly i right. for two years we did not get a diagnosis. i do not know if i was naive, i did not want to admit what ican see, naive, i did not want to admit what i can see, or i was frightened. i am sure i was afraid because we know there is only one outcome. there is only a steady progression all the way through. neither of us wanted to admit that. that is why i am proud ofjo. although she will not admit to it now, she is fighting this. it makes me... i am privileged to help her on thejourney makes me... i am privileged to help her on the journey because she is so full of it. she is determined she is
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going to beat this, even though she is not, so it is like, let's get on with our lives and see what we can do. it knocks you for six when you get the diagnosis. i hit rock bottom, the same as most other people do. but it was a case of i have got to be strong now. i have to try to remove the alpha female bit. what is life like for both of you now? ~ what is life like for both of you now? . . ., ., what is life like for both of you now? ~ ., ., ., , now? we cannot do all the things we used to love — now? we cannot do all the things we used to love to _ now? we cannot do all the things we used to love to do. _ now? we cannot do all the things we used to love to do. i _ now? we cannot do all the things we used to love to do. i am _ now? we cannot do all the things we used to love to do. i am grieving - used to love to do. i am grieving forjo, i am grieving for the life we had. we used to love cinema and theatre. it is looking for different ways of achieving those same things. because of streaming services, we can sit and watch a movie. i will make popcorn and get some ice cream. and we can sit in our back row sofa
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holding hands, watching the movie as we used to do, except in a different environment. everything we do or did, i like to try to replicate but in a different way now. the diagnosis. _ in a different way now. the diagnosis, how— in a different way now. the diagnosis, how long - in a different way now. the diagnosis, how long did it take once you had decided to be seen? it diagnosis, how long did it take once you had decided to be seen?- you had decided to be seen? it took from... it was _ you had decided to be seen? it took from... it was the _ you had decided to be seen? it took from... it was the 19th _ you had decided to be seen? it took from... it was the 19th of _ you had decided to be seen? it took from... it was the 19th of march, i from... it was the 19th of march, just before lockdown. we waited until the end ofjune before the consultant contacted us. by telephone, obviously, and just said jo has dementia, is there anything you would like to know? i was like, i want to know what it is going to be like, i need to know what to expect. he was very good in explaining things. but my world crashed about me at the time but thenit crashed about me at the time but then it was ok, how do we turn the negatives into a positive? how can i
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make life better for both of us? because we are on this journey together. and we love each other dearly, still. 50 it makes life kind of easier, in a way, but there are times... i think back to the diagnosis all the time and think i need something, i need help. something to keep me going. chris, ou can something to keep me going. chris, you can hear — something to keep me going. chris, you can hear from _ something to keep me going. chris, you can hear from their— something to keep me going. chris, you can hear from their story, i you can hearfrom their story, waiting for a diagnosis, people do wait. you talk about getting a diagnosis and how it can improve situations but a lot of people probably don't want the diagnosis. is that what you find? they do not want to face it. it is that what you find? they do not want to face it.— want to face it. it is scary. bill described _ want to face it. it is scary. bill described the _ want to face it. it is scary. bill described the feelings. - want to face it. it is scary. bill described the feelings. the i want to face it. it is scary. bill i described the feelings. the world changes — described the feelings. the world changes. what we found was, as the film has _ changes. what we found was, as the film has shown, a lot of people dismiss — film has shown, a lot of people dismiss symptoms as a part of
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ageing — dismiss symptoms as a part of ageing. people mistake symptoms of dementia _ ageing. people mistake symptoms of dementia for a natural part of ageing — dementia for a natural part of ageing and that is what we are trying — ageing and that is what we are trying to— ageing and that is what we are trying to raise awareness. it is not getting _ trying to raise awareness. it is not getting old, it is getting ill. understandably some go into denial and they— understandably some go into denial and they are afraid. but we believe by raising _ and they are afraid. but we believe by raising awareness we can help people _ by raising awareness we can help people to — by raising awareness we can help people to understand the benefits that can _ people to understand the benefits that can be put in place. treatment support— that can be put in place. treatment support people can access if diagnosed and the support from organisations such as the alzheimer's society. if people visit our website, they can see a lot about— our website, they can see a lot about the — our website, they can see a lot about the symptoms people might experience when they have dementia and how— experience when they have dementia and how it _ experience when they have dementia and how it differs from normal ageing~ — and how it differs from normal ageing. there is a checklist to help people _ ageing. there is a checklist to help people capture what they are experiencing and make sure when they make an _ experiencing and make sure when they make an appointment with the gp to discuss _ make an appointment with the gp to discuss symptoms they are well placed — discuss symptoms they are well placed to — discuss symptoms they are well placed to get the most out of the appointment because that is important, that people describe what
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they have _ important, that people describe what they have been going through and the gp can _ they have been going through and the gp can put _ they have been going through and the gp can put support in place. it is ”oreous gp can put support in place. it is gorgeous to _ gp can put support in place. it is gorgeous to see _ gp can put support in place. it 3 gorgeous to see the love you still have forjo. what would your advice be to someone else who may be watching now and can see those signs in a loved one? first watching now and can see those signs in a loved one?— in a loved one? first of all, get to our gp in a loved one? first of all, get to your gp straightaway. _ in a loved one? first of all, get to your gp straightaway. if _ in a loved one? first of all, get to your gp straightaway. if you i in a loved one? first of all, get to | your gp straightaway. if you resist going to the gp, contact the alzheimer's society. they have seen it all, have all the answers, have everything to guide you to where you need to be. but get it done and get it done early. i used to blamejo for things going wrong rather than blaming the disease. i separate the two now. i have doctorjo wilson on this side who i love dearly and i have dementia jo on this site. i hate dementia. i do not hatejo, i
