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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 17, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 5pm — the government confirms that the uk will introduce legislation to overwrite parts of the northern ireland post—brexit trade deal within weeks. let's fix it. we don't want to nix it, we want to fix it and we will work with our eu partners to do it. this is not a time for a unilateral action, announcing legislation which would essentially breach international law, undermine the international treaty and create a lot of unnecessary tension between brussels and london. the ukrainian military says the defenders of mariupol have ended their mission after hundreds of soldiers leave the azovstal steel plant, having been trapped there for more than two months.
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more evidence that wages are failing to keep pace with the cost of living — earnings are down 1.2% from last year when adjusted for inflation, their biggest fall since 2013. a woman convicted of killing a one—year—old boy she was hoping to adopt. her lawyersaid one—year—old boy she was hoping to adopt. her lawyer said she lost it over his crying. wayne rooney tells a libel trial that the fa wanted rebekah vardy to "calm down" during the european championships six years ago. the queen has made a surprise visit to the new london elizabeth line ahead of its opening next week. welcome to bbc news. the foreign secretary, liz truss, has confirmed the government will introduce legislation that would change parts of
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the post—brexit trading arrangements for northern ireland known as the protocol. she told parliament that britain would prefer a negotiated settlement with the eu, but failing that, it would pass a law to change the protocol to make trade easier in an attempt to encourage pro—unionist politicians back into power—sharing government in belfast. the eu has responded, warning "unilateral actions are not acceptable". our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. why are you risking - a trade war with brussels? talk of a trade war with europe might be premature, but the cabinet is taking a step which will raise tensions with the eu markedly. boris johnson: good morning, and thank you very much. - borisjohnson�*s government designed and passed into law all aspects of its brexit deal with brussels, knowing what they entailed, now the same cabinet wants legislation to allow it to do something rarely seen, to break the treaty it agreed. liz truss told parliament that's because there is currently political gridlock in northern ireland.
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eu customs procedures for moving goods within the uk have already meant companies are facing significant costs and paperwork. some businesses have stopped trade altogether. without resolving these and other issues, we will not be able to re—establish the executive and preserve the hard—won progress sustained by the belfast good friday agreement. it is over 2.5 years _ since the government negotiated and signed the withdrawal agreement. that deal included . the northern ireland protocol, which required some trade barriers and checks - in the irish sea, which was clear. from the outset and it was a choice by this prime minister— and the government, and yet now, barely two years later, _ the government is trying to convince people its flagship achievement was not a negotiated triumph, i but a deal so flawed -
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that they cannot abide by it. most of the political parties in northern ireland, led by sinn fein, who won the largest share of seats at the recent elections, do not want an escalation of tensions with the eu. they all met boris johnson yesterday. but the democratic unionists are blocking the assembly from working unless their issues are dealt with. the dup supported brexit, but the consequence of brexit is that there have to be checks on goods moving between the uk and the eu. those checks are now happening at northern ireland's ports. the dup say that undermines northern ireland's ties to the rest of the uk. the arrangements borisjohnson agreed are known as the protocol. goods are checked as they move from england, scotland and wales so there don't have to be customs posts along the land border with the republic of ireland, where they enter the eu and its single market. installations on the land border would pose a real threat to the peace process. ireland's foreign minister says the eu has made proposals for flexibilities to improve things and the uk should engage with those. this is not a time for unilateral
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action, announcing legislation which would essentially breach international law, undermine an international treaty and create a lot of unnecessary tension between brussels and london. instead, it's a time for re—engagement on the basis of the work that's been done since february to see whether we can find landing zones that both sides can live with. the uk government says, like most of the parties in northern ireland, it wants a negotiated outcome. the priority�*s to get power—sharing back up and running, but moving to break the treaty risks making any new deal with brussels even harder to achieve. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. the prime minister has been speaking this afternoon. let's hear what he had to say. how can you justify breaking a treaty that you signed? i think the higher duty of the uk government is, in international law, to the good friday agreement and the peace process,
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and that's the thing we have to really look to. and of necessity, we can make some changes, i think, to the protocol, which is not the law of the needs and persians. it's there in article 13.8, if things aren't working, you can change it, and it makes it very clear on the face of the text that you should make sure the east—west trade and the integrity of the uk internal market. so, let's fix it. we don't want to nix it, we want to fix it. and we will work with our eu partners to do it. let's get some reaction from europe with our brussels correspondent, nick beake. wa nts to wants to fix it, he says. quoting article 13.8. is the eu going to wear that?— article 13.8. is the eu going to wear that? , , , wear that? interesting the response from the eu — wear that? interesting the response from the eu today _ wear that? interesting the response from the eu today has _ wear that? interesting the response from the eu today has in _ wear that? interesting the response from the eu today has in a - wear that? interesting the response from the eu today has in a way - from the eu today has in a way mirrored — from the eu today has in a way mirrored the terminology and the tone the — mirrored the terminology and the tone the british government is using — tone the british government is using on _ tone the british government is using. on the one hand, the eu is
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saying _ using. on the one hand, the eu is saying we — using. on the one hand, the eu is saying we would like a negotiated solution _ saying we would like a negotiated solution to this is important these 'oint solution to this is important these joint talks— solution to this is important these joint talks get a bit more life in them _ joint talks get a bit more life in them and — joint talks get a bit more life in them and some of the problems over customs _ them and some of the problems over customs checks and filling in forms can he _ customs checks and filling in forms can be with — customs checks and filling in forms can be with. the eu say they have already— can be with. the eu say they have already done the medicines and in their willing to do it on other sorts— their willing to do it on other sorts of— their willing to do it on other sorts of products coming from the mainland — sorts of products coming from the mainland and great britain into northem— mainland and great britain into northern ireland. at the same time, they are _ northern ireland. at the same time, they are saying if the government goes _ they are saying if the government goes through with this and is willing — goes through with this and is willing to introduce legislation which — willing to introduce legislation which overrides big chunks for fundamental parts of the brexit deal. _ fundamental parts of the brexit deal, borisjohnson's government deal, boris johnson's government agreed _ deal, boris johnson's government agreed to, — deal, borisjohnson's government agreed to, that's a different matter~ _ agreed to, that's a different matter. they talk about serious concerns — matter. they talk about serious concerns because it would rip up international law, they say, and would _ international law, they say, and would override a treaty which was sorted _ would override a treaty which was sorted out — would override a treaty which was sorted out in light of the very complicated past of northern ireland and also _ complicated past of northern ireland and also it— complicated past of northern ireland and also it was the foundation for the trade — and also it was the foundation for the trade deal that was ultimately signed _ the trade deal that was ultimately signed. so for all those reasons, they— signed. so for all those reasons, they think— signed. so for all those reasons, they think it will be a really bad idea _ they think it will be a really bad idea. ., . , they think it will be a really bad idea. ., ., , , they think it will be a really bad idea. ., . , , .,, . idea. how many people are incredulous _ idea. how many people are incredulous that _ idea. how many people are incredulous that we - idea. how many people are incredulous that we are - idea. how many people are l incredulous that we are back idea. how many people are - incredulous that we are back here again when the first protocol took
