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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 16, 2022 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. borisjohnson will visit belfast later to urge the northern ireland assembly to resume power—sharing, as ministers prepare new laws to override parts of the brexit deal. president biden is to visit buffalo, new york, where a gunman killed ten people at a supermarket in what's being investigated as a racially motivated extremist attack. a study suggests dementia is the leading cause of death for women since 2011. the queen attends the final night of the royal windsor horse show — the first big event to mark the platinum jubilee. and stargazers across the world were treated to a stunning and unusual sight last night — a super blood moon.
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good morning. the prime minister borisjohnson will visit belfast today to urge the main northern ireland parties to resume power—sharing. the largest unionist party, the dup, is currently refusing to take part in the government of northern ireland because of the post—brexit trading arrangements with the eu, known as the northern ireland protocol. the uk government is expected to introduce legislation which would allow ministers to override parts of that protocol. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. boris johnson will arrive in northern ireland later to find a political system which is stuck. despite elections earlier this month, there's no new government. sinn fein finished top for the first time ever, but the democratic unionist party — the second largest at stormont — won't agree to power—sharing
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until the brexit deal is changed. they're worried about checks on goods travelling from great britain to northern ireland. even though many parties accept these arrangements, if unionist politicians don't, power—sharing can't get back up and running. borisjohnson signed the brexit deal, but he now agrees that changes are needed and is calling for the european union to negotiate tweaks. ahead of his visit today, boris johnson writes in the belfast telegraph. back in london, ministers have been drawing up legislation which would allow them to override parts of the brexit deal. it's set to be confirmed tomorrow, but will have to pass through parliament, meaning it could be months before the government has the power to act without agreement from europe. but the move would be controversial. some fear it could spark a trade war at a time when many businesses
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and households can least afford one. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. let's have a quick look at what the northern ireland protocol actually is. when we left the eu, it was agreed that goods arriving in northern ireland from the rest of the uk would be monitored to make sure they met eu standards. that's because northern ireland shares a land border with eu member, ireland, and an open border between ireland and northern ireland is seen as an essential part of the peace process. let's talk to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. so, adam, has the governments position softened a bit on this? so position softened a bit on this? sr this is a slightly confusing position softened a bit on this? srs this is a slightly confusing thing. you've got to take what the government says publicly and then you've got to take what is briefed to newspapers in particular by sources in the government. if you look at the stuff in the newspapers over the last couple of weeks, it
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sounded very gung ho, lots of stuff about ripping up the protocol, lots of stuff by publishing legislation that will just apply the protocol but if you listen to what ministers and the prime minister said publicly, they been much more conciliatory towards the eu and focusing on the fact they want to have a negotiated settlement with the eu, so i think it reflects two things. first of all, may be a different emphasis between different government ministries, some people a bit tougher than others, and also the second thing it represents is just the government is negotiating strategy which is to talk to the eu and hope that they can be a negotiated outcome with tweaks to the protocol, but also in their back pocket, have a plan to act if that can't be achieved. i think that's why, if you read some things, it sounds very gung ho, and it sounds much more friendly towards the eu in other things. it’s much more friendly towards the eu in other thin95-_ much more friendly towards the eu in other things- much more friendly towards the eu in other thingie— other things. it's not like it wasn't recognised - other things. it's not like it wasn't recognised as - other things. it's not like it wasn't recognised as a - other things. it's not like it | wasn't recognised as a tricky other things. it's not like it - wasn't recognised as a tricky issue in the run—up to the signing of the brexit agreement and obviously you covered every single aspect of that
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going up to it. so, with that in mind, what possible way as they through this that wasn't thought about at the time? the through this that wasn't thought about at the time?— through this that wasn't thought about at the time? the first thing to sa is about at the time? the first thing to say is the _ about at the time? the first thing to say is the first _ about at the time? the first thing to say is the first challenge - about at the time? the first thing to say is the first challenge the i to say is the first challenge the prime minister has got in northern ireland today is helping the dup, the democratic unionist party, climb down from the very extreme position they had on the protocol during the election campaign for the stormont assembly. they campaign for the protocol to be abolished altogether. no one in the uk or eu is giving that as an option. so for the dup to be able to enter power—sharing and for the assembly to get up and running and the executive to get up and running, the dup will have to climb down from that. i think that's what boris johnson climb down from that. i think that's what borisjohnson is main task will be today, and also i think about talking about legislation to override the protocol as part of that effort. now, in terms of what was foreseen originally, yes, it's interesting watching the uk government's evolution here.
