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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 16, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson heads to belfast to urge the northern ireland assembly to resume power—sharing, as ministers prepare plans to override parts of the brexit deal. ukraine claims its troops have reached the russian border near kharkiv. driving russians away from the city. price regulator ofgem will try to avoid price shocks in the future. i have made timetables to keep myself organised. ifeel have made timetables to keep myself organised. i feel prepared have made timetables to keep myself organised. ifeel prepared but have made timetables to keep myself organised. i feel prepared but at the same time i'm really nervous. and the stargazers across the world
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were treated to a truly stunning rare sight, notjust a blood moon but a super blood moon. in the past few minutes, the prime minister borisjohnson has arrived at hillsborough castle for talks with the main northern ireland parties to urge them to resume power—sharing. the largest unionist party the dup is currently refusing to take part in the government of northern ireland because of the post—brexit trading arrangements with the eu, known as the northern ireland protocol. uk government is expected to introduce legislation which would allow ministers to override parts of that protocol. speaking to the belfast telegraph in an interview published this morning, borisjohnson is of the protocol is now out of date and changes are
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needed. let's cross to hillsborough castle to our island correspondence. good afternoon. in castle to our island correspondence. good afternoon.— good afternoon. in the last few minutes, boris _ good afternoon. in the last few minutes, boris johnson - good afternoon. in the last few minutes, boris johnson has - good afternoon. in the last few - minutes, boris johnson has arrived minutes, borisjohnson has arrived here at hillsborough castle just outside belfast to prepare to meet the five biggest party in the northern ireland assembly. the election to that assembly 11 days ago produced significant changes in the political landscape. sinn fein the political landscape. sinn fein the irish nationalist party won the most number of seats for the first time. also the cross community alliance party more than double its number is to move up from fifth place to third. it is the party that is now the second—largest, the dup, who hold the key really to unlocking this whole dispute that is holding up this whole dispute that is holding up the restoration of a power—sharing devolved government. so mrjohnson says this afternoon he is going to try to encourage the dup to change its position, go back into government with the other parties, though nobody is expecting there to
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be major movements. the prime minister is on the move, heading across the trade border between great britain and northern ireland. his objective, he says, is to try to get goods moving across the irish sea more quickly. borisjohnson is planning legislation which would give him the power to change parts of the northern ireland protocol. but eu leaders are urging him not to, and insist the sticking points can be resolved through negotiation. the willingness of the european commission and of ireland to try to accommodate those concerns is very much there. what we cannot do is accept that the british government would act unilaterally, they would pass legislation to effectively breach international law, to set aside elements of a treaty that, of course, this prime minister was central to designing and putting in place. because that will cause an awful lot more problems than it will solve. relations between london and brussels are, again, having huge implications
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for northern ireland and vice versa. the democratic unionist party believes the protocol amounts to an economic barrier with england, scotland and wales, which damages northern ireland's place in the uk. under the rules of devolution in northern ireland, unionists and irish nationalists have to agree to share power for a devolved government to be formed. that means the dup has a veto, and it insists it will not go into a coalition unless the trade border is removed. i want to move forward, i want the political institutions to be working for everyone in northern ireland. but today the ball is firmly at the foot of the prime minister. let's see what he has to say, but, more fundamentally, what he has to do. borisjohnson has indicated he wants to keep negotiating with the eu. writing in the belfast telegraph he said...
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but he suggested the new legislation would give him the means to take action if a deal isn't reached. saying... commentators think it is unlikely the prime minister will be able to persuade the dup to change its position today. there is no immediate sign of a restoration, they have 2a weeks to try to resolve this. but no one is betting there will be an early resumption of devolved power sharing. most politicians in stormont broadly support the protocol as a way of managing the fallout from brexit. sinn fein says a unilateral move by the uk government would deepen political instability. this is a place where politics is always delicately poised, but this week is particularly pivotal. politicians from a few different parties have already been arriving
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here at hillsborough, some prominent members of sinn fein are currently involved in a demonstration which is happening not farfrom me here. protesters are demanding that the protocol, in essence, stays and also they are protesting about the government's plans to investigate the past here in northern ireland. legislation expected to be introduced later this week which would set up a new agency that would open up a recovery process where families could get information about what happened to their loved ones and if a paramilitary member does not cooperate they will be there to process them. on the brexit issue, the northern ireland protocol and borisjohnson can expect to hear a very different perspective on the different parties that will be speaking to him inside that grand building this afternoon. i5 speaking to him inside that grand building this afternoon. is it speaking to him inside that grand building this afternoon.— building this afternoon. is it fair to say that _ building this afternoon. is it fair to say that this _ building this afternoon. is it fair to say that this is _ building this afternoon. is it fair to say that this is a _ building this afternoon. is it fair to say that this is a kind - building this afternoon. is it fair to say that this is a kind of - to say that this is a kind of diplomatic exercise not one with much likelihood of altering what
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happens on the protocol? the talks that really matter are the ones that happen between the british government, the irish government as part... and the rest of the european union? , ~ ., , union? yes, i think that is true. reall , union? yes, i think that is true. really, northern _ union? yes, i think that is true. really, northern ireland - union? yes, i think that is true. really, northern ireland is- union? yes, i think that is true. really, northern ireland is not i union? yes, i think that is true. i really, northern ireland is not the first time is finding itself on the front line of the fallout from brexit. one of the reasons why brexit. one of the reasons why brexit has been so contentious here is that many would say it goes to the heart of identity politics, that basic sense of britishness or irishness that derives so much of politics here. there has been a slight change to borisjohnson in that article he wrote in the belfast times, a major change but the cross—country alliance party which regards itself as neither unionist or nationalist has had a in support and another third biggest party in the assembly. there voice at the talks table will be a lot larger than the last time borisjohnson arrived in town. however, i don't think that anybody will be expecting
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any sudden movement on the restoration of a devolved government. if the dup is persuaded that the government's moves in westminster to bring forward legislation, announced legislation to deal with its concerns over the protocol, the dup may unblock the devolved assembly. at present, it is blocking the assembly at stormont from assembling and we could see restoration of the assembly, some debates, committee hearing before we go to the next stage and the prospect of reviving the devolved government becoming viable. chris page at hillsborough castle in northern ireland, thank you very much. in brussels now is suzanne lynch who is the author of a book and a northern ireland journalist. thank you very much a being with us on bbc news this afternoon. where do you think we are in this process of changes to the protocol? i in this process of changes to the rotocol? ~ , ., ., _ protocol? i think it is fair to say that the attention _ protocol? i think it is fair to say that the attention of _ protocol? i think it is fair to say that the attention of the - protocol? i think it is fair to say that the attention of the eu - protocol? i think it is fair to sayj that the attention of the eu has protocol? i think it is fair to say - that the attention of the eu has not beenin that the attention of the eu has not been in brexit over the last few
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months. people are very exercised by the war in ukraine and getting a coherent eu response to that. however, there really is a sense in brussels that brexit is back and we are back to some kind of brinkmanship that we saw throughout the process between the european union on one side and the british government on the other. today, the irish foreign minister is in town for a foreign affairs meeting. he is meeting maros sefcovic, the eu commission's brexit point man, if you like, for talks. also due to talk to liz truss the british foreign secretary. on wednesday, maros sefcovic will meet the matter here on the northern ireland protocol update. this will really be the first time i think the eu member states will be getting a big briefing, if you like, by the commission on this. they have not been that interested in it, but now it is coming back with a bang. so after that meeting on wednesday, we should get more of a sense of what all the different eu countries feel about this issue at the moment. haw
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about this issue at the moment. how much of a problem _ about this issue at the moment. how much of a problem is the trust question for the british in brussels these days? i question for the british in brussels these days?— these days? i think there is an issue, there _ these days? i think there is an issue, there has _ these days? i think there is an issue, there has been - these days? i think there is an issue, there has been a - these days? i think there is an issue, there has been a lot - these days? i think there is an issue, there has been a lot of| issue, there has been a lot of personalities around this. michel barnierfor a long time brexit coordinator, now maros sefcovic. there was hope that the appointment of liz truss as foreign secretary to replace david frost as the brexit negotiator would kind of spur new momentum. that doesn't seem to have happened. what has happened is that over the last few weeks and months really, the negotiations have been going on but they were put on hold to another northern ireland elections to happen. now they have happened, we have political impasse in northern ireland and now this is now coming back onto the agenda. i think the message is that the eu is prepared to compromise, prepared to work within the confines of the northern ireland protocol agreed by both sides, but it is not going to reopen the negotiations completely. so i think a lot of the response
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will be what comes from london tomorrow, we are expecting a move by the government to begin overriding part of the protocol. the details of that, how far they go, i think will inform the reaction here. one last thou~ht inform the reaction here. one last thought on this, _ inform the reaction here. one last thought on this, i _ inform the reaction here. one last thought on this, i noticed that - thought on this, i noticed that simon company in his remarks in brussels was saying that effectively we should be trying to accommodate other positions, in other words, we have to be flexible. presumably the irish government knows better than any other government in the eu how important it is to get the combination. is an understanding from the brussels site that may be borisjohnson found from the brussels site that may be boris johnson found in from the brussels site that may be borisjohnson found in slightly in the position that david cameron and theresa may found themselves in? even though britain and the uk or britain is no longer in the eu, whereby he is being pulled quite hard from one side and he needs them to give him, in a sense, a way out? yes, i think there is a sense that there are no easy answers here and that northern ireland has been a conundrum, a political issue in lots
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of ways for decades now. and brexit, unfortunately, accentuated that. the last few years have been trying to get a solution to that. the issue now is that how far are they prepared to go? i do agree that the eu would be aware that they need to give something that borisjohnson can sell to the dup. there have been some signs this week with the language with the dup that maybe their demands were softening a bit. because they don't want to completely rewrite the protocol, they would expect some checks —— accept some checks. i think the thing to look at is customs checks, how do you make sure that some of the goods going into northern ireland that will stay in northern ireland that will stay in northern ireland and not go into the republic of ireland and into the eu, that they have less checks? i think the discussions now would be about how to check and achieve that. if they can achieve that, i think that will be an important move, because it has been one of the main request of the unionist community. they are saying
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there is still room for compromise, that they are still going to go back to the negotiating table, there will be a long time to run on this before we get to the point where a real breakdown which could ultimately get to the table. . ~ , breakdown which could ultimately get to the table. ., ~ i. , . , to the table. thank you very much my suzanne lynch- _ to the table. thank you very much my suzanne lynch. let _ to the table. thank you very much my suzanne lynch. let me _ to the table. thank you very much my suzanne lynch. let me bring - to the table. thank you very much my suzanne lynch. let me bring you - to the table. thank you very much my suzanne lynch. let me bring you a i suzanne lynch. let me bring you a bit of breaking news. we will go to stockholm now to the news conference taking place. there is a swedish prime minister on the right. she has confirmed within the last couple of minutes that sweden will formally apply for membership of nato and that the accession to nato should not take more than one year. the finality is have begun as a result of discussions in the swedish parliament. i think it is possible that the gentleman there is the leader of the principal opposition in sweden. the rest being we are united on this. sweden perhaps more than finland have been divided politically on whether or not to
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join nato. the opposition party was pushing quite hard on this for a while now. sweden's ruling party have been more divided on the question. they decided at the weekend to support it. that was what needed to be unblocked and here we have the news conference in stockholm. if we can get a bit of that translated into english to play out to you, we will do so a little later. but that is to confirm that sweden is formally applied to join nato. ukrainian forces have been retaking territory in north—eastern areas of the country, as russian forces focus on the donbas region further south. it comes as nato officials say russia's strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling amid heavy losses and fierce resistance. one of the biggest ever nato military exercise in the baltics gets under way in estonia involving ten countries, including the uk, us
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finland and sweden. james waterhouse reports from ukraine. "we have made it mr, president. we are here." where these ukrainian soldiers say they are is in the kharkiv region on the russian border. the invaders seem to have left the area surrounding ukraine second's largest city, kharkiv. leaving behind now familiar trails. translation: the russians left really quickly. _ they didn't have time to loot much. we saw what we think were the headquarters. many positions were abandoned, flak jackets and helmets lying around. as the russians focus more on the east, so is nato. carrying out its biggest ever exercises in latvia and estonia — ten countries, 15,000 troops. belarus is conducting its own military training close to the polish border. it's russia's ally and was a big facilitator in its invasion of ukraine.
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nato thinks ukraine could actually get itself in a position to win this war, but that would rely on two things — either the russians retreating completely, something that is looking very unlikely, or the ukrainians themselves forcing them out. president zelensky has already admitted he doesn't have the military means to free cities, as written there, like mariupol. translation: we continue very complicated and delicate - negotiation to save our people from mariupol, from azovstal. we deal with this issue on a daily basis, and the main thing is for agreements to be fulfilled. someone listening closely to that is yevheniy. his 24—year—old son is one of the hundreds of trapped ukrainian fighters there. translation: | understand | that the authorities are doing as much as they can, but of course more needs to be done because we need the results, not the process. do you think your son
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is going to survive this? and does your son think he's going to survive this? i am confident. it is all i have right now, it is what helps me to wake up in the morning. the last stand at mariupol steelworks are a reminder that this war is far from over. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. the american restaurant mcdonald has its permanent closure in the russian market and also its business in the country to a local buyer. our russia editor steve rosenberg, who bought one of the first big max after queueing for three hours back in the early 90s when mcdonald's first arrived in moscow, told us how significant this is and notjust for his diet. significant this is and not 'ust for his diet. ~ �*.,. ., ., significant this is and not 'ust for his diet. ~ ., ., .,, his diet. well, macdonald has temporarily — his diet. well, macdonald has temporarily shut _ his diet. well, macdonald has
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temporarily shut its _ his diet. well, macdonald has i temporarily shut its restaurants across russia back in march, when a lot of international companies and global brands had suspended their operations. the fact that mcdonald's has not come out and said, "that is it, we are selling up and pulling out," i think that is recognition of the reality really that things are not going to return to normal here, that what the kremlin because its special military operation and what most of the world because russia's war has changed things long term. so mcdonald's issued a statement in which it said that only a business in russia was no longer tenable or consistent with mcdonald's�* values. this really is the end of an era, remember when the first mcdonald's restaurant opened in russia way back in 1990, back in the ussr. there was such excitement come up such huge crowds and i had to queue for three hours to get in. remember that day american burgers and fries and pies and they really were a symbol that day of moscow embracing the west,
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fast hot food to help end the cold war. but fast forward 32 years, things have changed and basically russia and the west have lost their appetite for one another because russia's offensive in ukraine has sparked international condemnation and sanctions on the kremlin accuses the west of threatening russia. steve rosenberg in moscow. here a police investigation is annoying after a three—year—old boy died following a suspected dog attack in mill road in greater manchester. our correspondent is at the scene. hello to you. this is a horrible story. than to you. this is a horrible story. an awful to you. this is a horrible story. in awful tragedy. and inventors we re were called to a farm down a lane to i am now yesterday lunchtime. what found them to call the police and the police came in. it taken to hospital but as a result of his injuries, he died shortly after arriving there. police say they are
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treating this as a criminal investigation. they see that there may have been other incidents in the past that they are investigating at the moment. they see the injuries that the little boy received it looked as if they were caused by a dog. down at the farm itself, there is a public pathway which leads through the middle of the farm and from that pathway you can see a forensic tent and you can see two clear plastic shield that the police were using to protect themselves during the incident. the investigation is being led by a police officer who said that this is a terrible tragedy for everyone involved and that they are treating it as a criminal investigation, that they are very keen to hear from anyone else who has any information and for them to get in touch with the police. the police are hoping to release more details about this data on this afternoon.— on this afternoon. thank you very much. plans have been announced to review the energy price cap to try to keep down gas and intercity costs for
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consumers. the cap, set by the regulator often, rose by more than 50% last month bringing millions of households and seeing their bills rise. ofgem said more recent price cut would reflect the more recent rises. let's talk to peter smith, who is director of policy and national energy action, a charity working in england, wales and northern ireland. peter, let me ask you the festival. more frequent... presumably the higher cap means that people will find out more frequently where their bills are going to go up? but it has a bit of a sting in the tail, doesn't it?— the tail, doesn't it? sadly, we thinkthis _ the tail, doesn't it? sadly, we thinkthis will— the tail, doesn't it? sadly, we think this will significantly - the tail, doesn't it? sadly, we i think this will significantly reduce the protection that the price cap provides, particularly in the winter months and could lead to significant increases in energy bills at the coldest time of the year. in the context that energy prices continue
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to soar and are likely to remain high for some time, analysts predicting that there could be sustained high energy bills over the next year or two, the risk is that we will see every couple of months significant increases to energy bills. this is at a time when millions of people that we care most about, those on low income or vulnerable consumers, cannot pay their energy bills now. this is very difficult and we are hoping that ofgem, working alongside the uk government, recognise the seriousness of the current situation and do some more bespoke support to help vulnerable people to get through this energy crisis. just on that question _ through this energy crisis. just on that question in _ through this energy crisis. just on that question in the _ through this energy crisis. just on that question in the winter, - through this energy crisis. just on i that question in the winter, because that question in the winter, because thatis that question in the winter, because that is quite important, we should be clear what ofcom is proposing in this consultation which ends on the 14th ofjune, if people want to make contributions they will find the details on the ofgem website. in terms of this, it would mean that
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you could get another big rise in january. immediately after christmas, you could be suddenly whacked with higher bill than you faced in the quarter to october to december. faced in the quarter to october to december-— faced in the quarter to october to december. ., , . december. that is right. the current - rice december. that is right. the current rice ca- december. that is right. the current price can has — december. that is right. the current price cap has a _ december. that is right. the current price cap has a six-month _ december. that is right. the current price cap has a six-month window, | price cap has a six—month window, and face will change every three months now. leading to the situation that you mentioned, that people instead of having certainty from october through to the end of march, they are now midway through winter seeing significant increases to their energy bills. which will put further mental strain on people as well as exacerbating physical ill—health. i well as exacerbating physical ill-health— well as exacerbating physical ill-health. ~ , , ., ill-health. i think this will be a horrible shock _ ill-health. i think this will be a horrible shock for _ ill-health. i think this will be a horrible shock for people - ill-health. i think this will be a horrible shock for people over| ill-health. i think this will be a i horrible shock for people over the last few months, we know it is happening with the international factors and all the rest of it. to mitigate that, is there much more ofcom, ofgem, can do? it is a regulator, but it doesn't make the law. . ., ., ,
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regulator, but it doesn't make the law. ., , , law. the economy is driven with the uk government, _ law. the economy is driven with the uk government, and _ law. the economy is driven with the uk government, and it _ law. the economy is driven with the uk government, and it is _ law. the economy is driven with the uk government, and it is right - law. the economy is driven with the uk government, and it is right that| uk government, and it is right that we highlight the need for uk government to provide further adequate support, particularly to the poorest households. there is much more the regulator ofgem can do. first of all, ofgem are refundable for passing through a lot of the policy costs and operating costs that energy suppliers are liable to. and whilst we don't contest the fact that they need to reflect those costs that suppliers face in people's bills, the way they do that doesn't take any account of people's bills or anything. it is affected in a standing charge which has been soaring for years, but particularly growing in the last six months or so. they can look to better recover those costs in a much fairer way than they do at the moment. in addition to that, they used to provide much greater price protection for prepayment customers
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who are the hardest hit by the energy crisis, unlike direct debit customers, those households on prepayment have seen their bills soar right from day one of the increases in april. and it is right that ofgem, working alongside the uk government, see whether or not they can provide much greater price protection for those prepayment customers, recognising that at least half of those customers have incomes below £18,000 per year and are much more likely to be in very significant energy debt. they are really the hardest hit customers and we would like to see ofgem close down on those two particular issues. peter smith at thai national energy action and his back, thank you very much. charity says dementias are the leading cause of death all the women in the uk. it has been that case since 2011. to mark dementia action week, the charity has spent more than 1000 dementia sufferers and carers and has publish an online
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checklist for dementia. let's cross the winchester and the head of knowledge management at the alzheimer's society had worked on developing the checklist. knowledge management in this context is a real challenge, isn't it, in terms of if you are dealing with a relative or a friend who is living with this disease, in terms of how you communicate, make that communication effective and how you make the person feel safe and secure? yes. person feel safe and secure? yes, with dementia _ person feel safe and secure? yes, with dementia action _ person feel safe and secure? yes, with dementia action week, - person feel safe and secure? is: with dementia action week, we are refocusing on diagnosis and as part of that knowledge management if you like, it is expelling to people what the symptoms are and what might happen if they went to a doctor to get a diagnosis. at the alzheimer's society, we have noticed there are thousands of people with dementia who haven't had that diagnosis yet and i'm missing out on benefits. [30
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and i'm missing out on benefits. do ou and i'm missing out on benefits. do you find situations where the person whose behaviour is causing the concern and their part in it nearest relative have slightly different feelings about this? instant tivoli? —— instinctively? something the person who has the condition doesn't want to know, they have something they don't want to know and are frightened of it, they feel they know what they are going to be told and theyjust don't want know what they are going to be told and they just don't want to know what they are going to be told and theyjust don't want to confront it because it feels too overwhelming? where is the person who is with them needs to know so that they can start doing something to mitigate the impact on the person who has it and everybody around him who has it and everybody around him who love them?— who love them? yes, certainly. for the person — who love them? yes, certainly. for the person with _ who love them? yes, certainly. for the person with the _ who love them? yes, certainly. for the person with the possible - the person with the possible dementia, as you say, it can be quite frightening and daunting to go into the process to be assessed knowing what the outcome might be. but the person... equally, people with dementia content of a lack of insight as well as being in denial, italy might not appreciate how the
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symptoms are affecting them. —— they might not appreciate that. if we check out the benefits of getting the diagnosis, we begin to realise that going through the process, in our survey people said that after having the diagnosis, they wish they had gone earlier because there were more benefits of planning ahead access to support, getting some more treatments. it is a bit of a step to take. you can phone support line and we can talk you through things that we can talk you through things that we realise that the relationship has those tensions, as you say, the person potentially with dementia. often a family member will spot the symptoms because the sufferer will not be aware of them, which is why they go to the doctor and the doctor will ask you to both come along and will ask you to both come along and will speak to both of you. that can be really helpful. i will speak to both of you. that can be really helpful.— be really helpful. i 'ust finally ask ou be really helpful. i 'ust finally ask you if t be really helpful. i 'ust finally ask you if we _ be really helpful. i 'ust finally ask you if we can _ be really helpful. ijust finally ask you if we can quickly - be really helpful. ijust finally ask you if we can quickly run l ask you if we can quickly run through what is on the checklist,
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the highlights, as it were? checklist something we have developed with leading commissions and the royal college of gps. it is something you should print out if you are at all worried about your memory or other symptoms, fill it in and you can take it along to the doctor. it will enable you to have a really horrible conversation and will help the doctor. sometime people keep symptom diaries, this is more specific and will ask you to look at things like memory loss. but if you are having problems with daily living, problems with planning and language, you can fill out this form, take it to the gp and that really starts to be an assessment process to find out. if it is dementia, on the front foot if we get that diagnosis, you can then come to the alzheimer's society and the nhs social care for support people need to get over that barrier without worrying about the diagnosis and take that first step. thank
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without worrying about the diagnosis and take that first step.— and take that first step. thank you very much. — and take that first step. thank you very much. really _ and take that first step. thank you very much, really good _ and take that first step. thank you very much, really good to - and take that first step. thank you very much, really good to talk - and take that first step. thank you very much, really good to talk to l very much, really good to talk to you. very much, really good to talk to ou. . ~' very much, really good to talk to ou. . ~ , ., very much, really good to talk to ou. . ., ,, and very much, really good to talk to yon— and some - very much, really good to talk to l you._ and some helpful you. thank you. and some helpful advice there. _ you. thank you. and some helpful advice there. sign _ you. thank you. and some helpful advice there. sign for _ you. thank you. and some helpful advice there. sign for a _ you. thank you. and some helpful advice there. sign for a look - you. thank you. and some helpful advice there. sign for a look at. you. thank you. and some helpful| advice there. sign for a look at the weather. outbreaks of rain in scotland this afternoon with a cool easterly wind. in northern ireland, england and wales, sunny spells and heavy and thundery downpours which could deliver a lot of rain in a sort space of time. there will be disruption but not everybody will get to see them. for much of wales and the southern half of england it will become dry and increasingly sunny going into this evening. the high temperatures across eastern part of england, the lower parts in eastern scotland with the brain and the onshore wind. the rain moves across the northern isles, if you and fog patches. the story of tomorrow's weather is for outbreaks of rain to become heavier and more widespread across western areas, especially into the afternoon. the head of, it is a warm day in the sunny spells in eastern scotland
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particular through eastern and central parts of england. some of the highest temperatures of the year so far, 26 around the london area with a thunderstorm is possible here to end the day. hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines: borisjohnson heads to belfast — as part of efforts to restore northern ireland's power—sharing government. ukraine says its troops have reached the russian border near kharkiv in the north east, after driving russian forces away from the city. energy bills could change every three months from your proposals. it says it would provide price shocks in the long term. gcse and a—level exams begin for many after the pandemic stop them taking place for
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the last two years. stargazers the last two years. sta rgazers were the last two years. stargazers were in for a treat last night, a stunning and rare sight, notjust any blood moon but a super blood moon. sport now, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh. good afternoon. liverpool are a little bit closer to manchester city in the premier league table than they might have expected today, butjurgen klopp says they're unlikely to get another favour from the leaders, one that would help his own team claim the title on sunday's final day. pep guardiola's side did come from 2—0 down for the first time in his reign at west ham, but the 2—2 draw means that if liverpool win their game in hand the two teams will go into the last match just a point apart. but klopp isn't expecting city to provide them with another slip up when they play aston villa. i don't know when city dropped points at the last time two games in a row, historically so i don't
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expect city to drop points but it has no influence on our game tomorrow. eitherway has no influence on our game tomorrow. either way we go into the last match day are one point behind. it would be the perfect scenario from today's point of view and that's what we will try to do. southampton provide liverpool's opponents for their game in hand tomorrow night. both mo salah and virgil van dijk are signifcant doubts for the match agaisnt ralf hasenhuttl�*s side, with the southampton boss intrigued by the role they could play in who will be eventually crowned champions. it is fantastic for the premier league to have such a close title race. everybody is electrified from this battle and we are now part of this battle and we are now part of this dual if you want —— duel. we took two points, manchester city lost four points against us. against
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liverpool, the first game we lost, so now it is up to us to show that we can be competitive against the top team. the race to qualify for the champions league will also go down to the final day, after arsenal dropped out of the top four after spurs' win over burnley. arsenal's game in hand is tonight at newcastle. they'll start it two points behind spurs, so a win would allow them to go back above their north london rivals as they both likely fight for one spot. how lucky i am to have them, how much they are looking forward to playing on monday and about the challenge ahead because we all know everything we've been through throughout the season and how we might have to fight to be in this position. losing a derby is always painful and you learn a lot through the situation, probably more than any victory, so it's good to go through those moments sometimes.