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so long to get in place and to actually start working? i so long to get in place and to actually start working? i think there is a _ actually start working? i think there is a real _ actually start working? i think there is a real sort _ actually start working? i think there is a real sort of - actually start working? i think. there is a real sort of collective sigh _ there is a real sort of collective sigh in — there is a real sort of collective sigh in brussels. of course the allegation of what london is saying is the _ allegation of what london is saying is the eu _ allegation of what london is saying is the eu has cost this in part by not being flexible enough. being too strict in _ not being flexible enough. being too strict in the application of the northern— strict in the application of the northern ireland protocol, and with the eu _ northern ireland protocol, and with the eu says as we can reinterpret this and work together and make this work for— this and work together and make this work for the — this and work together and make this work for the will of northern ireland — work for the will of northern ireland and for the uk and for the eu. ireland and for the uk and for the eu the— ireland and for the uk and for the eu. the british government is going for the same part of the deal need to he _ for the same part of the deal need to be rewritten. that's a problem here _ to be rewritten. that's a problem here because of the moment, the mandate, — here because of the moment, the mandate, the sort ofjob the jeep wrecks a — mandate, the sort ofjob the jeep wrecks a negotiator on the eu side can do. _ wrecks a negotiator on the eu side can do. he — wrecks a negotiator on the eu side can do. he is— wrecks a negotiator on the eu side can do, he is limited by what the 27 eu countries— can do, he is limited by what the 27 eu countries allow him to do and they don't— eu countries allow him to do and they don't want to rewrite this. that— they don't want to rewrite this. that is— they don't want to rewrite this. that is tricky and i say this is a collective _ that is tricky and i say this is a collective sigh because there is a really busy time as we know for the uk and _ really busy time as we know for the uk and the — really busy time as we know for the uk and the eu anything about it, war in ukraine, _ uk and the eu anything about it, war in ukraine, millions of refugees from _ in ukraine, millions of refugees from that— in ukraine, millions of refugees from that country going into new eu
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countries, _ from that country going into new eu countries, trying to make a home there _ countries, trying to make a home there. soaring energy prices, lots of people — there. soaring energy prices, lots of people dealing with the cost of living _ of people dealing with the cost of living rising across a continent and justice _ living rising across a continent and justice week we have sweden and finland. _ justice week we have sweden and finland, two eu members looking to 'oin finland, two eu members looking to join nato _ finland, two eu members looking to join nato and other perspective problems that might cause in terms of any— problems that might cause in terms of any sort — problems that might cause in terms of any sort of retaliation from vladimir— of any sort of retaliation from vladimir putin, so for all those reasons, — vladimir putin, so for all those reasons, the eu says it does not want _ reasons, the eu says it does not want a _ reasons, the eu says it does not want a war— reasons, the eu says it does not want a war of words and certainly does _ want a war of words and certainly does not — want a war of words and certainly does not want to trade more but it looks— does not want to trade more but it looks like we are a long way from that at _ looks like we are a long way from that at this — looks like we are a long way from that at this point. john campbell is bbc northern ireland's economics and business editor. outline how difficult these arrangements are. it outline how difficult these arrangements are.- outline how difficult these arrangements are. outline how difficult these arranuements are. , . , . arrangements are. it is always meant the will be arrangements are. it is always meant they will be checks _ arrangements are. it is always meant they will be checks on _ arrangements are. it is always meant they will be checks on products - they will be checks on products coming — they will be checks on products coming from _ they will be checks on products coming from great _ they will be checks on products coming from great britain - they will be checks on products coming from great britain intol coming from great britain into northern— coming from great britain into northern ireland _ coming from great britain into northern ireland and - coming from great britain into. northern ireland and particularly coming from great britain into- northern ireland and particularly on food products _ northern ireland and particularly on food products. that— northern ireland and particularly on food products. that means - northern ireland and particularly on| food products. that means northern ireland _ food products. that means northern
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ireland is— food products. that means northern ireland is still— food products. that means northern ireland is still inside _ food products. that means northern ireland is still inside the _ food products. that means northern ireland is still inside the using - food products. that means northern ireland is still inside the using a - ireland is still inside the using a market— ireland is still inside the using a market for— ireland is still inside the using a market for goods _ ireland is still inside the using a market for goods and _ ireland is still inside the using a market for goods and the - ireland is still inside the using a market for goods and the eu . ireland is still inside the using a i market for goods and the eu has strict _ market for goods and the eu has strict rules— market for goods and the eu has strict rules for— market for goods and the eu has strict rules for food _ market for goods and the eu has strict rules for food products - strict rules for food products entering _ strict rules for food products entering the _ strict rules for food products entering the single - strict rules for food products entering the single market l strict rules for food productsl entering the single market so strict rules for food products i entering the single market so it strict rules for food products - entering the single market so it has been difficult — entering the single market so it has been difficult for small— entering the single market so it has been difficult for small food - been difficult for small food retailers _ been difficult for small food retailers in _ been difficult for small food retailers in particular- been difficult for small food retailers in particular and i retailers in particular and difficult _ retailers in particular and difficult for— retailers in particular and difficult for haulage - retailers in particular and - difficult for haulage companies retailers in particular and _ difficult for haulage companies who have had _ difficult for haulage companies who have had to — difficult for haulage companies who have had to he _ difficult for haulage companies who have had to be at _ difficult for haulage companies who have had to be at the _ difficult for haulage companies who have had to be at the front - difficult for haulage companies who have had to be at the front line - difficult for haulage companies who have had to be at the front line of i have had to be at the front line of this and _ have had to be at the front line of this and really— have had to be at the front line of this and really deal— have had to be at the front line of this and really deal with - have had to be at the front line of this and really deal with a - have had to be at the front line of this and really deal with a lot - have had to be at the front line of this and really deal with a lot of. this and really deal with a lot of people — this and really deal with a lot of people work— this and really deal with a lot of people work and _ this and really deal with a lot of people work and the _ this and really deal with a lot of people work and the checks. i this and really deal with a lot ofl people work and the checks. but this and really deal with a lot of. people work and the checks. but in terms _ people work and the checks. but in terms of— people work and the checks. but in terms of the — people work and the checks. but in terms of the overall— people work and the checks. but in terms of the overall impact - people work and the checks. but in terms of the overall impact on - people work and the checks. but in terms of the overall impact on thei terms of the overall impact on the northern— terms of the overall impact on the northern ireland _ terms of the overall impact on the northern ireland economy, - terms of the overall impact on the northern ireland economy, it's - northern ireland economy, it's actually— northern ireland economy, it's actually pretty— northern ireland economy, it's actually pretty difficult - northern ireland economy, it's actually pretty difficult to - actually pretty difficult to quantify _ actually pretty difficult to quantify because - actually pretty difficult to quantify because the - actually pretty difficult to - quantify because the northern ireland — quantify because the northern ireland economy— quantify because the northern ireland economy has - quantify because the northern. ireland economy has performed quantify because the northern - ireland economy has performed more or less _ ireland economy has performed more or less in _ ireland economy has performed more or less in line — ireland economy has performed more or less in line with _ ireland economy has performed more or less in line with the _ ireland economy has performed more or less in line with the rest _ ireland economy has performed more or less in line with the rest of- ireland economy has performed more or less in line with the rest of the - or less in line with the rest of the uk, for ekample— or less in line with the rest of the uk, for example today _ or less in line with the rest of the uk, for example today we - or less in line with the rest of the uk, for example today we have . or less in line with the rest of the - uk, for example today we have record low unemployment _ uk, for example today we have record low unemployment in _ uk, for example today we have record low unemployment in northern - uk, for example today we have record| low unemployment in northern ireland and employee — low unemployment in northern ireland and employee jobs _ low unemployment in northern ireland and employee jobs are _ low unemployment in northern ireland and employee jobs are still— low unemployment in northern ireland and employee jobs are still growing. . and employee jobs are still growing. so we _ and employee jobs are still growing. so we are _ and employee jobs are still growing. so we are not— and employee jobs are still growing. so we are not in— and employee jobs are still growing. so we are not in a _ and employee jobs are still growing. so we are not in a situation- so we are not in a situation where you consider— so we are not in a situation where you consider protocol— so we are not in a situation where you consider protocol at _ so we are not in a situation where you consider protocol at as - you consider protocol at as currently _ you consider protocol at as currently permitted - you consider protocol at as currently permitted is - you consider protocol at as - currently permitted is wrecking the northern _ currently permitted is wrecking the northern ireland _ currently permitted is wrecking the northern ireland economy. - currently permitted is wrecking the northern ireland economy. the - northern ireland economy. the evidence — northern ireland economy. the evidence simply— northern ireland economy. the evidence simply does _ northern ireland economy. the evidence simply does not - northern ireland economy. the evidence simply does not stackj northern ireland economy. the i evidence simply does not stack up for that _ evidence simply does not stack up forthat. however— evidence simply does not stack up for that. however i— evidence simply does not stack up for