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remember the northern ireland protocol was sold as a permanent solution that solved lots of the problems and gave stability to northern ireland and now the government has shifted into a position where they say it's causing lots of problems, and it's not working. the rationale that the prime minister gives for that is that the world has changed in that we had a pandemic and we are now facing a cost of living crisis. that's the argument he makes in his opinion piece for the belfast telegraph today, but i think a lot of people say hang on, the problems as you see it in the protocol were inherent from the beginning and i do have to say i remember towards the end of the brexit negotiations, when the government was celebrating that they had squared the circle and done this deal with brussels that involve the protocol, it was so much better than theresa may's deal, i got the impression talking to senior people in the british government, they never intended to apply it in full and actually what we've seen play out over the last year or two kind of maybe confirms that suspicion. thank you very much, adam. let's get
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the thoughts of shaun woodward. shaun woodward was northern ireland secretary between 2007 to 2010, under both tony blair and gordon brown. welcome. so, is this a square that is impossible, a circle that is impossible to square to continue with that analogy there from adam? how do you see this going forward? well, the first problem is the rhetoric is almost now out of control. you have had liz truss making ridiculous statements about tearing up international treaties, you've had the dup now refusing to put forward the speaker so the assembly can't actually be convened in northern ireland, and, as a consequence, rhetoric which has been very high on a number of sides is spinning out of control. the second thing which is really important here, joanna, the conspicuous absence until today of the prime minister. the prime ministers i
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worked for, tony blair and gordon brown and john major, where very, very active, notjust brown and john major, where very, very active, not just when crises happened, but actually in the build—up to building agreements and what has been a game so noticeable in this is that the prime minister was warned that his attempt to fix brexit with the protocol wouldn't work, he didn't listen. and he didn't focus. so, let's be generous here, it's good that the prime minister is finally rolling up his sleeves and going into day, but he's going to be confronted by a dup that allowed rhetoric to spin out of control, how he brings them back from refusing to even allow the assembly effectively to meet, is going to be very, very difficult. how he does that and reconcile that with sinn fein and their position, having become now the largest party in a democratic election which they won fairly and squarely, they absolutely now are the biggest party with most seats in northern ireland
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and they want the protocol to stay. so the prime minister has got a very tricky hand to play. so the prime minister has got a very tricky hand to play-— tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then, tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then. so _ tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then, so how _ tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then, so how would _ tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then, so how would you - tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then, so how would you play i tricky hand to play. sorry to come in then, so how would you play it| in then, so how would you play it with a dup?— in then, so how would you play it with a dup? what is first of all got to do is work _ with a dup? what is first of all got to do is work in _ with a dup? what is first of all got to do is work in partnership - with a dup? what is first of all got to do is work in partnership with i to do is work in partnership with the irish government. the good friday agreement is effectively protected by the partnership between the irish government and the british government. it is also given the added level of underpinning if you like by the president of united states, who supplies in effect money, investment, jobs in northern ireland, as well as status, recognition of people who felt previously they were not being treated equally, so the smart thing to do, which is what all prime ministers have done before, as you effectively hand—in—hand with the irish government and you go in with the knowledge that you have the president of the united states behind you. borisjohnson has those offers for a long time. what he's got to do today to win the dup is
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not put off side sinn fein, who are, after all, not put off side sinn fein, who are, afterall, now not put off side sinn fein, who are, after all, now the largest party in northern ireland and they didn't just get those votes from nationalists, people who want a united ireland at the end of the day, they got them from very ordinary people, many of them unionists, who wanted to see a party address the cost of living, because that's what sinn fein campaigned on. so the prime minister has hopefully done his homework, he's got to go there today, negotiate the dup back into nominating a speaker, and to do so without making ridiculous promises he can't keep and alienating sinn fein and he can only do that if he has the support hand—in—hand with the irish government and the good news for him is the eu has made it very clear that they think there is ground to be made up here. fin that they think there is ground to be made up here.— be made up here. on that point, that's what _ be made up here. on that point, that's what i _ be made up here. on that point, that's what i was _ be made up here. on that point,
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that's what i was thinking - be made up here. on that point, that's what i was thinking if - be made up here. on that point, that's what i was thinking if you | that's what i was thinking if you are talking there because obviously there's all the heat but what the eu have said they could look at is not having checks on goods that go from britain to northern ireland and stay there. i mean, that sounds like it would potentially be a workable solution in borisjohnson in the article he has written today talks about a shared objective to create the broadest possible cross community support for a reformed protocol. do you think that will be the shape of it? i protocol. do you think that will be the shape of it?— the shape of it? i can only hope it is. let's remember, _ the shape of it? i can only hope it is. let's remember, politics - the shape of it? i can only hope it is. let's remember, politics in i is. let's remember, politics in northern ireland is based on hope. that's the whole basis with which we got the good friday agreement. and again, what i would say is that it doesn't really matter what political party you are in, everybody wants the peace process to endure, nobody wants to see that thrown under the bus, and that's why liz truss really has got to be reined in with her rhetoric in which what effectively she is offering is if we don't get what you want now we willjust change what we agreed, we will tear
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up change what we agreed, we will tear up the treaties, i mean, putting aside what that means about britain's position in the world, opposing the rule of law, just imagine if everybody else with whom we made trade agreements decided, having made them, you know what, we will change it even though we didn't agree that with the people in britain, it would be a catastrophe for britain's trade globally if liz truss's rhetoric and watches trying to say, with this bill the government may be introducing, actually happened, and that's where rhetoric is out of control and it becomes reckless. so the prime ministerfundamentally becomes reckless. so the prime minister fundamentally today, what he's actually got to do is to start rebuilding the trust that's been squandered by crazy rhetoric and an absence on his part of being involved with the european union and michael martin in seeking a solution. if you rebuild trust, then the hope becomes you can persuade
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jeffrey donaldson, who was a good guy, i've worked with him for many decades, he is a very smart guy, but he's got himself into a very tricky place, not least because the british government have almost encouraged him by not saying no at an earlier stage and you need the prime minister to say no and i say that with humility of having been secretary of state. but without a strong prime minister, next to you, then you can't be an effective secretary of state in what i fear is that the current secretary of state has somewhat has his hands tied behind his back because of the absence of the prime minister. thank ou ve absence of the prime minister. thank you very much- _ the authorities in the us city where 10 people were killed in a mass shooting on saturday have said that the teenager charged with the attack deliberately sought out a location with a high black population. the shooting — which is being investigated as an act of racially motivated violent extremism — happened at a grocery store in buffalo, in new york state. 18—year—old payton grendon was arrested in the aftermath.
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0ur correspondent will grant has more. 0ne person's been killed in another fatal mass shooting — this time in california. four other people were critically wounded in the attack at a church near los angeles. the gunman was tackled by members of the congregation and detained heavily armed and dressed in tactical gear, he livestreamed his entire horrific attack. 18—year—old payton gendron drove for miles to reach this supermarket in a predominantly black neighbourhood of buffalo. heavily armed and dressed in tactical gear, he livestreamed his entire horrific attack. the killing spree began in the car park, where four people were killed, before he entered the building and continued his rampage. a security guard, a retired buffalo policeman, tried to stop him but was among those killed. most of the victims were black. before the attack, the gunman posted a kind of manifesto online — a hate—filled screed laying bare his extremist views. outside the supermarket, gendron was disarmed, taken into custody and charged
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with first—degree murder. in court, his lawyer entered a not—guilty plea. now, new and difficult questions have emerged. after threatening such violence last year, the gunman was held by the authorities for a mental health evaluation, then released. a further blow to this tight—knit community torn apart by a teenager with a gun. will grant, bbc news. 0ne person's been killed in another fatal mass shooting — this time in california. four other people were critically wounded in the attack at a church near los angeles. the gunman was tackled by members of the congregation and detained outside the presbyterian church in laguna woods, orange county. police said an asian man in his 60s opened fire on the congregation of about 30 to a0 mostly taiwanese people. we believe a group of churchgoers detained him and hogtied his legs with an extension cord and confiscated at least two weapons from him.