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hate dementia. i do not hatejo, i hate dementia. i do not hatejo, i hate dementia. it was an eye—opener, to be able to say now we have the diagnosis, we can separate them, it is not your fault. diagnosis, we can separate them, it is not yourfault. i diagnosis, we can separate them, it is not your fault. i still diagnosis, we can separate them, it is not yourfault. i still do blame herfor some things, even is not yourfault. i still do blame her for some things, even today, is not yourfault. i still do blame herfor some things, even today, but thatis herfor some things, even today, but that is a different story. but it is so helpful. get to the gp. as soon as you notice anything. it is not just memory loss.— as you notice anything. it is not just memory loss. thank you for cominu just memory loss. thank you for coming in- _ just memory loss. thank you for coming in- l _ just memory loss. thank you for coming in. i am _ just memory loss. thank you for coming in. i am sure _ just memory loss. thank you for coming in. i am sure your- just memory loss. thank you for i coming in. i am sure your openness will help people watching. chris has given us some good website advice. if you've been affected by any of the issues raised in this interview, the bbc action line home page has contact details for a range of organisations which offer most gcse and a—level exams start from today, which means many students in england, wales and northern ireland, will be sitting their first
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formal exams since the start of the pandemic. scottish highers began at the end of april. for some, it's their first experience of sitting in an exam hall, while school leaders are warning about a shortage of invigilators. our education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to a school in wigan to check on preparations. coming up in the next couple of weeks, it's absolutely essential that we have a good revision programme. at the deanery church of england high school in wigan, it's final study sessions. when i did my mocks and i got the results, iwas like, agh. chelsea and her classmates have done their mock exams. tears were coming in my eyes as i was walking in. i could just see the paper, all the invigilatorsjust standing at the front with their arms crossed. i'm just like, "oh, my days!" the next time they go into the exam room, it will be for real. i want to do a career in medicine, so i obviously want to get them seven, eights and nines to, like, obviously, gain, like, offers from university. like major universities like manchester, even oxford.
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it wasn't as bad as i was expecting, considering what we did at revision catching up in the canteen, it's talk of revision and exam timetables. if, you know, people have been off with covid, teachers have been good at live lessons and putting work on so we can do everything. i've got 21 exams spread out across a month and a half, so sometimes i'll go home and i'll revise for an hour or so and then i'll go to footballjust to take my mind off it. i think it's really important to not only...obviously, worry about your grades, but worry about yourself and worry about your mental health. ok, year11, you can put your pens down, please. the government says this year's students will be graded more generously than the last time exams were sat in 2019, but they won't get as many top grades as last year, when results were decided by teachers' assessments. pupils will get formula sheets to use in exams and there has been advance information for gcses and a—levels. so i've got two a—levels left — design and technology, and engineering i've got left,
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but i've got a btec and a ctec, as well. jasmine is worried about what could come up. it's been a bit mad, to be honest, because we've missed so much time and every time someone was off we'd all have to go off. so, as engineering students, we can't do our things at home. it's more just all online or special software we don't have at home. and so we're all 18 now and it feels like we've missed a big chunk of, like, growing up in our in a—levels. it's just like stress constantly that you're not going to get everything done. and then, after that into actual jobs, it feels like we've not even been in school at all. we are really excited for our children to be able to show what they're brilliant at, as well, and do well in their gcses and their a—levels, despite the fact that it's been so difficult. for the deputy head, mrs turner, it's about making pupils believe they can aim high. but there is no doubt anxiety levels are also high. most pupils haven't had any national exams since their sats in primary school.
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we are seeing children that are presenting to us with really, really difficult social, emotional and mental health issues. we've got more children, probably triple, quadruple the amount of children, that previously would have struggled to go in an exam hall that are feeling that way now getting ready for an exam. it's all the stuff you put in beforehand. it's all the practice runs. it's all the getting yourselves ready that they've not had. sometimes, the children rub their hands together. i'll see their legs are shaking, breathing might get a little bit faster. so just go over to those children and just let them know that we're here. a quiet, "are you ok?" because of increased levels of anxiety, more invigilators are needed and some schools have struggled to recruit. here, the school nurse has stepped in. predominantly, an invigilator has always been like a retired person. unfortunately, when covid did hit, a lot of the retirees didn't want to come into school then. so there has been quite a bit of a shortage. breathe in.
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hold. in the library, there's an exam stress workshop. as well as breathing techniques, minnie is on hand to help pupils and staff. if pupils are having a difficult day, then they can come into the wellbeing room. they can have a chat with me, they can spend a little time with minnie. we'll go for a walk and we'll talk to pupils that way. she's a very big part of the school. star pupil! she is the star pupil, yes. what can we think about that we could do to maybe help with that? teachers here have put on revision classes in the easter holidays and extra sessions after school. i'm going to actually do question 13. the government says national exams represent a major step back to normality. for these pupils, it's a major step towards their future goals and aspirations. our grades open the doors to what we want to become in this world and ijust honestly think that the support that the teachers are giving me and giving to the rest of the students as well is just really helpful.