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the former british number one laura robson has confirmed her retirement from tennis at the age of 28. as a teenager, robson reached the fourth round of the us open and here at wimbledon, as well as winning silver in the mixed doubles with andy murray at the 2012 olympics. she says the decision to retire was forced upon her after having three hip operations. that's why it's difficult because for a long time i did think, if i could just get back out there, if i just had the chance to compete solidly again, then who knows? but ultimately, what's happened has happened and i think overall i'm a much nicer person from it, from going through all of that and i've grown so much that i'm now ok. if i keep looking back thinking what if, then i can't move forward. that's all the sport for now.
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i'll be back in the next hour. the eurovision song contest was memorable for many reasons including the rare feat of uk entry making it to the top half of the leaderboard. 183 points! the to the top half of the leaderboard. 183 oints! ., 183 points! the night and the victory belongs _ 183 points! the night and the victory belongs to _ 183 points! the night and the victory belongs to ukraine i 183 points! the night and the - victory belongs to ukraine thanks to an outpouring of popular support throughout europe. the group had been predicted to take the title following the russian invasion, russia being barred from this year's contest. that's the reaction of the ukrainian... commentatorwho contest. that's the reaction of the ukrainian... commentator who had to follow the programme. the italian host didn't need to do that, they
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did it from home. thank you for joining us. were you broadcasting from home or were you on stage? i was. can you repeat the question? alessandro, thank you for giving up your time from home. what was it like on the night? it your time from home. what was it like on the night?— like on the night? it was fun, it was good. _ like on the night? it was fun, it was good. the _ like on the night? it was fun, it was good, the atmosphere - like on the night? it was fun, it was good, the atmosphere was like on the night? it was fun, it - was good, the atmosphere was great, a little terrifying at the beginning because we didn't have a clue of what we were facing but the atmosphere was great and i've been lucky to share it with two friends, mika and laura, so we can share the
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tension and the happiness together. it's a big challenge, i'm sure your bosses wouldn't say this publicly but there must be times when tv executives say, oh, no, we've won because they know how big a deal thatis because they know how big a deal that is taking on this huge event. in the beginning, you have to give when it comes to build a show like this. in the beginning you have to give and spend money but it all comes back at the end so it is a scary but worth it. did comes back at the end so it is a scary but worth it.— scary but worth it. did you feel when you _ scary but worth it. did you feel when you were _ scary but worth it. did you feel when you were standing - scary but worth it. did you feel when you were standing on - scary but worth it. did you feel| when you were standing on the scary but worth it. did you feel - when you were standing on the stage for hours, probably with sore feet, that it was a foregone conclusion this year because of the war? i don't know, to be fair, the crowd in
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the venue were cheering a lot for spain and serbia, for moldova, but surely the guys from ukraine got empathy and i think if you ask them they would prefer not to have this kind of empathy. full stop you think the would kind of empathy. full stop you think they would rather _ kind of empathy. full stop you think they would rather win _ kind of empathy. full stop you think they would rather win on _ kind of empathy. full stop you think they would rather win on their- kind of empathy. full stop you think they would rather win on their own l they would rather win on their own merit? ., , ., ,., , they would rather win on their own merit? ., , ., , ., , merit? for sure, nobody wants the war. but merit? for sure, nobody wants the war- itut i — merit? for sure, nobody wants the war. but i think— merit? for sure, nobody wants the war. but i think the _ merit? for sure, nobody wants the war. but i think the empathy - merit? for sure, nobody wants the war. but i think the empathy is - merit? for sure, nobody wants the war. but i think the empathy is a i war. but i think the empathy is a good sign from the audience. that's what makes — good sign from the audience. that's what makes eurovision _ good sign from the audience. that's what makes eurovision different, i good sign from the audience. that's what makes eurovision different, it| what makes eurovision different, it is ultimately down to the votes of the people watching at home all around europe and an area bigger than what we normally call europe geographically because of all the
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other countries that are part of this annual event. the professionals really liked sam ryder�*s song spaceman, what did you think of it? he's a superfun spaceman, what did you think of it? he's a super fun fella. i spotted him three months ago, i didn't know him three months ago, i didn't know him before, and getting ready for eurovision i bumped into his social media channels and i saw the face and heard the voice because he has the greatest voice, but i saw his face and felt empathy once again for him and said to myself, this guy could win the eurovision because he has the whole package. in could win the eurovision because he has the whole package.— has the whole package. in terms of the challenge _ has the whole package. in terms of the challenge for— has the whole package. in terms of the challenge for ukraine, - has the whole package. in terms of the challenge for ukraine, they've l the challenge for ukraine, they've won, they are in the middle of a war, they are hoping to host it, but presumably everybody is going to
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need a plan b for next year. i don't know if it's — need a plan b for next year. i don't know if it's a _ need a plan b for next year. i don't know if it's a rule _ need a plan b for next year. i don't know if it's a rule or— need a plan b for next year. i don't know if it's a rule or something - need a plan b for next year. i don't know if it's a rule or something but i heard that the country where they won will most likely be the country hosting the next eurovision, but i don't know if it's true or not. for sure, i would don't know if it's true or not. for sure, iwould be don't know if it's true or not. for sure, i would be happy to do it again and i will be happier if it can be done in ukraine because we all know what it would mean. but it doesnt all know what it would mean. but it doesn't have _ all know what it would mean. but it doesn't have to _ all know what it would mean. but it doesn't have to be _ all know what it would mean. but it doesn't have to be in _ all know what it would mean. but it doesn't have to be in the _ all know what it would mean. but it doesn't have to be in the capital, i doesn't have to be in the capital, it can be anywhere in the host country, maybe it could be on the western side rather than in kyiv, the heart of the capital city. whatever happens, do you think italy would be willing to step in again to
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help? could you be honorary ukrainians? i help? could you be honorary ukrainians?— help? could you be honorary ukrainians? i cannot speak for ital , i ukrainians? i cannot speak for italy. i would _ ukrainians? i cannot speak for italy, i would be _ ukrainians? i cannot speak for italy, i would be pleased - ukrainians? i cannot speak for italy, i would be pleased but l ukrainians? i cannot speak for italy, i would be pleased but i | italy, i would be pleased but i really don't know. i don't even know if you would be happy, what do you think? i if you would be happy, what do you think? �* , , ., ~ ., if you would be happy, what do you think? �* ,, .,~ ., , ., ., think? i can't speak on behalf of the bbc, think? i can't speak on behalf of the bbc. the — think? i can't speak on behalf of the bbc, the bbc— think? i can't speak on behalf of the bbc, the bbc is _ think? i can't speak on behalf of the bbc, the bbc is funded - think? i can't speak on behalf of the bbc, the bbc is funded by | the bbc, the bbc is funded by licensed players so there will be people watching right now throwing things at the television if i should dare to rise above my pay grade and say, we'll take it, no problem and other costs that go with it! but i'm sure everybody in europe but wanted to take place next year, another chance to celebrate ukraine's success. are you getting yourself a pink bucket hat to show your solidarity with kalush orchestra? what's that? the solidarity with kalush orchestra? what's that?— solidarity with kalush orchestra? what's that? ., ., , what's that? the hat the lead singer was wearing- — what's that? the hat the lead singer was wearing. oh, _ what's that? the hat the lead singer was wearing. oh, yeah! _ what's that? the hat the lead singer was wearing. oh, yeah! i _ what's that? the hat the lead singer was wearing. oh, yeah! i like - what's that? the hat the lead singer was wearing. oh, yeah! i like and i l was wearing. oh, yeah! i like and i usually wear _ was wearing. oh, yeah! i like and i usually wear them, _ was wearing. oh, yeah! i like and i usually wear them, i've _ was wearing. oh, yeah! i like and i usually wear them, i've got - was wearing. oh, yeah! i like and i usually wear them, i've got plenty| usually wear them, i've got plenty of bucket hats at home. i am going
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to be looking _ of bucket hats at home. i am going to be looking at _ of bucket hats at home. i am going to be looking at your— of bucket hats at home. i am going to be looking at your social - of bucket hats at home. i am going to be looking at your social media i to be looking at your social media later, alessandro, i'm going to be searching for that photograph! alessandro cattelan, a real pleasure to speak to you, thank you for your time and fingers crossed for next year. it time and fingers crossed for next ear. . , , time and fingers crossed for next ear. ., , , , ., , time and fingers crossed for next ear. .,, , , .,, ., ~ time and fingers crossed for next ear. , , ., year. it was my pleasure, thank you, cu s. year. it was my pleasure, thank you, guys- bye- — most gcse and a—level exams start today, the first in—person since 2019. they will be many pupils in england, wales and northern ireland sitting their first formal exam since the start of the pandemic. teachers are warning about a shortage of invigilators and some are worried about catching covid if they go in and sit in the exams. we have spent a day at a school in waiting to see how they have been preparing. coming up in the next couple of weeks, it's absolutely essential that we have a good revision programme. at the deanery church of england high school in wigan, it's final study sessions. when i did my mocks and i got
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the results, i was like, "ah!" chelsea and her classmates have done their mock exams. i had tears coming in my eyes as i was walking in. i just see the paper, all the invigilators just standing at the front with their arms crossed. i'm just like, "oh my days!" the next time they go into the exam room, it will be for real. i want to do a career in medicine, so i obviously want to get them seven, eights and nines to, like, obviously gain offers from university, like maybe universities like manchester, even oxford. i was expecting, considering what we did at revision... catching up in the canteen, it's talk of revision and exam timetables. i've got 21 exams spread out across a month and a half, so sometimes i'll go home and i'll revise for an hour or so, and then i'll go to footballjust to take my mind off it. obviously worry about your grades, but worry about yourself and worry about your mental health. 0k, yeariis, you can put your pens down, please. the government says this year's students will be graded more generously than the last time exams
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were sat in 2019, but they won't get as many top grades as last year, when results were decided by teachers�* assessments. pupils will get formula sheets to use in exams, and there has been advance information for gcses and a—levels. hi, love, you ok? for the deputy head, mrs turner, it's about making pupils believe they can aim high, but there is no doubt anxiety levels are also high. most pupils haven't had any national exams since their sats in primary school. we are seeing children that are presenting to us with really, really difficult emotional...social, emotional, mental health issues. we've got more children, probably triple, quadruple the amount of children that previously would have struggled to go to the exam hall, getting ready for an exam. it's all the stuff you put in beforehand. it's all the practice runs, it's all the getting yourselves ready that they've not had. breathe in. in the library, there's an exam stress workshop. as well as breathing techniques, minnie is on hand to help pupils and staff.
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if pupils are having a difficult day, then they can come into the wellbeing room. they can have a chat with me, they can spend a little time with minnie. she's a very big part of the school. the government says national exams represent a major step back to normality. for these pupils, it's a major step towards their future goals and aspirations. our grades open the doors to what we want to become in this world, and ijust honestly think that the support that the teachers are giving me and giving to the rest of the students as well, obviously, is just really helpful. elaine dunkley, bbc news. borisjohnson is in belfast this afternoon — as part of efforts to restore power—sharing at stormont — as ministers in london prepare to outline plans which would override the post—brexit trade deal. ukraine says its troops have reached the russian border near kharkiv in the north east, after driving russian forces away from the city. energy bills could change every
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three months under new plans. the regulator ofgem claims it will avoid price shocks in the long—term. more than 100 uk festivals are committed to tackling sexual violence and have pledged to take a survivor led approach and that all allegations will be taken seriously. let's talk to kelly bennaton, spokesperson for rape crisis england & wales. firstly, does anyone collate the number of attacks that take place at festivals or on festival sites over the years?— festivals or on festival sites over the ears? , ., , the years? there is no official body that collates _ the years? there is no official body that collates that. _ the years? there is no official body that collates that. you _ the years? there is no official body that collates that. you gov - the years? there is no official body that collates that. you gov did - the years? there is no official body that collates that. you gov did a i that collates that. you gov did a report in 2018 that should festivalgoers had experienced sexual
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assault so we know it happens but there is no official body that collates all of the reports and we know that sexual violence as a crime is vastly underreported and so it would be hard to get a true reflection of that.— would be hard to get a true reflection of that. that raises valid points, _ reflection of that. that raises valid points, anyone - reflection of that. that raises valid points, anyone who's i reflection of that. that raises i valid points, anyone who's been reflection of that. that raises - valid points, anyone who's been to a large music festival, it would be quite a difficult thing to do in any normal circumstances to report an attack of this kind, it's a hard barrier for people to cross, but the practicalities of doing it, it sounds silly, but the practicalities of doing it on a festival site must be an added complication for those who are victims of attacks have this kind of harassment that is making them uncomfortable, never mind being assaulted. ~ , ., ~ assaulted. absolutely and i think festivalgoers— assaulted. absolutely and i think festivalgoers deserve _ assaulted. absolutely and i think festivalgoers deserve to - assaulted. absolutely and i think festivalgoers deserve to know i assaulted. absolutely and i think i festivalgoers deserve to know that if the report sexual assault it will be listened to, they will be
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believed and that those working on site are equipped to handle reports with knowledge and empathy so the purpose of this charter is to show festival attendees that if they do report it, even though it's difficult, that they will be taken seriously, that they will have a space to go and that festivals will have the ability to signpost them on to specialist services afterwards. it's a number of things, notjust whether or not you go to the police, it's straightforward things like medical attention, whether you need somebody to sit down with and spend time with away from the noise and kerfuffle of everything going on at the festival, and a safe space if you feel you are being harassed or endangered, somewhere you can go and know that you will be safe. it's quite a lot for the festivals to sign up to, isn't it, however well—meaning they have been in the past, if they haven't had this before. i suppose a question from
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your organisation was my point of view and most of the public must be, how will be no if they are rightly doing what they say they will to? if a child says to a parent they want to go to a festival, how can they feel confident in saying yes, you can go, notjust because you have friends around you but because if you have trouble or problems there is somebody there who is going to be on your side? bi; is somebody there who is going to be on your side?— on your side? by signing up to the charter and _ on your side? by signing up to the charter and saying _ on your side? by signing up to the charter and saying they _ on your side? by signing up to the charter and saying they have - charter and saying they have specific policies in place for addressing sexual harassment on site, they are also committed to prevention and sharing messages in the lead up to the festival and signposting care for those impacted and they will have training from professionals. the association who have developed this charter will be monitoring festivals to make sure that they are keeping commitments and post—festival season there will
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be interviews with festivalgoers as well as festivals themselves to see where the gaps are and what changes can be made. where the gaps are and what changes can be made-— colleen rooney has been in the witness box at the high court again this morning, as she defends a libel claim made against her by rebekah vardy. our correspondent colin paterson has the latest. coueen colleen rooney went into great detail about her detective work and dining out who was leaking stories from her private instagram to the press —— finding out. we heard how she had tried to figure out who was leaking by putting up fake stories and the focus moved one story, when their basement flooded, made up by coueen their basement flooded, made up by colleen rooney, put on her instagram and only rebekah vardy�*s account had access to it and six days later it appeared in the sun newspaper.