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he was detained when the deputies arrived. that group of churchgoers displayed what we believe is exceptional heroism and bravery in intervening to stop the suspect. they undoubtedly prevented additional injuries and fatalities. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson will visit belfast later to urge the northern ireland assembly to resume power—sharing, as ministers prepare new laws to override parts of the brexit deal. president biden heads to buffalo, new york, where a gunman killed ten people at a supermarket, in what's being investigated as a racially motivated extremist attack. and, stargazers across the world were treated to a stunning and unusual sight — a super blood moon. a three—year—old boy has died in a suspected dog attack in greater manchester. it happened at a house in the town of milnrow, near rochdale, yesterday afternoon. greater manchester police says it's
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investigating previous incidents involving dogs at the home. no arrests have been made. nato officials say moscow's invasion strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling. it's thought russia may have lost a third of its ground combat troops and is failing to make progress in the donbas region. meanwhile, one of the biggest ever nato military exercises in the baltics gets under way in estonia today. code—named "hedgehog", the manoeuvres will involve ten countries, including the uk, us, finland and sweden. let's get more now from our correspondent in kyiv, james waterhouse. james, is there an increasing sense in ukraine that they have the upper hand? i in ukraine that they have the upper hand? ., �* ., .,, ., ., in ukraine that they have the upper hand? ., �* ., ., ., hand? i wouldn't go as far to say u- er hand? i wouldn't go as far to say upper hand. _ hand? i wouldn't go as far to say upper hand, joanna, _ hand? i wouldn't go as far to say upper hand, joanna, but - hand? i wouldn't go as far to say upper hand, joanna, but i - hand? i wouldn't go as far to say upper hand, joanna, but i think. upper hand, joanna, but i think certainly for president zelensky�*s perspective, he is seeing russia as running into a dead—end although he would to think that. we are seeing
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russia's girls continue to shrink and move. the 24th of february, he wanted to take all of this country, he wanted to topple president zelensky and his government, in the 82 days since this war has shifted eastwards, we are seeing videos this morning seemingly posted by ukrainian forces on the russian border in the north—eastern kharkiv region, they shout here we are, mr president, which suggests russians there have been forced out of artillery range from ukraine's second largest city kharkiv, which is and become so much under attack during this invasion. the russians have moved south to the donbas region which vladimir putin is now said is now his priority, and a military experts ever given abandoned their goal of trying to encircle defending ukrainian troops in the area as well. so the russians have shrunk and their ambitions but
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are still mounting a number of assaults all the way along the front line in this sizable land, nor that they now occupy and then you have to look on the ukrainian side. nato was saying ukraine could get in a position to win this war but by president zelensky�*s own admission, he does not have the military capability as things stand to break the deadlock in mariupol in the south—east, the besieged city where ukrainian fighters remain trapped. the west is continuing its support. it's making longer term commitments in terms of weaponry and equipment but, as things stand, i think it is continuing to feed into the fact that this war is continuing to get bogged down. so that this war is continuing to get bogged down-— that this war is continuing to get boned down. ., ., ., bogged down. so on that point about military capability. — bogged down. so on that point about military capability, it's _ bogged down. so on that point about military capability, it's an _ military capability, it's an extraordinary statistic to hear that russia has lost apparently about a third of its combat forces on the ground. how do the different military is up now against each
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other? it military is up now against each other? , ., , ' . military is up now against each other? , . , , . ., other? it is, as ever, difficult to net an other? it is, as ever, difficult to get an accurate _ other? it is, as ever, difficult to get an accurate read. _ other? it is, as ever, difficult to get an accurate read. i - other? it is, as ever, difficult to get an accurate read. i mean, i get an accurate read. i mean, western assessments are around 15,000 figure for russian troops to have lost their lives. in terms of the uk ministry of defence assessment that russia has lost a third of its invasion force, that includes injured, killed soldiers, as well as damaged or captured equipment. the pentagon and the us made a similar conclusion at the start of this month so that suggests that's been the case for a while. ukraine too has suffered losses. but these are the very reasons that ambitions have been shrunk and russia has had to make its way eastwards. crucially, russia is closer to its border. it's looking to replenish. there are reports they are mobilising men and women in occupied territories of ukraine to replace the fallen soldiers and then we have to keep an eye on what's
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happening to the north and belarus, where they are thought to be moving troops towards its 700 mile long border with ukraine. which is therefore drawing ukrainian forces back to the north of the country, so that effects ukraine but also is belarus's way of responding to the sizeable nato exercises happening in belarus and latvia. this is a country which is russia magnus ally and allow russia to fire rockets into ukraine and move troops from belarus into belarus itself. so once again there are no forces surrounding ukraine. the war are still very much inside the country but we are once again almost back to the times ofjanuary but we are once again almost back to the times of january this year, seeing much larger scale movement of forces adding to the overall tension of the situation.— of the situation. thank you very much.