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elaine dunkley, bbc news. laverne antrobus is a child psychologist. she joins us from london. good morning. as we heard in the report, levels of anxiety are rising. what can we do to help students taking exams? i rising. what can we do to help students taking exams? i think what i 'ust heard students taking exams? i think what liust heard in _ students taking exams? i think what ijust heard in the _ students taking exams? i think what i just heard in the video _ students taking exams? i think what i just heard in the video was - ijust heard in the video was exactly it. yes, anxiety is rising and children are feeling they do not know what to expect, but what we heard was schools have worked hard to recognise and take into account those children who perhaps have an elevated level of anxiety, so will make different arrangements for them. but for most children, the ordinary level of anxiety is probably important to help them push through and what will be important is they go through that routine. somebody said you see the
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invigilator holding the papers and sit in your chair. all of those things are things we want young people to rehearse now so there are few surprises in the routine of taking an exam. it few surprises in the routine of taking an exam.— few surprises in the routine of taking an exam. few surprises in the routine of takin: an exam. , taking an exam. it is something we have spoken _ taking an exam. it is something we have spoken about _ taking an exam. it is something we have spoken about before, - taking an exam. it is something we have spoken about before, how- taking an exam. it is something we have spoken about before, how do| taking an exam. it is something we i have spoken about before, how do we teach children that some level of anxiety is actually ok? figs teach children that some level of anxiety is actually ok? as parents and teachers. _ anxiety is actually ok? as parents and teachers, we _ anxiety is actually ok? as parents and teachers, we have _ anxiety is actually ok? as parents and teachers, we have to - anxiety is actually ok? as parents and teachers, we have to talk i anxiety is actually ok? as parents i and teachers, we have to talk about our own experience. if you have little anxiety, it's probably a sign something is out of kilter and your brain needs you to feel engaged and purposeful, and the anxiety you feel going into the exam is telling you it is an important time. what we don't want is for the anxiety to floor children. it was lovely to hear that extra lessons, after—school revision, those opportunities will be a moment to checkin opportunities will be a moment to check in with your anxiety and to
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perhaps use breathing techniques. some techniques, meditation, that young people talk to me about that helps them. the story of today as everybody get started is that little bit of stress and tension is the anxiety that needs to fire you into that top gear you need. abs, anxiety that needs to fire you into that top gear you need. b. 1!th anxiety that needs to fire you into that top gear you need.— that top gear you need. a lot of schools doing — that top gear you need. a lot of schools doing extra _ that top gear you need. a lot of schools doing extra things i that top gear you need. a lot of schools doing extra things to i that top gear you need. a lot of i schools doing extra things to help. what could we do at home to help children? , , ., children? there will be parents now with their teenage _ children? there will be parents now with their teenage children - children? there will be parents now with their teenage children knowing there will be in moments of high tension. this is such an important time. i think you want to be there, providing as many rest breaks meals needed. also the reassurance that if things go wrong in the initial days or there are exams that do not feel right, let's punch ahead, look through that and get on to the next
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one. the messages i hearfrom young children with perhaps elevated levels, they say parents being alongside them, comforting them, helping them to move on together, i have faith in you, is a key message in the next few weeks. that have faith in you, is a key message in the next few weeks.— have faith in you, is a key message in the next few weeks. that is good to hear. thank _ in the next few weeks. that is good to hear. thank you. _ in the next few weeks. that is good to hear. thank you. good _ in the next few weeks. that is good to hear. thank you. good advice. i to hear. thank you. good advice. sound advice. we finish at 9:15am. what have you been up to the last few weeks? enjoying the sunshine, getting out and about. it is wonderful to be back. we have a packed show. from long queues at airport gates to waiting months to get a new driving licence. major organisations we all rely on are still blaming poor customer service and long delays
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on the pandemic. matt allwright finds out how it's leaving hundreds of thousands of people frustrated and what you can do if you're affected. plus, temperatures in some parts of the uk have hit 24 degrees, and more warm weather is forecast this week. i think we rounded it up. but with skin cancer rates rising, xand's here to help keep you safe in the sun. the number of people diagnosed with malignant melanoma has increased by 50% over the last decade. i'll explain how to spot the signs of it early and why a higher spf doesn't always mean you have more protection. . and healthy habits can help protect your physical and mental health. but if you're struggling to keep them, michael mosley tells us how one simple change to your day, like eating beetroot or even exercising slowly, has been scientifically proven to boost your fitness and brain power. plus, from dressing royalty to judging the hit show the great british sewing bee, designer patrick grant tells us why buying new clothes is going out of fashion.
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and her pop star moves will always be on trend. steps star faye tozer�*s here and making her debut in strictly fitness. see you at 9:15. i have realised i canjudge what time of year it is based on xand's wardrobe. , ., ., ,, wardrobe. the linen is out. thank ou for wardrobe. the linen is out. thank you for noticing. _ wardrobe. the linen is out. thank you for noticing. i _ wardrobe. the linen is out. thank you for noticing. i want _ wardrobe. the linen is out. thank you for noticing. i want it - wardrobe. the linen is out. thank you for noticing. i want it to i wardrobe. the linen is out. thank you for noticing. i want it to look| you for noticing. i want it to look nice _ you for noticing. i want it to look nice and — you for noticing. i want it to look nice and not— you for noticing. i want it to look nice and not to be that blazer that i cannot— nice and not to be that blazer that i cannot wear it again. | nice and not to be that blazer that i cannot wear it again.— nice and not to be that blazer that i cannot wear it again. i would like to see it on _ i cannot wear it again. i would like to see it on tomorrow's _ i cannot wear it again. i would like to see it on tomorrow's show. i i cannot wear it again. i would like to see it on tomorrow's show. he l i cannot wear it again. i would like l to see it on tomorrow's show. he is also selling — to see it on tomorrow's show. he is also selling ice _ to see it on tomorrow's show. he is also selling ice cream _ to see it on tomorrow's show. he is also selling ice cream after - to see it on tomorrow's show. he is also selling ice cream after the i also selling ice cream after the show — also selling ice cream after the show. . . , also selling ice cream after the show. ., ., , . ., show. that was cruel and unnecessary! _ show. that was cruel and unnecessary! summer i show. that was cruel and unnecessary! summer is | show. that was cruel and i unnecessary! summer is on the show. that was cruel and _ unnecessary! summer is on the way when he has his linenjacket on. time now to get the news where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. police are investigating social media footage appearing to show
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an officer repeatedly hitting an individual on the head during an incident in east london at the weekend. the footage — which includes others besides this — shows officers dragging a man beside a police van outside kingsland shopping centre on saturday. officers say they were carrying out a pre—planned operation "targeting e—scooters and moped—enabled crime". nine people were arrested. nightclubs across london are warning they're "running out of time" to find bouncers, and they claim it's leading to fears about safety. three quarters of bars, pubs and clubs have been found to be short of security staff. the night time industries association is calling for government action before the peak months of the summer — when securityjobs are in highest demand. a memorial garden where survivors can remember those who lost their lives looks likely to be created at the site of grenfell tower. 72 people died when fire engulfed the residential tower block in north kensington five years ago. the grenfell tower memorial
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commission said it was engaging with survivors, the bereaved, and local residents about ideas for the community—led memorial. we spoke to some of the families that lost people in 9/11, and they were part of a commission similar to ours to help decide what would happen. and they told us how difficult it was and how, honestly, that is part of the process — having people find out they don't like things and then readjust and keep changing the idea until we arrive there — and that is the process. travel, and a look at the tube board. the bank branch of the northern line has reopeneed this morning after four months of improvement work. there are delays on the district line following late—finishing engineering work, and delays on the metropolitan line due to an earlier signalfailure — and the waterloo & city line has minor delays due to a faulty train. onto the weather now with sara. good morning to you. we've had some thunderstorms out towards the south west of london overnight.