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that's what prompted colleen rooney to put up herfamous that's what prompted colleen rooney to put up her famous accusation. that's what prompted colleen rooney to put up herfamous accusation. she said she never expected it to go as big as it did and she did not expect to be sitting in the high court. as for the wagatha nickname, she found it ridiculous and hated every moment of it. she also asked why she had on a screen grab of a picture of her unveiling a scooby doo baddie, she said she did not want to draw attention to herself and that had been made by somebody else. it finished with rebekah vardy�*s lawyer saying it was her agent, caroline watt, who had been the leak but coueen watt, who had been the leak but colleen rooney would not accept this, she said she did believe that rebekah vardy herself knew exactly what was going on. if you were watching the sky
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overnight, there's a chance you may have an unusual phenomenon — a super blood moon. what's that? well, a blood moon is the result of a total lunar eclipse, when the earth comes between the moon and the sun. the sunlight that reaches the moon passes through the earth's atmosphere. that bends the light and makes the moon's surface appear red. a super blood moon is what you get when it happens while the moon is in its closest orbit to earth, making it appear larger than normal. it's the first super blood moon to appear for two years. let's speak to dr greg brown, who's an astronomer at the royal observatory greenwich. whether you are at home of the observatory, i guess you were glued to the sky overnight.— to the sky overnight. certainly some of us were. — to the sky overnight. certainly some of us were, lots _ to the sky overnight. certainly some of us were, lots going _ to the sky overnight. certainly some of us were, lots going on _ to the sky overnight. certainly some of us were, lots going on here - to the sky overnight. certainly some of us were, lots going on here at. of us were, lots going on here at the observatory. unfortunately not all of us could take part, but certainly a number of us were watching the sky this morning. it’s watching the sky this morning. it's almost 12 hours since it happened so you're a very lively considering
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what time you were up until last night! we appreciate it. can you describe it for us?— night! we appreciate it. can you describe it for us? during a total lunar eclipse. — describe it for us? during a total lunar eclipse, sometimes - describe it for us? during a total lunar eclipse, sometimes known describe it for us? during a total. lunar eclipse, sometimes known as describe it for us? during a total- lunar eclipse, sometimes known as a blood moon, the shadow of the earth begins to cover the surface of the moon, which takes the best part of an hourfor the dark part of moon, which takes the best part of an hour for the dark part of the shadow of the earth to cover the entirety of the moon and then a further hour, the entirety of the shadows covering the moon and turns a deep orange, red colour which is because the light is being bent around the earth by the atmosphere, effectively what you are seeing is every sunrise and sunset on a surface of the earth being projected onto the surface of the moon all at once. ., ., . ., , once. you get a particularly spectacular _ once. you get a particularly spectacular version - once. you get a particularly spectacular version of - once. you get a particularly spectacular version of that. j once. you get a particularly - spectacular version of that. ten times more than the normal sunrise, sunset. you've seen them before, presumably. {lin
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sunset. you've seen them before, presumably-— sunset. you've seen them before, resumabl . ., ., , , , presumably. on a few occasions, yes. how frequently _ presumably. on a few occasions, yes. how frequently does _ presumably. on a few occasions, yes. how frequently does this _ presumably. on a few occasions, yes. how frequently does this happen? - presumably. on a few occasions, yes. j how frequently does this happen? for an how frequently does this happen? fr?" any specific observer on the surface of the earth, you get a lunar eclipse, a total lunar eclipse may be every two years or so, so we had another one a couple of years ago visible from the uk which had this deep red colour as lunar eclipses do, whereas for the entirety of the earth, anywhere on the surface of the earth, they happen maybe twice a year. the earth, they happen maybe twice a ear. ., the earth, they happen maybe twice a ear, ., ., , , ., the earth, they happen maybe twice a ear. ., , ., ., , the earth, they happen maybe twice a ear, ., .,, , ., ., , ., year. for those planning to try and see one in — year. for those planning to try and see one in the _ year. for those planning to try and see one in the best _ year. for those planning to try and see one in the best possible - see one in the best possible position next time it appears, they've probably got a bit of a weight, but where is the best place to experience this from? —— bit of a wait. it to experience this from? -- bit of a wait. , , ., , , . . wait. it depends on the specific ecfi-se. wait. it depends on the specific eclipse- they — wait. it depends on the specific eclipse. they are _ wait. it depends on the specific eclipse. they are visible - wait. it depends on the specific eclipse. they are visible to - eclipse. they are visible to approximately half of the earth when they occur but which half will be dependent on which side of the earth
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at the moon is currently on so for the one we just had, the united states of america, in fact, the entire american continents had fantastic views but for most of the rest of the world you are out of luck. it depends on which total lunar eclipse you are looking at. you've definitely earned a good night's sleep. thank you for telling us about it. put that in the diary for 2032, with any luck. it's been worth waiting for. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. a taste of summer rather than spring in our weather this week. talking about warmth, humidity and also thunderstorms. across southern england last night there was plenty of thundery activity. storms came out of france, moved to southern england, plenty of lightning, weakening into this morning. ahead of that, a broad area of rain
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that continues to track north across scotland today. the same areas that had all the thunder and lightning and downpours last night are seeing some sunshine so far today. keep your umbrella close by. the story of the weather this week is low—pressure to the west, rounded the flow of air containing warmth and humidity but from low pressure weather fronts bringing rain at times and thunderstorms. today the rain is in scotland, although the sunshine in shetland. a cool easterly wind as well. for northern ireland, wales and england, the afternoon has sunny spells but heavy and thundery downpours, it could be a lot of rain in a short space of time. not everybody will catch them. much of wales and southern england, it will be turning drier and more sunny niu this evening. warmer in eastern parts of england come up to around 23. cool in the rain and the onshore wind and easter in scotland. the rain will push across
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the northern isles tonight as showers and thunderstorms elsewhere fade away. largely dry for the second half of the right, some mist and fog patches. just eastern scotland and north—east england that dip into single figures. a lot of fine weather to begin tomorrow. the story tomorrow is about the rain as it earns more widespread and heavy across western parts especially in the afternoon. and a very warm and sunny spell ahead of that across eastern parts, warmer in eastern scotland, but towards the south—east of england the highest temperature of the year so far, around 26. some heavy and thundery downpours across southern and eastern parts going into tuesday evening and overnight. all of that clear through by wednesday morning and we're left with a few showers around to move to scotland especially in the morning. another area of rain will take its time to head towards northern ireland later in the day. ahead of that, warm and sunny spells, showers and thunderstorms breaking out again late in the day through parts of england and wales. temperatures may be a notch down on wednesday. they trail off a bit more as we go towards the end of the week and after a largely fine thursday, showers and rain again on friday.
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with a thunderstorm is possible here
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to end the day. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 3pm... borisjohnson is in belfast this afternoon as part of efforts to restore power—sharing at stormont. sinn fein described the meeting with mrjohnson is tough. ukraine says its troops have reached the russian border near kharkiv in the north east, after driving russian forces away from the city. first finland, now sweden confirms they will apply to join the nato alliance — upending its long history of military neutrality. energy bills could change every three months under new plans. the regulator ofgem claims it will avoid price shocks in the long term.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister borisjohnson is at hillsborough castle for talks with the main northern ireland parties, to urge them to resume power—sharing. let's hear what the president of sinn fein has to say about that meeting with a power can be restored. meeting with a power can be restored-— backed by the british government. it is an appalling vista. do you any clear at this point about the talks_ do you any clear at this point about the talks on— do you any clear at this point about the talks on a time period of the resurrection of the executive? we have no resurrection of the executive? - have no clarity by this absolute clarity and certainty that the time for the executive is now. the time to appoint a first and deputy first minister is now, to appoint a speaker to the assembly is now. people have had the election, it has been a long election campaign, goodness knows, now is the time for people to get back to work. here is the real kicker, there is an
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established mechanism through the joint committee to deal with those elements of the protocol that need to be smoothed out, finessed and altered. the prime minister is aware of that, the government in dublin is aware of that, the european institutions are aware of that, and yet here we find ourselves in a situation where the british prime minister is quite willing in coordination with the dup with very, very unacceptable obstructionist tactics. what that says to the population, people who are struggling now to pay for their groceries and to keep the show on the road in their own homes and their own families is just astounding. it is not acceptable in the north of ireland, dare say it would not be acceptable anywhere else in england, in borisjohnson's own backyard, would he deem it acceptable for one minute to say to struggling families and workers, "struggle on. struggle on while we
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hold a veto on the government that can deliver for you." hold a veto on the government that can deliverfor you." it hold a veto on the government that can deliver for you." it is not accessible there or here, and we have made that clear to him. we did not manage to convince him of the error of his ways, but be very, very clear that we will persist on these matters. d0 clear that we will persist on these matters. ,., , ., clear that we will persist on these matters. ,., i. ., matters. do you not...? inaudible _ inaudible worst that we needed to hear where that the british government would honour the established mechanisms and channels that have been agreed to smooth out, to consider and to resolve the hiccups, the difficulties that arrive, arise from the location of the protocol. everybody agrees there is no difference, no division of mines on that matter. where the line is drawn is when the british government says with its chest to start out that they will act unilaterally, that they will act unilaterally, that they will act unilaterally, that they will legislate unilaterally. and where the british government very cynically, i have to say, says
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to unionism or a section of political unionism that they can have a veto on progress, they can have no such veto. democracy has to rule in at the end, and the democratic wishes of the people have to be respected. and be very clear, i am flanked by two former ministers of the executive and the first minister elect, everybody is very clear that whatever people's differences or points of divergence, everybody wants government. everybody wants the executive established. what we needed to hear from borisjohnson and we need to hear yet is that of the executive must be formed. no buts or no conditionality and no unionist veto. inaudible we expect to see delivery in terms of abortion services, the cultural
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package within the next week. that has been given. on the issue of legacy stop we have challenged the british governor's approach to this. they are clearly amiss delay proposes unacceptable and has roundly rejected by all shades of opinion here on the island of ireland. and indeed condemned internationally. the alternative proposal is, we don't know. what we do know is that many, many moons ago at stormont house, agreement was sound, agreement was found, a consensus was found amongst the political parties here in the british government, the tories have been really, really very negative and have held back those proposals. it seems to me that you are suggesting _ it seems to me that you are suggesting or— it seems to me that you are suggesting or saying - it seems to me that you are suggesting or saying that i it seems to me that you are i suggesting or saying that after it seems to me that you are - suggesting or saying that after that meeting. _ suggesting or saying that after that meeting. you — suggesting or saying that after that meeting, you nothing _ suggesting or saying that after that meeting, you nothing it— suggesting or saying that after that meeting, you nothing it is- suggesting or saying that after that meeting, you nothing it is less - meeting, you nothing it is less likely— meeting, you nothing it is less likely that _ meeting, you nothing it is less likely that power—sharing - meeting, you nothing it is less likely that power—sharing can i meeting, you nothing it is less - likely that power—sharing can resume and stormont — likely that power—sharing can resume and stormont can _ likely that power—sharing can resume and stormont can get up— likely that power—sharing can resume and stormont can get up and - and stormont can get up and running again— and stormont can get up and running again after— and stormont can get up and running again after that — and stormont can get up and running again after that meeting _ and stormont can get up and running again after that meeting with -
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and stormont can get up and running again after that meeting with boris i again after that meeting with boris johnson _ again after that meeting with boris johnson. secondly, _ again after that meeting with boris johnson. secondly, are _ again after that meeting with boris johnson. secondly, are you - again after that meeting with boris - johnson. secondly, are you committed to power-sharing — johnson. secondly, are you committed to power—sharing even— johnson. secondly, are you committed to power—sharing even if— johnson. secondly, are you committed to power—sharing even if the _ johnson. secondly, are you committed to power—sharing even if the prime - to power—sharing even if the prime minister— to power—sharing even if the prime minister overrides— to power—sharing even if the prime minister overrides the _ to power—sharing even if the prime minister overrides the protocol? i minister overrides the protocol? would _ minister overrides the protocol? would you — minister overrides the protocol? would you still— minister overrides the protocol? would you still be _ minister overrides the protocol? would you still be committed i minister overrides the protocol? would you still be committed toj would you still be committed to that? _ would you still be committed to that? , , ., ., , that? firstly, we have not given up on power-sharing _ that? firstly, we have not given up on power-sharing or— that? firstly, we have not given up on power-sharing or the _ that? firstly, we have not given up| on power-sharing or the executive, on power—sharing or the executive, far from on power—sharing or the executive, farfrom it. power—sharing is the only game in a town. working together is the only option, there is no plan b. we live here together, we have to work together, we have to make progress together. we are up for that. we will work night and day to make that happen stop the unfortunate thing is that the british government now is playing a game of brinkmanship with the european institutions, indulging a section of political unionism which believes that it can hold a veto and frustrate and hold a society to ransom. that is what needs to change. our commitment to power—sharing, our commitment to working in partnership with an ever—changing michelle o'neill, she will say how anxious she is to take
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offers and to lead for everybody. we campaigned on the basis of establishing for a functioning partnership institutions, electing a first minister for all. when we said that, we meant that. we believe that in the current circumstances, so many people irrespective of how they voted, legitimately expect that ac functioning government now. we are committed to that. iflan functioning government now. we are committed to that.— committed to that. can i 'ust...? if the prime — committed to that. can i 'ust...? if the prime minister _ committed to that. can ijust...? if the prime minister produces - the prime minister produces legistation— the prime minister produces legislation overrunning - the prime minister produces legislation overrunning the i legislation overrunning the protocol, _ legislation overrunning the protocol, is _ legislation overrunning the protocol, is that _ legislation overrunning the protocol, is that a - legislation overrunning the protocol, is that a red - legislation overrunning the protocol, is that a red line| legislation overrunning the i protocol, is that a red line for legislation overrunning the - protocol, is that a red line for you when _ protocol, is that a red line for you when it— protocol, is that a red line for you when it comes _ protocol, is that a red line for you when it comes to _ protocol, is that a red line for you when it comes to power—sharing? there _ when it comes to power—sharing? there are — when it comes to power—sharing? there are no _ when it comes to power—sharing? there are no red _ when it comes to power—sharing? there are no red lines _ when it comes to power—sharing? there are no red lines for- when it comes to power—sharing? there are no red lines for us - when it comes to power—sharing?| there are no red lines for us when it comes to power—sharing. by that power is shared and that others step up power is shared and that others step up and nominate. let me tell you, there is no circumstance, as we envisage, in which the protocol can be wished away, spirited away, or indeed legislated away. the notion that in the mother of all parliaments as it boasts, that there
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would be an attempt to legislate, to break international law, is a shocking and breathtaking. we find ourselves astounded that members of the house of commons or lords would even countenance such a proposal. what we want is the british government, the european institutions, to sort out the issues about the protocol, to smooth its implementation. we accept that, but what we want is government to be resumed, power—sharing to be resumed and for the first time in the north, for the first time a huge benchmark of equality where we have for the first time a nationalist first minister, acting for all and taking office. ., ., ., , office. how heated was the meeting? what did he say _ office. how heated was the meeting? what did he say directly? _ office. how heated was the meeting? what did he say directly? i _ office. how heated was the meeting? what did he say directly? i know - office. how heated was the meeting? what did he say directly? i know you| what did he say directly? i know you are heading — what did he say directly? i know you are heading towards _ what did he say directly? i know you are heading towards a _ what did he say directly? i know you are heading towards a trade - what did he say directly? i know you are heading towards a trade war. - are heading towards a trade war. look, _ are heading towards a trade war. look, it — are heading towards a trade war. look, it was _ are heading towards a trade war. look, it was a _ are heading towards a trade war. look, it was a lively _ are heading towards a trade war. look, it was a lively meeting. . are heading towards a trade war. i look, it was a lively meeting. was it heated? tough i think was the word. we are not here to beat around
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the bush or to try and sugar—coat anything. this is a very serious situation. this is a very serious situation. this is a very serious situation. it is an acceptable for families, for children, for communities that are in the most desperate and in some cases hard times that politics that the british prime minister says to those people, those workers and families, "too bad. too bad, we have to delay. too bad, because others have a veto and their needs are being prioritised and addressed." that, to our mind, is scandalous, actually. i would use the word scandalous.— the word scandalous. people are stru: calin the word scandalous. people are struggling right _ the word scandalous. people are struggling right now— the word scandalous. people are struggling right now with - the word scandalous. people are struggling right now with the - the word scandalous. people are| struggling right now with the cost of living _ struggling right now with the cost of living crisis, we are ten days past _ of living crisis, we are ten days past our— of living crisis, we are ten days past our election and people came out in _ past our election and people came out in large numbers and voted for politics— out in large numbers and voted for politics to — out in large numbers and voted for politics to work. they voted for parties — politics to work. they voted for parties to — politics to work. they voted for parties to work together, voted for a local— parties to work together, voted for a local executive which will put money — a local executive which will put money in — a local executive which will put money in their pockets, voted to fix our health— money in their pockets, voted to fix our health service and they are heing _ our health service and they are being denied all of that by the dup. they are _ being denied all of that by the dup. they are being supported by boris johnson _ they are being supported by boris johnson and koh who we have just met
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in this— johnson and koh who we have just met in this building. that is not acceptable or tolerable and should not go _ acceptable or tolerable and should not go on — acceptable or tolerable and should not go on the one day longer. we are determined, — not go on the one day longer. we are determined, very determined to be in the executive, determined to tell people _ the executive, determined to tell people as — the executive, determined to tell people as we promised the whole way through— people as we promised the whole way through the election. it is now time to get— through the election. it is now time to get into — through the election. it is now time to get into that executive and do business — to get into that executive and do business and actually respond to the public's _ business and actually respond to the public's needs. what borisjohnson is sponsoring in the dup is nonsense and it— is sponsoring in the dup is nonsense and it is— is sponsoring in the dup is nonsense and it is madness at this time. thank— and it is madness at this time. thank you. _ and it is madness at this time. thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that _ thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that it— thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that it was— thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that it was a _ thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that it was a tough _ thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that it was a tough meeting - thank you, bbc newsnight. you have said that it was a tough meeting and i said that it was a tough meeting and a lively— said that it was a tough meeting and a lively meeting _ said that it was a tough meeting and a lively meeting. but _ said that it was a tough meeting and a lively meeting. but can— said that it was a tough meeting and a lively meeting. but can i— said that it was a tough meeting and a lively meeting. but can i ask you i a lively meeting. but can i ask you about— a lively meeting. but can i ask you about boris— a lively meeting. but can i ask you about borisjohnson's_ a lively meeting. but can i ask you| about boris johnson's fundamental point, _ about boris johnson's fundamental point, which — about boris johnson's fundamental point, which is _ about boris johnson's fundamental point, which is that _ about boris johnson's fundamental point, which is that the _ about boris johnson's fundamental point, which is that the northern i point, which is that the northern ireland _ point, which is that the northern ireland protocol— point, which is that the northern ireland protocol has _ point, which is that the northern ireland protocol has lost - point, which is that the northern ireland protocol has lost the - ireland protocol has lost the confidence _ ireland protocol has lost the confidence of _ ireland protocol has lost the confidence of the _ ireland protocol has lost the confidence of the unionist i ireland protocol has lost the . confidence of the unionist part, ireland protocol has lost the - confidence of the unionist part, the unionist _ confidence of the unionist part, the unionist community, _ confidence of the unionist part, the unionist community, not— confidence of the unionist part, the unionist community, notjust - confidence of the unionist part, the unionist community, not just the l unionist community, not just the dup? _ unionist community, not just the dup? and — unionist community, not just the dup? and you _ unionist community, not just the dup? and you need _ unionist community, not just the dup? and you need to _ unionist community, not just the dup? and you need to have - dup? and you need to have power-sharing _ dup? and you need to have power—sharing here. - dup? and you need to have power—sharing here. at- dup? and you need to have power—sharing here. at the| dup? and you need to have - power—sharing here. at the heart of the good _ power—sharing here. at the heart of the good friday— power—sharing here. at the heart of the good friday agreement - power—sharing here. at the heart of the good friday agreement is- power—sharing here. at the heart of the good friday agreement is that i the good friday agreement is that both communities _ the good friday agreement is that both communities have _ the good friday agreement is thatj both communities have confidence the good friday agreement is that. both communities have confidence in the governance — both communities have confidence in the governance here, _ both communities have confidence in the governance here, and _ both communities have confidence in the governance here, and unionistsi the governance here, and unionists don't _ the governance here, and unionists don't have — the governance here, and unionists don't have confidence, _ the governance here, and unionists don't have confidence, so— the governance here, and unionists don't have confidence, so he - the governance here, and unionists don't have confidence, so he is- don't have confidence, so he is saying. — don't have confidence, so he is saying. "i — don't have confidence, so he is saying. "i am— don't have confidence, so he is saying. "i am not— don't have confidence, so he is saying, "i am not wrecking - don't have confidence, so he is saying, "i am not wrecking the | saying, "i am not wrecking the protocol — saying, "i am not wrecking the protocol but _ saying, "i am not wrecking the protocol but i _ saying, "i am not wrecking the protocol but i am _ saying, "i am not wrecking the protocol but i am having - saying, "i am not wrecking the protocol but i am having to - saying, "i am not wrecking the - protocol but i am having to reform it to win _ protocol but i am having to reform it to win the — protocol but i am having to reform it to win the confidence _
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protocol but i am having to reform it to win the confidence of- protocol but i am having to reform it to win the confidence of the - it to win the confidence of the unionist — it to win the confidence of the unionist community— it to win the confidence of the unionist community is - it to win the confidence of the unionist community is to - it to win the confidence of the unionist community is to getl unionist community is to get power-sharing _ unionist community is to get power—sharing up _ unionist community is to get power—sharing up and - unionist community is to get. power—sharing up and running." unionist community is to get - power—sharing up and running." let power-sharing up and running." let me power—sharing up and running." me answer you as we answered power—sharing up and running."- me answer you as we answered the prime minister in the following terms — firstly, nobody including unionism has a veto on progress. the majority of mlas returned to the assembly support the protocol. that is a fact. there is no call for a consensus or for cross community consensus or for cross community consensus for the protocol. that is a legalfiction consensus for the protocol. that is a legal fiction the consensus for the protocol. that is a legalfiction the british government is peddling to try and dress up what we regard as a very, very negative approach to the good friday agreement and its institutions and to try and dress it up institutions and to try and dress it up as being pro—good friday agreement, it is nothing of the sort. the proposed course of action tjy sort. the proposed course of action by borisjohnson and his government can cause nothing other than instability insecurity and hardship for people. let me say again, those areas of the protocol where people wish to see smooth out altered,
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there is a mechanism for that to happen. please don't miss that. there is a forum, the european institutions have engaged, have made progress, will engage, but they need a good faith partner in the british government. so rather than playing these games and giving coverage to these games and giving coverage to the dup for what is essentially a wreck as a pot of recharge and holding society to the british government could act constructively and to be clear and say to one and all, "the issues in the protocol will be resolved through the agreed mechanisms." and borisjohnson as prime minister will lead and drive that effort. in the meantime, for the good of one and all, the executive needs to be formed. by the way, the ulster unionist party's position is that they are willing to enter the executive, just so we are clear. it is one party, the dup, thatis clear. it is one party, the dup, that is holding all others to ransom. at a time, as michelle has
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said, when people are facing into a cost of living crisis that we have not seen in 20 or 30 years. by the way, it is not going to get any easier, it will get much differently difficult the cost of living crisis and facing into the winter. thank ou ve and facing into the winter. thank you very much- _ and facing into the winter. thank you very much. that _ and facing into the winter. thank you very much. that is _ and facing into the winter. thank you very much. that is mary - and facing into the winter. thank you very much. that is mary lou| you very much. that is mary lou mcdonald _ you very much. that is mary lou mcdonald in _ you very much. that is mary lou mcdonald in the _ you very much. that is mary lou mcdonald in the white _ you very much. that is mary lou mcdonald in the white and - you very much. that is mary lou i mcdonald in the white and michelle o'neill in the blackjacket, protectively the president of sinn fein and the leader of sinn fein in the northern ireland assembly and the northern ireland assembly and the nominee to be first minister when and if power—sharing is restored. the essence of that is that they come out of a meeting with borisjohnson visibly that they come out of a meeting with boris johnson visibly with the northern ireland secretary brandon lewis has well and officials at the northern ireland office. and the prime minister, as he is doing with all the parties, is upskill explaining what his addictions are and how he plans to meet them. what is interesting about that was a number of things, in terms of what mary mcdonnell had to say. she said
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he had assured them that his objective was to fix rather than scrap the protocol, which is an important message because quite a number of his backbench mps think the protocol should be torn up completely. they are still uncomfortable about the whole idea of a division between part of the uk which is within the single market still. this was a compromise that was agreed because of stability on the island of ireland. if the northern ireland could be in the single market, then you didn't need a border between northern ireland and the republic. nobody wants restoration of the border because of the fears that that would add to political instability and create a potential target for activity etc. she is saying that he is saying he doesn't want to scrap it, he wants to fix it. mary lou mcdonald says what he was unclear about was what would be in this legislation that liz truss is publishing tomorrow with a statement to parliament. and that will increase suspicions that it is perhaps this is brinkmanship,
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an attempt to speed up the brussels response to the process by threatening some unspecified changes to the protocol. the last point she made, which was particularly interesting, was that she said she told boris johnson interesting, was that she said she told borisjohnson that unilateral action on the northern ireland protocol would be wrong, which pretty much echoes the position the irish government and indeed the european commission takes on this. we will bring more on that as soon as we have it. we will go now to westminster, we are going to the treasury select committee which is questioning senior figures in the bank of england about the cost of living crisis and rising interest rates will stop let's hear from andrew bailey, who is the governor of the bank of england. welcome, michael. i believe this is your last appearance because you are to stand down before this committee. we will miss you. at at a moment