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the charity alzheimers research uk says dementia is now the leading cause of death for women in the uk since 2011. to mark dementia action week, the charity has spoken to more than 1,000 dementia sufferers and their carers, and has published an online checklist to identify the signs of dementia. let's talk to samantha bentham—hermetz, director of policy and public affairs at alzheimers research uk. thank you very much forjoining us. we will come to that online checklist because i'm sure it is something people will want to hear about but first of all, why is dementia so much more prevalent amongst women than men? goad amongst women than men? good mornin: , amongst women than men? good morning, joanna. _ amongst women than men? good morning, joanna. yes, _ amongst women than men? good morning, joanna. yes, it's - amongst women than men? (13mm morning, joanna. yes, it's shocking to hear that two out of three people affected by dementia are women. we don't really know the reason for that, but it's thought through research that hormonal changes might be at play. there's also some research that indicates women are less likely to participate in physical activity so for example, women tend to leave sport at a
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younger age but also there is a significant impact of loneliness and social isolation amongst women but the truth is we just don't know why women are more affected and we need more research to find new treatments for dementia and also to understand better how we can prevent dementia for future generations. sg�*s better how we can prevent dementia for future generations.— for future generations. 4096 of dementia cases _ for future generations. 4096 of dementia cases can _ for future generations. 4096 of dementia cases can be - for future generations. 4096 of - dementia cases can be prevented? that's right. a research paper in the lancet found there are 12 modifiable risk factors things which are simple things people can do on an everyday basis, keeping active, eating healthily, staying connected. so we launched a campaign very much focused on showing people the steps they can take to reduce their risk of developing dementia. we also know that the government is about to launch a women's health strategy and also a dementia strategy and we want those two strategies to be joined up. we also want to see the government deliver on its promise to
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doubly dementia research budget. we know research will be vital both in finding new treatments but also speeding up progress in clinical trials. we must find out why women are more affected by dementia. we know that dementia is devastating to everyone at effects, but it's so important that we understand ways to better treat and prevent it. fin better treat and prevent it. on those things you were describing there, which can improve your chances of not getting dementia, they are all things which where a massive challenge through lockdown. are you concerned about the longer term impact of lockdown on older people, on all of us?— people, on all of us? lockdown it had a huge _ people, on all of us? lockdown it had a huge effect _ people, on all of us? lockdown it had a huge effect on _ people, on all of us? lockdown it had a huge effect on all - people, on all of us? lockdown it had a huge effect on all of - people, on all of us? lockdown it had a huge effect on all of us. i people, on all of us? lockdown it i had a huge effect on all of us. some people found it particularly difficult to keep active, very difficult to keep active, very difficult to keep active, very difficult to stay connected at times particularly older generations who may not have been so digitally
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included. so it's really vital that the government takes action to ensure that people understand the risk factors of dementia and can make these small changes. we know that the changes that happen in the brain start 15—20 years before the symptoms are detected. we know that people making changes in middle life can have a huge impact because there is little changes build up over time and they have a protected effect which allows us to live longer, healthier lives.— which allows us to live longer, healthier lives. , ., ., healthier lives. they mentioned that checklist you — healthier lives. they mentioned that checklist you are _ healthier lives. they mentioned that checklist you are launching - healthier lives. they mentioned that checklist you are launching to - checklist you are launching to identify dementia versus getting old. can you tell us a bit about that? �* �* , old. can you tell us a bit about that? ~ 3 , a that? the alzheimer's society, which is a different — that? the alzheimer's society, which is a different dementia _ that? the alzheimer's society, which is a different dementia charity, - is a different dementia charity, have today launched a focus on diagnosis and that checklist is about looking at the symptoms of dementia, so we know that dementia is not a normal part of ageing. there are significant changes to how
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people think, their thinking skills, but also changes to memory, so often it's finding it more difficult to get around, so getting lost more often, but also struggling to find the right words. so we would encourage anyone who is worried about their memory or worried about their thinking skills to get in touch with their gp and to seek a diagnosis where possible. it’s diagnosis where possible. it's something — diagnosis where possible. it's something that is often talked about and it is the fear, when you do start to come it happens to everybody, you forget names, perhaps what the thread of what you are talking about was, whatever it is, and you worry is this a sign of something potentially more sinister or is itjust the normal forgetting something? the concern has often been sort of historically about do i really want to know if i'm heading down the path of dementia because it feels quite frightening and it feels like there's nothing you can actually do about it? what would you say to that? $5 actually do about it? what would you
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sa to that? . , actually do about it? what would you say to that?— say to that? as we touched on earlier on _ say to that? as we touched on earlier on in _ say to that? as we touched on earlier on in this _ say to that? as we touched on | earlier on in this conversation, many people do feel that sense of i suppose fatalism that there are no treatments, but actually there are symptomatic treatments, so things that help in some of the symptoms that help in some of the symptoms that are available, so if people do get a diagnosis it's likely that they won't be prescribed those treatments that would help with symptoms of dementia. but also actually getting a diagnosis is something we know people really value. it can be very unsettling to not know what's going on so to not know if something is just normal, getting older, being forgetful against a disease that can be treated. and i think one of the things that people say they value about getting a diagnosis is actually being able to plan, making plans differently and changing your life because of your diagnosis i think it's an important aspect, but
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essentially, as a research charity, alzheimer's research uk believes one day we will find new treatments to tackle dementia and that will stop this being the biggest killer of people. we hope to be able to prevent dementia in the future but we also know that there are things people can do today and we want people can do today and we want people to be able to look after their brain health and take these little steps that accumulate over time that really helps to reduce our risk of developing dementia. just a thou . ht on risk of developing dementia. just a thought on the _ risk of developing dementia. just a thought on the hormonal— risk of developing dementia. just a thought on the hormonal changes that could impact potentially on dementia you mentioned right at the beginning, we were talking about hrt last week and how research is potentially indicating that could have an impact on dementia. what are your thoughts on that? what is the evidence? ., . ., , , evidence? one of the challenges is women are — evidence? one of the challenges is women are not _ evidence? one of the challenges is women are not very _ evidence? one of the challenges is women are not very well _ evidence? one of the challenges is i women are not very well represented when it comes to data about clinical trials. we know that women are less likely to be able to participate in medical trials and there is less research overall including women. we
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know that, for example, in basic science, often the trials are done with mouse models which are male, so it's very hard to really get a whole picture on the impact of women so for example we know that women are more likely to experience side effects of drugs but are less likely to be involved in those clinical trials, so one of the things we are calling on people to do today is to actuallyjoin dementia research, healthy volunteers and also people with a dementia diagnosis, to get involved in research. we work in partnership with the alzheimer's society and the nihr to run a platform called join dementia research and we would encourage people to take a look at the website and to arrange a call back to actually participate in dementia research because we need more people to be able to actively participate if we are able to find the differences between healthy brains and brains that have dementia. that
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will help us build our understanding and work towards a future where we can overcome the fear, harm and heartbreak of dementia.- can overcome the fear, harm and heartbreak of dementia. thank you so much forjoining _ heartbreak of dementia. thank you so much forjoining us. _ heartbreak of dementia. thank you so much forjoining us. good _ heartbreak of dementia. thank you so much forjoining us. good to - heartbreak of dementia. thank you so much forjoining us. good to talk- heartbreak of dementia. thank you so much forjoining us. good to talk to i much forjoining us. good to talk to you. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, good morning. it is one of those days where many of you will see sunshine break through the cloud this morning which could set off one or two heavy and thundery showers. the cloudiness of all will be parts of scotland with an easterly breeze, outbreaks of rain just pushing an easterly breeze, outbreaks of rainjust pushing north, although it does state sunny in shetland. northern ireland will see heavier downpours, then showers and thunderstorms this afternoon. the same for northern england. the rest of england and wales, some of you will stay dry and humid in the sunshine, up to 23 celsius. the showers that we do see will continue into the evening. the persistent rain eases in scotland. a small
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chance of a view showers in the south—east later in the night. many will become a dry with a few fog patches, and not quite as mild as last night. we will see cloud and outbreaks of rain develop around the irish sea, but elsewhere a sunny start to tomorrow. hazy sunshine, but the warmest day of the year so far, reaching 25 in the south—east. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson will visit belfast later to urge the northern ireland assembly to resume power—sharing, as ministers prepare new laws to override parts of the brexit deal. president biden heads to buffalo, new york, where a gunman killed ten people at a supermarket, in what's being investigated as a racially motivated extremist attack. a study suggests dementia is the leading cause of death for women since 2011. the queen attends the final night
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of the royal windsor horse show, the first big event to mark the platinum jubilee. and, stargazers across the world were treated to a stunning and unusual sight — a super blood moon. sport and now a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. the former british number one laura robson has confirmed her retirement from tennis this morning at the age of 28. as a teenager, robson reached the fourth round of the us open and here at wimbledon, as well as winning silver in the mixed doubles with andy murray at the 2012 olympics. she says the decision to retire was forced upon her after having three hip operations. everton have confirmed they're assisting merseyside police after brentford striker ivan toney and full back rico henry said their families were racially abused at goodison park during yesterday's 3—2 win.