that. however i think- evidence simply does not stack up for that. however i think it- evidence simply does not stack up for that. however i think it is- for that. however i think it is important _ for that. however i think it is important to _ for that. however i think it is important to say— for that. however i think it is important to say the - for that. however i think it is| important to say the protocol for that. however i think it is. important to say the protocol as originally— important to say the protocol as originally negotiated _ important to say the protocol as originally negotiated has - important to say the protocol as originally negotiated has never. important to say the protocol as - originally negotiated has never been fully implement _ originally negotiated has never been fully implement it— originally negotiated has never been fully implement it because - originally negotiated has never been fully implement it because there - originally negotiated has never beenj fully implement it because there are so called _ fully implement it because there are so called grace — fully implement it because there are so called grace periods _ fully implement it because there are so called grace periods which - fully implement it because there are so called grace periods which meansj so called grace periods which means all the _ so called grace periods which means all the checks— so called grace periods which means all the checks and _ so called grace periods which means all the checks and controls - so called grace periods which means all the checks and controls are - so called grace periods which means all the checks and controls are not l all the checks and controls are not in place _
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all the checks and controls are not in place and — all the checks and controls are not in place and indeed _ all the checks and controls are not in place and indeed we _ all the checks and controls are not in place and indeed we can- all the checks and controls are not in place and indeed we can say- in place and indeed we can say confidently _ in place and indeed we can say confidently the _ in place and indeed we can say confidently the protocol - in place and indeed we can say confidently the protocol as - confidently the protocol as negotiated _ confidently the protocol as negotiated will— confidently the protocol as negotiated will never- confidently the protocol as negotiated will never be i confidently the protocol as . negotiated will never be fully implemented _ negotiated will never be fully implemented because - negotiated will never be fully implemented because the i negotiated will never be fullyj implemented because the eu negotiated will never be fully - implemented because the eu has already— implemented because the eu has already changed _ implemented because the eu has already changed its _ implemented because the eu has already changed its own - implemented because the eu has already changed its own loss - implemented because the eu has already changed its own loss in l already changed its own loss in order— already changed its own loss in order to — already changed its own loss in order to guarantee _ already changed its own loss in order to guarantee the - already changed its own loss in order to guarantee the supply. already changed its own loss in. order to guarantee the supply of medicines— order to guarantee the supply of medicines from _ order to guarantee the supply of medicines from great _ order to guarantee the supply of medicines from great britain - order to guarantee the supply ofi medicines from great britain into northern— medicines from great britain into northern ireland. _ medicines from great britain into northern ireland.— medicines from great britain into northern ireland. there is this idea of red channels _ northern ireland. there is this idea of red channels and _ northern ireland. there is this idea of red channels and green - northern ireland. there is this ideaj of red channels and green channels that has been put forward. can you explain how they would work? and explain how they would work? and if that you have _ explain how they would work? and if that you have a _ explain how they would work? and if that you have a green _ explain how they would work? and if that you have a green channel- explain how they would work? and if that you have a green channel 4 goods— that you have a green channel 4 goods which— that you have a green channel 4 goods which are _ that you have a green channel 4 goods which are coming - that you have a green channel 4 goods which are coming from i that you have a green channel 4 i goods which are coming from great britain _ goods which are coming from great britain into— goods which are coming from great britain into northern _ goods which are coming from great britain into northern ireland - goods which are coming from great britain into northern ireland and i britain into northern ireland and are going — britain into northern ireland and are going to— britain into northern ireland and are going to stay— britain into northern ireland and are going to stay in— britain into northern ireland and are going to stay in northern - are going to stay in northern ireland _ are going to stay in northern ireland. that— are going to stay in northern ireland. that means - are going to stay in northern ireland. that means there i are going to stay in northern. ireland. that means there will are going to stay in northern - ireland. that means there will be virtually — ireland. that means there will be virtually no — ireland. that means there will be virtually no checking _ ireland. that means there will be virtually no checking and - ireland. that means there will be virtually no checking and mentall virtually no checking and mental paperwork— virtually no checking and mental paperwork on _ virtually no checking and mental paperwork on those _ virtually no checking and mental paperwork on those goods. - virtually no checking and mentall paperwork on those goods. read channel— paperwork on those goods. read channel goods _ paperwork on those goods. read channel goods would _ paperwork on those goods. read channel goods would be - paperwork on those goods. read channel goods would be goods . paperwork on those goods. read i channel goods would be goods from great _ channel goods would be goods from great britain — channel goods would be goods from great britain which _ channel goods would be goods from great britain which are _ channel goods would be goods from great britain which are coming - channel goods would be goods from great britain which are coming intol great britain which are coming into northern— great britain which are coming into northern ireland _ great britain which are coming into northern ireland and _ great britain which are coming into northern ireland and are _ great britain which are coming into northern ireland and are due - great britain which are coming into northern ireland and are due to- great britain which are coming into. northern ireland and are due to flow on into— northern ireland and are due to flow on into the _ northern ireland and are due to flow on into the relative _ northern ireland and are due to flow on into the relative ireland - northern ireland and are due to flow on into the relative ireland or- northern ireland and are due to flow on into the relative ireland or the . on into the relative ireland or the wider— on into the relative ireland or the wider elk — on into the relative ireland or the wider eu. those _ on into the relative ireland or the wider eu. those products- on into the relative ireland or the wider eu. those products will- on into the relative ireland or the wider eu. those products will be| wider eu. those products will be subject— wider eu. those products will be subject to — wider eu. those products will be subject to full— wider eu. those products will be subject to full eu _ wider eu. those products will be subject to full eu checks - wider eu. those products will be subject to full eu checks and - subject to full eu checks and controls _ subject to full eu checks and controls at _ subject to full eu checks and controls at northern - subject to full eu checks and i controls at northern ireland's ports — controls at northern ireland's ports that— controls at northern ireland's ports. that is— controls at northern ireland's ports. that is not— controls at northern ireland's ports. that is not a _ controls at northern ireland's ports. that is not a new- controls at northern ireland's ports. that is not a new ideal controls at northern ireland's l ports. that is not a new idea by controls at northern ireland's - ports. that is not a new idea by any means and — ports. that is not a new idea by any means and in fact _ ports. that is not a new idea by any means and in fact it _ ports. that is not a new idea by any means and in fact it was _ ports. that is not a new idea by any means and in fact it was discussedl means and in fact it was discussed and worked — means and in fact it was discussed and worked up try— means and in fact it was discussed and worked up by the _ means and in fact it was discussed and worked up by the northern- and worked up by the northern ireland — and worked up by the northern ireland civil— and worked up by the northern ireland civil service _ and worked up by the northern ireland civil service as - and worked up by the northern ireland civil service as far- and worked up by the northern ireland civil service as far back| and worked up by the northern. ireland civil service as far back as
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2018, _ ireland civil service as far back as 2018. before _ ireland civil service as far back as 2018, before the _ ireland civil service as far back as 2018, before the protocol- ireland civil service as far back as 2018, before the protocol ever. 2018, before the protocol ever existed — 2018, before the protocol ever existed the _ 2018, before the protocol ever existed. the eu _ 2018, before the protocol ever existed. the eu and _ 2018, before the protocol ever existed. the eu and its- 2018, before the protocol ever. existed. the eu and its proposals 2018, before the protocol ever- existed. the eu and its proposals in 0ctoher— existed. the eu and its proposals in october for— existed. the eu and its proposals in october for softening _ existed. the eu and its proposals in october for softening the _ existed. the eu and its proposals in october for softening the impact . existed. the eu and its proposals in october for softening the impact of| october for softening the impact of the protocol, — october for softening the impact of the protocol, they— october for softening the impact of the protocol, they referred - october for softening the impact of the protocol, they referred to - october for softening the impact of the protocol, they referred to an i the protocol, they referred to an express — the protocol, they referred to an express lane _ the protocol, they referred to an express lane and _ the protocol, they referred to an express lane and we _ the protocol, they referred to an express lane and we have - the protocol, they referred to an express lane and we have a - express lane and we have a discussions _ express lane and