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ago, you are not sure you will miss us, but we will miss you and thank you for your service over the years. it has been very valuable indeed. thank you. so, governor, can i start with you? much comment in the press and particularly from conservative names of parliament at the moment to set stressing satisfaction with the bank of england is on inflation. as we know from your main report, we are now looking forecasts of over 10% in the autumn, much higher figure than what was suggested in the last report back in february. indeed, the ability of the bank to forecast inflation seems to have been rather a miss for some considerable period of time. i wonder if you could just comment on the assertion that many are beginning to make now, that you have been asleep at the wheel, that you
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should have done far more on the monetary side far earlier in order to get on top of this inflation. we shouldn't be in the position we are in. this could have been avoided had you been smarter in what you have done. in answering that, can i ask you to take it as read that we accept that there is a lot of uncertainty, particularly around what has been going on in ukraine with energy prices, supply chain bottlenecks and so on? but particularly focus on the labour market, the overheated labour market in your response. i will try to do that. so to say we fitted our decisions based on the facts and evidence. fist decisions based on the facts and evidence. �* ., , evidence. at the time. i do see comments _ evidence. at the time. i do see comments around _ evidence. at the time. i do see comments around hindsight, i evidence. at the time. i do see i comments around hindsight, but evidence. at the time. i do see - comments around hindsight, but we have to _ comments around hindsight, but we have to take decisions based on how we see _ have to take decisions based on how we see the _ have to take decisions based on how we see the facts on the evidence at the time _ we see the facts on the evidence at the time. you mentioned the issue of e>
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that— a calibration onto that is to say that at— a calibration onto that is to say that at the _ a calibration onto that is to say that at the forecast peak of inflation that we currently have, which _ inflation that we currently have, which comes in the fourth quarter of this year. _ which comes in the fourth quarter of this year. so— which comes in the fourth quarter of this year, so that is when i'm afraid — this year, so that is when i'm afraid over— this year, so that is when i'm afraid over 10%. i should emphasise that afraid over10%. i should emphasise that i_ afraid over10%. i should emphasise that i do— afraid over10%. i should emphasise that i do not— afraid over 10%. i should emphasise that i do not feel at all enormously happy— that i do not feel at all enormously happy about this, this is a bad situation — happy about this, this is a bad situation to be in. but it is notable _ situation to be in. but it is notable that 80% of the overshoots of the _ notable that 80% of the overshoots of the target at that point is due to energy and tradable goods. that is the _ to energy and tradable goods. that is the piece that i would put into this category of things that have happened, and particularly the impact — happened, and particularly the impact on global prices that is coming — impact on global prices that is coming through to this country. as you said. _ coming through to this country. as you said, they have been a series of supply— you said, they have been a series of supply shocks going on, most recently. _ supply shocks going on, most recently, this is a big factor in the chain— recently, this is a big factor in the chain it _ recently, this is a big factor in the chain it we were last here, and inthe— the chain it we were last here, and inthe main— the chain it we were last here, and in the main report of the impact of the war. _ in the main report of the impact of the war, russia's invasion of ukraine _ the war, russia's invasion of ukraine. of course, as others do, we
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can't _ ukraine. of course, as others do, we can't predict — ukraine. of course, as others do, we can't predict things like wars. i think— can't predict things like wars. i think that _ can't predict things like wars. i think that was what you were implying, that is not in our power, or in— implying, that is not in our power, or in anybody's power. it is well established practice to accommodate supply— established practice to accommodate supply shocks where they are expected to be transient, but then to not— expected to be transient, but then to not accommodate the so—called second _ to not accommodate the so—called second round effects of those shocks — second round effects of those shocks i_ second round effects of those shocks. i would also say before i move _ shocks. i would also say before i move onto — shocks. i would also say before i move onto the labour market, is important. — move onto the labour market, is important, that a sequence of shocks like this. _ important, that a sequence of shocks like this, which have really come one after— like this, which have really come one after another with no gaps between — one after another with no gaps between them, is almost unprecedented, i think. between them, is almost unprecedented, ithink. so between them, is almost unprecedented, i think. so let me turn to— unprecedented, i think. so let me turn to the — unprecedented, i think. so let me turn to the remaining 20% will stop the merger— turn to the remaining 20% will stop the merger to be very precise before you move _ the merger to be very precise before you move on? too the merger to be very precise before you move on?— you move on? too casually very recise you move on? too casually very precise before _ you move on? too casually very precise before you _ you move on? too casually very precise before you move - you move on? too casually very precise before you move on? i you move on? too casually very. precise before you move on? are you move on? too casually very - precise before you move on? are you saying that with hindsight it would be fine to have done things differently, but as the information was being revealed to you through time in the past, it would not have been reasonable to expect as you to done anything differently? i been reasonable to expect as you to done anything differently?— done anything differently? i think on that part. _
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done anything differently? i think on that part. i— done anything differently? i think on that part, i don't _ done anything differently? i think on that part, i don't think- done anything differently? i think on that part, i don't think we - on that part, i don't think we could — on that part, i don't think we could i_ on that part, i don't think we could. i don't think we could foresee _ could. i don't think we could foresee a _ could. i don't think we could foresee a war in ukraine. another factor— foresee a war in ukraine. another factor that— foresee a war in ukraine. another factor that we are dealing with at the moment is a further leg of covid. — the moment is a further leg of covid, which is affecting china, which — covid, which is affecting china, which i'm — covid, which is affecting china, which i'm sure you read about. and appears _ which i'm sure you read about. and appears to— which i'm sure you read about. and appears to be affecting it more seriously— appears to be affecting it more seriously than the effect that we saw previously. this has been quite a large _ saw previously. this has been quite a large new— saw previously. this has been quite a large new issue. the zero covid policy _ a large new issue. the zero covid policy that — a large new issue. the zero covid policy that china has pursued up till now— policy that china has pursued up till now has caused dislocations in china. _ till now has caused dislocations in china. but— till now has caused dislocations in china, but our assessment is that actually— china, but our assessment is that actually it— china, but our assessment is that actually it hasn't caused those dislocations have not caused major economic— dislocations have not caused major economic effects. that is not what we are _ economic effects. that is not what we are seeing now, there were some very weak— we are seeing now, there were some very weak numbers out of china this morning. _ very weak numbers out of china this morning, and the closure of shanghai is having _ morning, and the closure of shanghai is having a _ morning, and the closure of shanghai is having a real effect. there is no question— is having a real effect. there is no question about that. if is having a real effect. there is no question about that.— question about that. if i can go back a bit _ question about that. if i can go back a bit further _ question about that. if i can go back a bit further than - question about that. if i can go back a bit further than what - question about that. if i can go back a bit further than what is| back a bit further than what is happening in china and sticking with the supply side stuff, as it were, bottlenecks, things like that, no
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sense that you misjudged any of the impact of that? or, for example, the shift in demand for services to goods and the extent that that happened, the effects that the economy as a gamut of lockdown...? the shift and mix of demand from services _ the shift and mix of demand from services to— the shift and mix of demand from services to goods is interesting, because — services to goods is interesting, because in— services to goods is interesting, because in the uk economy, that is largely— because in the uk economy, that is largely now— because in the uk economy, that is largely now corrected itself. where it has _ largely now corrected itself. where it has not _ largely now corrected itself. where it has not corrected itself is in the us — it has not corrected itself is in the us so _ it has not corrected itself is in the us. so the us still has a mix of demand _ the us. so the us still has a mix of demand which is skewed towards goods _ demand which is skewed towards goods if— demand which is skewed towards goods. if anything, the progress that the — goods. if anything, the progress that the us was making in readjusting that balance has been disrupted by recent rise of covid again _ disrupted by recent rise of covid again so — disrupted by recent rise of covid again. so we have been seeing the us correcting _ again. so we have been seeing the us correcting that balance and shifting back to _
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correcting that balance and shifting back to the existing goods and services — back to the existing goods and services mix, but that seems to have been _ services mix, but that seems to have been stopped and held up in recent months _ been stopped and held up in recent months. again, it is notjust about what _ months. again, it is notjust about what other— months. again, it is notjust about what other shocks? as soon as you see what _ what other shocks? as soon as you see what effect they have. covid outside — see what effect they have. covid outside this country has been a factor— outside this country has been a factor in — outside this country has been a factor in that. the reason the us is important — factor in that. the reason the us is important is — factor in that. the reason the us is important is that the global increase in goods demand is hugely concentrated in the us. we published a chart— concentrated in the us. we published a chart in— concentrated in the us. we published a chart in february, i think, on that _ a chart in february, i think, on that that— a chart in february, i think, on that. that drives world prices, these — that. that drives world prices, these are _ that. that drives world prices, these are world markets and world supply— these are world markets and world supply chains and world shipping capacity. — supply chains and world shipping capacity, for instance. so it does affect _ capacity, for instance. so it does affect us— capacity, for instance. so it does affect us in— capacity, for instance. so it does affect us in that sense. the uk, we have _ affect us in that sense. the uk, we have seen— affect us in that sense. the uk, we have seen as — affect us in that sense. the uk, we have seen as we hoped we would, a shift back — have seen as we hoped we would, a shift back. putting that transient labet— shift back. putting that transient label on — shift back. putting that transient label on it— shift back. putting that transient label on it in the uk has not been, i label on it in the uk has not been, ithink. _ label on it in the uk has not been, ithink. out— label on it in the uk has not been, i think, out of place. on label on it in the uk has not been, i think, out of place.— label on it in the uk has not been, i think, out of place. on the labour
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market, i think, out of place. on the labour market. you _ i think, out of place. on the labour market. you are — i think, out of place. on the labour market, you are going _ i think, out of place. on the labour market, you are going to... - i think, out of place. on the labour market, you are going to... yeah, | market, you are going to... yeah, the market, you are going to. .. yeah, the labour— market, you are going to... yeah, the labour market. _ market, you are going to... yeah, the labour market. it _ market, you are going to... yeah, the labour market. it is _ market, you are going to... yeah, the labour market. it is wrong - market, you are going to... yeah, the labour market. it is wrong to i the labour market. it is wrong to see say— the labour market. it is wrong to see say that 20% is the labour market — see say that 20% is the labour market. we have a tight labour market — market. we have a tight labour market i— market. we have a tight labour market. i think the last time we were _ market. i think the last time we were here. _ market. i think the last time we were here, italked market. i think the last time we were here, i talked about the uncertainty around the end of the furlough — uncertainty around the end of the furlough scheme. in terms of the timing _ furlough scheme. in terms of the timing of— furlough scheme. in terms of the timing of our decision making thati million _ timing of our decision making thati millionjobs remaining on the furlough _ millionjobs remaining on the furlough scheme right to the end, which _ furlough scheme right to the end, which was — furlough scheme right to the end, which was well in excess of what we had expected it to be. and that we have been— had expected it to be. and that we have been uncertain what the effect of the _ have been uncertain what the effect of the ending of the scheme would be. of the ending of the scheme would be 0f— of the ending of the scheme would be. of course, we now know that you can't _ be. of course, we now know that you can't really _ be. of course, we now know that you can't really see the ending of the furlough — can't really see the ending of the furlough scheme in the unemployment data, furlough scheme in the unemployment data. as _ furlough scheme in the unemployment data. as an— furlough scheme in the unemployment data, as an implement comes down, now so _ data, as an implement comes down, now so in — data, as an implement comes down, now 3.8. in the forecasts we publish the report. — now 3.8. in the forecasts we publish the report, we thought it would come down a _ the report, we thought it would come down a bit _ the report, we thought it would come down a bit further before starting to rise _ down a bit further before starting to rise again. i wanted to pick up some _ to rise again. i wanted to pick up some thing — to rise again. i wanted to pick up some thing else which i think is important _ some thing else which i think is important. again, iwant some thing else which i think is important. again, i want to discuss with the _ important. again, i want to discuss with the committee because i think it has— with the committee because i think it has been— with the committee because i think it has been a difficultjudgment that we — it has been a difficultjudgment that we have wrestled with, that is
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that we have wrestled with, that is that we _ that we have wrestled with, that is that we have wrestled with, that is that we have seen a fall in the sight — that we have seen a fall in the sight of— that we have seen a fall in the sight of the labour market and force — sight of the labour market and force. since the end of 2019, before covid _ force. since the end of 2019, before covid we _ force. since the end of 2019, before covid, we have seen a fall in the size of— covid, we have seen a fall in the size of the — covid, we have seen a fall in the size of the labour market around 450.000 — size of the labour market around 450,000. that is about 1.3% of the labour— 450,000. that is about 1.3% of the labour force — 450,000. that is about 1.3% of the labourforce. rick like 450,000. that is about 1.3% of the labour force. rick like that, that might— labour force. rick like that, that might not— labour force. rick like that, that might not seem like a big number, but in— might not seem like a big number, but inthe— might not seem like a big number, but in the margin of the labour force. — but in the margin of the labour force. it — but in the margin of the labour force. it is _ but in the margin of the labour force, it is a very big fall in the labour— force, it is a very big fall in the labour force by historical standards.— labour force by historical standards. �* . . standards. and it reflects... apologies — standards. and it reflects... apologies to _ standards. and it reflects... apologies to you _ standards. and it reflects... apologies to you for - standards. and it reflects... - apologies to you for interrupting andrew bailey in that session. we will go back as soon as soon as we can. it's crossed to belfast to hillsborough castle and jeffrey donaldson from the dup. hate hillsborough castle and jeffrey donaldson from the dup. we are waitin: to donaldson from the dup. we are waiting to see — donaldson from the dup. we are waiting to see what _ donaldson from the dup. we are waiting to see what they - donaldson from the dup. we are waiting to see what they say - donaldson from the dup. we are waiting to see what they say in i waiting to see what they say in precise detail, so i will suspend judgment until i have seen what the government is proposing and consolidate with my party about that. ~ . consolidate with my party about that. ~ , , consolidate with my party about that. ~ . . . .. that. the prime minister is talking in an article _
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that. the prime minister is talking in an article today... _ in an article today... inaudible we have set out our seven tests, set them out last summer as to how we would judge any outcomes from this process. 07 tests remain, that will be the basis upon which we judge what the government tends to do. journalist asks question i haste what the government tends to do. journalist asks question i have the disadvanta . e journalist asks question i have the disadvantage over _ journalist asks question i have the disadvantage over you, _ journalist asks question i have the disadvantage over you, i _ journalist asks question i have the disadvantage over you, i haven't - disadvantage over you, i haven't seen the proposaljet so i am not making anyjudgments about what the government may do about until i see what they are going to be. we have heard the words, no need to see the actions. . heard the words, no need to see the actions. ,, .., ., heard the words, no need to see the actions. . ., ., heard the words, no need to see the actions. ,, ., ., actions. sinn fein came out and said it was a tough _ actions. sinn fein came out and said it was a tough meeting _ actions. sinn fein came out and said it was a tough meeting and - actions. sinn fein came out and said it was a tough meeting and seemed| it was a tough meeting and seemed quite _ it was a tough meeting and seemed quite angry, and accused the dup of holding _ quite angry, and accused the dup of holding the northern irish people to ransom _ holding the northern irish people to ransom over the protocol. they were very unhappy you seem less unhappy. are you _ very unhappy you seem less unhappy. are you more hopeful now that boris johnson _ are you more hopeful now that boris johnson is _ are you more hopeful now that boris johnson is going to do what you need to do— johnson is going to do what you need to do in— johnson is going to do what you need to do in order to have power—sharing going _ to do in order to have power—sharing
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going again? — to do in order to have power-sharing going again?— going again? well, we listened to what sinn fein _ going again? well, we listened to what sinn fein had _ going again? well, we listened to what sinn fein had to _ going again? well, we listened to what sinn fein had to say, - going again? well, we listened to what sinn fein had to say, but. going again? well, we listened to what sinn fein had to say, but it i going again? well, we listened to| what sinn fein had to say, but it is a bit rich coming from a party who walked away from government for three long years in northern ireland, who allowed waiting lists to grow and grow and now we are trying to clear up the mess they left behind. notwithstanding that, i want to see what the government have to propose, i welcome the prime minister being here today and the opportunity to speak to him. we waited a long time for this moment, a long time to see the government bring forward proposals that represent action to deal with the problems created by the irish sea border. by the harm that is doing to our economy, undermining our political institutions, creating instability and harming our relationship with the rest of the united kingdom. we cannot have power—sharing unless there is a consensus, that consensus doesn't exist. i'm in the business of rebuilding that consensus in northern ireland.—
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northern ireland. one quick follow-up. _ northern ireland. one quick follow-up, the _ northern ireland. one quick follow-up, the prime - northern ireland. one quick. follow-up, the prime minister, northern ireland. one quick- follow-up, the prime minister, did follow—up, the prime minister, did he tell— follow—up, the prime minister, did he tell you — follow—up, the prime minister, did he tell you he was going to announce plans— he tell you he was going to announce plans for— he tell you he was going to announce plans for legislation? has he said that to _ plans for legislation? has he said that to you, that he will announce it but _ that to you, that he will announce it but not — that to you, that he will announce it but not necessarily tabled legislation? | it but not necessarily tabled legislation?— it but not necessarily tabled legislation? it but not necessarily tabled leaislation? ., �* , . legislation? i don't see much point in havin: legislation? i don't see much point in having legislation _ legislation? i don't see much point in having legislation if _ legislation? i don't see much point in having legislation if you - legislation? i don't see much point in having legislation if you don't i in having legislation if you don't table it. legislation only becomes law when it is enacted by parliament. i believe the government will make their position clear later this week. the will make their position clear later this week. ~ . will make their position clear later this week. ~ , ., this week. the prime minister and the irish first — this week. the prime minister and the irish first minister— this week. the prime minister and the irish first minister said - the irish first minister said something. _ the irish first minister said something, what— the irish first minister said something, what does - the irish first minister said something, what does it. the irish first minister said - something, what does it mean to the irish first minister said _ something, what does it mean to you? there's— something, what does it mean to you? there's lots _ something, what does it mean to you? there's lots of— something, what does it mean to you? there's lots of land _ something, what does it mean to you? there's lots of land was _ something, what does it mean to you? there's lots of land was used here - there's lots of land was used here to describe potential outcomes. i suspend judgment until i see what the government are proposing. but i'm very clear that i want to see northern ireland's place within the uk fully respected and fully restored, because that is what the new decade, new approach agreement set. that is the agreement that formed the basis of the restoration of power—sharing at the beginning of 2020. that agreement has not been
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honoured by the government, i want to sue the government delivering on their commitments on a new decade, new approach, that means removing the rec border, respecting northern ireland's placing in the uk internal market. d0 ireland's placing in the uk internal market. , ., , market. do you trust the prime minister to _ market. do you trust the prime minister to do _ market. do you trust the prime minister to do what _ market. do you trust the prime minister to do what you - market. do you trust the prime j minister to do what you wanted market. do you trust the prime i minister to do what you wanted to do? or_ minister to do what you wanted to do? or do— minister to do what you wanted to do? or do you _ minister to do what you wanted to do? or do you feel— minister to do what you wanted to do? or do you feel in— minister to do what you wanted to do? or do you feel in the - minister to do what you wanted to do? or do you feel in the end i minister to do what you wanted to do? or do you feel in the end he i do? or do you feel in the end he will do _ do? or do you feel in the end he will do the — do? or do you feel in the end he will do the deal— do? or do you feel in the end he will do the deal that _ do? or do you feel in the end he will do the deal that he - do? or do you feel in the end he will do the deal that he has- do? or do you feel in the end he i will do the deal that he has before? i will do the deal that he has before? i don't _ will do the deal that he has before? i don't know— will do the deal that he has before? i don't know what _ will do the deal that he has before? i don't know what any— will do the deal that he has before? idon't know what any deal- will do the deal that he has before? i don't know what any deal with i will do the deal that he has before? i don't know what any deal with the | i don't know what any deal with the eu might look like. iwilljudge i don't know what any deal with the eu might look like. i willjudge any deal with the eu in the same way i would judge any unilateral action by the uk government. our seven tests apply in all cases, that will be the basis upon which we judge outcomes. i have to say the eu has shown no intent to do what needs to be done to respect northern ireland's place within the uk. the eu tell us that they want to protect the belfast or good friday agreement, yet their actions have harmed the agreement. undermine political stability in northern ireland. they have removed the consensus that existed, and
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therefore whatever outcomes there are, whether by agreement or by unilateral action on the part of the uk government, they must restore consensus in northern ireland. that is the only basis for power—sharing, thatis is the only basis for power—sharing, that is at the heart of the belfast or power—sharing agreement and that should be —— good friday agreement and should be respected. should be -- good friday agreement and should be respected. journalist asks question — and should be respected. journalist asks question the _ and should be respected. journalist asks question the tabling _ and should be respected. journalist asks question the tabling of - asks question the tabling of leuislation asks question the tabling of legislation is _ asks question the tabling of legislation is words. _ asks question the tabling of legislation is words. what i i asks question the tabling of l legislation is words. what i need asks question the tabling of - legislation is words. what i need is decisive action. that means i want to see the government enacting legislation that will bring the solution that we need. but let's see what the government are prepared to do. i have not seen that yet, i want to see it and i'm hoping that the government are going to do the right thing and help restore a consensus in northern ireland to address the very genuine and real problems that have been created by the northern ireland protocol. it is actions that
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ireland protocol. it is actions that i willjudge these things on, not just words. i willjudge these things on, not just words-— i willjudge these things on, not 'ust words. ~ ,, ~ ,, ,, . . just words. journalist asks question that is in the just words. journalist asks question that is in the hands _ just words. journalist asks question that is in the hands of— just words. journalist asks question that is in the hands of the _ that is in the hands of the government and parliament, i don't control that. what i do control is our actions. we willjudge what the government does and examine what they do, we'll make our own assessments and make our own decisions as to we respond. i am very clear i want to see the political institutions working properly and delivering the northern ireland. power—sharing can only be on the basis of consensus. that is at the heart of the agreement, that should be respected. you at the heart of the agreement, that should be respected.— should be respected. you say you have not seen _ should be respected. you say you have not seen the _ should be respected. you say you have not seen the proposal i should be respected. you say you have not seen the proposal yet, i should be respected. you say you i have not seen the proposal yet, but you have _ have not seen the proposal yet, but you have to— have not seen the proposal yet, but you have to really had a meeting with the — you have to really had a meeting with the prime minister. did you get a sense _ with the prime minister. did you get a sense of— with the prime minister. did you get a sense of what they were going to do and _ a sense of what they were going to do and whether it would be enough? 0r do and whether it would be enough? or did _ do and whether it would be enough? or did you _ do and whether it would be enough? or did you feel that you can trust him? _ or did you feel that you can trust him? what — or did you feel that you can trust him? what is your message to the people _ him? what is your message to the people of— him? what is your message to the people of northern ireland who are suffering _ people of northern ireland who are suffering with that of the cost of living _ suffering with that of the cost of living crisis? we suffering with that of the cost of living crisis?— living crisis? we want to help everyone. — living crisis? we want to help everyone. and _ living crisis? we want to help everyone, and we _ living crisis? we want to help everyone, and we have i living crisis? we want to help - everyone, and we have proposals that we have put forward to tackle the cost of living crisis. the prime
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minister stated very clearly that he believes his proposals are capable of resolving the issues around the protocol. i will look at those proposals very carefully. it is not a question of trust, it is a question of action. it is a question of the government doing the right thing, a question of the government acting as the government of the united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland to restore political stability, to restore our place within the uk internal market. that is what we are asking for. we are not asking for anything the government has not already committed to do. we just want to see that commitment to deliver.- to do. we just want to see that commitment to deliver. boris johnson is riskin: a commitment to deliver. boris johnson is risking a trade _ commitment to deliver. boris johnson is risking a trade war _ commitment to deliver. boris johnson is risking a trade war with _ commitment to deliver. boris johnson is risking a trade war with the - commitment to deliver. boris johnson is risking a trade war with the eu - is risking a trade war with the eu during _ is risking a trade war with the eu during a — is risking a trade war with the eu during a cost of living crisis to address— during a cost of living crisis to address your concerns in the northern_ address your concerns in the northern ireland protocol and yet you cannot give a commitment that you cannot give a commitment that you will_ you cannot give a commitment that you will go— you cannot give a commitment that you will go back into power sharing. what's _ you will go back into power sharing. what's your— you will go back into power sharing. what's your problem? is it that you cannot_ what's your problem? is it that you cannot stomach a sinn fein first
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minister? — cannot stomach a sinn fein first minister? i _ cannot stomach a sinn fein first minister? . ., u, minister? i have given a commitment to no back minister? i have given a commitment to go back into _ minister? i have given a commitment to go back into government - minister? i have given a commitment to go back into government as - minister? i have given a commitment to go back into government as soon | to go back into government as soon as the uk government delivers on the commitments they have already given in the agreement that formed the basis for the restoration of power sharing. i understand the eu laws mean that any retaliatory action by the eu will take up to nine months to be enacted by them. does anyone seriously believe that in the middle of a war in europe when the uk and eu are standing together against tyranny that the eu wants to start a trade war with the uk and to punish the people of northern ireland when they say what they want to do is uphold the belfast or good friday agreement? is that really what the eu want to do, to plunges into that kind of situation? i cannot believe thatis kind of situation? i cannot believe that is the case, i think the uk government is entitled to take action to protect the integrity of its own internal market. the government of the uk is a sovereign government, it's the government of northern ireland, they have the
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right under international law to take action to protect trade within our own country, that's all we are asking the government to do. studio: let me sum up what'sjeffrey donaldson... sorry, there's one more question. what if there is a proposal that could _ what if there is a proposal that could at— what if there is a proposal that could at least get you back to electing? could at least get you back to electin: ? , , could at least get you back to electin ? , , ,, electing? this is the same sinn fein who were in — electing? this is the same sinn fein who were in dublin _ electing? this is the same sinn fein who were in dublin this _ electing? this is the same sinn fein who were in dublin this morning - who were in dublin this morning asking the irish government to take their side. asking the irish government to take theirside. sinn asking the irish government to take their side. sinn fein drew double standards very well, i have to say. the prime minister is the prime minister of the united kingdom, he is here as our prime minister, the prime minister of the people of northern ireland, the idea the prime minister is taking sides as for the fairies. it's hisjob to protect northern ireland, it's hisjob to ensure that we have the right to trade freely within our own country.