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toney here, and henry, made the allegations on twitter after the game. everton say, "there is no place in football or society for racism." twist in title race. manchester city know they will be crowned premier league champions if they beat aston villa in their final game. that's despite being held to a 2—2 draw at west ham yesterday, they were two down at half time after a brace from jarrod bowen. city fought back after the break, jack grealish pulled one back before an own goal from vladimir coufal levelled the score. city had a chance to win it, but riyad mahrez�*s late penalty was saved. it is going to be a big day for the football club, and for the city. i can't wait. they have got a great record at the stadium, so i can't wait. it is something i've never
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experienced before, to wind a trophy on the last day of the season, and i can't wait. burnley remain in the bottom three for now after they lost 1—0 at tottenham who are into fourth. it was a harry kane penalty that settled it, given for handball by ashley barnes on the stroke of halftime. spurs are in the final champions league qualification place for now, but arsenal can move back into the top four if they win at newcastle tonight. stockport county have won promotion back to the football league, after spending eleven years playing in the fifth and sixth tiers of english football. they needed a draw at home to halifax to be absolutely certain. goals from paddy madden and will collar secured a 2—0 win and there were joyous scenes at the final whistle on the edgeley park pitch — players, staff and fans alike celebrated winning the national league. chelsea manager emma hayes says completing a league and cup double was the perfect way to end a tough season — which included
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competing under sanctions — as chelsea beat manchester city to lift the women's fa cup. it finished 3—2 after extra time at wembley as rhia chohan reports. back—to—back winners in the showpiece event of the season. chelsea celebrating their dominance after truly being put to the test. in the early minutes, manchester city had the chances, before england defender millie bright set up the perfect ball. deep cross in... and it's all the way in! all it took was a little nick from sam kerr to help it over. earlier this week the chelsea boss emma hayes said she loves watching city's lauren hemp play — she won't have enjoyed this, though. six goals in six games! erin cuthbert, who had covered every inch of this pitch, is often the creator of goals for chelsea — but she definitely owned this. two teams showing no signs of backing down. the holders were all set to win before hayley raso sent
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the game into extra time. the league's golden boot winner sam kerr has a magnetic touch — and once she'd latched onto the ball, no—one could stop her. this team has superb character for a reason and we've won the titles we have for multiple reasons. there is no denying it was the best fa cup final, i think, in recent years. chelsea — fa cup winners 2022! manchester city gave it their all, but the depth and consistency of this chelsea squad has paid off. they won the league last week, and have now secured their fourth fa cup — lifting trophies is becoming a habit for them. rhia chohan, bbc news, at wembley. that's all the sport for now. most gcse and a—level exams start from today, which means many students
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in england, wales and northern ireland, will be sitting their first formal exams since the start of the pandemic. scottish highers began at the end of april. for some, it's theirfirst experience of sitting in an exam hall. meanwhile, school leaders are warning about a shortage of invigilators. 0ur education correspondent elaine dunkley has been to a school in wigan to check on preparations. coming up in the next couple of weeks, it's absolutely essential that we have a good revision programme. at the deanery church of england high school in wigan, it's final study sessions. when i did my mocks and i got the results, iwas like, agh. chelsea and her classmates have done their mock exams. tears were coming in my eyes as i was walking in. i could just see the paper, all the invigilatorsjust standing at the front with their arms crossed. i'm just like, "oh, my days!" he the next time they go into the exam room, it will be for real. i want to do a career in medicine, so i obviously want to get them seven, eights and nines to, like, obviously, gain, like,
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offers from university. like major universities like manchester, even oxford. it wasn't as bad as i was expecting, considering what we did at revision. catching up in the canteen, it's talk of revision and exam timetables. if, you know, people have been off with covid, teachers have been good at live lessons and putting work on so we can do everything. i've got 21 exams spread out across a month and a half, so sometimes i'll go home and i'll revise for an hour or so and then i'll go to footballjust to take my mind off it. i think it's really important to not only...obviously, worry about your grades, but worry about yourself and worry about your mental health. 0k, year11, you can put your pens down, please. the government says this year's students will be graded more generously than the last time exams were sat in 2019, but they won't get as many top grades as last year, when results were decided by teachers�* assessments. pupils will get formula sheets to use in exams and there has been advance information
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for gcses and a—levels. so i've got two a—levels left — design and technology, and engineering i've got left, but i've got a btec and a ctec, as well. jasmine is worried about what could come up. it's been a bit mad, to be honest, because we've missed so much time and every time someone was off we'd all have to go off. so, as engineering students, we can't do our things at home. it's more just all online or special software we don't have at home. and so we're all 18 now and it feels like we've missed a big chunk of, like, growing up in our in a—levels. it's just like stress constantly that you're not going to get everything done. and then, after that into actual jobs, it feels like we've not even been in school at all. we are really excited for our children to be able to show what they're brilliant at, as well, and do well in their gcses and their a—levels, despite the fact that it's been so difficult. for the deputy head, mrs turner, it's about making pupils believe they can aim high.