we have a discussions between - express lane and we have a discussions between the i express lane and we have a | discussions between the uk express lane and we have a - discussions between the uk and eu officials _ discussions between the uk and eu officials for — discussions between the uk and eu officials for many _ discussions between the uk and eu officials for many months _ discussions between the uk and eu officials for many months now- discussions between the uk and eu officials for many months now try l discussions between the uk and eu| officials for many months now try to work out _ officials for many months now try to work out how — officials for many months now try to work out how you _ officials for many months now try to work out how you can _ officials for many months now try to work out how you can put _ officials for many months now try to| work out how you can put something like this— work out how you can put something like this into effect. _ work out how you can put something like this into effect. those _ work out how you can put something like this into effect. those talks - like this into effect. those talks have _ like this into effect. those talks have not— like this into effect. those talks have not actually _ like this into effect. those talks have not actually been - like this into effect. those talks have not actually been able - like this into effect. those talks have not actually been able to i like this into effect. those talks - have not actually been able to reach any agreement— have not actually been able to reach any agreement on— have not actually been able to reach any agreement on what _ have not actually been able to reach any agreement on what that - have not actually been able to reach any agreement on what that should i any agreement on what that should look like _ any agreement on what that should look like in — any agreement on what that should look like in practice _ any agreement on what that should look like in practice and _ any agreement on what that should look like in practice and that's - look like in practice and that's mainly— look like in practice and that's mainly because _ look like in practice and that's mainly because the _ look like in practice and that's mainly because the uk - look like in practice and that's mainly because the uk says . look like in practice and that's i mainly because the uk says the look like in practice and that's - mainly because the uk says the eu still wants— mainly because the uk says the eu still wants a — mainly because the uk says the eu still wants a system _ mainly because the uk says the eu still wants a system which - mainly because the uk says the eu still wants a system which is - mainly because the uk says the eu still wants a system which is a - still wants a system which is a greater— still wants a system which is a greater risk— still wants a system which is a greater risk rather— still wants a system which is a greater risk rather than - still wants a system which is a greater risk rather than one i still wants a system which is a i greater risk rather than one and which _ greater risk rather than one and which they— greater risk rather than one and which they have _ greater risk rather than one and which they have to _ greater risk rather than one and which they have to bear- greater risk rather than one and which they have to bear a - greater risk rather than one and which they have to bear a littlel greater risk rather than one and l which they have to bear a little bit more _ which they have to bear a little bit more wrist — which they have to bear a little bit more wrist to _ which they have to bear a little bit more wrist to make _ which they have to bear a little bit more wrist to make the _ which they have to bear a little bit more wrist to make the system i which they have to bear a little bit - more wrist to make the system work. for the _ more wrist to make the system work. for the moment, _ more wrist to make the system work. for the moment, thank— more wrist to make the system work. for the moment, thank you _ more wrist to make the system work. for the moment, thank you very- more wrist to make the system work. i for the moment, thank you very much, john campbell there. the chancellor, rishi sunak, says the government hasn't ruled out bringing in a windfall tax on oil and energy companies that are benefiting from higher prices. speaking in the commons, he said the govermment would act "pragmatically" when it comes to measures to deal with the cost of living crisis. of course as the situation evolves, our response will also evolve. i have always been clear
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we stand ready to do more. and, madam deputy speaker, that does bring me to the topic of a windfall tax. now unlike the party opposite, we on this side of the house don't believe that windfall taxes are the simple and easy answer to every problem. but we are pragmatic. and what we want to see are energy companies, who have made extraordinary profits at a time of acutely elevated prices, investing those profits back into british jobs, growth and energy security. but as i have been clear and as i have said repeatedly, if that doesn't happen soon and at significant scale, then no option is off the table. the labour party is forcing a commons vote on the windfall tax issue. ed miliband, labour's shadow climate change secretary, said the government had run out of excuses on the cost of living crisis and urged conservative mps to vote with the opposition. this house can make a difference tonight, and i say this to his mps directly. we have all heard from
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our own constituencies what families are facing. this is an emergency for millions of people. a windfall tax could make a difference. no, i won't. use this opportunity to tell the chancellor to act. it is the right thing to do. it's the fair thing to do. the case is unanswerable. and if they do not, they will have to explain to their constituents why they refuse to support the help that could make a difference now. i urge members to vote for our amendment tonight to help tackle the social emergency our country is facing. and there was support for a windfall tax from the conservative mp and former minister robert halfon. the oil companies are not passing the cuts to the pumps. _ they don't reduce the price... they take ages to reduce the prices when the international— oil price falls. the oil bosses are earning multi—million pound - salaries and getting _ multi—million pound bonuses. they are, in essence, -
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in my view, the new oligarchs. and i would urge him to— consider both a windfall tax on the on the oil companies, - which we can then use to cut for the lower paid or cut energy bills, and also— introduce a pump watch, a monitor to make sure. that there is fair competitionl and consumers get a fair deal at the pumps, but genuinely- recognise all the work that he has done while trying to cut cost of living. _ more people are employment that in several years but in real terms wages are down since 2013 because of the cost—of—living incident slipping —— living are slipping. let's talk to our economics correspondent andy verity. take the basic pitch at first we already had a decade which of the
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worst improvement in standard living for centuries and we just got over that and that we are back with falling living standards territory as these figures show. 4.2% is a headlight improvement in average earnings is actually not that bad and that is excluding bonuses but of course is not improving living centres because prices are rising even faster for reasons we all know. partly the reopening of the global economy post—dynamic and it's also the other big reason is the war in ukraine which is pushed up energy prices even further. including bonuses, you see a much different picture, based 7% increase including bonuses but that masks great differences between financial services we have a 10.7% increase in the public sector at 1.6%, he says not without bitterness. there is a great difference between different sectors of the economy and not every sectors of the economy and not every sector is improving their living standards. sector is improving their living standards— sector is improving their living standards. , ., standards. when it comes to 'obs, if ou're standards. when it comes to 'obs, if you-e looking — standards. when it comes to 'obs, if you're looking for i standards. when it comes to 'obs, if you're looking for a h standards. when it comes to 'obs, if you're looking for a job, h standards. when it comes to 'obs, if you're looking for a job, it's _ standards. when it comes to jobs, if you're looking for a job, it's a -
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you're looking for a job, it's a good time if you have the right skills. ., ., ., ., skills. you have the title of a market that _ skills. you have the title of a market that you _ skills. you have the title of a market that you have - skills. you have the title of a market that you have had . skills. you have the title of a j market that you have had for skills. you have the title of a - market that you have had for decades and by that i mean you have got many more people sore from working many more people sore from working many more vacancies and that is 1.3 million we have and that's the first time higher than rates of an appointment. that means the balance of power between the employees selling their labour and the employer bidding for that labour is much more in favour of the employee than it's been for a long time. andy, thank you very much. ukraine's military says it's working to evacuate all remaining troops from their last stronghold in mariupol. more than 260 soldiers have left the azovstal steel plant and been taken to areas held by russian—backed rebels. president zelensky has hailed them as heroes after the fighters had spent more than two months trapped inside the plant, which was surrounded by russian forces in early march. they're expected to be exchanged for russian prisoners of war. our ukraine correspondent joe inwood has this report. if this is the end of the battle
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for mariupol, it's not how many would've envisaged it. ukrainian fighters being frisked by the russian soldiers they'd been in a bloody battle with for more than 80 days. some of these men are seriously wounded. it was said without treatment, they would die. these pictures were released by the russian ministry of defence. the whole process was carried out in coordination with the red cross and united nations with one aim in mind. translation: we hope - to save the lives of our boys. among them are heavily wounded. they are being treated. i want to underline — ukraine needs its ukrainian heroes alive. this is our principle. i think these words can be understood by all adequate people. the most seriously injured were driven to hospital. more than 200 more were taken to anotherfacility inside russian—controlled territory. it is believed the soldiers will be exchanged in a prisoner swap. but it seems some fighters have stayed behind.