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that's his role as prime minister and so i think sinn fein need to stop this puerile nonsense that they've been engaging in as of late, get serious and this deal with the real —— let's deal with the real issues instead of the silly approach they take of attacking everybody who doesn't agree with them. i want to work with the other political parties to make northern ireland a better place for everyone but let's grow up, let's be mature about this. the prime minister has a duty to resolve these issues. that's why he's here and we should all work with him to get a solution. what with him to get a solution. what about at least _ with him to get a solution. what about at least electing - with him to get a solution. what about at least electing a - with him to get a solution. what about at least electing a speaker? we will— about at least electing a speaker? we will examine what the government are proposing carefully and we will come to review what steps we can take. we want to move northern ireland forward but we are clear we need to see decisive action taken by the government. thank you very much. studio: that was so jeffrey donaldson coming to the end of his statement outside hillsborough
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castle following the meeting that the dup contingent had with the prime minister. quite interesting, what he said, near the end when he talked about its prime minister's duty to ensure that we can trade fairly across the uk. the implication of that, i think, is that the prime minister failed implication of that, i think, is that the prime ministerfailed in his duty when he agreed the terms of this protocol with the european commission because of that issue of creating a border between great britain and northern ireland on the other side of the channel in the irish sea, the north sea. the point about this is that he was emphasising they are going to withhold their decision on whether or not they can go back into power sharing, not on the scrapping of the protocol but on what the government commits to do, what the specifics are in the legislation published tomorrow, i think that's interesting. it's not a guarantee by
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any means they are going back into power sharing soon but the war could be a long and protracted process because the government legislation could take months to get through the house of lords and through the commons. they then have to face some kind of international legal action if that effectively breaks the terms of the treaty, negotiated with the eu, any process of a judgment or enforcement of that will take many months and therefore power—sharing couldn't reasonably expected for that whole period and that seems to be the subtext behind whatjeffrey donaldson is saying but what it hangs on is what the government actually commits to tomorrow and we might not know that tomorrow either because it may be we get the title of a bill, a statement from the foreign secretary in the commons and then we have to wait for the detail because they will want to ensure that detail meets the dup�*s concerns before they publish anything. let's go to westminster now, where the treasury committee
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are questioning senior figures from the bank of england. the cost of living is expected to dominate the session. and of course the criticism of the government that perhaps it failed to act quickly enough in acting against inflation. this is the deputy governor of the bank of england, one of them, speaking now.— of them, speaking now. inflation animations— of them, speaking now. inflation expectations are _ of them, speaking now. inflation expectations are uncomfortably. of them, speaking now. inflation - expectations are uncomfortably high. i would rather we moved back to a more neutral policy stance. i think the advantage of doing so would be to try to ensure that that mix of relatively strong pay growth inflation and inflation expectations does not become more firmly embedded. d0 does not become more firmly embedded-— does not become more firmly embedded. , ., ., , ., embedded. do you feel that your views on the _ embedded. do you feel that your views on the dangers _ embedded. do you feel that your views on the dangers of - embedded. do you feel that your views on the dangers of an - views on the dangers of an overheated labour market, you are getting _ overheated labour market, you are getting on — overheated labour market, you are getting on top of that notion rather quicker—
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getting on top of that notion rather quicker than other members of the committee, effectively? you don't have to _ committee, effectively? you don't have to be — committee, effectively? you don't have to be modest. | committee, effectively? you don't have to be modest.— have to be modest. i think it is eas to have to be modest. i think it is easy to see — have to be modest. i think it is easy to see these _ have to be modest. i think it is easy to see these things - have to be modest. i think it is easy to see these things with l easy to see these things with hindsight. at the time, we are all making decisions which often require judgments amongst great uncertainty so one has to be careful about doing the hindsight thing. i do think the rise of long covid and the drop in workforce participation has been a major development that it would have been hard to foresee a year ago, but as the evidence has come through, we've tried to take that into account in our forecasts. if you have you _ account in our forecasts. if you have you had _ account in our forecasts. if you have you had prevailed - account in our forecasts. if you have you had prevailed in - account in our forecasts. if you - have you had prevailed in previous meetings — have you had prevailed in previous meetings where you appeared to have had a rather— meetings where you appeared to have had a rather more concerned view of what has _ had a rather more concerned view of what has been happening in the tabour— what has been happening in the labour market than other committee members. _ labour market than other committee members, how much of a better position— members, how much of a better position do— members, how much of a better position do you think we may be in
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as a consequence when you think atrout— as a consequence when you think about inflation and the de—anchoring of inflation _ about inflation and the de—anchoring of inflation expectations from the 2% where — of inflation expectations from the 2% where we seem to be at the moment? — 2% where we seem to be at the moment? will it have made a big difference? i moment? will it have made a big difference?— moment? will it have made a big difference? ~' , ., difference? i think we may be in a better place _ difference? i think we may be in a better place in _ difference? i think we may be in a better place in terms _ difference? i think we may be in a better place in terms of— difference? i think we may be in a better place in terms of inflation l better place in terms of inflation expectations. to be fair, had we entered the qe programme, the current inflation rate and prospective inflation rate through this year really would not be very different. the scale of the energy price shocks and the rise in food prices and global goods prices driven by events outside the uk are such that even a slight policy through last year would leave us with inflation well above target. there's really no sensible monetary policy which could have been put in place a year or two ago that could have capped inflation at the 2% target this year. but have capped inflation at the 2% target this year.—
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have capped inflation at the 296 target this year. but it would have heled target this year. but it would have helped trying _ target this year. but it would have helped trying to — target this year. but it would have helped trying to anchor— target this year. but it would have helped trying to anchor down - helped trying to anchor down inflation rates, expectations and perhaps cool down the labour market and those wage inflationary pressures we are seeing coming through now. i pressures we are seeing coming through now— pressures we are seeing coming through now. pressures we are seeing coming throu~h now. ., ., ., , ,, through now. i do want to stress the 'uduments through now. i do want to stress the judgments which _ through now. i do want to stress the judgments which are _ through now. i do want to stress the judgments which are being - through now. i do want to stress the judgments which are being made - judgments which are being made amidst uncertainty have the risk of looking back with the certainty of hindsight. looking back with the certainty of hindsiaht. ~' ~ . ., ., , hindsight. like michael, iwas votin: hindsight. like michael, iwas voting for— hindsight. like michael, iwas voting for a — hindsight. like michael, iwas voting for a modest _ hindsight. like michael, iwas voting for a modest timing . hindsight. like michael, iwas voting for a modest timing a i hindsight. like michael, i was - voting for a modest timing a little bit earlier, — voting for a modest timing a little bit earlier, through _ voting for a modest timing a little bit earlier, through the _ voting for a modest timing a little bit earlier, through the autumn . voting for a modest timing a littlej bit earlier, through the autumn of last year — bit earlier, through the autumn of last year. just _ bit earlier, through the autumn of last year. just after _ bit earlier, through the autumn of last year. just after i _ bit earlier, through the autumn of last year. just after i came - bit earlier, through the autumn of last year. just after i came to - bit earlier, through the autumn of last year. just after i came to this| last year. just after i came to this committee — last year. just after i came to this committee i— last year. just after i came to this committee i started _ last year. just after i came to this committee i started to _ last year. just after i came to this committee i started tojoin - last year. just after i came to this . committee i started tojoin michael, when _ committee i started tojoin michael, when i _ committee i started tojoin michael, when i came — committee i started tojoin michael, when i came here _ committee i started tojoin michael, when i came here in— committee i started tojoin michael, when i came here in august- committee i started tojoin michael, when i came here in august last - when i came here in august last year. _ when i came here in august last year. i_ when i came here in august last year. i started _ when i came here in august last year, i started to _ when i came here in august last year, i started to vote _ when i came here in august last year, i started to vote in- when i came here in august last year, i started to vote in the - year, i started to vote in the minority— year, i started to vote in the minority for— year, i started to vote in the minority for a _ year, i started to vote in the minority for a tightening - year, i started to vote in the minority for a tightening butj year, i started to vote in the| minority for a tightening but i would — minority for a tightening but i would want _ minority for a tightening but i would want to _ minority for a tightening but i would want to associate - minority for a tightening but i. would want to associate myself minority for a tightening but i- would want to associate myself with the thought — would want to associate myself with the thought it — would want to associate myself with the thought it would _ would want to associate myself with the thought it would make - would want to associate myself with the thought it would make a - the thought it would make a difference _ the thought it would make a difference only _ the thought it would make a difference only at _ the thought it would make a difference only at the - the thought it would make ai difference only at the margin the thought it would make a - difference only at the margin we were, _ difference only at the margin we were, it— difference only at the margin we were, it it — difference only at the margin we were, if it made _ difference only at the margin we were, if it made a _ difference only at the margin we were, if it made a difference -
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difference only at the margin we were, if it made a difference at. were, if it made a difference at all, were, if it made a difference at all. because— were, if it made a difference at all, because as _ were, if it made a difference at all, because as andrew- were, if it made a difference at all, because as andrew was - were, if it made a difference at - all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of— all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of the — all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of the overshoot _ all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of the overshoot is _ all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of the overshoot is to - all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of the overshoot is to do - all, because as andrew was saying, 80% of the overshoot is to do withi 80% of the overshoot is to do with first-round — 80% of the overshoot is to do with first—round effects, _ 80% of the overshoot is to do with first—round effects, to _ 80% of the overshoot is to do with first—round effects, to do - 80% of the overshoot is to do with first—round effects, to do with - 80% of the overshoot is to do with first—round effects, to do with the| first—round effects, to do with the shocks _ first—round effects, to do with the shocks that — first—round effects, to do with the shocks that have _ first—round effects, to do with the shocks that have hit _ first—round effects, to do with the shocks that have hit the _ first—round effects, to do with the shocks that have hit the economy| first—round effects, to do with the - shocks that have hit the economy and so you _ shocks that have hit the economy and so you are _ shocks that have hit the economy and so you are only— shocks that have hit the economy and so you are only talking _ shocks that have hit the economy and so you are only talking about - shocks that have hit the economy and so you are only talking about the - so you are only talking about the behaviour— so you are only talking about the behaviour of _ so you are only talking about the behaviour of firms, _ so you are only talking about the behaviour of firms, the - so you are only talking about the| behaviour of firms, the behaviour so you are only talking about the i behaviour of firms, the behaviour of bargeiners _ behaviour of firms, the behaviour of bargeiners in — behaviour of firms, the behaviour of bargainers in the _ behaviour of firms, the behaviour of bargainers in the labour— behaviour of firms, the behaviour of bargainers in the labour market - behaviour of firms, the behaviour of bargainers in the labour market forl bargainers in the labour market for the other— bargainers in the labour market for the other 20% _ bargainers in the labour market for the other 20% and _ bargainers in the labour market for the other 20% and so _ bargainers in the labour market for the other 20% and so you - bargainers in the labour market for the other 20% and so you are - bargainers in the labour market for. the other 20% and so you are talking about _ the other 20% and so you are talking about a _ the other 20% and so you are talking about a very— the other 20% and so you are talking about a very small— the other 20% and so you are talking about a very small part _ the other 20% and so you are talking about a very small part of _ the other 20% and so you are talking about a very small part of the - about a very small part of the inflation — about a very small part of the inflation overshoot _ about a very small part of the inflation overshoot that - about a very small part of the inflation overshoot that we i about a very small part of the . inflation overshoot that we see. about a very small part of the - inflation overshoot that we see. [5 inflation overshoot that we see. [£3 that to inflation overshoot that we see. that to go as far as saying inflation overshoot that we see.“ that to go as far as saying anything you did _ that to go as far as saying anything you did on — that to go as far as saying anything you did on the monetary side of interest— you did on the monetary side of interest rates in the past could not have been— interest rates in the past could not have been expected to have brought inflation _ have been expected to have brought inflation much closer to its target? because _ inflation much closer to its target? because is— inflation much closer to its target? because is beyond, you cannot control— because is beyond, you cannot control energy prices and we are where _ control energy prices and we are where we — control energy prices and we are where we are because monetary policy was never _ where we are because monetary policy was never going to do the job. monetary— was never going to do the job. monetary policy was not going to do the job— monetary policy was not going to do the job in— monetary policy was not going to do the job in the — monetary policy was not going to do
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the job in the circumstances. - monetary policy was not going to do the job in the circumstances. that's| the job in the circumstances. that's a very— the job in the circumstances. that's a very important— the job in the circumstances. that's a very important point— the job in the circumstances. that's a very important point stop - the job in the circumstances. that's a very important point stop i - the job in the circumstances. that's a very important point stop i think. a very important point stop i think a very important point stop i think a tightening — a very important point stop i think a tightening we've _ a very important point stop i think a tightening we've been— a very important point stop i think a tightening we've been doing - a tightening we've been doing monetary— a tightening we've been doing monetary policy _ a tightening we've been doing monetary policy since - a tightening we've been doing . monetary policy since december a tightening we've been doing - monetary policy since december is having _ monetary policy since december is having an — monetary policy since december is having an effect. _ monetary policy since december is having an effect. it's _ monetary policy since december is having an effect. it's putting - monetary policy since december is having an effect. it's putting up i having an effect. it's putting up the cost — having an effect. it's putting up the cost of— having an effect. it's putting up the cost of borrowing, - having an effect. it's putting up the cost of borrowing, we - having an effect. it's putting up the cost of borrowing, we will. having an effect. it's putting up - the cost of borrowing, we will come onto that _ the cost of borrowing, we will come onto that it— the cost of borrowing, we will come onto that. it can _ the cost of borrowing, we will come onto that. it can have _ the cost of borrowing, we will come onto that. it can have an _ the cost of borrowing, we will come onto that. it can have an impact, i onto that. it can have an impact, but we _ onto that. it can have an impact, but we have _ onto that. it can have an impact, but we have to _ onto that. it can have an impact, but we have to recognise - onto that. it can have an impact, but we have to recognise that. onto that. it can have an impact, | but we have to recognise that the first-round — but we have to recognise that the first—round effects _ but we have to recognise that the first—round effects coming - but we have to recognise that the first—round effects coming from l first—round effects coming from these _ first—round effects coming from these shocks _ first—round effects coming from these shocks because _ first—round effects coming from these shocks because all- first—round effects coming from these shocks because all the i first—round effects coming from - these shocks because all the supply chain effects — these shocks because all the supply chain effects we _ these shocks because all the supply chain effects we were _ these shocks because all the supply chain effects we were talking - these shocks because all the supply chain effects we were talking about| chain effects we were talking about previously, — chain effects we were talking about previously, china _ chain effects we were talking about previously, china has— chain effects we were talking about previously, china has come - chain effects we were talking about previously, china has come back. chain effects we were talking about| previously, china has come back in, all of— previously, china has come back in, all of those — previously, china has come back in, all of those current _ previously, china has come back in, all of those current and _ previously, china has come back in, all of those current and we - previously, china has come back in, all of those current and we saw- all of those current and we saw before — all of those current and we saw before the _ all of those current and we saw before the invasion _ all of those current and we saw before the invasion of - all of those current and we saw before the invasion of ukraine, j before the invasion of ukraine, these — before the invasion of ukraine, these are — before the invasion of ukraine, these are things _ before the invasion of ukraine, these are things that _ before the invasion of ukraine, these are things that typically. these are things that typically throughout— these are things that typically throughout history, _ these are things that typically throughout history, we - these are things that typically throughout history, we and l these are things that typically. throughout history, we and the these are things that typically- throughout history, we and the npc has looked — throughout history, we and the npc has looked through _ throughout history, we and the npc has looked through after— throughout history, we and the npc has looked through after the - throughout history, we and the npc has looked through after the globalj has looked through after the global financial— has looked through after the global financial crisis, _ has looked through after the global financial crisis, those _ has looked through after the global financial crisis, those kind - has looked through after the global financial crisis, those kind of- financial crisis, those kind of energy— financial crisis, those kind of energy price _ financial crisis, those kind of energy price shocks. - financial crisis, those kind of energy price shocks. what. financial crisis, those kind of. energy price shocks. what has happened _ energy price shocks. what has happened this _ energy price shocks. what has happened this time _ energy price shocks. what has happened this time andrew's. energy price shocks. what has- happened this time andrew's opening remarks _ happened this time andrew's opening remarks as— happened this time andrew's opening remarks as we've _
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happened this time andrew's opening remarks as we've had _ happened this time andrew's opening remarks as we've had a _ happened this time andrew's opening remarks as we've had a serious - happened this time andrew's opening remarks as we've had a serious of - remarks as we've had a serious of these _ remarks as we've had a serious of these shocks _ remarks as we've had a serious of these shocks which _ remarks as we've had a serious of these shocks which then - remarks as we've had a serious of these shocks which then plays - remarks as we've had a serious of| these shocks which then plays into michael's — these shocks which then plays into michael's point _ these shocks which then plays into michael's point about _ these shocks which then plays into michael's point about inflationary. michael's point about inflationary expectations_ michael's point about inflationary expectations and _ michael's point about inflationary expectations and second—round l expectations and second— round effects — expectations and second—round effects because _ expectations and second—round effects because if— expectations and second—round effects because if you - expectations and second—round effects because if you are - expectations and second—round effects because if you are a - effects because if you are a business. _ effects because if you are a business. you _ effects because if you are a business, you think- effects because if you are a business, you think about i effects because if you are a - business, you think about what prices — business, you think about what prices you _ business, you think about what prices you can _ business, you think about what prices you can set _ business, you think about what prices you can set in _ business, you think about what prices you can set in labour- business, you think about what - prices you can set in labour market, there _ prices you can set in labour market, there is— prices you can set in labour market, there is the — prices you can set in labour market, there is the risk— prices you can set in labour market, there is the risk that _ prices you can set in labour market, there is the risk that your— there is the risk that your perception. _ there is the risk that your perception, your- there is the risk that your perception, your inflation there is the risk that your- perception, your inflation mentality may change — perception, your inflation mentality may change and _ perception, your inflation mentality may change and you _ perception, your inflation mentality may change and you think- perception, your inflation mentality may change and you think we - perception, your inflation mentality may change and you think we are l perception, your inflation mentalityj may change and you think we are in perception, your inflation mentality. may change and you think we are in a more _ may change and you think we are in a more inflationary— may change and you think we are in a more inflationary environment - more inflationary environment because — more inflationary environment because you _ more inflationary environment because you get _ more inflationary environment because you get one - more inflationary environment because you get one shot - more inflationary environmentl because you get one shot after another— because you get one shot after another and _ because you get one shot after another and you _ because you get one shot after another and you think- because you get one shot after another and you think it's- because you get one shot afterl another and you think it's going because you get one shot after. another and you think it's going to be sustained — another and you think it's going to be sustained so— another and you think it's going to be sustained so i— another and you think it's going to be sustained so i think— another and you think it's going to be sustained so i think all- another and you think it's going to be sustained so i think all of- another and you think it's going to be sustained so i think all of us i another and you think it's going toj be sustained so i think all of us on the committee _ be sustained so i think all of us on the committee are _ be sustained so i think all of us on the committee are absolutely- be sustained so i think all of us on . the committee are absolutely focused on making _ the committee are absolutely focused on making sure — the committee are absolutely focused on making sure that— the committee are absolutely focused on making sure that medium—term i on making sure that medium—term inflation _ on making sure that medium—term inflation expectations _ on making sure that medium—term inflation expectations don't - on making sure that medium—term inflation expectations don't d - inflation expectations don't d anchor— inflation expectations don't d anchor which— inflation expectations don't d anchor which would _ inflation expectations don't d anchor which would take - inflation expectations don't d anchor which would take us l inflation expectations don't d - anchor which would take us away persistently _ anchor which would take us away persistently from _ anchor which would take us away persistently from the _ anchor which would take us away persistently from the target - anchor which would take us away persistently from the target —— l persistently from the target —— de-anchor _ persistently from the target -- de-anchor-_ persistently from the target -- de-anchor.- i - persistently from the target -- de-anchor.- i will- persistently from the target -- de-anchor.- i will say| de-anchor. finally... i will say quickly. _ de-anchor. finally... i will say quickly. i _ de-anchor. finally... i will say