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but there is no doubt anxiety levels are also high. most pupils haven't had any national exams since their sats in primary school. we are seeing children that are presenting to us with really, really difficult social, emotional and mental health issues. we've got more children, probably triple, quadruple the amount of children, that previously would have struggled to go in an exam hall that are feeling that way now getting ready for an exam. it's all the stuff you put in beforehand. it's all the practice runs. it's all the getting yourselves ready that they've not had. sometimes, the children rub their hands together. i'll see their legs are shaking, breathing might get a little bit faster. so just go over to those children and just let them know that we're here. a quiet, "are you 0k?" because of increased levels of anxiety, more invigilators are needed and some schools have struggled to recruit. here, the school nurse has stepped in. predominantly, an invigilator has always been like a retired person. unfortunately, when covid did hit, a lot of the retirees didn't
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want to come into school then. so there has been quite a bit of a shortage. breathe in. hold. in the library, there's an exam stress workshop. as well as breathing techniques, minnie is on hand to help pupils and staff. if pupils are having a difficult day, then they can come into the wellbeing room. they can have a chat with me, they can spend a little time with minnie. we'll go for a walk and we'll talk to pupils that way. she's a very big part of the school. star pupil! she is the star pupil, yes. what can we think about that we could do to maybe help with that? teachers here have put on revision classes in the easter holidays and extra sessions after school. i'm going to actually do question 13. the government says national exams represent a major step back to normality. for these pupils, it's a major step towards their future goals and aspirations. 0ur grades open the doors to what we want to become in this world and ijust honestly think that the support that the teachers
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are giving me and giving to the rest of the students as well is just really helpful. elaine dunkley, bbc news. the eurovision song contest was memorable for many reasons — including the rare feat of a uk entry making the top half of the leaderboard. 183 points. however, the night and the victory belonged to ukraine and kalush 0rchestra, thanks to a massive outpouring of popular support throughout europe. the group had been predicted to take the title as support rose following russia's invasion. the man going wild in this clip is ukrainian eurovision commentator timur miroshnychenko, who had to cover the contest from a bunker in kyiv. speaking earlier to the bbc, he said he hopes the country will be able to host the competition next year. i was the host in 2017, and of
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course it is my dream now to host this wonderful event next year somewhere in ukraine. somewhere. you know, i havejust chatted with the minister of culture of ukraine an hour before, and he said that we will do our best to welcome all the guests next year into a peaceful country. we still have some time before the final decision where to host eurovision next year, may be till the end of summer or early september, and of course we believe that our armed forces will defend all our country and all our territories and we will have the chance to say that we guarantee that here you will be safe. ~ ., , ., , ., safe. with me now in the studio is a tv critic scott _ safe. with me now in the studio is a tv critic scott brian. _ safe. with me now in the studio is a tv critic scott brian. welcome. - safe. with me now in the studio is a | tv critic scott brian. welcome. what a turnaround. in previous years it has always been the fallout of how did we do so badly? in the end, good
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to lose out to ukraine, it feels like the right outcome. and to lose out to ukraine, it feels like the right outcome. and an incredibly emotional _ like the right outcome. and an incredibly emotional one, - like the right outcome. and an incredibly emotional one, too. j incredibly emotional one, too. watching it on sunday, when they announced how many votes they had received from the telly vote, many people are getting out their calculators because it was an extraordinarily high figure. it was worked out by some eurovision geeks and they worked out that, essentially, they received 12 points from every single european competing nation, bar one or two. from every single european competing nation, bar one ortwo. so from every single european competing nation, bar one or two. so i think itjust showed how much solidarity there was with them, but also their performance was incredibly and captivating. this was notjust because of what is happening beyond the contest, i think they really had a powerful and emotional contest. of course, every year with eurovision, the following year it then heads to that particular nation. of course, theissue that particular nation. of course, the issue is, i think, down to whether it can be held in ukraine next year, and that is down to the logistics and security because the
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closer you get to eurovision, the bigger it actually is. they completely close of entire parts of the city. when you watch eurovision on saturday from turin, you would have seen the stadium with thousands and thousands of people, but not only that, performers, delegation, and i think it is also the commentators. you have to find it in a way which makes sure everyone is safe and secure. as you have seen, president zelensky has talked about how symbolic it would be and powerful it would be, but also just for the people of ukraine, how emotional it would be to have it in kyiv next summer.— emotional it would be to have it in kyiv next summer. let's talk about britain. kyiv next summer. let's talk about britain- no — kyiv next summer. let's talk about britain. no nil— kyiv next summer. let's talk about britain. no nil points! _ kyiv next summer. let's talk about britain. no nil points! yes, - britain. no nil points! yes, normally — britain. no nil points! yes, normally i'm _ britain. no nil points! yes, normally i'm talking - britain. no nil points! yes, normally i'm talking about| britain. no nil points! yes, - normally i'm talking about how we have done so badly. what has been so great this year is not only the phenomenal performance by sam ryder, but also down to the fact that it seems the bbc and the people who decide who to send forward have