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katerina spent two months underground with her husband. she thinks he is still there. translation: it's very | painful for me especially. my husband is still there, and i know a lot of people who are still there. what they are heroically doing under there, under bombardment, not being let out, it's terrible. i feel helpless. i really want to help them. ijust don't know how. i feel really powerless. while moscow can finally claim some success in mariupol, it is a very different picture in the north of the country. ukrainian soldiers yesterday said they had reached the russian border. the process of liberating the towns and villages of kharkiv is well under way. stepanyenko endured the invasion of ruska lozova. with the arrival of ukrainian troops, he decided to escape south. translation: there was a train in front. l
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a missile hit it— and landed on the ground. it didn't explode, but it landed two metres from my house. _ after that i was under cluster shelling. - i don't care much, but i got my things together and left. - the battles for mariupol and kharkiv may be drawing to a close, but this war is far from over. joe inwood, bbc news, lviv. and a quick reminder we'll be taking your questions in ukraine this thursday at 12:30pm. we'll have guests able to answer all aspects of the war — from whether ukraine really could now win it, nato expansion and what moscow might do next. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions and you can e—mail us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. volunteer police officers in england and wales are to be allowed to use taser stun guns. the home office says it's to ensure
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they're not "at a disadvantage" when dealing with violence. our home affairs correspondent june kelly is in manchester. where the announcement was made by the home secretary today. what sort of training would these officers have to undergo first?- of training would these officers have to undergo first? well, there is a big stress _ have to undergo first? well, there is a big stress on _ have to undergo first? well, there is a big stress on training - have to undergo first? well, there is a big stress on training and - have to undergo first? well, there is a big stress on training and that| is a big stress on training and that has been welcomed by the police watched because obviously tasers are controversial and what is being said if they will under the same training as regular officers. the reason for this expansion of taser use is that the home secretary believes it because these unpaid volunteer faced the same risks as their paid colleagues, they should have the same kit but of course tasers are controversial and have been linked to a number of deaths and there is concern about the divorce fortunate use of them against members of the black community and the human rights organisation amnesty international has condemned this move, what it
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calls this dangerous expansion of taser use. in calls this dangerous expansion of taser use. calls this dangerous expansion of taser use-— taser use. in the cost-of-living crisis has _ taser use. in the cost-of-living crisis has cropped _ taser use. in the cost-of-living crisis has cropped up _ taser use. in the cost-of-living crisis has cropped up even - taser use. in the cost-of-living crisis has cropped up even at i taser use. in the cost-of-living l crisis has cropped up even at the police federation conference. would've they been saying? it would've they been saying? it certainly has for the vista been a dominant issue here, the whole issue of pay and in the question—and—answer session after the home secretary and spoken, we heard from one officer, she has been a police officer for 23 years and she serves with the north wales force and this is what she said to the home secretary. on saturday, i went to my mother's house where she gave me £40 so that _ on sunday i could put petrol in the car and buy food for my son's school lunches because i have no money left at the end of the month. now, i work in child protection with vulnerable adults, the most vulnerable members of our community, and i love myjob, but if the rate of interest goes up, i can't pay my mortgage, i can't pay for fuel,
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and i'm not going to be able to continue to come to work. i went to see an accountant and the advice was, "leave the police, work for 22 hours a week and claim benefits and you will be better off. " how can that be right? applause so applause there as you heard for the detective constable and now the home secretary has an urge the police federation which represents rank—and—file officers in england and to engage with the police pay body. she also been her speech focus on the fact that there has been an increase in police officers. they are now back at the levels they were in 2010 after all the years of cuts and there are another 7000 officers promised, but what officers here same is fine increasing number of new recruits coming in, but you are in danger of leaving experienced officers like detective constable nye if this issue of pay is not addressed.— nye if this issue of pay is not addressed. , . ., ~ , ., , addressed. jane, thank you very much. a woman has been convicted of murdering a one—year—old boy
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she was hoping to adopt. leiland james corkill was placed with laura and scott castle by authorities in cumbria less than five months before his death from catastrophic head injuries. let's go live to our reporter mairead smyth who is in preston. this is a really tragic case involving the death of a one—year—old boy who was murdered by the woman who had hoped to adopt him. laura cassell wept in the dock as a jury from returned a guilty verdict at preston crown court today. the 38—year—old had tried to argue that leiland—james's death was argue that leiland—james's death was a tragic accident but admitted manslaughter at the beginning of this trial. the one—year—old suffered brain injuries, catastrophic brain injuries at the home of laura castle and her husband scott in barrow in cumbria. scott castle is 35 and was cleared of all charges here today and he wept and struggled to draw breath as the verdicts will return. the court
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heard that leiland—james was moved into the home by cumbria county council bite workers in august 2020, but by november, concerns had been raised whenever the couple had said they have struggled to bond with leiland—james. to the chief executive of cumbria county council has said that a review has been ordered into what went wrong here in that review we published injuly ordered into what went wrong here in that review we published in july and the crown prosecution service has today released a statement saying they work very closely with the police to build the strongest possible case to secure justice for leiland—james, giving laura castle double option but to admit at the start of the trial that she had caused his death and giving the jury the evidence they needed to find her guilty of his murder. mrjustice jeremy baker will sentence laura castle next wednesday. back to you. thank you very much from preston. a 48—year—old man has been arrested after a three—year—old boy died following a suspected dog attack in rochdale. he handed himself into custody
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following the incident on sunday, and has been detained under the dangerous dogs act. in the us, presidentjoe biden and the first lady are in buffalo to pay respects to those killed in sunday's shooting. they said the president will comfort the families of victims and express gratitude for the bravery of first responders and these are live pictures from buffalo where the president is speaking. let's listen in. b, where the president is speaking. let's listen in.— let's listen in. a sign on a birthday — let's listen in. a sign on a birthday asking _ let's listen in. a sign on a birthday asking where - let's listen in. a sign on a birthday asking where is l let's listen in. a sign on a - birthday asking where is daddy? catherine massey, 72, writer and advocate, who dressed up in costumes at schools and cut the grass in the park and helped in local elections.