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they are largely clearing away. we've got some, mist and murk, though, to start us off this morning in our suburbs. any showers pulling off towards the north, but then some sunshine could spark off some further showers here and there as we run through the day today. a lot of places will stay dry with some sunshine — in the best of it, temperatures around 21 celsius. overnight tonight, we're dry, we're clear, we are going to see a little bit of mist and murk and maybe some passing cloud, as well. but we'll stay dry into tomorrow morning, and temperatures typically staying in low double figures, so it'll be a warm start tomorrow. i just want to show you the fronts charts to show you what a mess it is, actually, over the next few days. we've got low pressure dominating our weather this week, there are frontal systems trying to push further showers in at times. showers, so of course they are hit and miss — we won't all see them. tomorrow, though, largely dry for a good deal of the day, and a warm one — could be 25 or 26 degrees for us — very high 70s in fahrenheit. staying warm through the week, but unsettled. that's it, but go to our website to read about a former london teacher who's
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become a netflix reality star. i'll have our next update in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. the time is 8:34am. it's not often you see tom cruise and alan titchmarsh sharing a stage together — but this is no ordinary stage. i don't know, maybe occasionally. they are best buddies! they were amongst a star—studded cast at windsor castle, hosting the royal windsor horse show to mark beginning of the queen's platinum jubilee celebrations. helena wilkinson was there. arriving to a delighted audience, the queen looked well. she and the audience were witness to a spectacular show — taken through more than five centuries of history. at its heart, the queen's beloved animal — horses. more than 500 took part,
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accompanied by 1,000 performers. singing. there were spectacular stunts... ..a hollywood star, and music, too. # while thou shalt flourish, shalt flourish great and free... over the years, definitely, my admiration for her has grown, and so i think that makes you even more nervous. anybody that sort of says they're blase about singing for the queen, i just don't believe! and i'm sure everyone backstage is feeling the need to really put on their best performance, because that's what she deserves. as well as the pomp and pageantry, there was humour. on behalf of everyone here, we'd like to very humbly thank you for choosing us over the state opening of parliament. laughter. applause. i speak on behalf of the whole cast, that we know this is notjust
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a once—in—a—generational event — this is never going to happen again. i don't think in a thousand years we will have another monarch, you know, who lives 70 years, so we're aware of the occasion. and the fact that we also know that she loves horses — whatever happens, she is going to love every single moment of this show. towards the end of the performance, a poignant moment. lady louise windsor in the duke of edinburgh's carriage. the queen's horses and ponies were also brought out. lady louise's riding pony. i therefore speak on behalf of a grateful nation and commonwealth when i give you our sincere and most loving thanks. applause. fire! it was an evening of celebration, and one that appeared to bring greatjoy to the queen. helena wilkinson, bbc news.
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it's all starting. lots of parties to look forward to.— it's all starting. lots of parties to look forward to. and the double bank holiday _ to look forward to. and the double bank holiday at _ to look forward to. and the double bank holiday at the _ to look forward to. and the double bank holiday at the end _ to look forward to. and the double bank holiday at the end of - to look forward to. and the double bank holiday at the end of may i to look forward to. and the double | bank holiday at the end of may and start ofjune? bank holiday at the end of may and start ofjune?_ bank holiday at the end of may and start ofjune? don't ask me, i'm the wron: start ofjune? don't ask me, i'm the wrong person! _ start ofjune? don't ask me, i'm the wrong person! i'm — start ofjune? don't ask me, i'm the wrong person! i'm always _ start ofjune? don't ask me, i'm the wrong person! i'm always here. i i start ofjune? don't ask me, i'm the| wrong person! i'm always here. i am normally good on the days off, that's for sure. the eurovision song contest was memorable for many reasons — including the rare feat of a uk entry making the top half of the leaderboard. sam ryder pulled it out of the bag. as you predicted.— sam ryder pulled it out of the bag. as you predicted. however, the night — and the victory — belonged to ukraine, thanks to a great song and a massive outpouring of popular support. if you want to know how that went down in ukraine, take a look at this. who will be the winner of the eurovision song contest 2022? graham norton: sending so much love to that man. 183 points.