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really listened to the feedback. let's have a quick listen because he is there. there is nothing but space. and i want to go home. so, you are saying then the effort that they has been to make sure it was a top entry. that they has been to make sure it was atop entry-— was a top entry. yes, the years there was — was a top entry. yes, the years there was a — was a top entry. yes, the years there was a mentality - was a top entry. yes, the years there was a mentality that - was a top entry. yes, the years there was a mentality that we i was a top entry. yes, the years - there was a mentality that we have to send a eurovision style pops onto it, and i think there was also a sense that it really didn't matter so much about the performance because so many people were saying, oh, the reason we perform so badly is down to brexit, it is down to what europe thinks of us as a nation. and actually, those of eurovision fans have been saying for years it is just because we don't send anyone good enough. there are some things we could not control, for example the order that we were placed in. but we were at the point
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of the contest that tends to have the highest viewing figures. but also, sam ryder came along with a song that i think would have been having airplay if it wasn't even in eurovision. someone told me yesterday that it was played on capital radio. capital don't normally play eurovision entries. i think it was the fact that we managed to have a song that really shone through and stood out, and also there were so many ballads on saturday night, so something distinctive. just to go from zero points to something like 436 points, phenomenal. and it builds hopefully something for next year, too. that’s something for next year, too. that's where i something for next year, too. that's where i was — something for next year, too. that's where i was going — something for next year, too. that's where i was going to _ something for next year, too. that's where i was going to go _ something for next year, too. that's where i was going to go because - something for next year, too. that's where i was going to go because in i where i was going to go because in the classic way is all doom and gloom or it's all amazing. have we now crack to? _ gloom or it's all amazing. have we now crack to? i _ gloom or it's all amazing. have we now crack to? i think _ gloom or it's all amazing. have we now crack to? i think certainly - now crack to? i think certainly focusing on a performer who knows what the experience of being in eurovision is and embraces it, sam ryder was already a big presence on tick—tock. you could really feel that he wanted to be a part of the eurovision system, that he understood it and got the fans
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involved. if you look at some of the most recent winners, they have gone on to be in the billboard charts, but also playing live because they are phenomenal performers. the ratings on saturday, it was the second highest viewing figures for eurovision this century. the highest in more than ten years. that is down to the amount of young people watching it because theyjust love it as a big music spectacle. there is this idea that eurovision is nonsense, and it is, but it can also be a massive opportunity for new artists, and hopefully next year our entry will be just the same, somebody who really wants to catapult themselves onto the world stage. catapult themselves onto the world sta . e. . catapult themselves onto the world sta . e. s , ~ , catapult themselves onto the world state. s , ~ , , stage. and 'ust keep building. quali stage. and just keep building. quality nonsense! _ stage. and just keep building. quality nonsense! i— stage. and just keep building. quality nonsense! i am - stage. and just keep building. | quality nonsense! i am always stage. and just keep building. - quality nonsense! i am always for quality nonsense.— quality nonsense! i am always for quality nonsense. thank you, nice to see me. quality nonsense. thank you, nice to see me- -- — quality nonsense. thank you, nice to see me- -- is— quality nonsense. thank you, nice to see me- -- is a _ quality nonsense. thank you, nice to see me. -- is a you. _ if you've just finished the milk and you're about to throw the plastic bottle in the recycling hang on a moment because you might need to make a note of it first.
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that's because today is the first day of the big plastic count, the uk's biggest ever investigation into how much household plastic waste we throw away. here's our climate and environment correspondentjonah fisher. every year, each of us, on average, produces about 400 kilos of household waste. 44% of it is then recycled. this is one of the biggest recycling plants in britain — in southwark, in south london. this facility deals with the recycling for about two million people every year. that's 150,000 tonnes. the number—one rule is if you're not sure, don't put it in your recyclable bin. with the ball, that baseball ball, that needs to be removed. when we collect the waste in the streets, we ask the general public to put plastics, glass, metals and paper in the same bin. so the role of this facility is to separate this material. the top few things that we are
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seeing coming to our facilities and which should not would be the things like textiles — clothes. we see shoes, jumpers, etc. it can be recycled, but not on the kerb—side collection. it needs to be at a household waste recycling centre. we see a lot of, like, coffee cups. it can be recycled — again, if it's brought back to the the shop or the store where you bought your coffee. check on your local council's website where all the guidance are provided and usually you get the contact details if you're unsure. so this feels like the end of the process here in this plant. absolutely. so at the very end. so you can see the different fractions. we've got all the plastics together — it will go to another plant to be sorted and recycled. we've got the cardboard and the paper, which will go directly to a paper mill to be recycled into new piece of cardboard and paper. and, finally, we've got the metals. of those, plastic is the hardest to recycle. but there are some success stories.
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each different type of plastic needs a different processing plant. this one in east london, it processes milk bottles. you can see all these bales here. these are all milk bottles that we use at home and have been sorted and brought here. now, this plant is a big one. it processes about 400 million milk bottles every year. it works 24 hours a day, round the clock. that's about 10% of the milk bottles that we use in the uk. the bottles are chopped up with their tops on and then a machine sorts the plastic by colour. so this is the end product. these are white plastic pellets — very much like lentils, in fact. now, tim, this is what's come out at the end here. what happens to these now? so what we're going to do with this is make new milk bottles.