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the glue of the family and the community. marcus morrison, 52, schoolbus aid. went to buy snacks for a weekly night with the family. survived by his wife and three children and his stepdaughter. the centre of their world. heywood patterson, 57, father, church deacon. fed the homeless and had a food kitchen. gave rise to the grocery store to neighbours who needed help. putting food in the trunk of others when he took his final breath. aaron sold her, 55 retired buffalo police officer. for three decades. three decades. loved electric cars, heroes who gave his life to save others on a saturday afternoon and had that man not been
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wearing that best that he purchased, bulletproof vest, a lot of lives would have been saved. a beloved father and husband. geraldine talley, 62, expert bankerand father and husband. geraldine talley, 62, expert banker and known for her warm gentle personality. friend to everybody and devoted mother and grandmother. ruth woodfield, 88, beloved wife, mother, grandmother, great—grandmother, sang in a church choir, caretaker to her husband, bring him clean clothes, cutting his hair and holding his hand every day she visited him in the nursing home. a heart as big as her head. pearl yarn, 77, mother, grandmother, missionary of god, public school teacher who also read a local food pantry. public school teacher who also read a localfood pantry. loved singing, dancing and herfamily. and all three injured, as they are good men,
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20, shot and the neck but fighting through it. jennifer warmington, 50, christopher braeden, 55, both treated with injuries and on the long road to recovery. individual lives with love, service and community and speak to the bigger story of who we are as americans. a great nation because we are good people. jill and i bring you this message from deep in our nation's so. in america, evilwill message from deep in our nation's so. in america, evil will not win, i promise you. hate will not prevail. white supremacy will not have the last word. , g ., �* last word. president joe biden s-ueakin last word. president joe biden speaking in — last word. president joe biden speaking in buffalo, _ last word. president joe biden speaking in buffalo, paying i last word. president joe biden - speaking in buffalo, paying tribute there to some of the people who died in that racially motivated shooting in that racially motivated shooting in new york state at the weekend.
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you're watching bbc news. the former england captain wayne rooney has begun giving evidence in a libel case brought against his wife coleen rooney by rebecca vardy. our correspondent sean dilley is at the high court in london for us. sean, what is the latest from today? an awful lot of interest in the period before the critical period that really sparked the court case. we out there was a tweet in october 2019 when coleen rooney revealed she is carried out some of a sting operation and what was dubbed very cleverly wagatha christie. they had spoken about instances coleen rooney had about leak to the media about her and three instances she carried out sting operations, namely a flood in the house and did not have to my
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gender selection story for a fictional baby and a car crash in the us as she is saying that is how she netted who she thinks the account of rebekah vardy. we heard a lot about the euros in 2016, wayne rooney and jamie vardy were never social friends according to rooney but played on that team and rooney said he was asked by england managers to have a chat with any party in his capacity as captain to ask her to calm down. calm down after legal team which was already dancing on the table and not that i'm aware, wayne rooney. we heard awful about that table and that period of time and independence that wayne rooney said he had from coleen rooney and he claims not to have any knowledge whatsoever of the sting operation that she had been
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mounting. operation that she had been mounting-— operation that she had been mountina. ., ~' ,, , . mounting. thank you very much. included mounting. thank you very much. included in _ mounting. thank you very much. included in the _ mounting. thank you very much. included in the england - mounting. thank you very much. included in the england 28 - mounting. thank you very much. l included in the england 28 women provisional squad this summer and the european championships, the former captain has been out injured since january and tough news for arsenal midfielder who has been left out after picking up in the injury earlier. she looks set to miss another tournament having not played in the 2019 world cup. she another tournament having not played in the 2019 world cup.— in the 2019 world cup. she went to the world cop _ in the 2019 world cup. she went to the world cup in _ in the 2019 world cup. she went to the world cup in 2015 _ in the 2019 world cup. she went to the world cup in 2015 but barely i the world cup in 2015 but barely play because she went in injured and was really fit to play and she talked about how hard it was to be a part of this and barely playing the minute, she missed the last world cup in this due to a knee injury and now that she's missing it again will be hard for her to take. and in mid
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june, and austria at old trafford. losing their top goal—scorer, she's going tojoin buyer munich. the beaufort city with 57 goals and knowledge appearances in the fa cup finals defeat to chelsea on sunday. in the men's game, when at southampton for liverpool would see the move to a point of premier league leaders as manchester city handled the final day of the season on sunday and of liverpool lose, they will when the titles tonight. the door for the title push was opened for pep guardiola side but he is not expecting another slip up on sunday. is not expecting another slip up on sunda . , . .,
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is not expecting another slip up on sunda . , _, ,., is not expecting another slip up on sunda. , , is not expecting another slip up on sunda . , .., ,., , ., sunday. they could both be involved aaain on sunday. they could both be involved again on the — sunday. they could both be involved again on the weekend _ sunday. they could both be involved again on the weekend properly - again on the weekend properly involved and a few minutes, i don't know but we will see that. it will be perfect for the game but if not, taking each day afterwards and no doubt about the final we are realistic about this.- realistic about this. cycling history has _ realistic about this. cycling history has been _ realistic about this. cycling history has been made - realistic about this. cycling history has been made as. realistic about this. cycling i history has been made as he realistic about this. cycling - history has been made as he has become the first black african rider at the top class opposition in the shape of putting the stomach to admit and beat him to the finish line and he continues to make history becoming the first black african to win the monday class the season. but this is the biggest victory of the 22—year—old's career so far. he has also been honoured by
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british realty today. jason and laura kenney have become the first couple to receive a knighthood together with the olympic gold medallist and five—time olympic champion, they receive it. the rebuilding of the chief executive of the england and wales cricket board has resigned after seven years in charge. missing success and limited office but with both england's women's and men's team in recent failures and tapestry could have seen an overhaul where the new test coach captain and managing director have the biggest projects introducing a new limited overs competition, starting last year. some sadness to bring you informal rugby league chief executive has
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died at age 81. lindsay also had a revival in the 1980s as chairman was heavily involved in the creation of the super league in 1986, the chief executive said he will be remembered as one of the most significant leaders in sports history. london born defensive has announced his retirement after a ten year career in the nfl and he was draughted by the raiders in 2012 and play for the dallas cowboys and tennessee titans. he recorded the forced fumble for the cowboys at wembley stadium against the jacksonville jaguars. and they said that was his career highlight. that is all the support for now and only fosters would be back with the sports day for you at half past six. finland's parliament has overwhelmingly backed the government's decision to join nato, a huge foreign policy shift in response to russia's invasion of ukraine. the move clears the way for finland to apply for membership alongside neighbouring sweden.