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quickly, i made _ de-anchor. finally... i will say quickly, i made a _ de-anchor. finally... i will say quickly, i made a speech - de-anchor. finally... i will say quickly, i made a speech in i de-anchor. finally... iwillsay- quickly, i made a speech in glasgow in november which looked at the status of the labour market, we have data until september, and at that point what was happening is that unemployment was falling and vacancies were rising sharply, but those numbers seem to be in line, the increase in vacancies which would reduce unemployment as the vacancies are filled and at my speech i said i would become more worried about the labour market if it were the case that vacancies would carry on going up and unemployment were to stop falling quite so quickly and that's indeed what we've seen and there is a chart in the latest npr which says that essentially, there are a lot of vacancies around and relatively few unemployed. it has come as a surprise to me but i tried to indicate and i've followed that logic. i indicate and i've followed that louic. ., ., ., ~ indicate and i've followed that louic. ., ., ., ,, ., indicate and i've followed that loiic, ., ., ., ~' ., logic. i want to talk about your future projections _ logic. i want to talk about your future projections for - logic. i want to talk about yourj future projections for inflation. what _ future projections for inflation. what do — future projections for inflation. what do you see is the main risks to your projections going forward? let
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your pro'ections going forward? let me your projections going forward? lotti me put your projections going forward? let me put forward the picture of what is driving inflation. then i'll tell you the risks. the main driver of the profile of inflation, particularly what brings it down, is the very big real income shock that is coming from these outside forces, particularly from energy prices now and still global goods prices. that real income shock is going to have an effect on domestic demand and it's going to impact, as i'm afraid we saw in the projection, will increase unemployment. that will have a much bigger effect than the effect of increases in the bank rate that we do, that is the big driver in terms of the downward pressure. that's also what is putting us in this challenging position where
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we've got what we call a trade—off where the pressure upwards on inflation is being matched by a downward pressure from the real income shock coming in and managing our way through that to use the analogy of walking and narrow path, thatis analogy of walking and narrow path, that is a very challenging environment to be in, so that's the backdrop. the pick—up that we going to see this year is coming predominantly with 80% coming through energy and i'm afraid ukraine is the biggest driver of that. the risks, as we said in the reports, we do think there is a central case that inflation comes back to target and goes below target in the third year. but there are risks, we put the balance of risks on the upside. the risks there are unfortunately quite a number. both domestic and nondomestic. the domestic and nondomestic. the domestic risk is exactly what we've been talking about which is that the
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labour market does not cool down. we might get more saving, more than we expected, savings will get used to support demand for longer which is possible because there has been this build—up and saving it again it is a very challenging the judgment coming out on seeing that type of pandemic related saving. it's worth saying that when i go around the country, as i do a lot, talking to businesses, they are still very focused on, how do i hire people? there is a very interesting conversation we have where they want to talk about hiring more people and we are talking about the concerns we have about the shock to real income and what it will do. that's a domestic risk. on the overseas side, i think we have risks from all the things we have at the moment so clearly we could get more and supply chain disruption in china. ukraine, i'm afraid, is the big one in a way and i will boil that down to two
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things. one is obviously as a further energy price shocks,, i think that would come more from the cutting off of gas and distiller supplies like diesel. ukraine and russia, i should say. crude oil isn't so much the issue, i think it isn't so much the issue, i think it is what would happen from disruption. then i'm afraid the one that i will sound apocalyptic about is food. i was in washington at the imf world back spring meeting a month ago and we had a ukrainian finance minister there, i spent most of my time in meetings, not walking out of meetings, only when the russian finance minister came on. this is a big concern. two things a
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ukrainian finance minister said as ukraine has food in store but it cannot get it out at the moment. while he was optimistic about crop planting, ukraine is a major supplier of wheat and cooking oil, he was optimistic about planting but he was optimistic about planting but he said at the moment they have no way of shipping it out as things stand and it is getting worse. that's a major worry and it's not just a major worry for this country, but for the developing world. so if i had to... sorry for being apocalyptic, but that is a major concern. apocalyptic, but that is a ma'or concern. ., �* ., concern. you've mentioned the united states a coople _ concern. you've mentioned the united states a couple of— concern. you've mentioned the united states a couple of times. _ concern. you've mentioned the united states a couple of times. the - states a couple of times. the government in this country has announced _ government in this country has announced measures to tackle the cost of _ announced measures to tackle the cost of living, some are calling for even _ cost of living, some are calling for even more — cost of living, some are calling for even more measures to the extent that they— even more measures to the extent that they factored in fiscal policy
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risk stop— that they factored in fiscal policy risk stop we that they factored in fiscal policy risk sto_ ~ ., , that they factored in fiscal policy risksto_~ ., , , risk stop we always use fiscal oli as risk stop we always use fiscal policy as an — risk stop we always use fiscal policy as an assumption, - risk stop we always use fiscal policy as an assumption, we i risk stop we always use fiscal - policy as an assumption, we don't use it and what it would be in future. ., ., .,. ., future. three have not factored in there may — future. three have not factored in there may be _ future. three have not factored in there may be additional _ future. three have not factored in| there may be additional measures coming _ there may be additional measures coming down the track? so you have not factored — coming down the track? so you have not factored in additional measures? it's not factored in additional measures? it's not _ not factored in additional measures? it's not for— not factored in additional measures? it's not for us to speculate what the government might do. what it's not for us to speculate what the government might do. what extent are ou the government might do. what extent are you cleaning _ the government might do. what extent are you cleaning economic _ the government might do. what extent are you cleaning economic sanctions i are you cleaning economic sanctions —— are ukrainian economic sanctions having? _ —— are ukrainian economic sanctions having? wka— -- are ukrainian economic sanctions havin: ? ~ , . ., -- are ukrainian economic sanctions havin.?. , ., ~' , . , -- are ukrainian economic sanctions havinu? , ., ,, , . , ., having? we use market prices for commodities _ having? we use market prices for commodities like _ having? we use market prices for commodities like energy - having? we use market prices for commodities like energy and - having? we use market prices for| commodities like energy and food. the world wheat price has gone up just under 25% since we were last year at the last hearing —— last here, so that will include a view of what could be involved but based on what could be involved but based on what we've seen and going back to
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our earlier discussion, there's a lot of uncertainty around this situation. and you see it, let me take the natural gas price which is the best example. natural gas prices have fallen over the last month or so. they were very high during. so. they were very high the have fallen over the last month or so. they were very high the ofgem calculation is the most important price which is why we've got a leg up price which is why we've got a leg up on that later this year. interestingly, the uk spot price is now well below the continental european spot price because we've had a big influence of liquefied natural gas, great work by the people doing this. if we could keep that up, but it's next winter that is the critical period. it that up, but it's next winter that is the critical period.— that up, but it's next winter that is the critical period. it struck me that really _ is the critical period. it struck me that really the _ is the critical period. it struck me that really the report _ is the critical period. it struck me that really the report and - is the critical period. it struck me that really the report and your. that really the report and your response _ that really the report and your response to our chair, when you said
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80% of— response to our chair, when you said 80% of the _ response to our chair, when you said 80% of the cpi is due to external factors— 80% of the cpi is due to external factors and to a certain degree raising — factors and to a certain degree raising rates, you say, would have had very— raising rates, you say, would have had very omitted effect. have you felt a _ had very omitted effect. have you felt a bit — had very omitted effect. have you felt a bit helpless through this period? —— very limited effect. more period? -- very limited effect. more than uncomfortable. _ period? -- very limited effect. more than uncomfortable. it's _ period? -- very limited effect. more than uncomfortable. it's a _ period? -- very limited effect. more than uncomfortable. it's a very, - than uncomfortable. it's a very, very difficult place for us to be in. to predict and forecast 10% inflation and there's not a lot we can do about 80% of it, it is an extremely difficult place to be. we have to recognise the reality of the situation we face. let me be clear, please do not interpret anything i've said as a criticism of the situation in ukraine, i'm very supportive of what is going on in ukraine. we have to live with that and deal with it. you are saying
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raising rates will be hopeless? | and deal with it. you are saying . raising rates will be hopeless? no. i think a raising rates will be hopeless? firm i think a instructive comparison is we publish — i think a instructive comparison is we publish our— i think a instructive comparison is we publish our central— i think a instructive comparison is we publish our central forecast i we publish our central forecast based — we publish our central forecast based on — we publish our central forecast based on the _ we publish our central forecast based on the market _ we publish our central forecast based on the market rate - we publish our central forecast based on the market rate for. based on the market rate for interest_ based on the market rate for interest rates _ based on the market rate for interest rates but— based on the market rate for interest rates but we - based on the market rate for interest rates but we also . based on the market rate for| interest rates but we also put detail— interest rates but we also put detail into _ interest rates but we also put detail into the _ interest rates but we also put detail into the document - interest rates but we also put detail into the document in. interest rates but we also put. detail into the document in the monetary— detail into the document in the monetary policy _ detail into the document in the monetary policy report. - detail into the document in the monetary policy report. what i detail into the document in the - monetary policy report. what would be the _ monetary policy report. what would be the past — monetary policy report. what would be the past for the key _ monetary policy report. what would be the past for the key forecast - be the past for the key forecast variabtes— be the past for the key forecast variables it— be the past for the key forecast variables if we _ be the past for the key forecast variables if we took— be the past for the key forecast variables if we took interest - be the past for the key forecast . variables if we took interest rates is constant — variables if we took interest rates is constant if— variables if we took interest rates is constant. if you _ variables if we took interest rates is constant. if you look— variables if we took interest rates is constant. if you look at - variables if we took interest ratesl is constant. if you look at constant rate path. — is constant. if you look at constant rate path. and _ is constant. if you look at constant rate path. and you _ is constant. if you look at constant rate path, and you need _ is constant. if you look at constant rate path, and you need to- is constant. if you look at constant. rate path, and you need to compare it with _ rate path, and you need to compare it with the _ rate path, and you need to compare it with the main _ rate path, and you need to compare it with the main market _ rate path, and you need to compare it with the main market rate - rate path, and you need to compare it with the main market rate path, l it with the main market rate path, the market— it with the main market rate path, the market rate _ it with the main market rate path, the market rate path _ it with the main market rate path, the market rate path has - it with the main market rate path, the market rate path has inflation| the market rate path has inflation coming _ the market rate path has inflation coming ttack— the market rate path has inflation coming back from _ the market rate path has inflation coming back from the peak- the market rate path has inflation coming back from the peak at - the market rate path has inflation coming back from the peak at thei the market rate path has inflation - coming back from the peak at the end of this— coming back from the peak at the end of this year— coming back from the peak at the end of this year to — coming back from the peak at the end of this year to 6.6% _ coming back from the peak at the end of this year to 6.6% in _ coming back from the peak at the end of this year to 6.6% in quarter- coming back from the peak at the end of this year to 6.6% in quarter two - of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 _ of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 and — of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 and then _ of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 and then 2.1% _ of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 and then 2.1% in _ of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter- of this year to 6.6% in quarter two 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to l 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to 2024 _
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2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to 2024 if— 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to 2024 if you _ 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to 2024. if you take _ 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to 2024. if you take the _ 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to 2024. if you take the constant . 2023 and then 2.1% in quarter to i 2024. if you take the constant path and assume — 2024. if you take the constant path and assume rates _ 2024. if you take the constant path and assume rates are _ 2024. if you take the constant path and assume rates are at _ 2024. if you take the constant path and assume rates are at 1%, - and assume rates are at 1%, inflation — and assume rates are at 1%, inflation would _ and assume rates are at 1%, inflation would be _ and assume rates are at 1%, inflation would be on - and assume rates are at 1%, inflation would be on that i and assume rates are at 1%, - inflation would be on that scenario 2~9%~ _ inflation would be on that scenario 2~9%~ so— inflation would be on that scenario 2~9%~ so irr— inflation would be on that scenario 2~9%~ so in two— inflation would be on that scenario 2.9%. so in two years, _ inflation would be on that scenario 2.9%. so in two years, that is- 2.9%. so in two years, that is ihftatioh — 2.9%. so in two years, that is inflation still— 2.9%. so in two years, that is inflation still well— 2.9%. so in two years, that is inflation still well above - 2.9%. so in two years, that is. inflation still well above target. that does— inflation still well above target. that does show— inflation still well above target. that does show that _ inflation still well above target. that does show that policy - inflation still well above target. | that does show that policy does havem — that does show that policy does havem we _ that does show that policy does havem we are— that does show that policy does have... we are not— that does show that policy does have... we are not seeing - that does show that policy does| have... we are not seeing policy that does show that policy does - have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, _ have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, it— have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, it can _ have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, it can have _ have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, it can have an _ have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, it can have an effect - have... we are not seeing policy has no effect, it can have an effect and i no effect, it can have an effect and our forecast — no effect, it can have an effect and our forecast is _ no effect, it can have an effect and our forecast is having _ no effect, it can have an effect and our forecast is having an _ no effect, it can have an effect and our forecast is having an effect. . our forecast is having an effect. thats— our forecast is having an effect. that's very— our forecast is having an effect. that's very important _ our forecast is having an effect. that's very important both - our forecast is having an effect. that's very important both to l our forecast is having an effect. i that's very important both to bring actuat— that's very important both to bring actual inflation— that's very important both to bring actual inflation down _ that's very important both to bring actual inflation down but _ that's very important both to bring actual inflation down but to - that's very important both to bring actual inflation down but to ensurei actual inflation down but to ensure that inflation— actual inflation down but to ensure that inflation expectations - actual inflation down but to ensure that inflation expectations stay - actual inflation down but to ensure that inflation expectations stay on| that inflation expectations stay on track _ that inflation expectations stay on track. . , , that inflation expectations stay on track. _ ., track. monetary policy cannot revent track. monetary policy cannot prevent inflation _ track. monetary policy cannot prevent inflation going - track. monetary policy cannot prevent inflation going up - track. monetary policy cannot. prevent inflation going up during this year and thereby reducing living standards but it can ensure that as that shock fades, inflation returns to the 2% target. it is in order to ensure that we have been raising interest rates, to ensure we
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get back to 2% interest on a sustained basis.— get back to 2% interest on a sustained basis. get back to 296 interest on a sustained basis. you sustained basis. very quickly. you mentioned — sustained basis. very quickly. you mentioned your _ sustained basis. very quickly. you mentioned your frustration - sustained basis. very quickly. you mentioned your frustration in - mentioned your frustration in inflation _ mentioned your frustration in inflation going up 10% are not being able inflation going up10% are not being able to— inflation going up 10% are not being able to control it in the short term with monetary policy and i presume you dont— with monetary policy and i presume you don't advocate policies we had when _ you don't advocate policies we had when we _ you don't advocate policies we had when we last had rampant inflation on wage _ when we last had rampant inflation on wage controls but do you think there _ on wage controls but do you think there is— on wage controls but do you think there is anything else that could have _ there is anything else that could have been done to control inflation or is there — have been done to control inflation or is there nothing, we just have to see it _ or is there nothing, we just have to see it rise — or is there nothing, we just have to see it rise to — or is there nothing, we just have to see it rise to that level before it comes— see it rise to that level before it comes down again? i�*m see it rise to that level before it comes down again?— see it rise to that level before it comes down again? i'm very careful, i don't advocate _ comes down again? i'm very careful, i don't advocate policies _ comes down again? i'm very careful, i don't advocate policies the - i don't advocate policies the government should adopt and i don't think the government has things it can't do, the impressive work on gas supply, we need to keep that up like we did with vaccines, procurement made a huge difference, ensuring gas supplies is a huge different comic
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difference —— ensuring gas supplies has a huge difference and ensuring ukraine can get its food out of the country would be a huge contribution. the third thing i would say and i am not advocating government policy, going back to the conversation we had at the beginning about the labour market, the more we can do to understand what is going to shape people's participation in the labour market going forwards, the labour market going forwards, the better. understanding it is a good thing. if the better. understanding it is a good thing. iii the better. understanding it is a good thing-— the better. understanding it is a uroodthin. . ., . good thing. if i could add to that, we talk a lot _ good thing. if i could add to that, we talk a lot to _ good thing. if i could add to that, we talk a lot to businesses - good thing. if i could add to that, i we talk a lot to businesses through the agents network. i did a visit to wates— the agents network. i did a visit to wales the — the agents network. i did a visit to wales the week before last and what was striking from talking to a number— was striking from talking to a number of businesses is how they are looking _ number of businesses is how they are looking to _ number of businesses is how they are looking to build the resilience of their— looking to build the resilience of their supply chains so in a sense, their supply chains so in a sense, the behavioural response to what we've _ the behavioural response to what we've seen, so they are reassuring
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where _ we've seen, so they are reassuring where possible supply chains so you -et where possible supply chains so you get that _ where possible supply chains so you get that certainty of supply. it may come _ get that certainty of supply. it may come at _ get that certainty of supply. it may come at greater cost in the short term _ come at greater cost in the short term because globalisation created the more _ term because globalisation created the more extended supply chains in the more extended supply chains in the first— the more extended supply chains in the first place, they were more efficient, — the first place, they were more efficient, then when you see the kind of— efficient, then when you see the kind of shocks we have seen from the pandemic— kind of shocks we have seen from the pandemic and now from the war in ukraine, _ pandemic and now from the war in ukraine, less confidence about those extended _ ukraine, less confidence about those extended supply chains. you are seeing _ extended supply chains. you are seeing it's— extended supply chains. you are seeing it's notjust about extended supply chains. you are seeing it's not just about what policy — seeing it's not just about what policy could or couldn't do, you are seeing _ policy could or couldn't do, you are seeing the — policy could or couldn't do, you are seeing the private sector respond and thinking how it can build resilience. that may be at a cost in the short— resilience. that may be at a cost in the short term... studio: we are going to leave the governor of the bank and his team. deputy governor speaking there, one of the deputy governors could. the key elements so far is the bank's
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performance on the impact of covid. he said there have been supply shocks, most recently with russia's invasion of ukraine, we cannot predict things like war which is not an anybody's power. he says we could not have done anything differently. there was also the situation in china which appears to be affecting the country more seriously. in essence, he is saying we could not have predicted how far the economy would fall. the other question they will be asking is about inflation, whether the bank has been sufficient in preparing the country for the impact of inflation. time for the weather. hello. outbreaks of rain in scotland this afternoon with a cool easterly wind for northern ireland. for england and wales, sunny spells and scattered heavy and thundery downpours that could deliver a lot of rain in a short space of time with a risk of disruption, though, not everybody
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will get to see them. and for much of wales and the southern half of england becoming dry and increasingly sunny going into this evening, the higher temperatures across eastern parts of england, the lower ones across eastern scotland with the rain and the onshore wind and the rain moves across the northern isles into tonight. elsewhere, showers and thunderstorms fade away. a few mist and fog patches just east in scotland and northeast england dipping down into single figures. the story of tomorrow's weather is for outbreaks of rain to become heavier and more widespread across western areas, especially into the afternoon, whereas ahead of that it's a warmer day in the sunny spells from eastern scotland, particularly through central and eastern parts of england. some of the highest temperatures of the year so far. we're going to see 26 around the london area, though. thunderstorms here possible to end the day.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 4pm... borisjohnson meets northern ireland's main parties as part of efforts to restore power—sharing at stormont, but differences remain over the future of post—brexit trade rules. i want to see the government delivering on their commitments on a new decade, new approach, and that means removing the irish sea border, it means respecting northern ireland's place within the uk internal market. the ireland's place within the uk internal market.— ireland's place within the uk internal market. �* , internal market. the british prime minister has _ internal market. the british prime minister has created _ internal market. the british prime minister has created the _ internal market. the british prime i minister has created the impression at least _ minister has created the impression at least that he is minded to get rid of— at least that he is minded to get rid of the — at least that he is minded to get rid of the protocol, know that clearly — rid of the protocol, know that clearly is _ rid of the protocol, know that clearly is not possible. legally, that is — clearly is not possible. legally, that is not _ clearly is not possible. legally, that is not permissible. ukraine says its troops have reached the russian border near kharkiv in the north east, after driving russian forces away from the city.