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and these milk bottles can come back here and create a circular loop to recycle them again and again. just over half our recycling is processed here. the rest is sent abroad. daniel webb is the founder of everyday plastic. they've put the count together alongside greenpeace. welcome, thank you forjoining us. you counted your own plastic waste every day for a year, didn't you? what was that like? yes, i did. good morning. so, yes, it was a massive learning experience. i really wanted to understand my own personal impact on the plastic problem, and ijust wanted to get a more in—depth insight into my plastic footprint. so yes, i did this time the experiment, i counted every single bit of plastic waste that i created for a whole year. the experience changed my life. ifelt that
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for a whole year. the experience changed my life. i felt that if it did that for me, it improved my understanding and reduced water used, and encouraged me to get active, then what could it do on a national scale and that's where we at the moment. 0ver national scale and that's where we at the moment. over 170,000 national scale and that's where we at the moment. 0ver170,000 people have signed up to take part. and at the moment. over170,000 people have signed up to take part.— have signed up to take part. and so the intention _ have signed up to take part. and so the intention being, _ have signed up to take part. and so the intention being, from _ have signed up to take part. and so the intention being, from what - have signed up to take part. and so the intention being, from what you | the intention being, from what you are saying, that when people actually focus on what is happening in their own household, they will change habits and behaviour? yes. i think it is more _ change habits and behaviour? yes. i think it is more about _ change habits and behaviour? yes. i think it is more about firstly, - change habits and behaviour? yes. i think it is more about firstly, the - think it is more about firstly, the big plastic count is the biggest investigation by the uk into household plastic waste. we are all doing our bit to recycle, but plastic waste is still everywhere. something doesn't add up there. we want to push for the change that we need, and we need help to do that. we are encouraging people across the country to count their plastic for just one week, to submit their data into our website, and then that will
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generate their plastic footprint, which will help them to understand their use, but it will also contribute to vital evidence that we will use to present to the government, to supermarkets, to retailers, to really push for the change that we need to tackle the plastic crisis. change that we need to tackle the plastic crisis-— change that we need to tackle the lastic crisis. ., «s , ., , . plastic crisis. thank you very much. danielwebb, _ plastic crisis. thank you very much. daniel webb, founder _ plastic crisis. thank you very much. daniel webb, founder of _ plastic crisis. thank you very much. daniel webb, founder of everyday l daniel webb, founder of everyday plastic. the libel court battle between footballers' wives coleen rooney and rebekah vardy resumes in the high court in london this morning. let's talk to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson who's at the high court. what happens today, colin? yes, we arejust what happens today, colin? yes, we are just waiting for them to arrive. they often arrive at about 10am, and coleen rooney will be cross—examined further this morning. 0n coleen rooney will be cross—examined further this morning. on friday she was in the witness box and we heard her describe the post where she accused rebekah vardy of being the league of her private information to
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the sun newspaper as her last resort. we learned from her witness statement that three times she had tried to settle this out of court. we also heard rebekah vardy �*s barrister say to coleen rooney, just because you believe something, that does not make it true. he gave the example of, if you believe derby county are going to win the premiership in two years time, that does not mean it is going to happen. the derby county manager, wayne rooney, her husband, was sitting on the front row and managed to stay completely blank in the face while that exchange was going on. what is going to be happening this afternoon, once coleen rooney has finished giving her evidence, her legal team will be calling witnesses, including joe mclaughlin, the brother of coleen rooney, and who runs her social media accounts. we will hear from the likes of mark whittle, a former media manager of the fa. we expect this to lead to questions about the famous incident in 2016, the england— wales game in
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the euros, when rebekah vardy moved seats to be behind coleen rooney. what the rooney legal team says this proves is that rebecca vu —— rebekah vardy is someone who is a fame hungry and wanted to be in the paper. we will get these extra witnesses being called. we paper. we will get these extra witnesses being called. we can see over our witnesses being called. we can see over your shoulder, _ witnesses being called. we can see over your shoulder, a _ witnesses being called. we can see over your shoulder, a huge - witnesses being called. we can see over your shoulder, a huge number witnesses being called. we can see i over your shoulder, a huge number of photographers and reporters there. so much interest in this outside the court. what is the atmosphere like inside the court? it is court. what is the atmosphere like inside the court?— inside the court? it is very, very intense. there _ inside the court? it is very, very intense. there is _ inside the court? it is very, very intense. there is only _ inside the court? it is very, very intense. there is only about - inside the court? it is very, very intense. there is only about 40 | intense. there is only about 40 people allowed inside, and when you sit down in the press seats, you are so close to everybody. it has been fascinating, watching the body language, the way that when wayne rooney and coleen rooney arrived, and when rebekah vardy arrived, they did not look at each other at all. but when rebekah vardy took to the witness box, coleen rooney said at her the whole time. wayne rooney has got through all of this by clasping
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his hands and looking into the middle distance with absolutely no expression on his face. also worth saying, the reason whyjamie expression on his face. also worth saying, the reason why jamie vardy, rebekah vardy �*s footballing husband has not been in court is that because he has been playing for leicester city. since this trial has started he has played two games and scored four goals, so at least one person is having a good time. thank you, colin. let's catch up on the weather now. hello, matt. good morning. this is a familiar scene to many of you this morning. grey skies in belfast, and rain, but bear with it. many of you we will see something much brighter. brighter skies already with us on the south coast of england. you can see where the persistent rain is, it is easing away from north—east england, pushing through central scotland with another batch of showers pushing into northern ireland. showers across northern england, down towards the wash weather has been some thunder
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recently, and then more gathering towards wales and the south—west. they will push north, more sunshine developing either side. it is a case of keep something waterproof to hand if you are in southern parts. some sunshine will make it feel humid, but the skies will darken every so often, and they could be a thundering downpour coming your way. northern ireland will brighten up later, more thunderstorms later. the same, too, for much of northern england. across scotland it is going to be a grey day without mix of rain coming and going and the best of the sunshine in checking. an easterly breeze will make it feel cool across mainland scotland. 11—15 c here. 18 or19 mainland scotland. 11—15 c here. 18 or 19 in northern ireland, and in england and wales a humid afternoon in those sunny moments with temperatures up to 22 celsius. it does have an impact on pollen levels. with the sunshine after recent rain means high levels in the south of england and where is in particular. this evening and overnight, showers fading away. persistent rain in scotland pushing
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north towards shetland. lots of low cloud around. most will become dry, and it will be a humid night but not quite as warm as last night. on tuesday, whether france are pushing in off the atlantic and they are starting to drag in the windsor from france, which will make things even more humid. the weatherfronts. to activate through the day around the irish coasts, some heavy rain here. elsewhere, any early morning mist and fog will clear and lots of sunshine through the morning. hazy sunshine through the morning. hazy sunshine into the afternoon, reaching 26 in the south—east corner. the warmest day of the year so far. 20 celsius in the far north of scotland. the heavy rain will work across the country tuesday night into wednesday, and on the other side of this whether front means we will not have such a humid day on wednesday. a few showers gathering to the south and the west. that is how your weather looks. goodbye.
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shooting on this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the uk prime minster borisjohnson heads to belfast to urge the northern ireland assembly to resume power—sharing, as ministers prepare new laws to override parts of the brexit deal. president biden will visit buffalo, new york, where a gunman killed ten people at a supermarket, in what's being investigated as a racially motivated extremist attack. we'll be live in the city. nato says moscow's invasion strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling as one of the biggest ever nato military exercises in the baltics gets under way later today in estonia. the queen attends the final night of the royal windsor horse show — the first big event to mark the platinum jubilee. and stargazers across the world were treated to a stunning and unusual sight — a super blood moon.

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