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timur yells in delight. that is how to celebrate. absolutely brilliant! the man going particularly wild in that clip was notjust any old eurovision fan. it was ukraine's regular eurovision commentator timur miroshnychenko, thank you so much for speaking to us. you were covering that from your bunker in kyiv. thank you for being with us. explain to us the significance of that moment and to our reaction, it was beautiful to watch. ., ., ., watch. thanks for having me. oh... you know. — watch. thanks for having me. oh... you know, since _ watch. thanks for having me. oh... you know, since the _ watch. thanks for having me. oh... you know, since the 21 _ watch. thanks for having me. oh... you know, since the 21 february i watch. thanks for having me. oh... you know, since the 21 february all| you know, since the 21 february all ukrainians have many different types of emotion and of course they are all negative —— 24th of february. at
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that moment we saw the whole world, the whole of europe, all european people stands with us and you can't even imagine how important it is for us and of course in that moment of victory it was... it was overwhelming. that was my reaction and i think the kind of reaction of all ukrainians.— and i think the kind of reaction of all ukrainians. you must know the competition _ all ukrainians. you must know the competition inside _ all ukrainians. you must know the competition inside out. _ all ukrainians. you must know the competition inside out. you i all ukrainians. you must know the competition inside out. you must| all ukrainians. you must know the i competition inside out. you must be a big part of eurovision in ukraine. how confident where you that ukraine would get the level of support, the backing that you did? brute would get the level of support, the backing that you did?— would get the level of support, the backing that you did? we hoped for that. you know, _ backing that you did? we hoped for that. you know, it _ backing that you did? we hoped for that. you know, it wasn't _ backing that you did? we hoped for that. you know, it wasn't the i backing that you did? we hoped for that. you know, it wasn't the main | that. you know, it wasn't the main aim of our participation. the main aim of our participation. the main aim was... and that way, on the 24th of february we were not thinking about eurovision. it was just how to
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stay alive, see our families, relatives, kids. thanks to our armed forces of ukraine, we have had the opportunity to be part of this musical event, the biggest one in europe and the world, and even now you might think we are to host next year's up eurovision so it is quite important. the main thing is we sort this wonderful support and solidarity from the european people. we also sought the reality of war because members of the band, kalush, they are going back to their home country to fight. to they are going back to their home country to fight.— country to fight. to fight on different fronts. _ country to fight. to fight on different fronts. maybe i country to fight. to fight on | different fronts. maybe they country to fight. to fight on i different fronts. maybe they will not get weapons and go to the front line, of course we have to fight on every front. information upfront, and so on. of course here we will
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continue our work as volunteers, as reporters, as musicians, and of course we are all waiting for the main victory, the great victory which we are always dreaming about. timur, tell us about where you are watching. you looked like you wet on your own in the bunker, did you have any company? == your own in the bunker, did you have any company?— your own in the bunker, did you have any company? -- you were alone. of course, any company? -- you were alone. of course. it _ any company? -- you were alone. of course. it was _ any company? -- you were alone. of course, it was about _ any company? -- you were alone. of course, it was about ten _ any company? -- you were alone. of course, it was about ten people i any company? -- you were alone. of course, it was about ten people who | course, it was about ten people who worked on the broadcast. in peaceful times, of course, but on the first day of the full—scale russian invasion, they built tv towers, tv stations. on the fifth day they shut our office in the centre of kyiv which is why we have had to move
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somewhere under the ground. during eurovision you cannot stop and go to a bomb shelter. you have to work live which is why we decided to do a transmission from the bunker from the very beginning. that is why nothing could interrupt that wonderful moment.- nothing could interrupt that wonderful moment. , , . . wonderful moment. give us an idea. we seak wonderful moment. give us an idea. we speak a — wonderful moment. give us an idea. we speak a lot _ wonderful moment. give us an idea. we speak a lot to _ wonderful moment. give us an idea. we speak a lot to ukrainians - wonderful moment. give us an idea. we speak a lot to ukrainians on - wonderful moment. give us an idea. we speak a lot to ukrainians on this| we speak a lot to ukrainians on this programme about daily life, how things have changed. it is nearly three months now since the conflict started. what is life like for you compared to how it would normally be for a tv presenter in ukraine? {iii for a tv presenter in ukraine? of course it is pretty different. now an ukrainian tv there are no entertainment programmes, just information programmes and news and so on. i am an entertainment presenter so i don't have right now
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my regularjob, that we have to do something and of course we have to do something to raise the morale of our nation of people and that is why we decided of course to broadcast eurovision. this is like a ray of hope. the previous peaceful life. the main idea that it is hope for a brighter future the main idea that it is hope for a brighterfuture and the main idea that it is hope for a brighter future and peaceful future for all of us. brighter future and peaceful future for all of u— for all of us. let's talk about that future. for all of us. let's talk about that future- will— for all of us. let's talk about that future. will you _ for all of us. let's talk about that future. will you post _ for all of us. let's talk about that future. will you post eurovision l for all of us. let's talk about that| future. will you post eurovision in ukraine next year, do you hope to do that? {lilli ukraine next year, do you hope to do that? . ., , ., ukraine next year, do you hope to do that? _, , a, _, that? of course i do. -- will you host? i have _ that? of course i do. -- will you host? i have done _ that? of course i do. -- will you host? i have done eurovision - that? of course i do. -- will you host? i have done eurovision for many years, i was the host in 2017 in kyiv and now to host this wonderful event next year. somewhere in ukraine. somewhere. i havejust chatted with the minister of culture of ukraine an hour ago and he said we will do our best to welcome all
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the guests next year to a peaceful country. we still have some time before the final decision of where to host eurovision next year. maybe until the end of summer or early september, and of course we believe that our armed forces will be occupy all of our country, our territories, and we will have a chance to guarantee that here you will be in safety. we guarantee that here you will be in safe . ~ ., ., ., , ., safety. we would love to see that. thank ou safety. we would love to see that. thank you so _ safety. we would love to see that. thank you so much _ safety. we would love to see that. thank you so much for— safety. we would love to see that. thank you so much for being - safety. we would love to see that. thank you so much for being with l safety. we would love to see that. i thank you so much for being with us today and thank you for your wonderful broadcast over the weekend, as well. that is a timur miroshnychenko, ukrainian tv presenter and eurovision start. that would be amazing _ presenter and eurovision start. twat would be amazing to see that next year. fix. would be amazing to see that next ear. �* , ., , would be amazing to see that next ear. �* , ,., would be amazing to see that next ear. ~ , , ., ., it has been a busy weekend of fa cup finals. , ., , , , ., , finals. loads happening. history made with _ finals. loads happening. history made with fa _ finals. loads happening. history made with fa cup _ finals. loads happening. history made with fa cup final- finals. loads happening. history made with fa cup final is - finals. loads happening. history made with fa cup final is played finals. loads happening. history i made with fa cup final is played on both days and drama in the premier
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league title race. i'm sure there were plenty of liverpool fans jumping around their living rooms. to have a zero up but in the end manchester city did what they do and got a point. it makes things really tasty going into the final week of the season. if liverpool lose at southampton tomorrow, manchester city will be champions. it is down to the final game of the season. city in the end held at west ham. they were 2—0 up in this one. that goal sent west ham fans wild. city fought back after the break, jack grealish pulled one back before this own goal from vladimir coufal levelled the score. and city had the chance to win it, but riyad mahrez�*s late penalty was saved. it's going to be a big day for this — for the football club and for the city and, you know, i can't wait.