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the white house says that president biden will host finland's president and the swedish prime minister on thursday to discuss their applications. another nato member, turkey, is under pressure to drop its opposition to theirjoining. joining us now is the swedish ambassador to the uk, mikaela kumlin granit. thank you for talking to us here at bbc news. how swiftly has public opinion in your country changed when it comes to membership of nato? let me underline that taking a historic decision and it would also be epic and that we are living in the era of having conducted a nonmilitary alignment policy and going into a new era because the realisation that
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sweet and possible security will improve and not only sweden but also europe possible security with nato membership. and... i europe possible security with nato membership. and...— europe possible security with nato membership. and... i hope that this is a temporary _ membership. and... i hope that this is a temporary freeze _ membership. and... i hope that this is a temporary freeze with _ membership. and... i hope that this is a temporary freeze with the - is a temporary freeze with the ambassador. let us see if it comes back to life. ambassador, can you hear us? we will try to contact the ambassador later and get her back on and just a moment. let's now return to our top story that he foreign secretary liz truss has confirmed the government will introduce legislation that would change parts of the post brexit trading arrangements for northern ireland known as the protocol. we can speak now to amanda ferguson, a journalist and political commentator in belfast. how has this gone down and very different on the political divide of which sit. the different on the political divide of which sit. .. ., , different on the political divide of which sit. ., , , which sit. the fact that she set the intention was _
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which sit. the fact that she set the intention was to _ which sit. the fact that she set the intention was to introduce - which sit. the fact that she set the intention was to introduce in - which sit. the fact that she set the intention was to introduce in the l intention was to introduce in the coming weeks is a bit of wiggle room where they have come out and said at a good start, but they want to see definitive action because they've gotten their fingers burned definitive action because they've gotten theirfingers burned many times before and shaken northern ireland into until they receive legislation and the structures are there within the agreement and iron out any wrinkles. we have heard from the sinn fein president was describe what they had outlined as the stuff of a rogue state and the interesting voices we've heard from this evening as northern ireland and business brexit working group is made of a group of large business interests in northern ireland and they said anything other than a negotiated outcome is suboptimal we have heard from liz truss is a negotiated outcome and
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all the dramas and perhaps there's a school of thought that this is less about northern ireland and northern ireland could just be collateral damage and a power—play internal ramblings of the government of the day. ramblings of the government of the da . . , , ., ., day. references been made to preserving _ day. references been made to preserving the _ day. references been made to - preserving the good friday agreement thatis preserving the good friday agreement that is why we have the border down the ever see other than the border between the republic of ireland. but the other good bit is there supposed to be a functioning assembly at stormont and that is not happening because of the protocol and how great is the tension between those international and those with local internal national interests which shall it should be clear that the good friday agreement remains in place and agreed between the british and irish government by the us. remains that they are part of the uk and ask people would vote for a united ireland in a border pole and so unionists can be content that
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there is no back to this, doesn't matter which way your trade flows, and where it comes to and from. we know that all of the parties acknowledge that the protocol is not perfect and needs to be financed but where the dup differs is it is scared of what the protocol means for northern ireland's place and it and would reflect on the fact that northern ireland did not vote for brexit but it respected the uk wide vote and there's going to be some sort of unique arrangement put in place to respect the fact about northern ireland is part of the uk it is a part of a separate island, it is a part of a separate island, it is a part of a separate island, it is with a land border and has a variety of reasons that will be impossible for a hard land border on this island and i think now, we have two separate issues. we have the deal between the eu in the uk, which
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can only be finessed and agreed and rectified by those two parties but then you have one party, the dup which has put in a block undeveloped government and all of the other parties want to be entered straightaway and deal with the business of cost—of—living prices and waiting lists and all the of the usual functions of government. the dup is using the only leverage it has to say we are not a part of this until we see action from the uk and etc really high bar with what they expect, their charms are particularly rigid at the moment and so it doesn't bow particularly well for an hour anytime soon.- so it doesn't bow particularly well for an hour anytime soon. thank you for an hour anytime soon. thank you for our for an hour anytime soon. thank you for your insight. _ the leeds born actress, scriptwriter and director kay mellor has died at the age of 71. best known for her down to earth, gritty dramas, she began working for granada television in the 1980s as a writer on cornonation street. she also wrote the highly acclaimed drama series, band of gold, and more recently the popular
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series, the syndicate. bbc look north's corinne wheatley takes a look back at her career. putting northern and working class voices centre stage. that was kay mellor�*s trademark. she started her career writing plays and worked on coronation street. her itv drama band of gold, which first aired in 1995, was hugely popular, telling the stories of sex workers in bradford. i want people to talk about it. i want people to say, "how can we protect these young women? how can we protect prostitutes? what can we do to make life safer for them?" more hit dramas followed, including fat friends, starring ruthjones, sheridan smith and james gordon and bbc one's the syndicate. her stories always had such a human element to them, even when you are looking at a lottery winners going to monaco and spending their money, this was all from a working class point of view. so it spoke to many people around the uk and in bradford in particular, she will be very sadly missed. in 2010, kay mellor received an obe.
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she was passionate about representing yorkshire and leeds in particular in her work. the musical of fat friends premiered in leeds grand theatre, as did the stage version of band of gold three years ago. very exciting for me to do it in leeds. more important for me to do it in leeds than in the west end or broadway. this is its home. i think it is as relevant today as back then. and i wanted to keep the same characters. because that is really important. a statement from kay mellor�*s production company said she died on sunday. tributes have poured in from across her industry. lenny henry said he was lucky to work with her on the syndicate. "she knew what she wanted and how to get the best of us from us as actors." lisa riley said the news was a massive shock, saying, "you were the best boss to work for." kay mellor was often described as a trailblazer for women champion for the north,
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but she was also known as a mentor, someone who inspired generations of writers. i'm joined now by actor jonathan kerrigan who worked with kay mellor on the bbc one series ”in the club” and ”the syndicate”. thank you forjoining us on the side occasion. how you remember kay? she is full of occasion. how you remember kay? file: is full of true occasion. how you remember kay? ’iie: is full of true northern occasion. how you remember kay? 5“ie: is full of true northern grid. she is full of true northern grid. she is such a prolific rider, director and artist, really. and ijust remember turning up on set and thinking here is the boss, here is the infamous kay mellorfrom band of gold in 1997 when i was a trauma school training. here is the woman herself, and she completely, she is
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the voice of the people, the venture arm which just puts you at ease and would not suffer fools gladly. she knows what she wants and she knows that she did it take and it wasn't like you go again and had to ask, you do tend to ask. she does at the ivan artist there. and when i was doing in the cloud, that kind of sums up what she was about because once you work with her once. you're part of the family. you would go to herfor advice and for part of the family. you would go to her for advice and for future projects come again is lucky enough to work on the syndicate as well. again, it was great to see her. i had seen herfor a couple of again, it was great to see her. i had seen her for a couple of weeks but years have passed and that was kind of everything, really. she was
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a family person, she had a lot of family onset and is lucky enough that family kept on growing. she is a prolific rider and director above everything is, she wasjust a prolific rider and director above everything is, she was just a lovely, lovely woman. should be greatly missed.— lovely, lovely woman. should be greatly missed. lovely, lovely woman. should be ureatl missed. ., ., ., greatly missed. how important do you think she was — greatly missed. how important do you think she was in _ greatly missed. how important do you think she was in giving _ greatly missed. how important do you think she was in giving women - think she was in giving women a voice, giving northern people a voice, giving northern people a voice which is often underrepresented? voice which is often underre - resented? ., �* voice which is often underreresented? ., �* ., underrepresented? you didn't often see that, underrepresented? you didn't often see that. you _ underrepresented? you didn't often see that, you said _ underrepresented? you didn't often see that, you said the _ underrepresented? you didn't often see that, you said the kitchen - underrepresented? you didn't often see that, you said the kitchen sink. see that, you said the kitchen sink drums of the 1960s and we tended to go away from that in the 80s and 90s, go away from that in the 80s and 905, i go away from that in the 80s and 90s, ithink. shejust go away from that in the 80s and 90s, i think. shejust brought back a realism and you know, to work with the production company which as we succumb empowered women and employees many women as possible onset and the balance of men and women but predominantly women, which
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was very unusual because industry is very male orientated which it needs addressing. and northern voices as well given the representation of that. time and time again, she gave a truth to the northern voice but each time we had something that we had not heard before, she constantly shifted and changed what she was writing about but universal values. love and betrayal and hope greed and something we can all connect with. that's where drums are so successful.— that's where drums are so successful. ., , , , successful. you can help but smile when talking _ successful. you can help but smile when talking about _ successful. you can help but smile when talking about her _ successful. you can help but smile when talking about her which - successful. you can help but smile when talking about her which is i when talking about her which is absolutely lovely. thank you for sharing your memories. four more people in england have been diagnosed with monkeypox. the uk health security agency says
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the risk to the public remains very low, although it appears the individuals caught it in the uk. monkeypox is usually associated with travel to west africa. dr susan hopkins, chief medical adviser to the uk health security agency, says men who have sex with men should be alert for any unusual rashes or lesions and contact a sexual health clinic if they have concerns. she told us more about the symptoms. symptoms start with what feels like a bit like a viral illness, so that's really difficult to tell what this is compared to anything else. however, quite rapidly they start developing spots, commonly on the face, but the movie down to the body commonly on the face, but then moving down to the body particularly on the hands and feet. it also sometimes in the genital areas as well. so it's important that people come if they see these unusual spots, they change how they look day by day and become spots that look like chickenpox but bigger, so people know what they look like, then that's symptoms that people really want to seek medical attention for and keep away
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from other people at that point. in terms of dangerousness, so, this is the cases we've detected are from the west african clade, and there's two major types in africa, the west africa and central africa. this clade reports from nigeria and other western african countries has a low mortality of 1% or less. again, that's probably even less in that related to case detection, but of course we are just starting to see it here and we will need to be alert to any complications. the duke and duchess of cornwall are travelling to canada for a three—day tour to celebrate the queen's platinum jubilee. the visit highlights a special bond between her majesty and canada, which she first visited more than 70 years ago. our royal correspondent sarah campbell reports. the most easterly city on the north american continent — stjohn's in newfoundland.