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energy bills could change every three months under new plans. the regulator ofgem claims it will avoid price shocks in the long term. as the cost of living continues to hit, the governor of the bank of england defends his actions on the economy. he has denied being asleep at the wheel on the economy. the first in—person gcse and a level exams begin for many, after the pandemic stopped them from taking place. very good afternoon if you have just joined us. the prime minister borisjohnson is at hillsborough castle for talks with the main northern ireland parties, to urge them to resume power—sharing. the largest unionist party, the dup,
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is currently refusing to take part in the government of northern ireland they are the second—largest party the northern ireland assembly. because of the post—brexit trading arrangements with the eu, known as the northern ireland protocol. the uk government is expected to introduce legislation which would allow ministers to override parts of that protocol. speaking to the belfast telegraph, borisjohnson said that protocol is now out of date and changes are needed. outside hillsborough castle, the leader of the democratic unionist party, sirjeffrey donaldson says he wants to see northern ireland's place within the united kingdom 'fully respected' and 'fully restored'. i want to see what the government have to propose, i welcome the prime minister being here today and the opportunity to speak to him. we waited a long time for this moment, we waited a long time to see the
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government bring forward proposals that represent action to deal with the problems created by the irish sea border, by the harm that is doing to our economy, undermining our political institutions, creating instability and harming our relationship with the rest of the united kingdom. we cannot have power—sharing unless there is a consensus, that consensus doesn't exist. i am in the business of rebuilding that consensus in northern ireland. as sir geoffrey has said that, that consensus has to happen because the good friday agreement says that a government can only perform if it is drawn both from unionist and nationalist parties. sinn fein finished first in the election. sinn fein's president mary lou macdonald said that the meeting she and michelle o'neill had with borisjohnson was tough, but sinn fein is committed to power sharing. we have not given up on power—sharing
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or the executive, farfrom it. power—sharing is the only game in town. working together is the only option, there is no plan b. we live here together, we have to work together, we have to make progress together. we are up for that. we will work night and day to make that happen. the unfortunate thing is that the british government now is playing a game of brinkmanship with the european institutions, indulging a section of political unionism which believes that it can hold a veto and frustrate and hold society to ransom. that is what needs to change. our commitment to power—sharing, our commitment to working in partnership with an ever—changing michelle o'neill, she will say how anxious she is to take offers and to lead for everybody. we campaigned on the basis of establishing for a functioning partnership institutions, electing a first minister for all. when we said that, we meant that.
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we believe that in the current circumstances, so many people irrespective of how they voted, legitimately expect that they see functioning government now. we are committed to that. ukraine says its troops, who have been counterattacking near the country's second largest city, kharkiv, have advanced as far as the russian border. ukrainian forces have been retaking territory in north—eastern areas in recent days, as russian forces focus on the donbas region further south. it comes as nato officials said russia's strategy in the east of ukraine may be stalling, amid heavy losses and fierce resistance. one of the biggest ever nato military exercises in the baltics gets under way in estonia today, involving ten countries, including the uk, us, finland and sweden. james waterhouse reports. "we have made it mr, president. we are here."
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where these ukrainian soldiers say they are is in the kharkiv region on the russian border. the invaders seem to have left the area surrounding ukraine second's largest city, kharkiv. leaving behind now familiar trails. translation: the russians left really quickly. _ they didn't have time to loot much. we saw what we think were the headquarters. many positions were abandoned, flak jackets and helmets lying around. as the russians focus more on the east, so is nato. carrying out its biggest ever exercises in latvia and estonia — ten countries, 15,000 troops. belarus is conducting its own military training close to the polish border. it's russia's ally and was a big facilitator in its invasion of ukraine. nato thinks ukraine could actually get itself in a position to win this war, but that would rely on two
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things — either the russians retreating completely, something that is looking very unlikely, or the ukrainians themselves forcing them out. president zelensky has already admitted he doesn't have the military means to free cities, as written there, like mariupol. translation: we continue very complicated and delicate - negotiation to save our people from mariupol, from azovstal. we deal with this issue on a daily basis, and the main thing is for agreements to be fulfilled. someone listening closely to that is yevheniy. his 24—year—old son is one of the hundreds of trapped ukrainian fighters there. translation: | understand | that the authorities are doing as much as they can, but of course more needs to be done because we need the results, not the process. do you think your son is going to survive this? and does your son think he's going to survive this? i am confident.
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it is all i have right now, it is what helps me to wake up in the morning. the last stand at mariupol�*s steelworks are a reminder that this war is far from over. james waterhouse reporting from ukraine. sweden's government has decided the country will seek nato membership, after decades of non—alignment. the prime minister, magdalena andersson, announced the decision after a three—hour debate, saying she feels confident of pubic support. a date for the formal application is still unclear because sweden will send its application together with finland. ulf kristersson, the leader of the opposition moderate party also backs the decision to apply for nato membership, describing it as 'historic�*.
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the american fast—food restaurant mcdonald's has announced it will exit the russian market and sell its business in the country to a local buyer. our russia editor steve rosenberg is in moscow and told us how significant this is. well, mcdonald's had temporarily shut its restaurants across russia back in march, that's when a lot of international companies and global brands had suspended their operations. the fact that mcdonald's has now come out and said, "look, that's it, we are selling up, we are pulling out," i think that is recognition of the reality, really, that things are not going to return to normal here, that what the kremlin calls its special military operation, what most of the world calls russia's war, has changed things long term. so mcdonald's issued a statement in which it said that owning a business in russia was no longer tenable or consistent with mcdonald's values. this really is the end of an era. i remember when the first
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mcdonald's restaurant opened in russia, way back in 1990, back in the ussr. there was such excitement, such huge crowds, they had to queue for three hours to get in. and i remember that day, american burgers and fries and pies, they really were a symbol, that day, of moscow embracing the west. fast hot food to help end the cold war. but fast forward 32 years, things have changed and basically russia and the west have lost their appetite for one another, because russia's offensive in ukraine has sparked international condemnation and sanctions, and the kremlin accuses the west of threatening russia. steve rosenberg speaking from moscow. let's cluster hillsborough castle in northern ireland. this is the alliance party of northern ireland giving its reaction following its meeting with boris johnson. liz
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following its meeting with boris johnson. , . . johnson. liz -- trust the central, and the atmosphere _ johnson. liz -- trust the central, and the atmosphere has - johnson. liz -- trust the central, and the atmosphere has been i johnson. liz -- trust the central, | and the atmosphere has been run johnson. liz -- trust the central, - and the atmosphere has been run over the past year. we need to see a reset and refocus on the uk government, not more threats and belligerence. a majority of mlas in northern ireland and people and the majority of the business immunity are very, very clear that they want to see civility and certainty around the protocol. we do not want to see any unilateral action. the only way forward is through usually agreed outcomes with the eu, they have to be sustainable solutions and illegal and make sure businesses have that stability and certainty they so crave. , ~ ,, stability and certainty they so crave. ~ ,, ~ ,, ,, . ,, stability and certainty they so crave. ~ ,, ~ ,, ,, ,, ,, m crave. journalist asks question it is clear that crave. journalist asks question it is clear that liz _ crave. journalist asks question it is clear that liz truss _ crave. journalist asks question it is clear that liz truss will _ crave. journalist asks question it is clear that liz truss will proceed - is clear that liz truss will proceed with her statement. judging by the briefings we have seen in the media, that will put the uk government powers to set aside aspects of the protocol. it may well be a threat is
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on the table, something that may not be used down the line. it will have two consequences, first it will make it more difficult to find agreement with the eu, because it is all about building up that degree of belligerence rather than trust. it will lead to more uncertainty in northern ireland. if you are a business trying to come here, you want to know what the long term relationship will be with the eu so you can make that investment decision and certainty. what this does is throw that in the air. we may well lose our business associations being deferred as a consequence. associations being deferred as a consequence-— associations being deferred as a consequence. journalist asks question i'm — consequence. journalist asks oussnon i'm not _ consequence. journalist asks oussnon i'm not sure - consequence. journalist asks question i'm not sure why - consequence. journalist asks question i'm not sure why the | consequence. journalist asks - question i'm not sure why the prime minister is here _ question i'm not sure why the prime minister is here exactly _ question i'm not sure why the prime minister is here exactly today, - minister is here exactly today, because we have not had a genuine dialogue over the uk government's approach to the brexit talks for many, many months. there has been wore in ukraine which has been the priority, understandably. but no ground work has been done for any of these particular moves. yes, i think this is about trying to locate the dup, and also trying to placate the
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eu and the conservative party. they are not acting in the true interests of northern ireland, it is a self—serving agenda he is pursuing. the flavour of language use of the meeting. — the flavour of language use of the meeting, you said it was robust. we are meeting, you said it was robust. are always meeting, you said it was robust. - are always polite and not prone to shouting, but we were very direct with the prime minister in terms of his assessment of the situation. also for him to take full responsibility and act in the interests of northern ireland. in particular, we were giving him a clear warning that if he plays fast and loose with the protocol and indeed the good friday agreement, he will be adding more and more instability to northern ireland. on the one hand, he is coming here with a certain set of outcomes, all his actions belie what he is trying to achieve. ., . _ . , , achieve. you are saying it has been achieve. you are saying it has been a difficult meeting _ achieve. you are saying it has been a difficult meeting and _ achieve. you are saying it has been a difficult meeting and frustrating, | a difficult meeting and frustrating,
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what do _ a difficult meeting and frustrating, what do you say to his argument that the eu _ what do you say to his argument that the eu is— what do you say to his argument that the eu is being fartoo intransigent? why on earth is a lorry— intransigent? why on earth is a lorry travelling from one supermarket to northern ireland, why does it— supermarket to northern ireland, why does it need to go through any checks— does it need to go through any checks if— does it need to go through any checks if it is not going anywhere near _ checks if it is not going anywhere near the — checks if it is not going anywhere near the public of ireland? we are 0 en to near the public of ireland? we are open to flexible _ near the public of ireland? we are open to flexible solutions - near the public of ireland? we are open to flexible solutions and - open to flexible solutions and mitigations. they can be done in the context of the protocol. a key ingredient for this trust, essentially the uk is asking the eu to subcontract the management of its economic frontier with the uk in terms of the single market and customs union to uk authorities. that involves honouring existing agreements. and always having proper protocols around deal sharing and labelling and that risk—based approach. if you are going to make further breaches of the protocol, that will be entirely counter—productive to that process of building trust. the process is not really been giving a proper chance over the past 12 months. it has been hard pressed by belligerence rather than generosity.
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we are happy as the last party, we are pro—european, opposed to brexit. we are happy to push the eu hard in terms of flexibility is, we have seen that in terms of medicines. they will turn round and say that they may have that generous offer in medicines, it was either unacknowledged by the uk or dismissed by certain ministers. that is no way to build relationships and get a close—up of outcomes. that is no way to build relationships and get a close-up of outcomes. that is a stehen get a close-up of outcomes. that is a stephen parry. — get a close-up of outcomes. that is a stephen parry, the _ get a close-up of outcomes. that is a stephen parry, the deputy - get a close-up of outcomes. that is a stephen parry, the deputy leader| a stephen parry, the deputy leader of the alliance party of northern ireland. perhaps the most pointed remarks he made her was to say that he didn't know why the prime minister bothered coming. let's go to ireland correspondent chris page was also at hillsborough. it is a fair point, isn't it?— fair point, isn't it? certainly don't give _ fair point, isn't it? certainly don't give the _ fair point, isn't it? certainly don't give the impression, l fair point, isn't it? certainly. don't give the impression, as fair point, isn't it? certainly - don't give the impression, as we have been listening to the parties coming out of hillsborough castle here today after meeting the prime minister, that things are moving forward at any rate of knots. i
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think that is fair to say. sinn fein, whenever they came out, the party president mary lou mcdonald have said they had a tough meeting with the prime minister, told him that any unilateral action that the uk was planning to take on the protocol to scrap parts of the trade border, they would be reckless in their view. the democratic unionist party, their leader sejeffrey donaldson said that they were suspending judgment, that they had not seen the devil and's proposals yet, they were going to see what did materialise —— they had not seen the proposals. he said tabling legislation alone was just words, and he needed decisive action. if it is the case that the dup are having to wait until legislation is passed before we even get to what the legislation will actually do, that
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suggests we could be in for a very, very long time of political deadlock indeed. i very long time of political deadlock indeed. , , , very long time of political deadlock indeed. , ,, indeed. i suppose it is possible that they could _ indeed. i suppose it is possible that they could find _ indeed. i suppose it is possible that they could find whatever l indeed. i suppose it is possible - that they could find whatever words the government will put in the legislation to fill the could go backin legislation to fill the could go back in and it would be enough. after what happened last time when they took the prime minister's word for it, the want something a bit more than reassurances.- for it, the want something a bit more than reassurances. yeah, that's ri . ht. more than reassurances. yeah, that's rirht. i more than reassurances. yeah, that's right- ithink— more than reassurances. yeah, that's right. | think the — more than reassurances. yeah, that's right. i think the levels _ more than reassurances. yeah, that's right. i think the levels of _ more than reassurances. yeah, that's right. i think the levels of trust - right. i think the levels of trust between the dup and borisjohnson have really been edging ever lower throughout mrjohnson's prime minister ship. the dup said they have been hearing words from mr johnson and his colleagues in government for a long time and that it is the absence of any action which drove them firstly to take their first minister out of the devolved government back in february, which meant that the stormont executive couldn't fully operate. and now after the election
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11 days ago, they said we stood on the basis that we would not be rejoining the stormont executive unless our concerns over the protocol are dealt with. so they do seem to be sitting in very high bar, that said, we have often seen in these very pivotaljuncture is in these very pivotaljuncture is in the political process in northern ireland that were never political will is there and people can find a certain amount of political, to do whatever it is that they feel is in their political best interests at a certain time. at the moment, it certainly doesn't look as if there is any process of devolved government being restored or prospect of the stormont assembly meeting any time soon. the dup are blocking it from eating at all because they have blocked a speaker last friday. borisjohnson says that he is going to keep on negotiating with the eu, whenever the foreign secretary this trust does announce over the coming days, we will watch very closely, by the dup but also by the other parties here. worth saying that the political relationships
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here are always a delicate balance and that if something is done that will help one side, unionist in this instance, it will certainly not help the irish nationalists such as stephen parry�*s alliance party. we heard that they are broadly in favour of managing the fallout from brexit and point back to brexit. they say brexit fundamentally, the referenda back in 2016 has caused so many different issues and destabilised those delicate political relationships in northern ireland. , ., political relationships in northern ireland. , . ., political relationships in northern ireland. , . . ., ireland. chris paige at hillsborough castle, the residents _ ireland. chris paige at hillsborough castle, the residents of— ireland. chris paige at hillsborough castle, the residents of the - castle, the residents of the northern ireland secretaryjust northern ireland secretary just outside northern ireland secretaryjust outside belfast, thank you very much. mps have been questioning senior leaders from the bank of england at the treasury committee in parliament this afternoon. the cost of living and inflation dominated the hearing, with the bank's leader andrew bailey defending criticism of the bank for failing to meet its target of keeping inflation at 2%. speaking to the committee chair mel
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stride, mr bailey denied the he had been "asleep at the wheel" when it came to rising rates. we have to office to take our decisions based on the facts and evidence at the time. i do see comments around hindsight but we have to take decisions based on how we see the facts and evidence at the time. you mentioned of external supply shocks, and i think the best way i can think of putting a calibration onto about is to say that at the forecast peak of inflation that we are currently at, which comes in the fourth quarter of this year, that is when it, i'm afraid, over10%... ishould emphasise that i don't feel at all of us be happy about this, this is bad situation to be in. but it is notable that 80% of the target at
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that point is due to tradable goods. that is the piece i would put into this category of things that have happened, particularly the impact on global prices that is coming through to this country. as you said, there have been a series of supply shocks going on, most recently, this is a big factor in the chains and were last here in the may report, the impact of the war, russia's invasion of ukraine. as others do, we can't predict things like wars. i think as you are implying is not really in our power, or in anybody's power. it is well established practice to accommodate supply shocks when they are expected to be transient, preventive not accommodate the so—called second round effects of those shocks. i would also say
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before and the labour market, which is important, a a series of shocks like this which have come one after the other with no gaps between them is almost unprecedented, i think. andrew bailey, governor of the bank of england at the treasury select committee which are still going on. plans have been announced to review the energy price cap more frequently, to try to keep down gas and electricity costs for consumers. the cap — set by the regulator, ofgem — rose by more than 50% last month, meaning millions of households saw their annual bills jump by around £700. ofgem said that a more frequent price cap would reflect the most up—to—date energy prices. but consumer groups warn the plans could make it harder to delay the pain of rising costs. joining us is alexa waud, co—director at fuel poverty action. my my apologies for misreading your name. what effect do you think a more frequent increase in the caps,
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which is what we are going to see at the moment, we will not see the caps lower, but rather higher because prices are rising, what impact do you think that would have, particularly on the lowest paid or fixed incomes? i particularly on the lowest paid or fixed incomes?— fixed incomes? i think it is going to have the _ fixed incomes? i think it is going to have the opposite _ fixed incomes? i think it is going to have the opposite effect - fixed incomes? i think it is going to have the opposite effect of. fixed incomes? i think it is going l to have the opposite effect of what we need. right now, we need immediate relief for people who already, due to the price cap rise that we saw at the beginning of april, cannot pay their bills. instead of assurance, security and confidence, is more frequent price cap rise is going to make things a lot harder and less predictable for people in the uk. and that isjust not acceptable. there are several things which the regulator ofgem can do to help households in a way that the pricing structure works, and reviewing the price cap more frequently in the midst of these rapid rises and continuing to not question how it is pinned to the volatile gas price and the
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combination or the reliance on gas as opposed to renewables, it is not acceptable. as opposed to renewables, it is not acce table. , as opposed to renewables, it is not acceptable-— acceptable. given that the transition _ acceptable. given that the transition to _ acceptable. given that the transition to a _ acceptable. given that the transition to a greener - acceptable. given that the - transition to a greener energy policy, even with the best will in the world would take several years, because we are dependent or have been so dependent on fossil fuels, what do you think can be done in the meantime? what effective tools are the government not deploying or, in your opinion, not deploying effectively enough? tote your opinion, not deploying effectively enough?- your opinion, not deploying effectively enough? we are not -a in: effectively enough? we are not paying attention _ effectively enough? we are not paying attention right - effectively enough? we are not paying attention right now - effectively enough? we are not paying attention right now to i effectively enough? we are not. paying attention right now to the way the energy pricing system is set up. in the long term and immediately, as soon as you integrate a home for instance, that has immediate effects on people's bills, making them smaller. and the turnover for solar panels also has immediate effects on our energy supply. in terms of the pricing structure, however, there are several things that ofgem could do immediately. right now, people who use a lot less energy are actually
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paying a lot more for the unit cost. and that is because of something called the standing charge that no matter how much energy you are using, you are going to be paying the standing charge. people in the uk right now who have reduced their usage down to next to nothing or even nothing are still having their metres to come away with the standing charge and are paying for it. and that is especially true, this is the second point, the people on prepayment metres. they have experienced the most price discrimination because they are the people who are least able to pay and they have seen the highest price rise and the highest price cap. and they are dealing with both the standing charge and the highest prices, they have the problem that if they run out of credit on their prepayment metre of it are going to be able to turn on the lights. whatever fuel they have been unfortunate enough —— whatever food we have been fortunate enough to buy will go bad in theirfridge. ofgem should be looking at the upside—down
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pricing structure moved towards a model where people would be assured through a right to energy the ability to turn on the lights were to heat their homes enough to stay healthy in the winter, to be able to cook basic food. instead, they are charging the most to people who are least able to pay for it.— least able to pay for it. alexa, co-director — least able to pay for it. alexa, co-director of _ least able to pay for it. alexa, co-director of fuel _ least able to pay for it. alexa, co-director of fuel poverty . least able to pay for it. alexa, - co-director of fuel poverty action, co—director of fuel poverty action, thank you very much. co-director of fuel poverty action, thank you very much.— most gcse and a—level exams started today, the first in—person since 2019 — meaning many pupils in england, wales and northern ireland are sitting their first formal exams since the start of the pandemic. but some head teachers are warning of a shortage of invigilators, because they're worried about catching covid. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley, spent a day at a school in wigan to see how pupils and teachers there have been preparing. coming up in the next couple of weeks, it's absolutely essential that we have a good revision programme. at the deanery church of england high school in wigan, its final study sessions. when i did my mocks and i got the results, i was like, "ah!"
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chelsea and her classmates have done their mock exams. i had tears coming in my eyes as i was walking in. i just see the paper, all the invigilators just standing at the front with their arms crossed. i'mjust like, "oh, my days!" the next time they go into the exam room, it will be for real. i want to do a career in medicine, so i obviously want to get them seven, eights and nines to, like, obviously gain offers from university, like maybe universities like manchester, even oxford. i was expecting, considering what we did at revision... catching up in the canteen, it's talk of revision and exam timetables. i've got 21 exams spread out across a month and a half, so sometimes i'll go home and i'll revise for an hour or so, and then i'll go to footballjust to take my mind off it. obviously worry about your grades, but worry about yourself and worry about your mental health. ok, year11s, you can put your pens down, please. the government says this year's students will be graded more generously than the last time exams were sat in 2019, but they won't get
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as many top grades as last year, when results were decided by teachers�* assessments. pupils will get formula sheets to use in exams, and there has been advance information for gcses and a—levels. hi, love, you ok? for the deputy head, mrs turner, it's about making pupils believe they can aim high, but there is no doubt anxiety levels are also high. most pupils haven't had any national exams since their sats in primary school. we are seeing children that are presenting to us with really, really difficult emotional...social, emotional, mental health issues. we've got more children, probably triple, quadruple the amount of children that previously would have struggled to go to the exam hall, getting ready for an exam. it's all the stuff you put in beforehand. it's all the practice runs, its all the getting yourselves ready that they've not had. breathe in. in the library, there's an exam stress workshop. as well as breathing techniques, minnie is on hand to help pupils and staff. if pupils are having a difficult
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day, then they can come into the wellbeing room. they can have a chat with me, they can spend a little time with minnie. she's a very big part of the school. the government says national exams represent a major step back to normality. for these pupils, it's a major step towards their future goals and aspirations. our grades open the doors to what we want to become in this world, and ijust honestly think that the support that the teachers are giving me and giving to the rest of the students as well, obviously, is just really helpful. elaine dunkley, bbc news. let's go live now to andover where we can speak to dr maryhan baker who is a child psychologist and parenting expert. thank you very much a being with us, doctor baker. first of all, the problem for a lot of parents is that they are dealing with children who have not had a period of stress in this kind of environment before.