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you know, we've had a great record at the etihad over the season, so...i can't wait. you know, it's something that i've never experienced before, you know, to win a trophy on the last day of the season. so, you know, i can't wait. i'm buzzing already. as long as the city beat villa they will be champions. everton's hopes of staying in the premier league are still in the balance, after they lost 3—2 at home to brentford. everton had two players sent off, and brentford had already equalised twice, when rico henry headed in what proved to be the winning goal. that leaves everton 16th in the table — two points ahead of burnley. everton have confirmed they're assisting merseyside police after brentford striker ivan toney and full—back rico henry said their families were racially abused at goodison park during yesterday's win. staying with the relegation battle — leeds kept alive their hopes of survival, after a last—minute equaliser against brighton. pascal struijk with what could be a crucial goal. it means they're a point clear of the relegation zone for now but burnley below them have a game in hand. burnley remain in the bottom
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three after they lost i—o at tottenham, who are into fourth. it was a penalty that settled it, given for this handball by ashley barnes on the stroke of half—time. you know who stepped up to take it — harry kane, ensuring spurs are in the final champions league qualification place for now. but arsenal can move back into the top four if they win at newcastle tonight. chelsea's women have done the double. the wsl champions beat manchester city 3—2 to win the women's fa cup for the fourth time. it went to extra time — chelsea were heading for victory after this brilliant second—half goalfrom erin cuthbert who put them 2—1 up. but in the 89th minute, city pressed forward and grabbed an equaliser — hayley raso straight off the bench to see the game go to extra time. no penalties needed, though — sam kerr's shot was deflected in off alex greenwood and that proved to be the winner. the former british number one laura robson has
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confirmed her retirement from tennis this morning at the age of 28. as a teenager, robson reached the fourth round of the us open and here at wimbledon, as well as winning silver in the mixed doubles with andy murray at the 2012 olympics. she says the decision to retire was forced upon her after having three hip operations. really a tough one for laura robson. the great teenage talent. the upside in one sense is she will be part of our commentary team, across the bbc, and wimbledon. tough decision, three hip operations, couldn't come back. another indication of how brutal top—level sport is on your body, andy murray also had those issues. saying he is still going. let's get somewhere that. i have some good news, more of this across parts of the country. not
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everyone but at the moment large amounts of cloud around and grey across as a scotland and north—east england where is this a shot from the board this shows it is wet. the radar confirms that, heavy rain in north—east england, parts of central and southern scotland, clear from northern ireland but the more show is pushing in. a line of showers edging into northern england, the tail end of that, thunderstorms around the wash, they will drift northwards but almost a north—south split today. there are the showers in north wales, northern england, drifting northwards. some will be heavy over the coming hours. skies are bright, and scattering of showers, some on the heavy side. some of you may see what than others but others will stay completely dry. more showers push in, northern ireland, heavy bursts of rain over the next few hours, brightening, scotland, lots of cloud to come today. cool easterly breeze, rain at times, brightest conditions throughout will be in shetland. in
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the easterly breeze, low cloud, could be a chilly day in scotland. it will feel that way anyway in the rain trees, 11 to 13 degrees. in its outcome 18 and 19 in northern ireland and widely into the 20s in wales. humid and when that sun comes your way it will boost pollen levels. into this evening and overnight, a few showers which will fade, turning dry across much of scotland, the shower clipping the south—east for a while but mainly dry by the end of that night, mist and fog patches around. a mild night but not quite as humid as last night but not quite as humid as last night but one humid air on the way as is where the fun starts to push in through tuesday, dragging out from france and that will boost temperatures. sunniest in the morning with lots of high cloud around tomorrow so any sunshine on the hazy side but in the west of the cloud will get bigger through the day, outbreaks of rain developing in south west, west wales, isle of man, northern ireland and south—west scotland. that limits the
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temperatures but in the hazy sunshine, 20 degrees around inverness, 25 and 26 to south—east, the warmest day of the year so far. heavy rain through the northern half of the country into wednesday, not much in the south but as the cold front pushes eastwards it will sweep away most of humid air. still feeling one on wednesday, dry with sunny spells for many but showers and thunderstorms brimming to the west and south—west later in the day. these are your temperatures for wednesday afternoon, higher than we expect at this stage in may, very pleasant when you are in the sunshine. it stays warm through the rest of this week. there will be showers and thunderstorms around at times. whatever your plans, always have a wet weather plan close to hand just in case. more details tomorrow. enjoy your day. we will see you then. if ou your day. we will see you then. if you are _ your day. we will see you then. if you are in _ your day. we will see you then. if you are in the _ your day. we will see you then. if you are in the process - your day. we will see you then. if you are in the process of - if you are in the process of recycling plastics this morning, and if you have finished some milk, wash it out and put it in a bid to in a probably everybody is up by now and
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has done all that. you might need to watch this first. that's because today is the first day of the big plastic count. our climate and environment correspondentjonah fisher is in margate to tell us more. he is counting lots of plastic. good mornin: he is counting lots of plastic. good morning from _ he is counting lots of plastic. good morning from my _ he is counting lots of plastic. good morning from my gate. _ he is counting lots of plastic. timc morning from my gate. today is the first day of the big plastic count. 100,000 people across the uk have signed up basically to document every little piece of plastic they use over the course of a week to give us a better picture about what we throw away. i am one of those people who is fascinated by what happens to stuff when we get rid of it. after our recycling is put outside is taken away, it goes to a sorting plant. last week i went to one of those in london to have a little look about where it all goes. every year, each of us, on average, produces about 400 kilos of household waste. 44% of it is then recycled. this is one of the biggest
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recycling plants in britain — in southwark, in south london. this facility deals with the recycling for about two million people every year. that's150,000 tonnes. the number—one rule is if you're not sure, don't put it in your recyclable bin. with the ball, that baseball ball, that needs to be removed. when we collect the waste in the streets, we ask the general public to put plastics, glass, metals and paper in the in the same bin. in the same bin. so the role of this facility is to separate this material. the top few things that we are seeing coming to our facilities and which should not would be the things like textiles — clothes. we see shoes, jumpers, etc. it can be recycled, but not on the kerb—side collection. it needs to be at a household waste recycling centre. we see a lot of, like, coffee cups. it can be recycled — again, if it's brought back to the the shop or the store where you bought your coffee.