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and as the ontario enters the stjohn's harbour, she took her own camera to film the rocky coastline of newfoundland. the then princess elizabeth in 1951. it is the country outside the uk she has returned to most often, completing 22 royal tours. her son is expected to talk about the profound affection she feels for canada and its people. getting ready for the return of the royals — the repainting, touching up and cleaning down has been in full swing in quidi vidi harbour in stjohn's ahead of prince charles and camilla's arrival. it's a really packed schedule. from here in picturesque new, took to antalya, and the northern territories. travelling 2,000 miles in a little over 48 hours. we are told, on the agenda, the treatment of indigenous peoples, climate change and thanking those people who, like the queen, have lived a life of service.
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the next morning, after formal tree planting ceremony at government house... just like his mother, charles has been a regular visitor to canada. his first tour was back in 1970. the most recent with the duchess of cornwall, and in 2017. this time around, every word said, every gesture made will be scrutinised — perhaps as never before. coming as it does, less than two months after the caribbean tours, which sparked such negative headlines. it is very beautiful and you can see the specs of blue... hosting the royals at government house is the lieutenant governor, the queen's representative in the province. they are of differing opinions, but everyone is entitled to those opinions, their personal opinions, and i never suggested they shouldn't have their own opinion, but by and large, i think the response will be positive. this is familiar territory for a prince who prioritises key skills for the man who will be one
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day be canada's king. the queen has made a surprise visit to paddington station in london to see the newly completed elizabeth line. the 96—year old monarch wasjoined by her youngest son, the earl of wessex, for the official opening this morning. the delayed crossrail project will open to the public next tuesday. nasa's perseverance mars rover, or percy as it's become known, is about to begin the most important part of its mission. after travelling seven miles since it landed on the red planet over a year ago, it's just arrived at an area that was once a river delta, which scientists have identified as one of the most likely places to find microscopic signs of ancient life. over the next six months, the rover will collect rock samples which could answer the question was there life on mars, as our science editor rebecca morelle reports. the parachute has deployed and we are seeing significant deceleration. it's a mission that began with a jaw—dropping descent, beaming back real footage of a mars
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landing, as nasa's perseverance rover was lowered onto the martian surface. over the last year, it's revealed the planet as never seen before — taking some selfies along the way. it's been busy trundling across the dusty terrain... ..and it's made history by flying a helicopter — the first powered flight on another planet. now, perseverance is ready to begin the most important part of its mission — hunting for signs of life — and it's reached an area where it has the best chance of finding it. i have been staring at this delta for years now, mostly in orbiter images, and now we're finally right in front of it, seeing it through the eyes of the rover. we know there was once liquid water on the surface of mars. we know there are organics on the surface of mars. and so all signs point to the surface of mars, 3.5 to 4 billion years ago, being a habitable planet.
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the rover�*s exploring an area called thejezero crater. billions of years ago, it was a huge lake — you can clearly see a river running into it. and this gives you an idea of what it once would have looked like. if we zoom in, this coloured area shows where the river met the lake, depositing sediment to create a delta. the rover landed here, in the floor of the crater. it's spent more than a year travelling the seven miles — that's about 11 kilometres — to get to the base of the delta. now it has a llo—metre climb to reach the top, so it's deployed the mini mars helicopter to scout the best path ahead. perseverance will drill into the most promising rocks. the hope is they will contain signs of microbes that once lived there. but the best samples will be left on the martian surface and collected by a future mission that will bring the rocks back to earth. imagine if we found evidence that there was some sort of microscopic life there. that's huge — it's
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mind—blowing in a way — and so i think the opportunity to look for that and bring it back to earth and then see what we see is going to rewrite history books, regardless of the answer! the mission is revealing the eerie beauty of mars — even showing us a martian solar eclipse, and capturing sounds of the rover hard at work. tapping. the red planet is dry and dusty today, but exploring the delta over the next six months will give us a new window into its past, and could finally answer the question of whether life ever existed on mars. rebecca morelle, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. it's been an east—west split out there today. across western areas, it was a case ofjust how wet will it get? well, it took its time, but it turned out to be very wet
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across parts of wales, northern ireland, south west england for a time. that wet weather sweeping its way eastwards into tonight, but for eastern areas in the sunshine, well, the highest temperature of the year so far, up to nearly 28 degrees celsius at heathrow airport. so, the rain courtesy of this weather front here. the warmth, the flow of air around low pressure sitting to the west of us. and as ijust hinted earlier, what started in the west with the wet weather, sweeping eastwards, some heavy and thundery downpours around in places. we get on into the second half of the night, that rain pushes across the northern isles, but elsewhere it becomes mainly dry. just a few showers for northern ireland, northern and western scotland, which temperatures mostly in double figures as we start the day tomorrow. so, into tomorrow, then, we have some morning showers around, especially into scotland and mainly in the north. elsewhere, there's a lot of fine weather to come. just a case of waiting for the next system to head our way, as it will into northern ireland, but really late in the day here and ahead of it, a few showers or thunderstorms starting to break out towards the south west and into wales from increasing cloud. now, temperatures for many
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will be on a par with where they've been today. not quite as high into the east and south east of england, but it won't be too far off. so, very warm where you get to see some sunshine, and temperatures near 20 in the warm spots in scotland as well. so, into tomorrow evening, then, we're taking wet weather through northern ireland, and ahead of it, notice how the showers or thunderstorms become more widespread through england and wales, eventually wet weather into scotland. the potential overnight and into thursday for the east and south east of england seeing some torrential thundery downpours in places. but notice again by thursday morning, with the exception of shetland, which will eventually see the back of the rain, we are behind that weather system, and there's a lot of fine weather to come again. just a few showers running in towards north west scotland with a fairly stiff breeze here. and temperatures still into the high teens, low 20s. these temperatures will just begin to trail off a bit from friday into the weekend. on friday, aided by the fact there will be more widespread wet weather around during the day this time, and then over the weekend, there'll be showers, most of those across northern parts of the uk.
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and for most areas, it'll feel cooler and fresher.
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today at six — ukrainian forces leave their last foothold in the devastated city of mariupol. taken to russian controlled territory as prisoners of war — these were the men who held on when all around them was ruin and rubble. for 82 days their defiance in the mariupol�*s steel plant came to symbolise ukrainian determination to save their country. thanks to the mariupol defenders the enemy was prevented from redeploying around 20,000 personnel into other regions. what does the final fall of mariupol mean for the conflict? also tonight. he is musician and photographer and heroin addict. we have a special report on how
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mental health is linked to most drug and alcohol addiction.

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