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what are your thoughts on that? and perhaps and importantly for the audience watching, what advice can you offer to try perhaps to mitigate some of the impact of that? if rare some of the impact of that? if we think about _ some of the impact of that? if we think about this, _ some of the impact of that? if we think about this, it _ some of the impact of that? if we think about this, it is _ some of the impact of that? if we think about this, it is not - some of the impact of that? if "we: think about this, it is not only have they not set any formal exams, they have not seen the rite of passage of the two years of them, also sitting those, appears in the years above or siblings sit these gcses or important exams. they are really coming into this without that kind of model of what it looks like and what is normal. there is a huge amount of anxiety that is related to these. and they know how important they are, so i think as parents, what we can do is just create space for them to be able to live music with us when they feel overwhelmed and help them try and place some perspective. i know this is really tricky, because obviously they are important, but there are a lot of other ways we can measure success
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academically and notjust other ways we can measure success academically and not just through the gcses. it is trying to keep that perspective in place for them. if you could give us an idea from the people who consulted you over the people who consulted you over the years, what sort of things are going through those youngsters�* minds right now? what sort of question is will they be asking and worrying about because of this familiar new setting? i worrying about because of this familiar new setting?- worrying about because of this familiar new setting? i think for some of them _ familiar new setting? i think for some of them it _ familiar new setting? i think for some of them it has _ familiar new setting? i think for some of them it has almost - familiar new setting? i think for some of them it has almost fellj some of them it has almost fell slightly surreal as if they are not actually going through this, they have really struggled to come to terms with the fact they are going to take the exams, they�*ve seen the two years above them with last—minute changes to examinations happening so a lot of them are feeling unprepared because they won�*t be expecting it and a lot of anxieties around an expectation that they need to do well and a lot of criticism about the challenges they might have had learning online and accessing their learning in the same way so they feel a huge amount of
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pressure not being able to perform as well as they can do and then that becomes quite debilitating for them to even sit and revise because they are caught in this constant chatter that they are not going to do as well. ., , that they are not going to do as well. . , . ,~' i. ., well. finally, let me ask you for the sort of _ well. finally, let me ask you for the sort of help _ well. finally, let me ask you for the sort of help people - well. finally, let me ask you for the sort of help people might i well. finally, let me ask you for| the sort of help people might be able to get particularly for those exam meltdowns because it�*s a terrible thing, you have a meltdown in one exam early in your exams and potentially if you don�*t manage that, it will completely throw the rest of your exams out. find that, it will completely throw the rest of your exams out.— that, it will completely throw the rest of your exams out. and i think it's really important _ rest of your exams out. and i think it's really important after— rest of your exams out. and i think it's really important after they've i it�*s really important after they�*ve had those situations to help them just decompress and get it all out and off their chests and then help them put a line under that particular one, it was one exam, one situation, it doesn�*t mean it�*s going to be the same in others. as the clip showed, what help them find
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ways of helping themselves, whether it is breathing exercises are mindfulness exercises, just to stay present, what has happened in the past isn�*t going to predict what�*s going to happen for them in the future. some breaking news, first is domestic about an important court case we�*ve been following. that�*s the murder of the police community support officerjulia james, she was out walking her dog when she was attacked. she reported a man who had been behaving suspiciously in the area for some time. callum wheeler, 22, from aylesham, kent, has been found guilty at canterbury current court of murdering julia james. more on that as soon as we get it. the other piece of news is that the elysee palace has confirmed the
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prime minister of france has been out to tender his resignation allowing the government to be reshaped after emmanuel macron�*s second victory as president. let�*s go to hugh ferris at the bbc sports centre for all the sports headlines. it was supposed to be a big summer for england bowler mahmood but he has been ruled out after his test debut earlier this year. he would likely have been in the england squad for the first game. he was ruled out because of back pain and now a scan has revealed a lumbar stress fracture, no timeframe has been set for his return. there is a crucial match. there�*s a crucial match in cricket�*s indian premier league today with two english players involved for the punjab kings against the delhi capitals. one of them, liam livingstone,
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was given the ball first, and with the opening delivery of the match had australia�*s david warner caught, known as a royal duck. warner wasn�*t originally supposed to be facing the first ball but switched ends once he saw it was livingstone. the winner will end the day in the playoff places. liverpool are a little bit closer to manchester city in the premier league table than they might have expected today, butjurgen klopp says they�*re unlikely to get another favour from the leaders, one that would help his own team claim the title on sunday�*s final day. pep guardiola�*s side did come from 2—0 down for the first time in his reign at west ham but the 2—2 draw means that if liverpool win their game in hand the two teams will go into the last match just a point apart. but klopp isn�*t expecting city to provide them with another slip up when they play aston villa. i don�*t know when city dropped points the last time two games in a row, historically, so i don�*t expect city to drop points there, but it has no influence on our game for tomorrow.
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either way we go into the last match day one point behind. it would be the perfect scenario from today�*s point of view and that�*s what we will try to do. the race to qualify for the champions league will also go down to the final day after arsenal dropped out of the top four after spurs�* win over burnley. arsenal�*s game in hand is tonight at newcastle. they�*ll start it two points behind spurs. mikel arteta is feeling grateful for how his team have performed so far this season. how lucky i am to have them, how much they are looking forward to playing on monday and how excited they are about the challenge ahead because we all know everything we�*ve been through throughout the season and how much we have to fight to be in this position. anti—racism charity kick it out says incidents at two premier league matches yesterday show "hate is alive and well within football". brentford striker ivan toney and full—back rico henry
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revealed their families were racially abused during their win at everton, who have confirmed they�*re assisting merseyside police. two burnley fans were arrested for "discriminatory gestures" during their match at spurs. kick it out also said they hope appropriate and decisive action is taken against all those involved. tiger woods is feeling "a lot stronger" for this week�*s us pga championship than he did at the masters in april. the 15—time major winner played nine holes at southern hills in oklahoma. woods is still recovering from a major car crash in february last year that caused leg and foot injuries. the former world number one made the cut at the masters before shooting two 6—over par rounds of 78. the former british number one laura robson has confirmed her retirement from tennis at the age of 28. as a teenager, robson reached the fourth round of the us open and here at wimbledon, as well as winning silver in the mixed doubles with andy murray at the 2012
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olympics. she says the decision to retire was forced upon her after having three hip operations. that�*s all the sport for now. the charity alzheimers research uk says dementia is now the leading cause of death for women in the uk since 2011. to mark dementia action week, charity, the alzheimer�*s society has spoken to more than 1,000 dementia sufferers and their carers, and has published an online checklist to identify the signs of dementia. with me now is david hayes. his wife, cheryl, aged 69, started showing symptoms for dementia at 61. it took four years before she got her diagnosis. thank you for speaking to us about this. often the problem is that there are lots of symptoms that might be dementia or mightjust be
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old age and presumably it�*s quite difficult for somebody and their partner to actually know what was going on. what was happening in your situation? �* . ., . going on. what was happening in your situation? . ., . . . , , situation? behavioural changes, she was very young _ situation? behavioural changes, she was very young at — situation? behavioural changes, she was very young at the _ situation? behavioural changes, she was very young at the time, - situation? behavioural changes, she was very young at the time, only - situation? behavioural changes, she was very young at the time, only 61 | was very young at the time, only 61 at the first signs, and at 63, a friend said there was something strange with cheryl but there were issues with feeding or eating which was frustrating because you don�*t know what the problem is, just not the same jolly person she was has been. these changes, it was quite a long time before we thought about this. ,, . , long time before we thought about this, ,, ., , , , long time before we thought about this. ,, ., _ , , long time before we thought about this. ,, . , _ , , . this. she was saying things she had never said before _ this. she was saying things she had never said before so _ this. she was saying things she had never said before so they _ this. she was saying things she had never said before so they were - this. she was saying things she had never said before so they were not | never said before so they were not passing moodiness which we all get from time to time or a partner will always get, we always wind each other up, it was something more frequent than that. it
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other up, it was something more frequent than that.— frequent than that. it wasn't so much moodiness, _ frequent than that. it wasn't so much moodiness, just - frequent than that. it wasn't so | much moodiness, just different. frequent than that. it wasn't so i much moodiness, just different. i think anybody whose partner, wife, husband, whatever is showing strange things going on, speak to a gp the sooner the better.— things going on, speak to a gp the sooner the better. somebody came to ou three sooner the better. somebody came to you three years _ sooner the better. somebody came to you three years in _ sooner the better. somebody came to you three years in and _ sooner the better. somebody came to you three years in and said _ sooner the better. somebody came to you three years in and said you - sooner the better. somebody came to you three years in and said you need l you three years in and said you need to find out. what was cheryl�*s reaction when you said we need to go and see a doctor? it reaction when you said we need to go and see a doctor?— and see a doctor? it was my son that ersuaded and see a doctor? it was my son that persuaded her- _ and see a doctor? it was my son that persuaded her. it _ and see a doctor? it was my son that persuaded her. it was _ and see a doctor? it was my son that persuaded her. it was 2015, - and see a doctor? it was my son that persuaded her. it was 2015, a - and see a doctor? it was my son that persuaded her. it was 2015, a friend | persuaded her. it was 2015, a friend said cheryl has strange things going on. it�*s difficult to say you�*ve got to go see a doctor. 18 months later in december 2016, my son said you have to go to the doctor and she booked straiton injanuary 2017 —— street in —— straight in. i�*m
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street in -- straight in. i'm interested _ street in -- straight in. i'm interested to _ street in -- straight in. i'm interested to hear - street in —— straight in. i'm interested to hear you say that because the question people ask themselves, what happens after you�*ve had a diagnosis like that? lots of people think it�*s the diagnosis that the bottom falls out of your world and some people think, i�*d rather not know and i�*ll deal with it as i go along and don�*t want to confront it. i with it as i go along and don't want to confront it.— to confront it. i would say it doesn't. — to confront it. i would say it doesn't. we _ to confront it. i would say it doesn't, we grasped - to confront it. i would say it doesn't, we grasped the - to confront it. i would say it - doesn't, we grasped the nettle. doesn�*t, we grasped the nettle. cheryl was pleased to know what her diagnosis was. well, not pleased, but you understand. when the memory clinic came here in 2017 after the scans, she was pleased to be able to say, i now know what is wrong and she then went on the drug that she
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needed and there was a change with that. she was still driving until about two and a half years ago. we continued life as best as possible and without this diagnosis, i would be struggling by now, to be frank. the answer is, go as soon as you feel, for example, when we went for the initial memory test which was in 2017 after the blood test at the medical clinic, there were silhouettes of an elephant and giraffe and a rhinoceros or whatever, and the chap said, what�*s that? she said i don�*t know. it was strange. she was a language teacher, she doesn�*t know any french whatsoever now and she taught it. that�*s extraordinary, how bits of the mind to attach themselves and are lost forever. i suppose it is holding on for what is still there for as long as possible. please
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answer this however you want, but can i ask you, how are things now? ok, she cooked sunday lunch yesterday with a bit of prompting, she washes up, she does the ironing, but we have one or two issues with rather damp things in the airing cupboard but it�*s ok, life is what it is and we travel, we go and see the children in kent and london, we went on holiday in march to the caribbean, we�*ve got a caravan in wales so we tend to continue life as best as possible and as best we can. i do lose my rag with her sometimes but it�*s very frustrating in that perspective, but on the whole, it�*s a sad but we have to get on with it as best we can. i would recommend to anybody who is in any doubt sooner
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rather than later, because the other thing we did recently but now it is too late but younger people, people diagnosed now have a chance to do drugs trials. we went to birmingham in march and they said cheryl is too advanced to do the drugs trials. but if you are diagnosed early, as i say, she was driving until two years ago. say, she was driving until two years auo. ., y say, she was driving until two years ato, ., , ., say, she was driving until two years auo. ., , ., . say, she was driving until two years auo. ., ,~/ . , ago. lovely to hear your story, we appreciate — ago. lovely to hear your story, we appreciate you _ ago. lovely to hear your story, we appreciate you telling _ ago. lovely to hear your story, we appreciate you telling us - ago. lovely to hear your story, we appreciate you telling us about. ago. lovely to hear your story, we appreciate you telling us about it | appreciate you telling us about it and something to be hopeful about which is life doesn�*t stop, you get on with it, maybe not in the way you wanted to, but you make the best of it and it�*s good to hear the two of you are still doing lots of stuff together. send cheryl our good wishes. thank you for your time. the authorities in the us city where ten people were killed in a mass shooting on saturday have said that the teenager charged with the attack deliberately sought out a location with a high black population.
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the shooting — which is being investigated as an act of racially motivated violent extremism — happened at a grocery store in buffalo, new york state. 18—year—old payton grendon was arrested in the aftermath. let�*s get more on this with james densley, professor of criminaljustice at metro state university in minnesota and co—author of the book, the violence project: how to stop a mass shooting epidemic. thank you for being with us. firstly, tell us about this particular incident. to what extent does it conform to what one might call a pattern or responses that are commonplace in these mass killings? there is no one profile of a mass shooter but we�*ve studied the life histories of mass shooter is going all the way back to 1966 in the book that you mentioned and there are commonalities and one of the key things is that this is often angry
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young men who are really searching for a place in the world and answers to their problems and they are airing a grievance and they are doing it in a very public, very horrible way and i think that�*s what we see here with this particular situation again which is we�*ve got somebody who is targeting racial and ethnic minority groups because they seem to be the sort of targets of what he sees as being his frustration or anger with society and so this is a sort of commonality that we have seen in the histories of mass shooters and unfortunately there are so many that we have the opportunity to go back and look at these patterns over time. this opportunity to go back and look at these patterns over time.- opportunity to go back and look at these patterns over time. this is a disturbin: these patterns over time. this is a disturbing trend _ these patterns over time. this is a disturbing trend we've _ these patterns over time. this is a disturbing trend we've seen - these patterns over time. this is a disturbing trend we've seen and i disturbing trend we�*ve seen and we�*ve seen other instances like the attack on the muslim community in new zealand a couple of years ago.
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and it happened here again in buffalo where the assailant actually live broadcast or livestreamed their terrible crime. after the event, it made some evidential use for the police investigation but it is a shocking element that technology now allows them to do. are these attacks really propaganda exercises? that’s really propaganda exercises? that's an interesting _ really propaganda exercises? that's an interesting way _ really propaganda exercises? that's an interesting way to _ really propaganda exercises? that's an interesting way to think- really propaganda exercises? “trust�*s an interesting way to think about them because you referenced the shooting in christchurch, new zealand. this particular shooting almost seems like it is a copycat event. that is something we see also in the histories of mass shooters, they study other mass shooters for inspiration but also to find their place in the world and what we have here is, this is an individual that posted some things on the internet prior to the shooting which were effectively plagiarised from the
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shooter in new zealand and then you have the element of livestreaming which is also something that that new zealand shooter did as well so there is a copycat component but there�*s also this piece about wanting the world to notice. this is a statement piece, a mass shooting is very much intended to be a person�*s final act because you either die on the scene, whether you take your own life or law enforcement takes it for you, or you are destined to spend the rest of your life in prison and depending on the state, you will be executed. so a mass shooting as a final act, you have to get to that point in your life where you no longer care if you live or die and you want to air that grievance to the world and the most public way possible, both to inspire others to maybe follow suit if they are feeling like they are too but also to send a message of, this is my statement, this is my act and this is what i�*m going to do about it. it's this is what i�*m going to do about it. it�*s a really troubling trend
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with the rise of social media and the internet that now you can broadcast this around the world and you can do so very, very quickly and you can do so very, very quickly and you can do so very, very quickly and you can get a lot of eyeballs on your actions, which feed into that fame seeking notoriety piece that some of these shooters have. thanks some of these shooters have. thanks so much for — some of these shooters have. thanks so much for your— some of these shooters have. thanks so much for your time, _ some of these shooters have. thanks so much for your time, professor, - so much for your time, professor, good to speak to you. a police investigation is underway after a three year old boy died after a suspected dog attack in milnrow, in greater manchester. our correspondent nick garnett is at the scene. terribly sorry, we had the wrong story there. we were going to go to simonjones, a correspondent who is at canterbury crown court, this is for the guilty verdict this afternoon in the case of the police
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community support officerjulia james who was murdered while she was out walking her dog. it�*s a grim case. out walking her dog. it's a grim case. ., . _, , out walking her dog. it's a grim case. i, case. police community support officerjulia _ case. police community support officerjulia james _ case. police community support officerjulia james was - case. police community support officerjulia james was out - case. police community support i officerjulia james was out walking her dog on the 27th of april last year when she was attacked and hit repeatedly on the head. she had no chance of survival. the man who attacked her was callum wheeler from the local area, the police heard he had been waiting for a lone woman to attack and julia james was the woman he came across. the jury was sent out just after 3:15pm this afternoon, they deliberated forjust over an hour before coming back with a guilty verdict. at the start of the trial, callum wheeler had admitted that he was the one who killed pcso julia james but denied
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it was murder. he said before the jury it was murder. he said before the jury came to court that he pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, but there was actually no manslaughter charge on the charge sheet and there was no evidence given to the court that he was suffering from any mental health issues in relation to this case that were relevant. in the hours after the killing, we heard 24 hours later he went back close to the murder scene, he had the murder weapon with him, a passer—by saw him with pictures on his dashcam in his vehicle and challenged callum wheeler because he thought he was acting strangely. he dialled 999 reporting this man to the police stop the prosecution said during the case that callum wheeler was possibly goading the police by going back to the murder scene 24 hours later perhaps he was looking for somewhere to dispose of the weapon that he used to killjulia james.
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that was a metal railwayjack. the pathologist said the injuries suffered were so bad, they were some of the worst he had ever come across in examinations of bodies he has done over the years. when the verdict was read out, julia james�*s family were in court. some of them gave expressions that they were pleased with the verdict. callum wheeler had to be held up in the dock as part of this when the verdict came in but we are expecting to hearfrom julia verdict came in but we are expecting to hear from julia james�*s family shortly and from the police, this was a huge investigation, the police having to investigate the killing of one of their own members of staff. for the police, they�*ve got a huge number of resources that lead them ultimately to callum wheeler. he has now been found guilty of murder and will be sentenced at a later date. we will be going back to canterbury crown court in the next hour to hear
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statements from the police and we hope from julia james�*s widower. if you were watching the sky overnight, and you were free of clouds, then there�*s a chance you would have seen this. it�*s known as a super blood moon and it happens when the earth gets between the sun and the moon to created a lunar eclipse. the earth�*s atmosphere then bends light from the sun — meaning only the red tones are visible on the lunar surface. the image was visible from europe and africa to north and south america — these pictures were filmed in spain. in case you�*re wondering a super moon happens when it is a full or new moon, at the closest point of its orbit around earth, making it appear a little bigger than usual. and this is how the lunar eclipse happened, though we have sped these pictures up by a huge amount. it�*s the first such super blood moon for two years and because it came in may, it�*s also nicknamed the flower moon, due
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to the northern hemisphere spring. and, as you might expect, it also made a spectacular backdrop to some landmarks around the world. this was our favourite — the ancient temple at cape sounion in greece. the queen has attended the first major celebration marking her platinum jubilee. the 96—year—old monarch was met with a standing ovation as she arrived at the royal windsor horse show, after she missed the state opening of parliament last week because of mobility issues. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. applause it was the first formal celebration of the platinum jubilee, the finale of the royal windsor horse show, complete with its guest of honour and most long—standing spectator — the queen. it was a romp through centuries of the country�*s history. there were plenty of horses and an earlier elizabeth. england�*s tudor queen,
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portrayed by dame helen mirren. the monarch who faced down the spanish armada. i know i have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but i have the heart and stomach of a king! and a king of england too! among the performers, there was a hollywood star... ..and a welsh soprano. there was precision drumming, which clearly delighted the guest of honour. and of course, any number of spectacular feats of horsemanship. there was a poignant moment when the driving carriage used by the queen�*s late husband, the duke of edinburgh, was driven into the ring by the queen�*s granddaughter, lady louise windsor. but the main purpose was to say thank you, a sentiment expressed in different ways. on behalf of everyone here, we�*d like to very humbly thank you for choosing us over
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the state opening of parliament. laughter and at the end, it was dame helen mirren who spoke not for the nation of elizabeth i but for the nation which for 70 years has had as its queen elizabeth ii. i therefore speak on behalf of a grateful nation and commonwealth when i give you our sincere and most loving thanks. applause the queen left to return to windsor castle. in 17 days, the main platinum jubilee celebrations will begin in central london, when many thousands more will have a chance to show their gratitude. nicholas witchell, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. i�*m heading west, i hope the rain is
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heading east. there is some rain and big thunderstorms out there at the moment. here is a few from scotland where it is a drab day, cloud and rain, a cool easterly wind. for northern ireland, wales and england, it brightened up, big clouds have developed and quite intense thundery downpours, the past few hours of rainfall here. you can see it in scotland but notice this area has moved north and the lightning across northern ireland and northwest england, some torrential downpours that could bring some disruption for this evening�*s rush hour. low pressure to the west and through much of this week, throwing up areas of rain, showers, thunderstorms but also delivering occasionally gaps of the warm sunshine. these downpours gradually fade into tonight and the rain pushes north and fizzles away from northern scotland and we are left with a lot of dry and misty,
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murky weather around with tonight�*s lowest temperatures in scotland and northeast england. tomorrow is our north, east split. western areas have the rain, not too much in the morning but in the afternoon northern ireland in western scotland, parts of wales and western england will see heavy and persistent rain whereas to the east of this, such contrast, there will be plenty of sunny spells, a in places and warm, much warmer than today and eastern scotland and the highest temperatures of the year so far likely to be recorded in the uk for east anglia, southeast england as high as 26 celsius. the chance of late thunderstorms through the warmest areas in the area of rain in the west will move further east overnight and into wednesday morning. all of that clears away going into wednesday. there will be a few showers in scotland early on wednesday then there is a gap then we are waiting for the next weather system to come around that area of
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low pressure so these are the showers in scotland at least on wednesday morning, a lot of fine weather elsewhere on wednesday, warm to very warm where you get sunshine. it will turn wetter but not until late in the day and ahead of that, a few showers and thunderstorms will head into wales and southern england. thursday looks like a largely fine day, it�*s on friday we will see wet weather once again and noticed the temperature is starting to come down a few degrees. by the weekend is going to feel cooler and fresher out there and there will still be a few showers to be had as well but also some occasional sunshine. that�*s how the weather is looking this week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson boris johnson speaks to borisjohnson speaks to political leaders and northern island as part of efforts to restore power sharing at stormont. the democratic unionist party says i can only happen if post—brexit trading arrangements are altered. i if post-brexit trading arrangements are altered. ., if post-brexit trading arrangements are altered. . ., , are altered. i want to see the government _ are altered. i want to see the government committing - are altered. i want to see the government committing on i are altered. i want to see the i government committing on their commitments and that means removing the irish sea border, respecting northern island space within the uk internal market. ,, . .. , , island space within the uk internal market. ,, , , , market. sinn fein accuses boris johnson as _ market. sinn fein accuses boris johnson as west _ market. sinn fein accuses boris johnson as west minister- market. sinn fein accuses boris johnson as west minister plans| market. sinn fein accuses boris l johnson as west minister plans to override the brexit trade deal. it override the brexit trade deal. it seems was absolutely extraordinary that the _ seems was absolutely extraordinary that the british government would propose _ that the british government would propose to legislate to break the
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law. propose to legislate to break the law a _ propose to legislate to break the law. �* ., , propose to legislate to break the law. �* . , ,

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