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check on your local council's website where all the guidance are provided and usually you get the contact details if you're unsure. so this feels like the end of the process here in this plant. absolutely. so at the very end. so you can see the different fractions. we've got all the plastics together — it will go to another plant to be sorted and recycled. we've got the cardboard and the paper, which will go directly to a paper mill to be recycled into new piece of cardboard and paper. and, finally, we've got the metals. of those, plastic is the hardest to recycle. but there are some success stories. each different type of plastic needs a different processing plant. this one in east london, it processes milk bottles. you can see all these bales here. these are all milk bottles that we use at home and have been sorted and brought here. now, this plant is a big one.
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it processes about 400 million milk bottles every year. it works 2a hours a day, round the clock. that's about 10% of the milk bottles that we use in the uk. the bottles are chopped up with their tops on and then a machine sorts the plastic by colour. so this is the end product. these are white plastic pellets — very much like lentils, in fact. now, tim, this is what's come out at the end here. what happens to these now? so what we're going to do with this is make new milk bottles. and these milk bottles can come back here and create a circular loop to recycle them again and again. just over half our recycling is processed here. the rest is sent abroad.
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let's find a little bit more about the big plastic count, i am joined ljy the big plastic count, i am joined by daniel webb, one of the brains behind it, and also by rachel hale has very kindly lent us invade her house this morning. daniel, tell us about the count. why is it needed? the big plastic count is a uk's biggest — the big plastic count is a uk's biggest ever investigation into household plastic waste. we are asking _ household plastic waste. we are asking people to count their plastic packaging waste for one week, submit their results at the end of the week that will— their results at the end of the week that will generate their own personalised household footprint. will also — personalised household footprint. will also create a picture and the evidence — will also create a picture and the evidence that we need to push for change _ evidence that we need to push for chan . e. ., , evidence that we need to push for chance. ., , ., evidence that we need to push for chance. . , ., , evidence that we need to push for chance. ., , ., , ., change. that it is not 'ust one thin . . change. that it is not 'ust one thin. i change. that it is not 'ust one thing. i think i change. that it is not 'ust one thing. i think there _ change. that it is notjust one thing. i think there are - change. that it is notjust one thing. i think there are 19 - thing. i think there are 19 different categories on that list. we have worked to create 19 different categories that people will use — different categories that people will use to categorise it, so it makes — will use to categorise it, so it makes it— will use to categorise it, so it makes it easier but also make it a lot easier— makes it easier but also make it a lot easier for us to analyse the waste —
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lot easier for us to analyse the waste. . . , lot easier for us to analyse the waste. ., . , ., lot easier for us to analyse the waste. .. , ., , ., lot easier for us to analyse the waste. .,. , . , ., . waste. rachel, why have you decide to sin waste. rachel, why have you decide to sign up? — waste. rachel, why have you decide to sign up? you _ waste. rachel, why have you decide to sign up? you are _ waste. rachel, why have you decide to sign up? you are a _ waste. rachel, why have you decide to sign up? you are a busy - waste. rachel, why have you decide to sign up? you are a busy mum, i waste. rachel, why have you decide i to sign up? you are a busy mum, you have kids, work, your husband has gone to work. we have kids, work, your husband has gone to work-— have kids, work, your husband has one to work. ~ ., ., ., ., gone to work. we found that although we have made — gone to work. we found that although we have made a _ gone to work. we found that although we have made a few _ gone to work. we found that although we have made a few changes - gone to work. we found that although we have made a few changes over - gone to work. we found that although we have made a few changes over the last few— we have made a few changes over the last few years — we have made a few changes over the last few years does _ we have made a few changes over the last few years does help _ we have made a few changes over the last few years does help you - we have made a few changes over the last few years does help— last few years does help you are re clina last few years does help you are recycling already. _ last few years does help you are recycling already. we _ last few years does help you are recycling already. we found - last few years does help you are recycling already. we found that this is just _ recycling already. we found that this is just from _ recycling already. we found that this isjust from the _ recycling already. we found that this isjust from the weekend i recycling already. we found that this isjust from the weekend so j recycling already. we found that. this isjust from the weekend so we don't _ this isjust from the weekend so we don't feel— this isjust from the weekend so we don't feel we — this isjust from the weekend so we don't feel we are _ this isjust from the weekend so we don't feel we are making _ this isjust from the weekend so we don't feel we are making a - this isjust from the weekend so we don't feel we are making a big - don't feel we are making a big enough — don't feel we are making a big enough impact _ don't feel we are making a big enough impact on _ don't feel we are making a big enough impact on reducing. don't feel we are making a big | enough impact on reducing our plastic— enough impact on reducing our plastic consumption— enough impact on reducing our plastic consumption and - enough impact on reducing our plastic consumption and we - enough impact on reducing our| plastic consumption and we are interested _ plastic consumption and we are interested to _ plastic consumption and we are interested to see _ plastic consumption and we are interested to see what - plastic consumption and we are interested to see what we - plastic consumption and we are interested to see what we are i interested to see what we are wasting _ interested to see what we are wastina. ~ . . , interested to see what we are wastina. ~ ., .,, ., interested to see what we are wastina. ~ ., ., . ., ., interested to see what we are wastin.. . ., .,, ., . ., ., ,., wasting. what has to change for your household to — wasting. what has to change for your household to have _ wasting. what has to change for your household to have less _ wasting. what has to change for your household to have less plastic? - wasting. what has to change for your household to have less plastic? this| household to have less plastic? this is from the weekend, what will it take for that to be much smaller? i actually think we need help from the top, tess— actually think we need help from the top. less packaging _ actually think we need help from the top, less packaging on _ actually think we need help from the top, less packaging on the _ actually think we need help from the top, less packaging on the items- actually think we need help from the top, less packaging on the items we| top, less packaging on the items we buy. top, less packaging on the items we buy it _ top, less packaging on the items we buy it is _ top, less packaging on the items we buy it is a _ top, less packaging on the items we buy. it is a privilege _ top, less packaging on the items we buy. it is a privilege to _ top, less packaging on the items we buy. it is a privilege to buy- top, less packaging on the items we buy. it is a privilege to buy things i buy. it is a privilege to buy things that are _ buy. it is a privilege to buy things that are not — buy. it is a privilege to buy things that are not in _ buy. it is a privilege to buy things that are not in plastic, _ buy. it is a privilege to buy things that are not in plastic, such - buy. it is a privilege to buy things that are not in plastic, such as. that are not in plastic, such as fruit— that are not in plastic, such as fruit and — that are not in plastic, such as fruit and veg _ that are not in plastic, such as fruit and veg delivery. - that are not in plastic, such as fruit and veg delivery. we - that are not in plastic, such as. fruit and veg delivery. we cannot escape _ fruit and veg delivery. we cannot escape plastic, _ fruit and veg delivery. we cannot escape plastic, we _ fruit and veg delivery. we cannot escape plastic, we are _ fruit and veg delivery. we cannot escape plastic, we are going - fruit and veg delivery. we cannot escape plastic, we are going to l fruit and veg delivery. we cannot . escape plastic, we are going to live with it. _ escape plastic, we are going to live with it. we — escape plastic, we are going to live with it, we need _ escape plastic, we are going to live with it, we need help. _ escape plastic, we are going to live with it, we need help.— with it, we need help. coming back to ou, with it, we need help. coming back to you. daniel. _ with it, we need help. coming back to you, daniel, is _ with it, we need help. coming back to you, daniel, is this _ with it, we need help. coming back to you, daniel, is this end - with it, we need help. coming back to you, daniel, is this end at - to you, daniel, is this end at making will become more aware of how much plastic they are creating at home but this is targeted at
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policymakers. home but this is targeted at policymakers-— home but this is targeted at policymakers. home but this is targeted at oli makers. , , a policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said, we policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said. we want _ policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said, we want to _ policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said, we want to push _ policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said, we want to push for _ policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said, we want to push for change - policymakers. absolutely. as rachel said, we want to push for change at | said, we want to push for change at the top _ said, we want to push for change at the top and — said, we want to push for change at the top and we need policymakers and decision—makers in business to take note of— decision—makers in business to take note of these results, so with rachet— note of these results, so with rachel saying we want people to become — rachel saying we want people to become more aware, to understand their plastic — become more aware, to understand their plastic footprint. we want that to — their plastic footprint. we want that to empower them to push for the change _ that to empower them to push for the change themselves. if that to empower them to push for the change themselves.— change themselves. if people want to net change themselves. if people want to get involved. — change themselves. if people want to get involved, it's _ change themselves. if people want to get involved, it's nice _ change themselves. if people want to get involved, it's nice today, - change themselves. if people want to get involved, it's nice today, but - get involved, it's nice today, but they can still sign up box i am a camp, go to thebigplasticcount.com and you can sign up there. so there you have it, if you want to find out just how much plastic you are a family creates over the course of the week you can sign up, take part, provide a bit more data to help us all cope with the plastic mountain. thank you. thank you to that brilliant family for letting us in and looking through their bins. one
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more day, talking of the family or i will bring in cakes and biscuits for my final day tomorrow. i have brought in quite a few cakes of the last few months. did brought in quite a few cakes of the last few months.— last few months. did you hear our editor shouts, _ last few months. did you hear our editor shouts, "final!"? _ last few months. did you hear our editor shouts, "final!"? . - last few months. did you hear our editor shouts, "final!"? . yes! . last few months. did you hear our| editor shouts, "final!"? . yes! you onl live editor shouts, "final!"? . yes! you only live once _ editor shouts, "final!"? . yes! you only live once good _ editor shouts, "final!"? . yes! you only live once good cakes, - editor shouts, "final!"? . yes! you only live once good cakes, please. | only live once good cakes, please. you will be — only live once good cakes, please. you will be back— only live once good cakes, please. you will be back in _ only live once good cakes, please. you will be back in three _ only live once good cakes, please. you will be back in three months, | you will be back in three months, you will miss us too much. you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. borisjohnson will visit belfast later to urge the northern ireland assembly to resume power—sharing, as ministers prepare new laws to override parts of the brexit deal. president biden is to visit buffalo, new york, where a gunman killed ten people at a supermarket in what's being investigated as a racially motivated extremist attack. a study suggests dementia is the leading cause of death for women since 2011. the queen attends the final night of the royal windsor horse show — the first big event to mark the platinum jubilee. and stargazers across the world were treated to a stunning and unusual sight last night — a super blood moon.

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